Newsfeeds

Bitbucket Issues

New Drupal Modules - 12 October 2017 - 3:11am

The Bitbucket Issues module provides a Bitbucket core API layer for managing git issues from your Drupal website.

Installation

Install as usual.

Place the entirety of this directory in the /modules folder of your Drupal
installation. Navigate to Administer > Extend. Check the ‘Enabled’ box next
to the ‘Bitbucket Issues’ and then click the ‘Save Configuration’ button at the bottom.

Populate module settings form with git base url and git user access token.

Categories: Drupal

Config default image

New Drupal Modules - 12 October 2017 - 3:07am

Image field formatter allowing to set a default image deployable through config management. It stores a file path into config, instead of a content uuid.

Categories: Drupal

Views fields as row classes

New Drupal Modules - 12 October 2017 - 3:05am
Categories: Drupal

Where VR's Going: Thoughts on OC4 Hardware Announcements - by Edward McNeill

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 October 2017 - 12:08am
At OC4, Oculus announced two standalone headsets in the works: Oculus Go and the Santa Cruz prototype. What does this mean for VR devs?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Neon Knights Board Game Up On Kickstarter

Tabletop Gaming News - 11 October 2017 - 3:00pm
I love cyberpunk. I honestly do. It’s one of my favorite genres. I know that the new Bladerunner movie has brought it back into the front-and-center. Well, now you can bring a bit of cyberpunk racing to your tabletops with Neon Knights. Grab your custom car, draft for the best drivers, and hit the raceway, […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Plausible Deniability For Skirmish Sangin Available For Pre-orders

Tabletop Gaming News - 11 October 2017 - 2:00pm
Not every operation that the military does is going to be known to the public. There’s all sorts of deeply covert missions going on all the time using teams of super-highly-trained soldiers. These various teams are surgical in their strikes, taking out key enemy personnel and locations. And soon, you’ll be able to bring these […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Singleton

New Drupal Modules - 11 October 2017 - 1:49pm
Description

This module utilizes the Singleton design pattern by loading in the petrknap/php-singleton
PHP library through composer. This module is only an API to allow you to utilize singletons
for classes you create.

How to use

In your PHP class

Categories: Drupal

The evolution of Acquia's product strategy

Dries Buytaert - 11 October 2017 - 1:26pm

Four months ago, I shared that Acquia was on the verge of a shift equivalent to the decision to launch Acquia Fields and Drupal Gardens in 2008. As we entered Acquia's second decade, we outlined a goal to move from content management to data-driven customer journeys. Today, Acquia announced two new products that support this mission: Acquia Journey and Acquia Digital Asset Manager (DAM).

Last year on my blog, I shared a video that demonstrated what is possible with cross-channel user experiences and Drupal. We showed a sample supermarket chain called Gourmet Market. Gourmet Market wants its customers to not only shop online using its website, but to also use Amazon Echo or push notifications to do business with them. The Gourmet Market prototype showed an omnichannel customer experience that is both online and offline, in store and at home, and across multiple digital touchpoints. The Gourmet Market demo video was real, but required manual development and lacked easy customization. Today, the launch of Acquia Journey and Acquia DAM makes building these kind of customer experiences a lot easier. It marks an important milestone in Acquia's history, as it will accelerate our transition from content management to data-driven customer journeys.

Introducing Acquia Journey

I've written a great deal about the Big Reverse of the Web, which describes the transition from "pull-based" delivery of the web, meaning we visit websites, to a "push-based" delivery, meaning the web comes to us. The Big Reverse forces a major re-architecture of the web to bring the right information, to the right person, at the right time, in the right context.

The Big Reverse also ushers in the shift from B2C to B2One, where organizations develop a one-to-one relationship with their customers, and contextual and personalized interactions are the norm. In the future, every organization will have to rethink how it interacts with customers.

Successfully delivering a B2One experience requires an understanding of your user's journey and matching the right information or service to the user's context. This alone is no easy feat, and many marketers and other digital experience builders often get frustrated with the challenge of rebuilding customer experiences. For example, although organizations can create brilliant campaigns and high-value content, it's difficult to effectively disseminate marketing efforts across multiple channels. When channels, data and marketing software act in different silos, it's nearly impossible to build a seamless customer experience. The inability to connect customer profiles and journey maps with various marketing tools can result in unsatisfied customers, failed conversion rates, and unrealized growth.

