Newsfeeds

Record $9.6B games investment in last 18 months, but games M&A/IPO drop - by Tim Merel

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 July 2019 - 7:36am
Digi-Capital’s new Games Investment Report Q3 2019 shows a record $9.6 billion games investment in the last 18 months. Yet at the same time games company M&As and IPOs dropped to 2010 levels at only $1.1 billion for the first half of 2019.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Homebrew setting tips with Dustin

Gnome Stew - 12 July 2019 - 4:49am

Homebrew setting creation is an important facet of the RPG experience. For many of us, world creation is what got us interested in RPGs in the first place. But whether you’re designing a setting for the first time or the hundredth time, there are some simple tips that can make the experience more productive and enjoyable.

Getting Started

The first step is don’t be intimidated. Playing published RPGs can give you the impression that hundreds of genius ideas must be put to paper before the game even starts. This is not the case. Many RPG settings are developed organically through play and experimentation, and yours should be too. So focus on having fun, don’t be over-worried about originality, and let the creative process take its course. While there is preliminary work to do before playing, it’s probably not as much as you think.

Think of the Aesthetics

A great place to start is thinking in big, broad terms. Be inspired by your favorite media, and look for themes and ideas that get your creative energy flowing. Love Ghost In The Shell? Definitely lift some cyberpunk aesthetic. Get pumped about Avatar: The Last Airbender? Some elemental magic and spiritual themes could be good. Genre mash your heart out, and don’t shy away from cliches. Instead, embrace a cliche and put a spin on it. So if your cyberpunk world is full of neon tubes, corrupt corporations, and elemental masters, maybe the strongest elemental masters are the most powerful CEOs! And the more powerful your magic, the more neon tube cybernetics you have to contain all your power flowing through your veins. Maybe elemental magic isn’t just for fighting; it powers all sorts of technology and daily life, and has become so important, it’s used as currency.

Think of the Core Conflict

Every great piece of media, while having a rich world, has a core conflict to explore. This makes the world feel alive, like it’s in motion and taking the players along for a ride. So what’s the big problem in your setting? Connect it to the aesthetics to make things feel cohesive. Maybe in this corrupt magical CEO world, a huge economic crisis has happened and companies are calling in all their debts. They’re forcibly reclaiming magic from the lower castes, and sometimes over pumping so much power out of people, it kills them. A classic haves and havenots story tailored to your world design. But don’t forget to connect this conflict to the players! In order to make it seem real, this problem needs to affect the players’ lives, their allies’ lives, and day to day struggles. Perhaps the players are all debtors trying to escape possibly lethal debt collection, and trying to train, focus, and gather enough elemental magic to pay off the creditors. Or maybe the players are actually a paid team of debt collectors, and have to journey to dangerous places and reclaim what “belongs” to the corporation, dealing with the moral struggles that entails.

Think of Factions

This is my favorite part of setting creation. The world really starts to feel fleshed out when you think about the social factors at play. The important thing to remember when creating factions is that dynamics matter much more than detail. It’s not so important to think about what a faction wears or eats or what language they speak, unless that somehow directly relates to the conflict and how that faction interacts with others. We already have the idea of two groups: haves and havenots. And we know one is oppressing the other. So what are some more interesting dynamic ideas to come out of this? Perhaps the havenots use extensive smuggler networks to move magic around and keep it hidden from the collectors. Maybe the havenots aren’t as educated or well trained, making it hard for them to produce useable elemental magic on their own. Or better yet, maybe the magically gifted among the havenots are forcibly recruited into wealthy society and removed from the people, keeping the economic disparity strong. This means gifted people hide their talents to try and support their communities from the sidelines.

Embrace the Unknown

You’re not going to answer every question about your setting while you brainstorm it. A lot of it is going to work itself out naturally as you play. What does it look like when the wealthy extract a magically gifted person from their neighborhood? Maybe you can brainstorm a whole session around it, and play it out to fill in the details. Or better yet, maybe a player has that sort of event in their backstory, and they can contribute their own ideas on how and when that happens. Don’t be afraid to let the players contribute! In fact, you can invite the players to contribute to this whole process, because great ideas can come from many minds when everyone respects and builds on each other’s contributions. My game Heroic Dark makes use of this fact, and makes setting creation into a structured, collaborative process for everyone at the table. The players become invested in the game world, because their ideas are a piece of it, and it makes the dangerous adventures in that world so much more compelling. Everyone is more willing to take risks, face challenges, and do heroic things because they want to see how their and others’ ideas play out in the high intensity story everyone is crafting together.

