Newsfeeds

myDropWizard.com: Drupal 6 security update for Password Policy module

Planet Drupal - 5 December 2018 - 11:59am

As you may know, Drupal 6 has reached End-of-Life (EOL) which means the Drupal Security Team is no longer doing Security Advisories or working on security patches for Drupal 6 core or contrib modules - but the Drupal 6 LTS vendors are and we're one of them!

Today, there is a Less Critical security release for the Password Policy  module to fix a Denial of Service (DoS) vulnerability.

The Password Policy module makes it possible to set constraints on user passwords.

The "digit placement" constraint is vulnerable to Denial of Service attacks if an attacker submits specially crafted passwords.

See the security advisory for Drupal 7 for more information.

Here you can download the Drupal 6 patch.

If you have a Drupal 6 site using the Password Policy module, we recommend you update immediately! We have already deployed the patch for all of our Drupal 6 Long-Term Support clients. :-)

If you'd like all your Drupal 6 modules to receive security updates and have the fixes deployed the same day they're released, please check out our D6LTS plans.

Note: if you use the myDropWizard module (totally free!), you'll be alerted to these and any future security updates, and will be able to use drush to install them (even though they won't necessarily have a release on Drupal.org).

Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: Drupal's commitment to accessibility

Planet Drupal - 5 December 2018 - 11:58am

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

Last week, WordPress Tavern picked up my blog post about Drupal 8's upcoming Layout Builder.

While I'm grateful that WordPress Tavern covered Drupal's Layout Builder, it is not surprising that the majority of WordPress Tavern's blog post alludes to the potential challenges with accessibility. After all, Gutenberg's lack of accessibility has been a big topic of debate, and a point of frustration in the WordPress community.

I understand why organizations might be tempted to de-prioritize accessibility. Making a complex web application accessible can be a lot of work, and the pressure to ship early can be high.

In the past, I've been tempted to skip accessibility features myself. I believed that because accessibility features benefited a small group of people only, they could come in a follow-up release.

Today, I've come to believe that accessibility is not something you do for a small group of people. Accessibility is about promoting inclusion. When the product you use daily is accessible, it means that we all get to work with a greater number and a greater variety of colleagues. Accessibility benefits everyone.

As you can see in Drupal's Values and Principles, we are committed to building software that everyone can use. Accessibility should always be a priority. Making capabilities like the Layout Builder accessible is core to Drupal's DNA.

Drupal's Values and Principles translate into our development process, as what we call an accessibility gate, where we set a clearly defined "must-have bar." Prioritizing accessibility also means that we commit to trying to iteratively improve accessibility beyond that minimum over time.

Together with the accessibility maintainers, we jointly agreed that:

  1. Our first priority is WCAG 2.0 AA conformance. This means that in order to be released as a stable system, the Layout Builder must reach Level AA conformance with WCAG. Without WCAG 2.0 AA conformance, we won't release a stable version of Layout Builder.
  2. Our next priority is WCAG 2.1 AA conformance. We're thrilled at the greater inclusion provided by these new guidelines, and will strive to achieve as much of it as we can before release. Because these guidelines are still new (formally approved in June 2018), we won't hold up releasing the stable version of Layout Builder on them, but are committed to implementing them as quickly as we're able to, even if some of the items are after initial release.
  3. While WCAG AAA conformance is not something currently being pursued, there are aspects of AAA that we are discussing adopting in the future. For example, the new 2.1 AAA "Animations from Interactions", which can be framed as an achievable design constraint: anywhere an animation is used, we must ensure designs are understandable/operable for those who cannot or choose not to use animations.

Drupal's commitment to accessibility is one of the things that makes Drupal's upcoming Layout Builder special: it will not only bring tremendous and new capabilities to Drupal, it will also do so without excluding a large portion of current and potential users. We all benefit from that!

Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: Pilot Program: Help us improve reliability of minor updates

Planet Drupal - 5 December 2018 - 10:50am

The Drupal Association seeks volunteer organizations from Agency and Drupal site owners running production Drupal 8 sites for the creation of an official minor-release beta-testers program.

Since Drupal 8.0's release in November 2015, the Drupal community has successfully transitioned to a scheduled release process whereby two minor releases are made every year.

The most recent of these releases was Drupal 8.6, released in September 2018.

In a significant change from Drupal 7, these minor releases may contain new features and maintain backwards compatibility. This means that every six months there are new features in Drupal core, instead of waiting for the next major release.