Acquia Journey delivers on this challenge by enabling marketers to build data-driven customer journeys. It allows marketers to easily map, assemble, orchestrate and manage customer experiences like the one we showed in our Gourmet Market prototype.

It's somewhat difficult to explain Acquia Journey in words — probably similar to trying to explain what a content management system does to someone who has never used one before. Acquia Journey provides a single interface to define and evaluate customer journeys across multiple interaction points. It combines a flowchart-style journey mapping tool with unified customer profiles and an automated decision engine. Rules-based triggers and logic select and deliver the best-next action for engaging customers.

One of the strengths of Acquia Journey is that it integrates many different technologies, from marketing and advertising technologies to CRM tools and commerce platforms. This makes it possible to quickly assemble powerful and complex customer journeys.

Acquia Journey will simplify how organizations deliver the "best next experience" for the customer. Providing users with the experience they not only want, but expect will increase conversion rates, grow brand awareness, and accelerate revenue. The ability for organizations to build more relevant user experiences not only aligns with our customers' needs but will enable them to make the biggest impact possible for their customers.

Acquia's evolving product offering also puts control of user data and experience back in the hands of the organization, instead of walled gardens. This is a step toward uniting the Open Web.

Introducing Acquia Digital Asset Manager (DAM)

Digital asset management systems have been around for a long time, and were originally hosted through on-premise servers. Today, most organizations have abandoned on-premise or do-it-yourself DAM solutions. After listening to our customers, it became clear that large organizations are seeking a digital asset management solution that centralizes control of creative assets for the entire company.

Many organizations lack a single-source of truth when it comes to managing digital assets. This challenge has been amplified as the number of assets has rapidly increased in a world with more devices, more channels, more campaigns, and more personalized and contextualized experiences. Acquia DAM provides a centralized repository for managing all rich media assets, including photos, videos, PDFs, and other corporate documents. Creative and marketing teams can upload and manage files in Acquia DAM, which can then be shared across the organization. Graphic designers, marketers and web managers all have a hand in translating creative concepts into experiences for their customers. With Acquia DAM, every team can rely on one dedicated application to gather requirements, share drafts, consolidate feedback and collect approvals for high-value marketing assets.

On top of Drupal's asset and media management capabilities, Acquia DAM provides various specialized functionality, such as automatic transcoding of assets upon download, image and video mark-up during approval workflows, and automated tagging for images using machine learning and image recognition.

By using a drag-and-drop interface on Acquia DAM, employees can easily publish approved assets in addition to searching the repository for what they need.

Acquia DAM seamlessly integrates with both Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 (using Drupal's "media entities"). In addition to Drupal, Acquia DAM is built to integrate with the entirety of the Acquia Platform. This includes Acquia Lift and Acquia Journey, which means that any asset managed in the Acquia DAM repository can be utilized to create personalized experiences across multiple Drupal sites. Additionally, through a REST API, Acquia DAM can also be integrated with other marketing technologies. For example, Acquia DAM supports designers with a plug in to Adobe Creative Cloud, which integrates with Photoshop, InDesign and Illustrator.

Acquia's roadmap to data-driven customer journeys

Throughout Acquia's first decade, we've been primarily focused on providing our customers with the tools and services necessary to scale and succeed with content management. We've been very successful with helping our customers scale and manage Drupal and cloud solutions. Drupal will remain a critical component to our customer's success, and we will continue to honor our history as committed supporters of open source, in addition to investing in Drupal's future.

However, many of our customers need more than content management to be digital winners. The ability to orchestrate customer experiences using content, user data, decisioning systems, analytics and more will be essential to an organization's success in the future. Acquia Journey and Acquia DAM will remove the complexity from how organizations build modern digital experiences and customer journeys. We believe that expanding our platform will be good not only for Acquia, but for our partners, the Drupal community, and our customers.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: The evolution of Acquia's product strategy

Planet Drupal - 11 October 2017 - 1:26pm

Four months ago, I shared that Acquia was on the verge of a shift equivalent to the decision to launch Acquia Fields and Drupal Gardens in 2008. As we entered Acquia's second decade, we outlined a goal to move from content management to data-driven customer journeys. Today, Acquia announced two new products that support this mission: Acquia Journey and Acquia Digital Asset Manager (DAM).

