Newsfeeds

Webform Product

New Drupal Modules - 6 February 2019 - 12:03pm

Webform Product can create a Commerce order from any Webform submission.

This module can be used for websites that have commerce for payment of predefined product types, but in need of a more flexible product for temporary product types or highly customisable product types, like a quick donation form or a promotional product.

With Webform you can create simple or very complex forms, combine this with the easy to setup handler and you got a new product, ready to be paid with any payment provider defined in Drupal Commerce.

Categories: Drupal

EA has a subscription service for 'another major platform' in the works

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 6 February 2019 - 11:25am

Electronic Arts already runs subscribe-for-access game libraries through the PC†™s Origin Access and the Xbox One†™s EA Access, and the company has another due out this year. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Fair Play Alliance expands Fair Play Summit for GDC 2019

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 6 February 2019 - 10:43am

The Fair Play Alliance, a cross-industry initiative focused on fostering fair play in online games, has announced it will return for Game Developers Conference 2019 with an all-day Fair Play Summit! ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

'Virtual pharmacology' advance tackles universe of unknown drugs

Virtual Reality - Science Daily - 6 February 2019 - 10:19am
Scientists have developed the world's largest virtual pharmacology platform and shown it is capable of identifying extremely powerful new drugs. The platform, soon to contain over a billion virtual molecules never before synthesized and not found in nature, is poised to dramatically change early drug discovery and send waves through the pharmaceutical industry, the authors say.
Categories: Virtual Reality

Gnome Stew Notables – Jabari Weathers

Gnome Stew - 6 February 2019 - 9:50am

About Jabari in their own words: Jabari Weathers is an illustrator and game designer who currently resides in Baltimore, Maryland. They also are (apparently) under suspicion of being a goblin princet from beyond the veil. In order to keep up their glamor, they make art and narrative games for themselves.

You can help them maintain their human facade by checking out their artwork at jmwillustration.com and their game design work at lunarveil.press. If you wish to follow along with their more anecdotal adventures, they can be found on instagram (jmwillustration) and twitter (JabariWeathers).

Tell us a little bit about yourself and your work? What project are you most proud of?

Hi Tracy, thanks for inviting me to do this with you! I’m a black, nonbinary scifi fantasy illustrator by day, and tabletop rpg/narrative game designer by night. I live in Baltimore and attended art school here (at MICA). Soon after I found myself making so many tarot cards for roleplaying game publishers. The work I’m most proud of in that regard is, in fact, split between making the 7th Sea Sortè deck art, and the Bluebeard’s Bride Tarot of Servants art. Both projects put together took 8 months for me to make the art for, which kind of scares me. As far as my game design work, I’m working on an epistolary game called A Dire Situation, which is essentially a really perverse game of telephone inspired by Dangerous Liaisons and other acidic period piece dramas. It’s a good time. You can follow my artwork at jmwillustration.com, my (announced) game design work at lunarveil.press, and me at twitter.com/JabariWeathers and instagram.com/jmwillustration~

What themes do you like to emphasize in game work?

Existential tension, often the questions of identity and knowing who you are. I’m in a few different professional and creative circles that I simultaneously feel indebted to as far as my taste in media and interests, and feel not immediately welcome in, having to have carved a niche for myself within scifi/fantasy illustration and game design. I often try to find ways to take the kind of performative tension I feel as a POC in both circles and fold that into game design terms. It’s sort of like journaling. There’s a mechanic in A Dire Situation where everyone chooses a secret for another person’s character, but you don’t know what secret has been chosen for you specifically, even though your *character* is understood to be aware of the secret and you as a player get to see all of the available secrets that are in play at the table. The result is nobody is quite who they themselves think they are, and you end up having to question a lot about the entity you’re stepping into for the evening. I like trying to get people to question their fictional personas, anyway!

How did you get into games? Who did you try to emulate in your career?