This rapid acceleration in feature development has resulted in the need for greater real-world testing of upgrade paths and backwards compatibility. Drupal core has a vast automated test-suite comprising almost 25,000 tests—however, these can be greatly complemented by real-world testing of production sites. There are an infinite number of ways to put Drupal together that cannot always be handled in automated tests.

In order to improve the reliability of the minor-releases, the Drupal community—in conjunction with the Drupal Association—aims to develop a minor-release beta testers panel comprised of agencies and site-owners who maintain complex Drupal 8 production sites.

Many companies and Drupal users are looking to help with core development but aren't always sure where to start. Membership in this panel presents a new way to help the development of software that powers their website.

Who should apply?

Agencies and site owners who maintain large and complex Drupal 8 production sites. In particular, sites that use a wide range of contributed and custom modules or have large volumes of content.

What is involved?

When the beta release becomes available, the Drupal core committers will work in conjunction with the Drupal Association to contact the members of the beta-testing panel to advise that the next minor release is ready for testing.

Members of the panel will be asked to attempt updating to the beta using a staging version of their site (not straight-on production) and report back any issues found. New issues will be opened to track and resolve reported issues. If a predetermined percentage of the program participants have not yet reported back their results, a decision may be made to delay releasing subsequent beta versions or a release-candidate. Participants whose participation lapses may be removed from the program.

At the moment, testing of the new release occurs in a largely ad-hoc fashion, but once the program is established, this will become more structured and maintainers will have access to statistics regarding the breadth of testing. This will then inform release management decisions in regards to release preparedness.

What's in it for participants?
  • Updating early helps find issues beforehand, rather than after the release is out.

  • Reporting issues encountered lets you tap the wealth of experience of the Drupal core contributors that you'd not have the same level of access to if you update on your own after the release.

  • All organizations and individuals taking part in the testing will receive issue credits for both testing the update and fixing any issues that arise.

  • Satisfaction in the knowledge that you helped shape the next minor release of Drupal core.

  • Advanced preview of upcoming features in Drupal core.

Apply to participate in the program

Categories: Drupal

Epic Games is no longer actively developing Unreal Tournament

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 5 December 2018 - 10:45am

After doubling down on Fortnite's ongoing development earlier this year, Epic head Tim Sweeney has now confirmed that the game is no longer being actively developed at the company. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Webform Confirmation File

New Drupal Modules - 5 December 2018 - 8:02am

Provides a webform handler that streams the contents of a file to a user after completing a webform.

Categories: Drupal

Custom Checkboxes

New Drupal Modules - 5 December 2018 - 6:55am

This module allows you fastly style the checkboxes of your site. You will only have to adapt the CSS a little bit.

Sponsorship

Categories: Drupal

Custom View Filters

New Drupal Modules - 5 December 2018 - 6:31am

This module adds two new filters to views:

  • Custom Az Filter: You can filter by the first letter of first/second word for a given text field you will have to define.
  • Node granular date filter: You can filter by year or/and month given a date field.
Sponsorship

Categories: Drupal

How Enemy AI works in Dicey Dungeons - by Terry Cavanagh

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 5 December 2018 - 6:25am
A detailed write up how the new Enemy AI works in my game, Dicey Dungeons! I tried to write it in a "popular science" style that's hopefully of interest to everyone, not just programmers.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Moonlighting for IGF 2019 - by Jason Blackford

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 5 December 2018 - 5:34am
Descent of Man (DoM) is an indie game submitted to the Independent Game Festival 2019 competition. Learn more about the game and the team making it.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Rolling a Ball: Harder Than You Thought (part 2) - by Nathaniel Ferguson

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 5 December 2018 - 5:33am
When creating the game Rollossus, I ran into more trouble than I thought trying to reach satisfying ball movement. This three-part blog series walks people through the issues I ran into and the solutions I found.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Community: Values & Principles Committee Update - November 2018

Planet Drupal - 5 December 2018 - 4:00am

The Values & Principles Committee has formed and has started its work. It has started by looking at Principle 8.

Why are we doing this?

As Dries said, when announcing the first iteration of the Drupal Values & Principles, the Drupal project has had a set of Values & Principles for a very long time. Historically, they were mostly communicated by word of mouth and this meant that some in our community were more aware of them than others.

Writing down the Values & Principles was a great first step. What we need to do now is continually refine the common understanding of these Values & Principles across our whole community and ensure that they are built-in to everything we do.

How will we work?

