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Commerce Payment Settings Switcher

New Drupal Modules - 19 March 2015 - 9:16am

This module allows you to use variables to switch payment method settings.

How it works

You should use this module if you want to easily switch payment method settings between your test and production account.

Since those settings are stored in the database as a Rule, this module will check if a configuration is defined on your settings.php or settings.local.php and override the configuration.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Easy: Book Review: Programming Guide to Drupal

Planet Drupal - 19 March 2015 - 8:20am

O'Reilly's Programmer's Guide to Drupal, written by Jennifer Hodgdon is a solid book for Drupal developers of all skill levels. I'd argue that it is one of the better books for PHP developers wanting to learn more about Drupal. It provides a wealth of solid information on a nice array of topics that professional Drupal developers should know. It's not a long read (less than 100 pages of actual content), but the structure and variety of topics covered makes it a great reference for best practices and intermediate to advanced "what's the best way to do this?" topics in Drupal development.

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Categories: Drupal

Drupal Watchdog: Painless User Docs

Planet Drupal - 19 March 2015 - 7:21am
Article

User documentation is a tricky thing to manage. On the one hand, docs are invaluable to your clients. But on the other, keeping “Write User Manual” at the top of your priority list is next to impossible, especially as you approach your go-live date.

The secret to squeezing good user docs into your schedule is to approach them the same way you would any other deliverable: create as little as possible from scratch by building on work you’ve already done, keep your users in mind at all times, and work efficiently.

That all sounds pretty familiar, right? Let’s talk about how to adapt these practices to user documentation.

Build a Template

Every site you build is different and requires a tailored set of docs. But that doesn’t mean you should be writing documentation from scratch each time. Instead, take a few hours to pull together a docs template. Working from a template can take the documentation process from a long, painful slog at deadline-time to a set of manageable little writing sprints, spread out over the entire development process.

Where to start?

First, pull together the elements that will appear in every user manual, for example, a general introduction to Drupal. Include chapters that cover the steps in content creation, an overview of the administrative menus, and a layman’s definition of things like nodes, blocks, and views. All these chapters will remain virtually untouched, from one site to the next, saving countless hours of writing.

As you build out the framework for your docs, keep your content as modular as possible. Creating self-contained chunks does two things for you: it makes it easy to rearrange sections from one manual to the next – without extensive rewrites – plus, it helps you keep track of what content needs updating and what doesn’t.

Once you’ve got the basics covered and the overall structure of your template worked out, writing your docs will be a simple matter of filling in details. If you write up features and functionality as they are being built, by the time you’re in the deadline crunch, your docs will be 90 percent complete.

Categories: Drupal

Cheppers blog: Rebuilding the Cheppers website with Drupal 8: On The Road

Planet Drupal - 19 March 2015 - 3:59am

The Cheppers team has decided to make our new website with Drupal 8. You can read about how and why we made this decision here. The following series of posts will document our progress, share the important lessons we learn, and highlight any mistakes we make in order to help others as they set out to use Drupal 8. This post will focus on exporting and importing site configuration.

Categories: Drupal

KnackForge: Programmatically create a node in drupal 7

Planet Drupal - 19 March 2015 - 2:17am

Steps for programmatically creating node in drupal7,
1. Create a new node object.
2. Save the object using the node_save() function.

Basic Node Creation :

$complaint_body = 'Your node complaint body text'; $node = new stdClass();  // Create a new node object $node->type = 'company';  // Content type $node->language = LANGUAGE_NONE;  // Or e.g. 'en' if locale is enabled node_object_prepare($node);  //Set some default values $node->title = 'Your node title'; $node->body[$node->language][0]['value'] = $complaint_body; $node->body[$node->language][0]['summary'] = text_summary($complaint_body); $node->body[$node->language][0]['format'] = 'full_html'; $node->status = 1;   // (1 or 0): published or unpublished $node->promote = 0;  // (1 or 0): promoted to front page or not $node->sticky = 0;  // (1 or 0): sticky at top of lists or not $node->comment = 1;  // 2 = comments open, 1 = comments closed, 0 = comments hidden // Add author of the node $node->uid = 1; // Set created date $node->date = 'complaint_post_date'; $node->created = strtotime('complaint_post_date'); $path = 'content/mytest-' . date('YmdHis'); $node->path = array('alias' => $path); // Save the node node_save($node);

Add custom fields

Categories: Drupal

KnackForge: Hide and override drupal status messages

Planet Drupal - 19 March 2015 - 2:17am

      This blog describes how to hide and override drupal status messages while creating and editing nodes.