Actually I got into games through my mom, who played DnD when she was younger and never stopped consuming speculative fiction. She kinda just passed the genre interest on to me. I also grew up with cousins who played a LOT of video games with me, and eventually made my way toward titles that valued a kind of emergent design that tabletop RPGs are especially well suited for (for example, Thief, Deus Ex [I grew up with Invisible War and Deadly Shadows and played the earlier games in late high school and early college], Morrowind). In high school, my religion teacher (I went to an all boys Catholic high school), was really my first longstanding GM with 3.5, but I had been reading the books for a solid amount of time before that point. I don’t know if I tried to emulate any one person in my game design upon starting, but I did try to chase the same kind of player choice that Looking Glass Studios baked into their digital work (which they pulled from tabletop games in a lot of ways), as well as their interdisciplinary approach to game design. Look at Thief: The Dark Project against it’s contemporaries and you can tell that it was made by people interested in things outside of the industry that it was making an impact on. I love how Looking glass trusts it’s players and doesn’t hold their hand, instead giving them tools to let the experience emerge. I also love how their games had such odd and idiosyncratic approaches that really challenged the player. I still chase both things in the social landscape that tabletop RPGs create, and I really hope I make something that’s half as inspiring as that Looking Glass ethos was for me!

More recently, I’ve been owing a lot of the recent game design lessons learned to Marissa Kelly, Sarah Richardson and Whitney Beltran from Bluebeard’s Bride, and John Harper’s work on Blades in the Dark. The former is such an amazing study in how to get horror and tension to emerge, and how to bake unusual ceremony into a game. A lot of people are intimidated by it when they are used to simulationist style games, and many admirers of Bluebeard’s Bride also label it as “simple” mechanically, but there is *so* much happening in the social and emotional landscape of that game, so much that gets mechanized so eloquently. Every piece of vocabulary that the players (including the Groundskeeper) use is calibrated perfectly to the theme and discussions Bluebeard’s is meant to provoke. Blades does a wondrous amount of things with a swashbuckling setup by letting players pick the details of their abilities and tools on the fly, but making *everything* a resource management game. When some of those resources aren’t just ‘coin’ or ‘inventory’ but are ‘stress’, it becomes evocative in a game that I wish a lot of other action/adventure RPGs would be. Both also have a remarkable relationship to violence that ends up more nuanced than what I think the common examples of games present show to those not entrenched in the game community. I’ve been studying these both *very* closely, and trying to digest the things they’ve brought to my game brain rather deeply.

Do you have any advice for others getting into the industry?

Don’t be afraid to put yourself out there, and do so in person! I try to go to events because I meet people and make fast friends when in the flesh, and those are friendships I really cherish and feel enriched by. Also, don’t underestimate how much you as (not a designer) are valuable to game design! A lot of my best game design ideas come from me essentially abstracting the anxieties of my day to day life doing freelance and being worried about the world into game mechanics and procedures, or finding the particular joys of the media I consume and turning that into a game. A Dire Situation started as an attempt to capture the unique feeling of watching people read things they shouldn’t have access to, which I always enjoy seeing in films. Get weird with your ideas, someone will cherish it and you’ll get to know yourself better through that, and don’t be afraid to share yourself before you’re ‘polished enough’. This industry is so young, and I think a lot of people curtail the considerable wisdom they can bring to it because they aren’t established, but that’s the way that communities grow best, when people exert the best of themselves in the truest way they know.

What do you think the most important things in gaming are right now?

That’s a huge question, and I’m afraid of my answer being too succinct to pin down a lot of the things that I think are valuable and important that are shifting in this medium and the community that fosters it. Right now, there’s a generation of designers and gamers that are pushing to be *way* more inclusive in this medium, which is amazing because it’s such an empathy builder. With that, we’re seeing a lot of games that are reflecting that wider spectrum of experiences and needs at a higher frequency, and seeing that it’s getting good and wide reception. Games like Bluebeard’s Bride, Star Crossed, Mutants in the Night, and BFF:Best Friends Forever are challenging questions of who’s stories are told, who’s perspectives are shared and what kind of exchange do we expect from such a social medium. As things move forward, I think that kind of willingness and encouragement to lean into new experiences without apologizing to established patterns of play and design is going to only help this community grow faster and stronger, even with the anticipated challenges. This medium is showing very explicitly that Joy isn’t just killing goblins, and Pain isn’t just the threat of being killed by goblins, and that kind of emotional honesty is pulling the industry into it’s teenage years.

This also comes with a greater call for accountability in our community as far as social safety. There’s a lot more discussion of missing stairs, safe tables, and supportive gatherings than I felt just a decade ago as a teenager. A lot of conduct has been pulled rather painfully into the light, a lot of social patterns are under intense scrutiny at our tables and in this industry, and I think that’s rightly so. Being in this world, much as I love it, can be so quietly, exhaustively bracing, and the people that make up this industry should feel able to assert what makes them feel safe and when they are threatened. People are actively doing this in games and in the community, and that’s amazing.