Last year on my blog, I shared a video that demonstrated what is possible with cross-channel user experiences and Drupal. We showed a sample supermarket chain called Gourmet Market. Gourmet Market wants its customers to not only shop online using its website, but to also use Amazon Echo or push notifications to do business with them. The Gourmet Market prototype showed an omnichannel customer experience that is both online and offline, in store and at home, and across multiple digital touchpoints. The Gourmet Market demo video was real, but required manual development and lacked easy customization. Today, the launch of Acquia Journey and Acquia DAM makes building these kind of customer experiences a lot easier. It marks an important milestone in Acquia's history, as it will accelerate our transition from content management to data-driven customer journeys.

Introducing Acquia Journey

I've written a great deal about the Big Reverse of the Web, which describes the transition from "pull-based" delivery of the web, meaning we visit websites, to a "push-based" delivery, meaning the web comes to us. The Big Reverse forces a major re-architecture of the web to bring the right information, to the right person, at the right time, in the right context.

The Big Reserve also ushers in the shift from B2C to B2One, where organizations develop a one-to-one relationship with their customers, and contextual and personalized interactions are the norm. In the future, every organization will have to rethink how it interacts with customers.

Successfully delivering a B2One experience requires an understanding of your user's journey and matching the right information or service to the user's context. This alone is no easy feat, and many marketers and other digital experience builders often get frustrated with the challenge of rebuilding customer experiences. For example, although organizations can create brilliant campaigns and high-value content, it's difficult to effectively disseminate marketing efforts across multiple channels. When channels, data and marketing software act in different silos, it's nearly impossible to build a seamless customer experience. The inability to connect customer profiles and journey maps with various marketing tools can result in unsatisfied customers, failed conversion rates, and unrealized growth.

Acquia Journey delivers on this challenge by enabling marketers to build data-driven customer journeys. It allows marketers to easily map, assemble, orchestrate and manage customer experiences like the one we showed in our Gourmet Market prototype.

It's somewhat difficult to explain Acquia Journey in words — probably similar to trying to explain what a content management system does to someone who has never used one before. Acquia Journey provides a single interface to define and evaluate customer journeys across multiple interaction points. It combines a flowchart-style journey mapping tool with unified customer profiles and an automated decision engine. Rules-based triggers and logic select and deliver the best-next action for engaging customers.

One of the strengths of Acquia Journey is that it integrates many different technologies, from marketing and advertising technologies to CRM tools and commerce platforms. This makes it possible to quickly assemble powerful and complex customer journeys.

Acquia Journey will simplify how organizations deliver the "best next experience" for the customer. Providing users with the experience they not only want, but expect will increase conversion rates, grow brand awareness, and accelerate revenue. The ability for organizations to build more relevant user experiences not only aligns with our customers' needs but will enable them to make the biggest impact possible for their customers.

Acquia's evolving product offering also puts control of user data and experience back in the hands of the organization, instead of walled gardens. This is a step toward uniting the Open Web.

Introducing Acquia Digital Asset Manager (DAM)

Digital asset management systems have been around for a long time, and were originally hosted through on-premise servers. Today, most organizations have abandoned on-premise or do-it-yourself DAM solutions. After listening to our customers, it became clear that large organizations are seeking a digital asset management solution that centralizes control of creative assets for the entire company.

Many organizations lack a single-source of truth when it comes to managing digital assets. This challenge has been amplified as the number of assets has rapidly increased in a world with more devices, more channels, more campaigns, and more personalized and contextualized experiences. Acquia DAM provides a centralized repository for managing all rich media assets, including photos, videos, PDFs, and other corporate documents. Creative and marketing teams can upload and manage files in Acquia DAM, which can then be shared across the organization. Graphic designers, marketers and web managers all have a hand in translating creative concepts into experiences for their customers. With Acquia DAM, every team can rely on one dedicated application to gather requirements, share drafts, consolidate feedback and collect approvals for high-value marketing assets.

On top of Drupal's asset and media management capabilities, Acquia DAM provides various specialized functionality, such as automatic transcoding of assets upon download, image and video mark-up during approval workflows, and automated tagging for images using machine learning and image recognition.