The Values & Principles are held very closely to the heart of the members of our community and we absolutely recognise that any work on them must be inclusive, clear, structured and accountable.

We are, therefore, going to be open about the work we are doing. While there are members of a committee that will focus on this task, it is not the committee’s job to make decisions “behind closed doors”. Instead, the committee is responsible for enabling the whole community to refine and communicate our common Values & Principles.

We will record actions and progress in the Drupal Governance Project so that all in our community will be able to have the necessary input.

How will we communicate?

We will continue to post updates on the Drupal Community Blog and, as already mentioned, you will always be able to see and, most importantly, participate in issues in the Governance Project. We even have a board on ContribKanban!

Who is on the committee?

Hussain Abbas (hussainweb) works as an Engineering Manager at Axelerant. He started writing programs in 1997 for school competitions and never stopped. His work focus is helping people architect solutions using Drupal and enforcing best practices. He also participates in the local developer community meetup for PHP in general and Drupal in particular. He often speaks at these events and camps in other cities.

Alex Burrows (aburrows), from UK, is the Technical Director of Digidrop and has over 10 years working in Drupal, as well as an avid contributor and a member of the Drupal Community Working Group. As well as this he is a DrupalCamp London Director and Organizer and the author of Drupal 8 Blueprints book.

Jordana Fung (jordana) is a freelance, full-stack Drupal developer from Suriname, a culturally diverse country where the main language is Dutch. She has been steadily increasing her participation in the Drupal community over the past few years and currently has a role on the Drupal Community Working Group. She loves to spend her time learning new things, meeting new people and sharing knowledge and ideas.

Suchi Garg (gargsuchi), living in Melbourne Australia is a Tech Lead at Salsa Digital. She has been a part of the Drupal community for more than 12 years as a site builder, developer, contributor, mentor, speaker and trainer. She had been a part of the Indian community before moving to Australia and is now an active Drupal community down under.

John Kennedy (johnkennedy), lives in Boston, works as a Product Manager for AWS. Over 10 years in Drupal as a site-builder, developer, speaker and on the business side. Co-organiser of Drupal Camp London 2012-2015. PM for Acquia Lightning and the Drupal 8 Module Acceleration Program.

Rachel Lawson (rachel_norfolk), UK and the Community Liaison at the Drupal Association will finally be providing logistical support to the committee and helping wherever she can. Having been in the Drupal community for 11 years as a site builder, a contributor and a mentor, she has had opportunity to experience how the community understands its collective Values & Principles.

In order to be as transparent and forthcoming as possible we wanted to address the fact that there are currently 2 CWG members on the committee. The initial call for people to join the Values & Principles committee happened at the same time as the Community Working Group was calling for new members and, as luck would have it, Alex Burrows applied for both.

In October 2018 a current member of the CWG, Jordana Fung joined the Values & Principles committee and at same time he was being vetted for potential membership to the CWG, Alex joined the Values & Principles committee as well. After the vetting process, Alex officially became a member of the CWG in November. So as it stands now, there are 2 CWG members on the V&P committee.

There are a few possible options going forward, some are:

  • Both CWG members continue for now (whilst the V&P committee is in the very early formation stages) and then possibly:
    • One member drops off
    • They act as a team and only one member (whichever is available) participates in meetings
  • The CWG decides which member is on the VP committee
    • We may need to add another member to the VP committee to take the place of the member that will no longer attend.
So, what’s next?

We have started by compiling a summary of feedback from the community so far that relates to the project’s Values & Principles from such places as the Whitney Hess Interviews, community-led conversations around governance and some anonymized feedback from the Governance Taskforce. We will be adding this summary to an issue in the project.

Call to action

We recognize, though, that what we really want to understand is how you understand what we already have written in Principle 8. THis is how we intend to do that…

The members of the committee have each written stories from their own memories of the Drupal community that demonstrate Principle 8 in action.

We invite you all to write your own stories, from your memories of the Drupal community, other tech communities or indeed any other aspect of life, that demonstrate Principle 8 to you. You should add your story to this issue we have created:

Add my story about Principle 8

One thing we do ask, though, is that you only add your own stories (as many as you like!) and NOT comment or question others’ stories. All stories are valid.

By the end of the year, we hope to have a rich set of stories that show how we, as a global community, interpret Principle 8 and we can then look to see if any changes need to be made to the words or, maybe, it is more a case of linking the Principle to the stories or providing other statements supporting Principle 8.