What’s your most meaningful gaming experience?

Generally, one that has enough trust to get uncomfortable. One where I can lean into the vulnerabilities of characters, and embolden fellow players to do the same. I look for kind of emotionally intense, bracing media, and I love feeling that way (or provoking that feeling) in a game. I want my assumptions shaken up a little bit, and, assuming it’s navigated compassionately and safely, I value going to dark places in games. It pulls a lot of the horror and strife of my actual world into perspective. I generally like my fantasy to reflect my reality and give me the vocabulary and process to make it better, or at least see it more clearly. There’s nothing wrong with lighter fare, but this is what will get my attention reliably.

What’s the most important change you could see occurring in the industry?

More than a few, but paying freelancers livable wages (even if it means shrinking the density of content) is the big one. There’s tons of ways to unpack this, and tons of reasons that workloads are overweighed and underpaid, many being unintentional for the majority of the market. In some ways, that’s made it even harder to check. The flipside is that I’ve had ADs in the industry say things along the lines of “artists take (RPG work) on as a hobby, nobody is doing this for full time work” and that sentiment really blew my mind. So many really talented artists spending so much time, money and effort perfecting craft and that’s a sentiment that’s we might be competing against when trying to navigate to a workable and healthy architecture of work. I think there’s a lot of wanting to do better on the business end, especially in indie RPGs, but the whole industry needs to (and is trying to) go through that learning process. The continued challenge to stick with those better principles I think is an instrumental change to the community’s sustainability.

Anything else you want to add?

When practicing magic, make sure to add salt!

And thank you for your time, Tracy!

 

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Entity Registration Form

New Drupal Modules - 6 February 2019 - 9:34am
Categories: Drupal

Agaric Collective: Pass variables without escaping nor sanitizing to t() in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 6 February 2019 - 9:12am

In Drupal 7 it was useful to do things like this: 

function mymodule_content() { $links[] = l('Google', 'http://www.google.com'); $links[] = l('Yahoo', 'http://www.yahoo.com'); return t('Links: !types', array('!types' => implode(', ', $links))); }

In this case, we are using the exclamation mark to pass the $links into our string but unfortunately, Drupal 8 doesn't have this option in the FormattableMarkup::placeholderFormat(), the good news is that even without this there is a way to accomplish the same thing. 

Read more and discuss at agaric.coop.

Categories: Drupal

Paragraphs View Mode Field

New Drupal Modules - 6 February 2019 - 7:33am
Categories: Drupal

TMGMT GearTranslations

New Drupal Modules - 6 February 2019 - 6:54am

Under Development.

Categories: Drupal

Mass.gov Digital Services: Introducing Drupal Test Traits

Planet Drupal - 6 February 2019 - 6:34am
Mass.gov dev team releases open source project

The Mass.gov development team is proud to release a new open source project, Drupal Test Traits (DTT). DTT enables you to run PHPUnit tests against your Drupal web site, without wiping your database after each test class. That is, you test with your usual content-filled database, not an empty one. We hope lots of Drupal sites will use DTT and contribute back their improvements. Thanks to PreviousNext and Phase2 for being early adopters.

Mass.gov is a large, content-centric site. Most of our tests click around and assert that content is laid out properly, the corresponding icons are showing, etc. In order to best verify this, we need the Mass.gov database; testing on an empty site won’t suffice. The traditional tool for testing a site using an existing database is Behat. So we used Behat for over a year and found it getting more and more awkward. Behat is great for facilitating conversations between business managers and developers. Those are useful conversations, but many organizations are like ours — we don’t write product specs in Gherkin. In fact, we don’t do anything in Gherkin beside Behat.

Meanwhile, the test framework inside Drupal core improved a lot in the last couple of years (mea culpa). Before Drupal Test Traits, this framework was impossible to use without wiping the site’s database after each test. DTT lets you keep your database and still test using the features of Drupal’s BrowserTestBase and friends. See DrupalTrait::setUp() for details (the bootstrap is inspired by Drush, a different open source project that I maintain).

