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Code Karate: Creating dynamic allowed values options for an entity field

Planet Drupal - 9 April 2015 - 5:59am

If you are building out a Drupal 7 site you may some day run into a situation where you need to h

Categories: Drupal

Bypass comment review

New Drupal Modules - 9 April 2015 - 12:28am

Module allows you enable bypass comment review. In this case any user that have permissions to post comment, will have ability skip approval.
That will be convenient in cases when you need improve communications for certain nodes.

Example:

You have an event and during this event anonymous users should be able to post comment without approval only on nodes, that related to this event.

Categories: Drupal

Iron Kingdoms Unleashed: Harnesser Tradition

RPGNet - 9 April 2015 - 12:00am
The harnesser, tradition of the warlocks.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

How a Business Plan Can Help Your Mobile Game Business - by Jovan Johnson

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 April 2015 - 10:36pm
Get app business plan tips. Mobile gaming is a popular, accessible, and potentially profitable business segment. Why don't all entrants create business plans?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Making character illustrations for a FPS game - by Junxue Li

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 April 2015 - 10:36pm
This article is a detailed walkthrough of how we make character promotion art for a FPS game: Zula
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Is Nintendo working on the defining videogame controller of the smart device age? - by Nicholas Lovell

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 April 2015 - 10:36pm
The Nintendo/DeNA deal makes no sense. At face value, it would suggest Nintendo is abandoning it's "Blue Ocean" strategy and jumping into a hyper-competitive market which doesn't play to its strengths. So what is really going on, wonders Nicholas Lovell.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

One Year in Steam Greenlight - by Gregory Avery-Weir

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 April 2015 - 10:36pm
Our creepy-funny adventure Ossuary has now been in the Steam Greenlight program for a year. Here's what that feels like.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

App Store Marketing for a Kids Game: An Exercise in Negotiating Differences - by Chris Allers

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 April 2015 - 10:28pm
We quickly realized that marketing a kids game is an exercise in negotiating the difference between multiple, important, and often irreconcilable positions and then deciding on a course of action.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

A New Dimension: Twisting the World in Video Games - by Adam Smith

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 April 2015 - 10:28pm
On the manipulation of three dimensional space in video games, and how a change in medium can vary its effectiveness; based on the differences between the omniscient perspective of Back to Bed and Monument Valley compared to the intimacy of Antichamber
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Midwestern Mac, LLC: Solr for Drupal Developers, Part 3: Testing Solr locally

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2015 - 8:05pm

In earlier Solr for Drupal Developers posts, you learned about Apache Solr and it's history in and integration with Drupal. In this post, I'm going to walk you through a quick guide to getting Apache Solr running on your local workstation so you can test it out with a Drupal site you're working on.

The guide below is for those using Mac or Linux workstations, but if you're using Windows (or even if you run Mac or Linux), you can use Drupal VM instead, which optionally installs Apache Solr alongside Drupal.

As an aside, I am writing this series of blog posts from the perspective of a Drupal developer who has worked with large-scale, highly customized Solr search for Mercy (example), and with a variety of small-to-medium sites who are using Hosted Apache Solr, a service I've been running as part of Midwestern Mac since early 2011.

Installing Apache Solr in a Virtual Machine

Apache Solr can be run directly from any computer that has Java 1.7 or later, so technically you could run it on any modern Mac, Windows, or Linux workstation natively. But to keep your local workstation cleaner, and to save time and hassle (especially if you don't want to kludge your computer with a Java runtime!), this guide will show you how to set up an Apache Solr virtual machine using Vagrant, VirtualBox, and Ansible.

Let's get started:

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association News: Drupal Association CTO: Year 1

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2015 - 4:00pm

My first day as Chief Technology Officer for the Drupal Association was the 31st of March 2014. I like to joke that I started a day before April Fool's Day on purpose.

As the first CTO for the Drupal Association, I'd like to highlight a few of the lessons I've learned and the accomplishments of the Drupal.org Product and Engineering Team over the past year.

Learning

In my first week... I learned... and learned... and learned. Listening is an important skill for any leader, but it is never more important than when you are picking up the 13-year history of the website you are inheriting as your responsibility.