By using a drag-and-drop interface on Acquia DAM, employees can easily publish approved assets in addition to searching the repository for what they need.

Acquia DAM seamlessly integrates with both Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 (using Drupal's "media entities"). In addition to Drupal, Acquia DAM is built to integrate with the entirety of the Acquia Platform. This includes Acquia Lift and Acquia Journey, which means that any asset managed in the Acquia DAM repository can be utilized to create personalized experiences across multiple Drupal sites. Additionally, through a REST API, Acquia DAM can also be integrated with other marketing technologies. For example, Acquia DAM supports designers with a plug in to Adobe Creative Cloud, which integrates with Photoshop, InDesign and Illustrator.

Acquia's roadmap to data-driven customer journeys

Throughout Acquia's first decade, we've been primarily focused on providing our customers with the tools and services necessary to scale and succeed with content management. We've been very successful with helping our customers scale and manage Drupal and cloud solutions. Drupal will remain a critical component to our customer's success, and we will continue to honor our history as committed supporters of open source, in addition to investing in Drupal's future.

However, many of our customers need more than content management to be digital winners. The ability to orchestrate customer experiences using content, user data, decisioning systems, analytics and more will be essential to an organization's success in the future. Acquia Journey and Acquia DAM will remove the complexity from how organizations build modern digital experiences and customer journeys. We believe that expanding our platform will be good not only for Acquia, but for our partners, the Drupal community, and our customers.

Categories: Drupal

Snippets Word Game Now Available

Tabletop Gaming News - 11 October 2017 - 1:00pm
You know me. I love when I see a game be successful on Kickstarter and then be made available to the general market. This is one such success story. Snippets had a good Kickstarter and now you can pick up a copy for yourself. Fun for the whole family, the game is more about creativity […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Ponyfinder: Tactics of Everglow Available From Silver Games

Tabletop Gaming News - 11 October 2017 - 12:00pm
Silver Games is further expanding their Ponyfinder product line with Ponyfinder: Tactics. This book looks to give players a whole bunch of new options for their characters. New feats, new base class (the Elementalist), new races and subraces, new spells. And for the GM, new monsters. It’s got a bit of everything for everyone. You […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Heads up, VR devs: Oculus has released its Avatar SDK and Explore API to the world

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 11 October 2017 - 11:47am

Speakers at Oculus Connect took some time today to detail what goodies VR developers can expect from the company in the near future. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

mark.ie: Drupal Camp Dublin is Next Week - Last Chance for Tickets

Planet Drupal - 11 October 2017 - 11:44am
Drupal Camp Dublin is Next Week - Last Chance for Tickets

Seems like just yesterday since we held DrupalCon in Dublin, now we're back with our annual Drupal Camp Dublin.

markconroy Wed, 10/11/2017 - 19:44

This year's Drupal Camp Dublin has a great line up of speakers from Ireland and abroad, covering such topics as:

  • Building multi-lingual, multi-region websites (Stella Power)
  • Working as a developer with attention-deficit disorder - add (Levi Govaerts)
  • Planning for disruptions (Jochen Lillich)
  • Migrating from Drupal 4 to 5 to 6 to 7 to 8 (Alan Burke)
  • Automating deployments (Luis Rodriguez)
  • Working webform and commerce and paragraphs and display suites and more (Chandeep Khosa)
  • Live debugging a site that's giving issues (Anthony Lindsay)
  • Deploy with Fabric, and test driven development (Oliver Davies)
  • Design in the Browser (yours truly, me, Mark Conroy)
  • Teaching web development at third level (Ruairi O'Reilly)
  • The QA process (Daniel Shaw)
  • Getting started with Docker (Ed Crompton)
  • The new theme coming to Drupal core (Mark Conroy)

And then there's some socials, and our Drupal Ireland AGM, and at least one other talk not announced yet, and ... you get the idea.

The full schedule is available on our website. There are some tickets left (only €20), get them before they are all gone.