      When you create or edit the nodes, drupal displays status messages like 'node has been created' and 'node has been updated'. Some may not be interested to view these messages. You can hide these messages using drupal_get_messages(). It returns all messages that have been set using drupal_set_message(). You need to add it to a custom submit handler for the corresponding form. You can add custom submit handler using either hook_form_alter() or hook_form_form_id_alter() in drupal. 

       To hide drupal status messages, use the code below. For example, i have hidden the status messages only for article node form.

<?php /** * Implement hook_form_alter() */ function kf_form_alter(&$form, &$form_state, $form_id) { if ($form_id == 'article_node_form') { // to add custom submit handler $form['actions']['submit']['#submit'][] = 'kf_article_form_submit'; } } /** * Implement kf_article_form_submit */ function kf_article_form_submit($form, &$form_state) { // to hide drupal status messages drupal_get_messages('status'); } ?>

       Similarly you can override these status messages. For that, you need to add messages after drupal_get_messages() in the custom submit handler.

Categories: Drupal

Webform conditional values

New Drupal Modules - 19 March 2015 - 12:24am
Categories: Drupal

Lawful GM: Trust the Players

RPGNet - 19 March 2015 - 12:00am
How players make the game!
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Multiplayer Growing Pains in Subterfuge - by ron carmel

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 March 2015 - 10:47pm
In multiplayer-only games, growing your player base too quickly can have serious negative repercussions. This came as a surprise to us, and we thought we'd share our experience and thinking around this.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

XNA is no more, as the phoenix rises from the ashes - by Simon Jackson

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 March 2015 - 10:47pm
We have finally reached the end of an era and the dawn of the next with the MonoGame project. The latest release has now broken its ties to the old XNA framework and stands alone.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Excellent GDC 2015 Talks and How You Can Attend For Free - by Peter Angstadt

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 March 2015 - 10:47pm
Here's a recap of best talks I saw at GDC this year and where you can check them out online right now, plus how you can attend if you can't afford the big cost on the pass.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

EGX Rezzed: From AAA Publisher to Indie Exhibitor - by Keaton White

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 March 2015 - 10:47pm
Reflections on experiencing EGX Rezzed as an indie developer after years of working at a AAA publisher.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Demons with Shotguns Invades Boston: Yet Another PAX East Postmortem - by Nicholas DiMucci

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 March 2015 - 10:47pm
It was my first PAX East and I only had a month to prepare. Was I successful in exhibiting Demons with Shotguns?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Video Games without Characters - by John Osborne

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 March 2015 - 10:47pm
A Response to Ian Bogost's Atlantic piece arguing for Video Games without Characters in favor of System Design.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Mission and Culture: Lessons from RIOT Games - by Richard Atlas

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 March 2015 - 10:47pm
Terrence Cohen, tech lead at Riot games, came to our shared work space last night to talk about company mission and culture. In this blog post, I sum some of that up and share what I learned!
Categories: Game Theory & Design

What is localization and why should I care? - by Simon Hill

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 March 2015 - 10:47pm
In this article we're going to explain what localization is really all about and discuss how to plan and execute it properly. We're also going to look at why you should allocate budget and resources to localization, and how to maximize your R.O.I.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Catching attention on expos as a no-name developer - by Pontus Lundén

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 March 2015 - 10:27pm
A post about getting attention on expos amongst a crowd of games that are probably more well known than yours.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Methods of organizing the interaction between scripts in Unity. - by Oleg Andrushko

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 March 2015 - 10:27pm
This article offers some various approaches to organization of interactions between Unity scripts from simple to advanced and describes to what problems can lead each of approaches, and will also offer ways of solution of these problems.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

5 marketing tips for game developers - by Monique Craig

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 18 March 2015 - 10:27pm
If you're finalizing your game and you're on the lookout for strategies to help you reveal your creation to the world, welcome aboard!
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Bryan Braun: An Opinionated Guide to Getting Help with Drupal

Planet Drupal - 18 March 2015 - 8:12pm

You are facing a Drupal problem and you need help. We've all been there.

Drupal is a mature open source project with a vast community, so there are a lot places you can look for help*, and they all have their pros and cons. I’ve spent nearly 4 years trying them all and I found that some options work better for me than others. If you want to save yourself the experimenting and just use the opinionated approach I use today, then stick around; this is the guide to getting help with Drupal that I wish I had several years ago.

Without further ado, here is the list of support channels I currently use, prioritized in the order that I use them:

1. Google It

Many things can be solved quickly through an online search. Drupal.org has a search bar, and I tried to use it a lot when I was getting started, but I’ve since learned that you just can’t compete with Google when it comes to search. Pro-tip: you can search Drupal.org exclusively from Google by using the “site” keyword: “site:drupal.org."