Categories: Drupal

Simplenews Unsubscribe List

New Drupal Modules - 5 December 2018 - 3:56am
Categories: Drupal

Kristof De Jaeger: Send me a webmention with Drupal!

Planet Drupal - 5 December 2018 - 3:07am

After months of reading, experimenting and a lot of coding, I'm happy that the first release candidate of the Drupal IndieWeb module is out. I guess this makes the perfect time to try it out for yourself, no? There are a lot of concepts within the IndieWeb universe, and many are supported by the module. In fact, there are 8 submodules, so it might be daunting to start figuring out which ones to enable and what they exactly allow you to do. To kick start anyone interested, I'll publish a couple of articles detailing how to set up several concepts using the Drupal module. The first one will explain in a few steps how you can send a webmention to this page. Can you mention me?

Step 1: enabling modules

After you downloaded the module and installed the required composer packages, enable following modules: IndieWeb, Webmention and Microformats2. In case you are not authenticated as user 1, also toggle the following permissions: 'Administer IndieWeb configuration' and 'Send webmention'.

Step 2: expose author information

To discover the author of a website after receiving a webmention, your homepage, or the canonical url of a post needs author information. The module comes with an Author block so you can quickly expose a block where you can configure your name. Your real name or nickname is fine, as long as there's something. The minimal markup should look like something like this:

Your name


Note: this can be anywhere in your HTML, even hidden. Step 3: configure webmention module

All configuration exposed by the modules lives under 'Web services' > 'IndieWeb' at /admin/config/services/indieweb. To configure sending webmentions go to /admin/config/services/indieweb/webmention/send. Ignore the ' Syndication targets' fieldset and scroll down to ' Custom URL's for content' and toggle the 'Expose textfield' checkbox.

Scroll down a bit more and configure how you want to send webmentions, either by cron or drush (webmentions are stored in a queue first for performance reasons)

Step 4: configure Microformats module

When sending a webmention to me, it would be nice to be able to figure out what exactly your post is. To achieve this, we need to add markup to the HTML by using CSS classes. Let's configure the minimal markup at /admin/config/services/indieweb/microformats by toggling following checkboxes:

  • h-entry on node wrappers
  • e-content on standard body fields. In case your node type does not use the standard body field, enter the field name in the 'e-content on other textarea fields' textarea.
  • dt-published, p-name, u-author and u-url in a hidden span element on nodes.
Now create a post!

Create a post with a title and body. Your body needs to contain a link with a class so that when I receive your webmention, I know that this page is valid. As an example, we're going to write a reply:

Hi swentel! I just read your article and it's awesome!

Save the post and verify the markup more or less looks like underneath. Make sure you see following classes: h-entry, u-url, p-name, dt-published, e-content, u-author.


 
    
       
          Published on Tue, 04/12/2018 - 22:39
       
       
         
            Test send!
            2018-12-04T22:39:57+01:00
         

         
       
     
     
 
  Hi swentel! I just read your article and it's awesome!
 

If everything looks fine, go to the node form again. Open the 'Publish to' fieldset where you can enter 'https://realize.be/blog/send-me-webmention-drupal' in the custom URL textfield. Save again and check the send list at /admin/content/webmention/send-list. It should tell that there is one item in the queue. As a final step, run cron or the 'indieweb-send-webmentions' drush command. After that the queue should be empty and one entry will be in the send list and I should have received your webmention!

Note: You can vary between the 'u-in-reply-to', 'u-like-of' or 'u-repost-of' class. Basically, the class determines your response type. The first class will create a comment on this post. The other two classes will be a mention in the sidebar.

What's next?

Well, a lot of course. But the next step should be receiving webmentions no? If you go to /admin/config/services/indieweb/webmention, you can enable receiving webmentions by using the built-in endpoint. Make sure you expose the link tag so I know where to mention you!

I tried it, and it didn't work!

Maybe I missed something in the tutorial. Or you have found a bug :) Feel free to ping me on irc.freenode.net on #indieweb-dev or #drupal-contribute. You may also open an issue at https://github.com/swentel/indieweb

Categories: Drupal

Drupal's commitment to accessibility

Dries Buytaert - 5 December 2018 - 2:56am

Last week, WordPress Tavern picked up my blog post about Drupal 8's upcoming Layout Builder.

While I'm grateful that WordPress Tavern covered Drupal's Layout Builder, it is not surprising that the majority of WordPress Tavern's blog post alludes to the potential challenges with accessibility. After all, Gutenberg's lack of accessibility has been a big topic of debate, and a point of frustration in the WordPress community.