Categories: Drupal

myDropWizard.com: Drupal 6 version of netFORUM Authentication not affected by SA-CONTRIB-2017-077

Planet Drupal - 11 October 2017 - 11:37am

Today, there was a Moderately Critical security advisory for an Access Bypass vulnerability in the netFORUM Authentication module for Drupal 7:

netFORUM Authentication - Moderately critical - Access Bypass - SA-CONTRIB-2017-077

The module was bypassing protections on the Drupal 7 user login form, to deter brute force attempts to login to the site, and so was an Access Bypass vulnerability by making login less secure when using this module.

However, Drupal 6 (including Pressflow 6) don't have these same protections for the user login form, and so, using this module is no less secure than using vanilla Drupal 6. Of course, these protections could be added to this module, and while this would be great security hardening, this doesn't represent a vulnerability - only a weakness which is also present (and widely known) in Drupal 6 core.

If you'd like all your Drupal 6 modules to receive security updates and have the fixes deployed the same day they're released, please check out our D6LTS plans.

Note: if you use the myDropWizard module (totally free!), you'll be alerted to these and any future security updates, and will be able to use drush to install them (even though they won't necessarily have a release on Drupal.org).

Categories: Drupal

Midweek Snippets

Tabletop Gaming News - 11 October 2017 - 11:00am
This shortened work week continues along. I’m certainly looking forward to the upcoming weekend. Gonna get together and hang out with some friends I don’t get to see too often. I’m sure there’ll be plenty of tasty snacks and treats to be had, too. But before we get there, we need to stock up on […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Mediacurrent: Mediacurrent Wins Three Nominations at 2017 Acquia Engage Conference

Planet Drupal - 11 October 2017 - 10:21am

Mediacurrent has been selected as finalists for the 2017 Acquia Engage Awards in the categories of Financial Services, Travel and Tourism, and Digital Experience. These awards recognize the amazing sites and digital experiences that leading digital agencies are building with the Acquia Platform.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: Drupal looking to adopt React

Planet Drupal - 11 October 2017 - 10:05am

This blog has been re-posted with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

Last week at DrupalCon Vienna, I proposed adding a modern JavaScript framework to Drupal core. After the keynote, I met with core committers, framework managers, JavaScript subsystem maintainers, and JavaScript experts in the Drupal community to discuss next steps. In this blog post, I look back on how things have evolved, since the last time we explored adding a new JavaScript framework to Drupal core two years ago, and what we believe are the next steps after DrupalCon Vienna.

As a group, we agreed that we had learned a lot from watching the JavaScript community grow and change since our initial exploration. We agreed that today, React would be the most promising option given its expansive adoption by developers, its unopinionated and component-based nature, and its well-suitedness to building new Drupal interfaces in an incremental way. Today, I'm formally proposing that the Drupal community adopt React, after discussion and experimentation has taken place.

Two years ago, it was premature to pick a JavaScript framework

Three years ago, I developed several convictions related to "headless Drupal" or "decoupled Drupal". I believed that:

  1. More and more organizations wanted a headless Drupal so they can use a modern JavaScript framework to build application-like experiences.
  2. Drupal's authoring and site building experience could be improved by using a more modern JavaScript framework.
  3. JavaScript and Node.js were going to take the world by storm and that we would be smart to increase the amount of JavaScript expertise in our community.

(For the purposes of this blog post, I use the term "framework" to include both full MV* frameworks such as Angular, and also view-only libraries such as React combined piecemeal with additional libraries for managing routing, states, etc.)

By September 2015, I had built up enough conviction to write several long blog posts about these views (post 1, post 2, post 3). I felt we could accomplish all three things by adding a JavaScript framework to Drupal core. After careful analysis, I recommended that we consider React, Ember and Angular. My first choice was Ember, because I had concerns about a patent clause in Facebook's open-source license (since removed) and because Angular 2 was not yet in a stable release.

At the time, the Drupal community didn't like the idea of picking a JavaScript framework. The overwhelming reactions were these: it's too early to tell which JavaScript framework is going to win, the risk of picking the wrong JavaScript framework is too big, picking a single framework would cause us to lose users that favor other frameworks, etc. In addition, there were a lot of different preferences for a wide variety of JavaScript frameworks. While I'd have preferred to make a bold move, the community's concerns were valid.

Focusing on Drupal's web services instead

By May of 2016, after listening to the community, I changed my approach; instead of adding a specific JavaScript framework to Drupal, I decided we should double down on improving Drupal's web service APIs. Instead of being opinionated about what JavaScript framework to use, we would allow people to use their JavaScript framework of choice.