I have been actively building and managing teams that build with Drupal since the early days of Drupal 6. Even before beginning to use Drupal, I've been focused on growing product and engineering teams that build big complex sites. It excited me to get involved with Drupal, doing what I feel I do pretty well, at a whole new level. I felt I knew a lot about the software, but had a relatively shallow experience with the site that powers the community.

In that first week, I learned that I had an amazing team of four—two of which were new to the team themselves—to help me learn the ropes. I also learned that they were overworked, more than overbooked, and still recovering from the Drupal.org upgrade to Drupal 7 that occurred in the fall of 2013.

I learned that Drupal.org is not built solely on Drupal. It is an intricate combination of technologies of which Drupal is only a fraction of that whole. Drupal.org is over 16 websites, CDN services, Git repositories, some Python in interesting places, some Puppet and some Jenkins and so much more. The volunteers that built our infrastructure were—and continue to be—amazing. They also have very, very understanding employers.

I learned that the Drupal Association is a phenomenal group of professionals (16 when I started) that are truly committed to our open source community.

Expect the worst, but assume the best

In my second week, we bled—not literally, mind you. Heartbleed was my trial by fire. It was an excellent opportunity to meet key infrastructure and security team volunteers. They are an amazing group of professionals.

In that process of securing Drupal.org from a threat that was rocking the Internet, I found the mantra that would come to define how to look at a site the size and scale of Drupal.org. Expect the worst, but assume the best.

Whether it be security, spam, or regressions on deployment, the best way to make sure your site can respond is to expect the worst possible behavior by untrusted users. At the same time, we are an open source community that aspires to be inviting and to grow. We have to assume every new user of Drupal.org is a potential future Drupal contributor that wants to make us better. That is quite the dichotomy to operate within as a team of technologists.

Grow, grow, grow

I mentioned that when I started, I had a team of 4 in an organization of 16. The Drupal.org product and engineering team is now 11.5 members strong—and the association just hired its 34th employee. That is incredibly rapid growth for a small organization to go through in one year.

Over the past year, we have spent a lot of time setting or norms and forming our culture. As a developing team, we had to pick our tools for communication and project management. We implemented new processes for defining the priority of our work. We established patterns of communication to make sure we regularly involved in the community—working groups in particular—in our iterations of getting things done. We have also been an incredibly productive team for one forming so quickly.

Governance, communication and the community

Governance for Drupal.org was established in early 2013. When I started, a good portion of my first few months was figuring out how to integrate myself and the team I was building into the working groups.

These working groups had gone through a couple of years worth of ideation processes and had a strong communication focus with their work. What the working groups did not have was enough sustained volunteer contribution and support to build the tools they were identifying as a need. Additionally, they were in a tough place where they had the authority to make decisions, but they didn't necessarily have a way to make sure those decisions were implemented.

My goal since beginning this work was figuring out a way to get all the cool community ideas implemented faster. A the same time, it is also my role to figure out how to make Drupal.org and the tools and infrastructure our community funds through the Drupal Association sustainable. These tools have to help us grow our community and help increase the skills of the learners in our community that will one day become the experts in our community.

My team's biggest challenge is continuing to make our ecosystem better as fast as we can while letting the community know where we are focusing our energies and getting the community to get involved when they have the time and interest.

With the guidance of the working groups and the Drupal Association Board, we were able to establish a strategic roadmap that helps communicate what is coming next for Drupal.org.

Getting things done

So what have we done in the past year? While growing a team and building new norms and processes, we were able to accomplish quite a lot...

Support for semantic versioning

We updated Drupal.org processes to support semantic versioning. 8.0.0 here we come! This also means we will be able to have more frequent Drupal releases reducing the time between new versions—8.1.0, 8.2.0 on deck.

Better infrastructure and deployments

We improved page load times—doing this included changes such as CDN-fronting our infrastructure and upgrading hardware that was long overdue for a refresh. The infrastructure is amazing, but there are few volunteers that understand it enough to keep maintained at the level the community needs. We now have dedicated DevOps engineers that are making sure our technology stack is performant and stable.

There are over 400 behavior driven design (BDD) tests that now allow us to more confidently make deployments to Drupal.org.