I understand why organizations might be tempted to de-prioritize accessibility. Making a complex web application accessible can be a lot of work, and the pressure to ship early can be high.

In the past, I've been tempted to skip accessibility features myself. I believed that because accessibility features benefited a small group of people only, they could come in a follow-up release.

Today, I've come to believe that accessibility is not something you do for a small group of people. Accessibility is about promoting inclusion. When the product you use daily is accessible, it means that we all get to work with a greater number and a greater variety of colleagues. Accessibility benefits everyone.

As you can see in Drupal's Values and Principles, we are committed to building software that everyone can use. Accessibility should always be a priority. Making capabilities like the Layout Builder accessible is core to Drupal's DNA.

Drupal's Values and Principles translate into our development process, as what we call an accessibility gate, where we set a clearly defined "must-have bar". Prioritizing accessibility also means that we commit to trying to iteratively improve accessibility beyond that minimum over time.

Together with the accessibility maintainers, we jointly agreed that:

  1. Our first priority is WCAG 2.0 AA conformance. This means that in order to be released as a stable system, the Layout Builder must reach Level AA conformance with WCAG. Without WCAG 2.0 AA conformance, we won't release a stable version of Layout Builder.
  2. Our next priority is WCAG 2.1 AA conformance. We're thrilled at the greater inclusion provided by these new guidelines, and will strive to achieve as much of it as we can before release. Because these guidelines are still new (formally approved in June 2018), we won't hold up releasing the stable version of Layout Builder on them, but are committed to implementing them as quickly as we're able to, even if some of the items are after initial release.
  3. While WCAG AAA conformance is not something currently being pursued, there are aspects of AAA that we are discussing adopting in the future. For example, the new 2.1 AAA "Animations from Interactions", which can be framed as an achievable design constraint: anywhere an animation is used, we must ensure designs are understandable/operable for those who cannot or choose not to use animations.

Drupal's commitment to accessibility is one of the things that makes Drupal's upcoming Layout Builder special: it will not only bring tremendous and new capabilities to Drupal, it will also do so without excluding a large portion of current and potential users. We all benefit from that!

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: Drupal's commitment to accessibility

Planet Drupal - 5 December 2018 - 2:56am

Last week, WordPress Tavern picked up my blog post about Drupal 8's upcoming Layout Builder.

While I'm grateful that WordPress Tavern covered Drupal's Layout Builder, it is not surprising that the majority of WordPress Tavern's blog post alludes to the potential challenges with accessibility. After all, Gutenberg's lack of accessibility has been a big topic of debate, and a point of frustration in the WordPress community.

I understand why organizations might be tempted to de-prioritize accessibility. Making a complex web application accessible can be a lot of work, and the pressure to ship early can be high.

In the past, I've been tempted to skip accessibility features myself. I believed that because accessibility features benefited a small group of people only, they could come in a follow-up release.

Today, I've come to believe that accessibility is not something you do for a small group of people. Accessibility is about promoting inclusion. When the product you use daily is accessible, it means that we all get to work with a greater number and a greater variety of colleagues. Accessibility benefits everyone.

As you can see in Drupal's Values and Principles, we are committed to building software that everyone can use. Accessibility should always be a priority. Making capabilities like the Layout Builder accessible is core to Drupal's DNA.

Drupal's Values and Principles translate into our development process, as what we call an accessibility gate, where we set a clearly defined "must-have bar". Prioritizing accessibility also means that we commit to trying to iteratively improve accessibility beyond that minimum over time.

Together with the accessibility maintainers, we jointly agreed that:

  1. Our first priority is WCAG 2.0 AA conformance. This means that in order to be released as a stable system, the Layout Builder must reach Level AA conformance with WCAG. Without WCAG 2.0 AA conformance, we won't release a stable version of Layout Builder.
  2. Our next priority is WCAG 2.1 AA conformance. We're thrilled at the greater inclusion provided by these new guidelines, and will strive to achieve as much of it as we can before release. Because these guidelines are still new (formally approved in June 2018), we won't hold up releasing the stable version of Layout Builder on them, but are committed to implementing them as quickly as we're able to, even if some of the items are after initial release.
  3. While WCAG AAA conformance is not something currently being pursued, there are aspects of AAA that we are discussing adopting in the future. For example, the new 2.1 AAA "Animations from Interactions", which can be framed as an achievable design constraint: anywhere an animation is used, we must ensure designs are understandable/operable for those who cannot or choose not to use animations.