I did a deep dive on the state of Drupal's web services in early 2016 and helped define various next steps (post 1, post 2, post 3). I asked a few of the OCTO team members to focus on improving Drupal 8's web services APIs; funded improvements to Drupal core's REST API, as well as JSON API, GraphQL and OpenAPI; supported the creation of Waterwheel projects to help bootstrap an ecosystem of JavaScript front-end integrations; and most recently supported the development of Reservoir, a Drupal distribution for headless Drupal. There is also a lot of innovation coming from the community with lots of work on the Contenta distribution, JSON API, GraphQL, and more.

The end result? Drupal's web service APIs have progressed significantly the past year. Ed Faulkner of Ember told us: "I'm impressed by how fast Drupal made lots of progress with its REST API and the JSON API contrib module!". It's a good sign when a core maintainer of one of the leading JavaScript frameworks acknowledges Drupal's progress.

The current state of JavaScript in Drupal

Looking back, I'm glad we decided to focus first on improving Drupal's web services APIs; we discovered that there was a lot of work left to stabilize them. Cleanly integrating a JavaScript framework with Drupal would have been challenging 18 months ago. While there is still more work to be done, Drupal 8's available web service APIs have matured significantly.

Furthermore, by not committing to a specific framework, we are seeing Drupal developers explore a range of JavaScript frameworks and members of multiple JavaScript framework communities consuming Drupal's web services. I've seen Drupal 8 used as a content repository behind Angular, Ember, React, Vue, and other JavaScript frameworks. Very cool!

There is a lot to like about how Drupal's web service APIs matured and how we've seen Drupal integrated with a variety of different frameworks. But there is also no denying that not having a JavaScript framework in core came with certain tradeoffs:

  1. It created a barrier for significantly leveling up the Drupal community's JavaScript skills. In my opinion, we still lack sufficient JavaScript expertise among Drupal core contributors. While we do have JavaScript experts working hard to maintain and improve our existing JavaScript code, I would love to see more experts join that team.
  2. It made it harder to accelerate certain improvements to Drupal's authoring and site building experience.
  3. It made it harder to demonstrate how new best practices and certain JavaScript approaches could be leveraged and extended by core and contributed modules to create new Drupal features.

One trend we are now seeing is that traditional MV* frameworks are giving way to component libraries; most people seem to want a way to compose interfaces and interactions with reusable components (e.g. libraries like React, Vue, Polymer, and Glimmer) rather than use a framework with a heavy focus on MV* workflows (e.g. frameworks like Angular and Ember). This means that my original recommendation of Ember needs to be revisited.

Several years later, we still don't know what JavaScript framework will win, if any, and I'm willing to bet that waiting two more years won't give us any more clarity. JavaScript frameworks will continue to evolve and take new shapes. Picking a single one will always be difficult and to some degree "premature". That said, I see React having the most momentum today.

My recommendations at DrupalCon Vienna

Given that it's been almost two years since I last suggested adding a JavaScript framework to core, I decided to talk bring the topic back in my DrupalCon Vienna keynote presentation. Prior to my keynote, there had been some renewed excitement and momentum behind the idea. Two years later, here is what I recommended we should do next:

  • Invest more in Drupal's API-first initiative. In 2017, there is no denying that decoupled architectures and headless Drupal will be a big part of our future. We need to keep investing in Drupal's web service APIs. At a minimum, we should expand Drupal's web service APIs and standardize on JSON API. Separately, we need to examine how to give API consumers more access to and control over Drupal's capabilities.
  • Embrace all JavaScript frameworks for building Drupal-powered applications. We should give developers the flexibility to use their JavaScript framework of choice when building front-end applications on top of Drupal — so they can use the right tool for the job. The fact that you can front Drupal with Ember, Angular, Vue, React, and others is a great feature. We should also invest in expanding the Waterwheel ecosystem so we have SDKs and references for all these frameworks.
  • Pick a framework for Drupal's own administrative user interfaces. Drupal should pick a JavaScript framework for its own administrative interface. I'm not suggesting we abandon our stable base of PHP code; I'm just suggesting that we leverage JavaScript for the things that JavaScript is great at by moving relevant parts of our code from PHP to JavaScript. Specifically, Drupal's authoring and site building experience could benefit from user experience improvements. A JavaScript framework could make our content modeling, content listing, and configuration tools faster and more application-like by using instantaneous feedback rather than submitting form after form. Furthermore, using a decoupled administrative interface would allow us to dogfood our own web service APIs.
  • Let's start small by redesigning and rebuilding one or two features. Instead of rewriting the entirety of Drupal's administrative user interfaces, let's pick one or two features, and rewrite their UIs using a preselected JavaScript framework. This allows us to learn more about the pros and cons, allows us to dogfood some of our own APIs, and if we ultimately need to switch to another JavaScript framework or approach, it won't be very painful to rewrite or roll the changes back.
Selecting a JavaScript framework for Drupal's administrative UIs