And we make a lot of deployments to Drupal.org... about 68 a month to just Drupal.org customizations. (About 3 commits per month are volunteers with the balance made by staff.)

When we deploy big stuff (there is a lot of small stuff), we let people know about it. The change notification process has a subscription option and we post those notices to our twitter handle at @drupal_infra.

Credit for organizations that contribute

Recently, users were given the ability to attribute their comments in the issue queue to the organization that gave them the time to make the contribution (their employer) or paid for the contribution (a customer). That is a huge leap for our community. It is going to give us a path to tracking how Drupal core, contributed modules and themes are made possible by the awesome organizations that are using Drupal.

There is an excellent UI for maintainers to give credit to the users can commit, and we are expanding this to allow that credit to extend to the organizations involved.

Improved account creation and new user experience

We have done a huge amount of work making creating a new account easier for users—and harder for spammers. We made it much easier for a user to create their Drupal.org profile from a subsite. These were important steps toward better user profiles.

A label now appears beneath the user picture of new users for the first 90 days they are on Drupal.org to help us welcome them and get them involved.

Coming soon, users that have contributed significantly to Druapl.org will get the "community" role on Drupal.org will be able to confirm new users to make it easier for them to post. This will make it easier for sprint organizers to help us engage with new users

User profiles are getting better

User profile pictures have been implemented—which seems small, but it has a big impact in a comment thread. You now have a decent URL to hand out for your Drupal.org profile (e.g. drupal.org/u/joshuami). Mentor fields also show the pictures of mentors. We made it easier for us to synchronize data between Drupal.org subsites.

By moving our crediting system to issue comments—rather than just commits—we are expanding what the definition of "contribution" is for our community.

With better data about our contributors, we'll be able to better highlight how people are involved.

Launch of Drupal Jobs

In August of 2014, we launched Drupal Jobs to help connect Drupal employers with job seekers. It continues to grow and we are now up to over 1,000 job seekers. We average over 200 open positions per month on Drupal Jobs.

Responsive updates to Bluecheese (Drupal.org's theme)

As a special New Year's present to the awesome volunteers that helped add responsive elements to our theme, our team merged those changes to the Bluecheese theme making Drupal.org much easier to use on mobile devices.

Launching and maintaining 3 Drupal Cons sites and the new Drupal Events

DrupalCons Austin, Amsterdam and Latin America all had sites built on Drupal to launch, maintain and archive. DrupalCon Los Angeles is the first site on our new Drupal Events platform that is totally changing the way we approach our ticket and registration process. Also, this site will allow us to maintain a single living archive of all Con session presentations and profile data.

User research

Starting at DrupalCon Austin, working with user research coach Whitney Hess, the team interviewed more than 30 community members of all types. That research was turned into the research that made up our skills acquisition model for our new personas.

Content strategy

Forum One was selected to help us build out a new content model, site map and governance plan for Drupal.org.

Next steps

The summary above does not come close to covering all of the great work. The Drupal.org product and engineering team has an awesome roadmap planned for the coming months.

  • More profile improvements for users and organizations
  • New content model and governance from the content strategy work
  • Drupal.org style guide and design system
  • DrupalCI - next version of continuous integration testing for Drupal.org
  • Issue workflow improvements to make contributing and maintaining easier
  • Better search and discovery
  • Improved data to help find and select modules, themes and distrobutions
  • Updates to Drupal Groups (groups.drupal.org) and Drupal Translations (localize.drupal.org)
Thank you

To the supporting partners that made all of this work possible, thank you. To the community volunteers that gave of their time to contribute code and ideas and feedback, thank you.

One last thank you, I feel absolutely blessed to work with such an awesome team of designers and developers, a project manager, a product manager and some incredible working group members.

I cannot wait to see what the next year brings.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal for Government: Using rules to populate custom profile fields from LDAP

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2015 - 2:09pm

LDAP is available for public query at UVa (ldap://ldap.virginia.edu), and since many folks around here work at UVa being able to pull data from LDAP based on their email address can be handy.  

First up needed to get php ldap installed http://www.aoddy.com/2009/01/18/how-to-install-php-ldap-module-on-centos5/ covered it nicely -

yum install php-ldap and service httpd restart and we were rolling....   