Zakim Bridge at Night, North End Boston. Photo by David Fox.Using DTT in a Testhttps://medium.com/media/cbe46617878edbc55bbf67c573fbc46a/href
  • Our test cases extend ExistingSiteBase, a convenience class from DTT that imports all the test traits. We will eventually create our own base class and import the traits there.
  • Notice calls to $this->createNode(). This convenience method wraps Drupal’s method of the same name. DTT deletes each created node during tearDown().
  • Note how we call Vocabulary::load(). This is an important point — the full Drupal and Mink APIs are available during a test. The abstraction of Behat is happily removed. Writing test classes more resembles writing module code.
More Featureshttps://medium.com/media/7c921cc06be32c3b0944aef1d597e853/hrefMisc
  • See the DTT repo for details on how to install and run tests
  • Typically, one does not run tests against a live web site. Tests can fail and leave sites in a “dirty” state so it’s helpful to occasionally refresh to a pristine database.

If you have questions or comments about DTT, please comment below or submit issues/PRs in our repository.

More from Moshe: Our modern development environment at Mass.gov

Interested in a career in civic tech? Find job openings at Digital Services.
Follow us on Twitter | Collaborate with us on GitHub | Visit our site

Introducing Drupal Test Traits was originally published in MA Digital Services on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Categories: Drupal

Free Legal Insight for Game Developers, Streamers, and Youtubers from Zac Rich - by Larry&Brandon GDU

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 6 February 2019 - 6:32am
Press Start Legal is a law firm based in the United States for Interactive Entertainment Industry. Zac Rich is the cofounder and is bridging the gap for all game developers about the legal side of game development.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Simply Signups

New Drupal Modules - 6 February 2019 - 5:58am

The Simply Signups module allows users to set up a simple event rsvp/signup system. Every event can have its own unique rsvp form. There is also templating available. You can set up a form template that can be loaded and adjusted on a per node/event basis.

Categories: Drupal

DrupalCon News: How to become a DrupalCon Mentor

Planet Drupal - 6 February 2019 - 4:35am

The backbone of every DrupalCon is the community of people who come together at the event, and in particular the involvement of community volunteers who collectively influence and shape the experiences of others in attendance. In short, Mentors!  

 

Categories: Drupal

OPTASY: How to Send Richly Formatted HTML Emails in Drupal 8: Deliver the Experiences that Your Customers Expect in 2019

Planet Drupal - 6 February 2019 - 4:07am
How to Send Richly Formatted HTML Emails in Drupal 8: Deliver the Experiences that Your Customers Expect in 2019 adriana.cacoveanu Wed, 02/06/2019 - 12:07

API first, responsive Bartik, headless and decoupled Drupal, Layout Builder, React admin UI... Drupal's evolved tremendously over these 18 years! Yet: the emails that we send out via its otherwise robust email sending system aren't different from those we used to send a... decade ago. And customers expect rich experiences outside your Drupal website or app. While website administrators expect to be enabled to easily manage, via the admin UI, their email content templates. So: how do you send HTML emails in Drupal 8?

Without relying on external services, of course...

And who could blame customers for expecting 2019-specific user experiences? Experiences that HTML-enabled emails deliver through their great features.

Categories: Drupal

Third & Grove: The 15 Things Your AEM Team Says Drupal Can't Do, But Can

Planet Drupal - 6 February 2019 - 4:00am
The 15 Things Your AEM Team Says Drupal Can't Do, But Can justin Wed, 02/06/2019 - 07:00
Categories: Drupal

ThinkShout: Fear and Loathing in Support Development

Planet Drupal - 6 February 2019 - 4:00am

Consider the following exchange:

Project Manager: “Hey Joe, next week we’d like you to add some new features to [client site].”

Me: “Sure thing! Where is it hosted?”

PM: “Ah, well… we’re not really sure. We’ve asked the client. The thing is, they haven’t been able to do any work on the site for the last couple of years, because someone built the site for them and then launched it without documentation, and with no support.”

Me: *Stunned Look*

PM: “Also, they don’t use any version control. So updates will have to be done via FTP.”

Me, reeling: “I… I don’t even think I have an FTP client on my computer.”

PM: “We believe in you.”

This is a worst-case support development scenario, one likely to bring with it uncertainty and fear. However, with a methodical approach, even the worst case can be turned to your advantage.

Getting started: Docs and detective work.