In my keynote, I proposed a new strategic initiative to test and research how Drupal's administrative UX could be improved by using a JavaScript framework. The feedback was very positive.

As a first step, we have to choose which JavaScript framework will be used as part of the research. Following the keynote, we had several meetings at DrupalCon Vienna to discuss the proposed initiative with core committers, all of the JavaScript subsystem maintainers, as well as developers with real-world experience building decoupled applications using Drupal's APIs.

There was unanimous agreement that:

  1. Adding a JavaScript framework to Drupal core is a good idea.
  2. We want to have sufficient real-use experience to make a final decision prior to 8.6.0's development period (Q1 2018). To start, the Watchdog page would be the least intrusive interface to rebuild and would give us important insights before kicking off work on more complex interfaces.
  3. While a few people named alternative options, React was our preferred option, by far, due to its high degree of adoption, component-based and unopinionated nature, and its potential to make Drupal developers' skills more future-proof.
  4. This adoption should be carried out in a limited and incremental way so that the decision is easily reversible if better approaches come later on.

We created an issue on the Drupal core queue to discuss this more.

Conclusion

Drupal should support a variety of JavaScript libraries on the user-facing front end while relying on a single shared framework as a standard across Drupal administrative interfaces.

In short, I continue to believe that adopting more JavaScript is important for the future of Drupal. My original recommendation to include a modern JavaScript framework (or JavaScript libraries) for Drupal's administrative user interfaces still stands. I believe we should allow developers to use their JavaScript framework of choice to build front-end applications on top of Drupal and that we can start small with one or two administrative user interfaces.

After meeting with core maintainers, JavaScript subsystem maintainers, and framework managers at DrupalCon Vienna, I believe that React is the right direction to move for Drupal's administrative interfaces, but we encourage everyone in the community to discuss our recommendation. Doing so would allow us to make Drupal easier to use for site builders and content creators in an incremental and reversible way, keep Drupal developers' skills relevant in an increasingly JavaScript-driven world, move us ahead with modern tools for building user interfaces.

Special thanks to Preston So for contributions to this blog post and to Matt Grill, Wim Leers, Jason Enter, Gábor Hojtsy, and Alex Bronstein for their feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

Outbreak: Undead 2nd Edition Up On Kickstarter

Tabletop Gaming News - 11 October 2017 - 10:00am
Well, the world’s come to an end again. Damnit, Todd! I told you to get that cough looked at. Now there’s a zombie outbreak and we’ve got to try and stay alive! Good thing I’ve got this Survivor’s Guide for Outbreak: Undead 2nd Edition. … Ok, so I don’t actually have that book. But I […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Spacefighter Board Game Up On Kickstarter

Tabletop Gaming News - 11 October 2017 - 9:00am
I don’t know about you, but I just love dogfights between different starfighters. If there’s a scene of squadrons fighting against one-another in a sci-fi movie, chances are pretty good that’s my favorite scene. Spacefighter, a new strategic board game up on Kickstarter, looks to bring the thrill and excitement of those encounters down onto […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Overbooked Board Game Coming to Kickstarter

Tabletop Gaming News - 11 October 2017 - 8:00am
My dad used to work for TWA. As such, we flew all the time, usually going Stnadby. So, if there was room on the plane, we went. If the flight was full, or overbooked, we waited. I saw many flights take off without me on it, but it’s no worry. Optimizing flights to be full […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

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