For the record I tried both simple ldap and ldap however simple ldap required a password field to work with the user profile fields - and that isn't available in our ldap server... and the ldap module didn't show me the profile fields up front... not saying either can't be made to work, just that I couldn't get what I wanted.... if anyone wants to test this process out I've attached a feature... ymmv

So working with rules it was... 

Categories: Drupal

Don Mattrick is out as Zynga's CEO, and founder Mark Pincus back in

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 8 April 2015 - 1:16pm

Zynga management shakeup comes as total surprise -- as ex-Xbox man Mattrick's tenure at at the company lasts less than two years. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Mediacurrent: Using Third Party Wrappers

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2015 - 12:52pm

Chances are decent that at some point you've needed to provide some third party service with styling information so that they can have their service look as though it were part of your website. The types of services this could apply to could range widely from external e-commerce platforms to HR and other internal tools. Furthermore, they could either include this HTML directly or with a link to files that you host.

Categories: Drupal

Acquia: PHP: The entire world is your development team – Beth Tucker Long

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2015 - 9:31am
Language Undefined PHP: The entire world is your development team – Beth Tucker Long

Categories: Drupal

GDC China 2015 confirms dates and calls for talk submissions

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 8 April 2015 - 9:06am

The call for submissions in Mandarin and English to present talks is now open for the 2015 Game Developers Conference China through May 22nd. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Segment

New Drupal Modules - 8 April 2015 - 8:40am

Segment.com integration.

Categories: Drupal

Wellnet Blog: Weekly Module Review - #6 Quicktabs, create tabs in an easy way!

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2015 - 8:25am

I’m developing a website and I had the need to have a page created with Views and divided in two tabs.
I know that it can be easily done by code, but I was interested in find a module that suits me.
And I found it! It’s called Quick Tabs.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Watchdog: Connecting Drupal to Salesforce in Three Easy Steps

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2015 - 7:20am
Article

The Salesforce Suite of Drupal modules is an easy way to connect Drupal to Salesforce, a Customer Relationship Management system used by retailers and non-profits alike, which allows non-technical staff to create extensive reports – reports that would be difficult to create using Drupal alone.

Although entities can be synchronized to Salesforce objects – and custom mappings created – there is lots more that can be done with Salesforce. Let’s take a look.

Getting started

For openers, you’ll need:

To get the Developer Edition, create a developer account.

Once you’re in Salesforce, you’ll quickly notice that the site seems overwhelming. A complete overview is way beyond the scope of this article; the most important objects for our purposes are Campaigns, Leads, Contacts, and Cases.

There are many other extensions for Salesforce, extensions that provide new object types. Also, existing object types can be extended in much the same way as in Drupal.

As a best practice, always work in a sandbox environment when not working within a dev instance. It will help ensure that you can create a proper development -> testing -> production workflow.

To create a sandbox (Enterprise, Performance, Unlimited, and Database.com), go to Setup » Sandboxes » Create new Sandbox.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Watchdog: Connecting Drupal to Salesforce in Three Easy Steps

Planet Drupal - 8 April 2015 - 7:20am
Article

The Salesforce Suite of Drupal modules is an easy way to connect Drupal to Salesforce, a Customer Relationship Management system used by retailers and non-profits alike, which allows non-technical staff to create extensive reports – reports that would be difficult to create using Drupal alone.

Although entities can be synchronized to Salesforce objects – and custom mappings created – there is lots more that can be done with Salesforce. Let’s take a look.

Getting started

For openers, you’ll need:

To get the Developer Edition, create a developer account.

Once you’re in Salesforce, you’ll quickly notice that the site seems overwhelming. A complete overview is way beyond the scope of this article; the most important objects for our purposes are Campaigns, Leads, Contacts, and Cases.

There are many other extensions for Salesforce, extensions that provide new object types. Also, existing object types can be extended in much the same way as in Drupal.

As a best practice, always work in a sandbox environment when not working within a dev instance. It will help ensure that you can create a proper development -> testing -> production workflow.

To create a sandbox (Enterprise, Performance, Unlimited, and Database.com), go to Setup » Sandboxes » Create new Sandbox.

Categories: Drupal
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