Drupal's commitment to accessibility is one of the things that makes Drupal's upcoming Layout Builder special: it will not only bring tremendous and new capabilities to Drupal, it will also do so without excluding a large portion of current and potential users. We all benefit from that!

Categories: Drupal

Remove html from node form menu items

New Drupal Modules - 5 December 2018 - 1:28am

Using menu_html menu allows to add html to menu items. But then on creation of new content in menu section menu parent items appear with that html tags.
This module hides a html tags used in menu items on node form.

Categories: Drupal

User Points Drupal 8

New Drupal Modules - 5 December 2018 - 12:32am

User Points module provides an entity to store the points accumulated by a user. It provides API functions for storing/removing points for various scenarios such as Login, Register, Posting Comment or Creating an Article. Points can be easily retrieved using API functions and use for various promotional stuff in the website.

The administrator can also set custom scenarios and award points on basis of those.

It is currently in active development and will be fit for production website very soon.

Categories: Drupal

Custom Entity Pager

New Drupal Modules - 5 December 2018 - 12:09am

The Custom Entity Pager module provides a twig extension that create a pager of content types.

Similar modules
  • Entity Pager: This module is similar but Custom Entity Pager is better performant because it avoids the usage of views. So far, our module is compatible with nodes.
Sponsorship

Categories: Drupal

Troy’s Crock Pot: Don’t forget the unicorns

Gnome Stew - 5 December 2018 - 12:01am

So, both as a designer and as a player I prefer fantasy roleplaying games that have a slightly darker backdrop than, say, the Forgotten Realms, which retains its hopeful outlook at all times.

(Not that FR isn’t awesome — I spend a lot of time there — though I usually turn the dial on the darkness setting higher than what appears on the page).

The pseudo-European backdrop of my homebrew setting Steffenhold is a dark fantasy reflection of the pre-Renaissance period.

And Kobold Press’ Midgard, which is steeped in Slavic legends and folklore, filled with imposing ghoul-stocked forests and tricksy gods who never reveal their motivations nor true selves, fits in my wheelhouse.

I’m also up for most Gothic-inspired horror. Baron von Strahd and Count Dracula are fearsome adversaries — plenty of room for heroics in an otherwise ink- and blood-stained milieu.

With that out of the way, however, I’d suggest that gamemasters not forgot that they should always make room for unicorns — or some other symbol of hope — in their fantasy adventures. Let a little sparkling light pierce the darkness.

I use unicorns as an example simply because in film and literature, unicorns were used to good effect in both The Last Unicorn and Legend. In war-torn lands troll- and goblin-filled, the mythical equine beast represents chastity and fidelity, an enduring quality that gives hope to good-hearted folk that they may yet triumph over oppression and tyranny.

But, of course, the maiden’s lure need not be the only bright light in your setting. Consider salting your universe with any of these options if you feel unicorns are a tad to cliche.

Dog. The “master’s hound” has represented fidelity and obedience for centuries, but was a powerful symbol during the middle ages. Dogs of great heroes have been recorded in many legends, King Arthur’s favorite hound was Cavall, and Ulysses’s dog was Argos — who recognized his master from his return from Troy and then died of joy. In fantasy gaming, a hound archon is one of the great celestials.

Elephant. A Danish order of knighthood that once consisted of 30 knights. Although a “white elephant” carries the connotation of a burden, the King of the White Elephant was a title born by the great king of Ava (Myanmar).

Griffin. The offspring of two creatures said to be of noble heritage, the lion and the eagle, the griffin represents valor and magnanimity. The griffin also guards sacred treasures.

Phoenix. This magical beast represents resurrection, a powerful symbol in both ancient times and in the middle ages. The creature also has an association with alchemy.

Serpent. Turning the Semitic/Christian connotation of the tempter on its head, adopt the other characteristics of the serpent — eternal, healing, wise and spiritual guardian — instead. Probably best represented as a coatl, symbol of the Aztec winged serpent Quetzalcoatl.

 

 

 

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Content Snippets

New Drupal Modules - 4 December 2018 - 2:48pm

Content Snippets is a simple module that provides an administrative and content editor interface for editing small bits of text that can then be used by developers when they would be otherwise tempted to hard-code content into custom code, themes, etc. Then these bits of text can be controlled by Content Editors without developer intervention. The snippets are also available as global tokens.

Categories: Drupal

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