Strength: Access to a ton of content. Exact searching of error messages.
Weakness: You often have to know the right vocabulary

2. Ask People you Work With

Online searches can fall short when your problem is fairly specific, or you don’t know the right vocabulary to use to describe your problem. Sometimes you just need to point at a screen and say “have you ever seen this before?” Face to face communication is fast, and effective (as long as you’ve got somebody experienced around you can talk to).

Strength: Face to face communication is often faster and easier
Weakness: Success will depend entirely on who you work with

3. Ask On Stack Exchange

Stack Exchange is a well-designed Q&A site that provides community-curated answers to programming questions. You’ll find that there are Drupal questions on both the main site (stack overflow.com) as well as the Drupal-specific site (drupal.stackexchange.com), but you’ll want to ask Drupal questions on the Drupal site. I have found the community there to be very active with most of my questions receiving responses in a matter of hours.

Strength: It’s a forum highly optimized for a good Q&A experience.
Weakness: The wrong kind of questions won’t survive here (like subjective questions or site-specific issues)
Link: http://drupal.stackexchange.com

4. Drupal.org Issue Queues

If you can isolate your issue down to a specific project (like a module, theme, or Drupal core) then you can go to the Drupal.org issue queue for help. If your issue has already been reported in the queue, you may find recommendations from the maintainer or even patches that fix the problem. Otherwise you can report the issue yourself. On one occasion I needed to fix an unfamiliar search-related issue that was outside my skill set, and I reported it in the issue queue of a contrib project. The maintainer got back to me in 2-3 days and posted a patch that fixed it. I benefited by getting a fix from an expert (which could have taken me days/weeks to figure out myself), and the project benefited from my QA work (the fix was included in the next module release). That’s the power of open source.

Strength: Can get expert feedback (and maybe even fixes) from module maintainers.
Weakness: Not useful unless you have isolated the issue.
Link: http://www.drupal.org/project/<project-name>/issues

5. Official Documentation

By official documentation, I’m talking about the Docs on Drupal.org, explanations on Module pages, or information found in README.txt files. These docs are often a great place to look if you are looking for help getting a module or theme installed and set up for the first time. Other than that, I haven’t had much luck browsing through them for my specific issues. The way I see it, if something in the official docs addresses your problem, you’ll come across it when googling your issue.

Strength: Entry-level instructions and set-up steps.
Weakness: Contains a lot of old information. Difficult to browse.
Link: http://drupal.org/documentation

6. Twitter

It’s hard to have a good conversation in 140 characters, but if you have enough followers who know Drupal (or you can get a retweet from somebody who does) then it can still be valuable. One way I’ve used it effectively is to ask my question on StackOverflow and then send the link out to Twitter to give it some attention if I’m not getting answers.

Strength: You may have more success asking your personal connections.
Weakness: 140 character limitation. Question can get lost in the mix.
Link: https://twitter.com

7. IRC

The Drupal community has IRC chatrooms on freenode at #drupal and #drupal-support designed for support. Some people really like using IRC for support; In some ways it’s like the “asking people you work with" suggestion above. That being said, I’ve always struggled to get answers via IRC. I feel awkward jumping in when there are already conversations in the channel, and several times I’ll ask a question but it promptly gets lost in the back scroll with no response. Plus, questions asked in IRC are usually not archived or searchable so the conversation you have won't benefit future people with your problem. So your mileage may vary, but I’ve yet to have a successful support experience on IRC.

Strength: Community of experts
Weakness: Chatrooms are not designed for Q&A.
Link: http://drupal.org/irc

Other Options

There are other options that I won’t discuss in detail. They all have strengths and weaknesses (which I’ll list below), but they aren’t really part of my main help workflow for one reason or another.

  • Drupal.org Forums - My questions have gone unanswered here. I’ve seen successful threads, but they seem pretty rare to me.
  • Groups.Drupal.org - Quality varies widely from group to group. I’ve seen groups with good discussion and others with lots of spam.
  • Local User groups - Good for subjective questions but not deep troubleshooting.
  • Books - Good for generic instruction, site building, and walkthroughs but not for heavy custom development.
  • Training - Can be online, on-site, or workshops. Good for generic instruction, site building, and walkthroughs but not for heavy custom development.
  • Conferences - Good for generic instruction and subjective questions. Not great for deep troubleshooting.
  • Example modules - Good for learning Drupal coding patterns but not for troubleshooting
  • Professional Services - Good for getting high-level architecture and security recommendations. Offering varies depending on the provider.
  • Api docs - Good for looking up specific Drupal  API functions.
  • [Insert your social network here]

Finally, whatever you ask, and whoever you ask it to, remember that you have a responsibility to ask good questions.

* Here’s the official drupal.org page on getting help (we covered all the options here and more).

Categories: Drupal
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