The very first thing to do when you have a new support project is to find the site documentation, or failing that, create a place for new docs. You are in the best position to document the site, because you don’t have any preconceived ideas about what to do - so document everything. Future engineers (and future you) will thank you.

Starting with the site and its hosting, you can reverse-engineer pretty much anything. You can even reverse-engineer the hosting if you need to, using Robtex! (Find the host, and ask the client to reach out to them for login info).

Once you have the hosting info, you can log in and establish the following: Are they running backups? Do they use a database, and is it backed up? Do they have any version control? Is there any sort of deployment process? Do they have a staging environment?

If the answer is ‘No’ to any of the above, then it’s usually pretty easy to add/enable. Once you have a ‘Yes’ for all of the above, update the documentation, password manager, etc. For example, even if they don’t use version control, there’s nothing stopping you from adding it to your local install, and pushing that code to a (now free!) private GitHub repo.

From there, you can add user accounts for yourself, and if it’s a CMS-based website such as WordPress or Drupal, log in and start investigating the code.

Figuring out the code - locally.

It’s always a good idea to do code investigations on a local installation - any tweaks and debug code can be spotted pre-deploy and removed. Make sure you document the process of getting a local installation up and running as well! Example: letting your co-workers know that they should run the WordPress-based wp-cli command wp search-replace client-site.com client-site.localhost on a newly imported database will save them hours of frustration, as well as preventing terrible accidents from happening (WordPress will quietly redirect you to the live site after logging in if you don’t change the site URLs in the local database. Oopsie!)

Once set up locally, you can start looking for theme-layer build tips. In the root of the project, look for Composer files, (which could indicate an automated build process). A README would also be a good thing to look for - these will often be the hidden documentation for a project.

You should also look for any taskrunner files, such as those used by Gulp or Grunt, or any other files that you wouldn’t expect to see in a clean install of the CMS.

Next, find the active theme. Usually, you can inspect the website and find paths to the theme from images (WordPress), or the favicon link in the header (Drupal).

Once you’ve located (and documented) the theme location, look in the theme for taskrunners, as well as any README files. If there’s are none to be found, look for a Sass or {less} directory. Gemfiles and Rakefiles will also give hints about the type front-end preprocessors in use, and what the scope of the preprocessor is. If it’s an older site, it might still use a Compass-based framework. If there’s no preprocessor, it might be using vanilla CSS!

Once all of that is done (and documented), you can actually start finding and working on code!

Where code?

Actually finding code can be tricky - say it’s a WordPress site, and you’ve been asked to add a menu to ‘campaign’ pages across the site. How to find the template quickly?

This is where a codebase searchable IDE is handy. Sites can have tens of thousands of files, and you want to be able to narrow your search. In the case of a WordPress template, you’d limit the search to the theme directory, preferably with a *.php file extension. From there, you can look at a campaign page and look for specific classes. In our case, hero-area campaign.

Result:

Don’t be a hero - use smart search

This site had over 100,000 files! A full search could have taken several minutes instead of the 1-2 seconds it took to search the 244 PHP files in the theme.

From here, you could simply get to work and add the menu, but it can be valuable to run a codesniffer against the template. The more it deviates from the coding standard for a particular CMS, the more likely your ‘correct’ code will run into issues. In addition, if the site is ever migrated to an automated deployment environment, it will fail builds that have coding standard filters.

You can also glean a lot about the mindset of the people who built the site - were they careful and clean in their coding style? Did they document/comment code? Did they make the same style errors over and over (like a lone developer would do) or is it random (like a team)?

You can also occasionally make fun discoveries:

Me: “OK, I installed the site locally and added the menu to the campaign template. I also noticed a coding error in the ‘related content’ section that was causing it to not display.”

PM: “Really? Do they have that on other content on the site?”

Me: “Yeah, every other content type has it. I suspect it was just an error that snuck in when someone was doing a search-and-replace on the code.”

PM: “So… how many pages did that impact?”

Me: “About 500 or so. It’s been that way for at least the last three years too.”

PM: *Stunned Look*

Categories: Drupal

Field Formatter Key Label

New Drupal Modules - 6 February 2019 - 3:38am
Categories: Drupal

VK Database Location Autocomplete

New Drupal Modules - 6 February 2019 - 3:19am
Categories: Drupal

Article test

New Drupal Modules - 6 February 2019 - 2:58am
Categories: Drupal

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