So after setting creation, it’s important to remember that worlds evolve. As you play the game, the players experience a mix of wins, losses, narrow survival, and tragic deaths. But as the consequences play out, you might find a setting detail is starting to feel vestigial or incongruent based on what has happened. Let the gameworld change! In our sample setting idea, if magic extractions always went unchallenged before, but now the havenots have been pushed to the edge, maybe they don’t take things lying down and extractions become dangerous and violent. This change could lead to another; as the wealthy see their authority challenged, they invent new, more brutal methods of extraction that are harder to resist.

Conclusion

Setting creation can be a much more fluid, relaxed, and flexible exercise than you may be used to. Following a stripped down process like this produces surprising results, because when you don’t weigh yourself down with figuring out every little detail and trying to be a genius, your creative juices can really flow. Between aesthetics, conflict, and faction dynamics, you should have a rich and living world ready for a fantastic adventure. By diving in before everything is nailed down, you let the details fill out organically and naturally, instead of arbitrarily making decisions just to put words on a page. But the most important thing to remember is to have fun. This is ultimately a game, not a writing competition, so the best measure of the success of your setting is having a good time.

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Webform Translation Permissions

New Drupal Modules - 12 July 2019 - 2:26am

Defines the following permissions to enable a user to translate a webform's configuration without granting them the 'translate configuration' permission needlessly.

  • translate any webform
  • translate own webform
Categories: Drupal

DrupalEasy: Demystifying drupal-core-require-dev and drupal-core-strict in the "Drupal Composer/Drupal Project" Composer template

Planet Drupal - 12 July 2019 - 12:51am

If you build Drupal 8 sites using the Drupal Composer/Drupal Project Composer template (DCDP), then you've likely noticed the development dependency webflo/drupal-core-require-dev. If you're like me, you probably didn't give it much thought the first 20 or 30 times you used the template. 

After a while though, I started to dig deeper into the details of DCDP, wanting to be able to understand exactly how it worked and what customizations I may want to make. DCDP was really my first real exposure to Composer, and the more I learned, the more I wanted to learn (as is often the case). My curiosity led me to this drupal-core-require-dev rabbit hole.

Some background

First, let's level-set ourselves - when you run either "composer install" or "composer create-project" (which is actually calling "composer install" as well) without the "--no-dev" switch, Composer will install all dependencies listed in your composer.json file in both the "require" and "require-dev" sections (as well as dependencies of dependencies). If you take a look at DCDP, you'll notice that in the "require-dev" section, there is one entry: webflo/drupal-core-require-dev. 

So, as most folks who start Drupal 8 projects using the recommended DCDP command listed in the README (composer create-project drupal-composer/drupal-project:8.x-dev some-dir --no-interaction), Composer is installing everything in the "require" and "require-dev" sections - including webflo/drupal-core-require-dev.

What exactly is webflo/drupal-core-require-dev? Well, it is a "virtual" dependency - meaning it doesn't include any code, rather it just includes a composer.json file that specifies the specific versions of Drupal core development ("require-dev") dependencies that are used to run Drupal core tests. The interesting (and sometimes problematic bit) is that webflo/drupal-core-require-dev doesn't specify any versions for non-development ("require") dependencies. If you take a look at Drupal core's composer.json file, you'll see that for the most part, specific versions of dependencies aren't specified - rather a range is. 

This leads to the situation where a project built with webflo/drupal-core-require-dev could have different dependency versions (as long as they adhere to the version constraints is Drupal core's composer.json) than what comes with Drupal core if you had just downloaded it from drupal.org.

For example, if on the date version 8.7.0 of Drupal core was released one of the development dependencies was at version 1.3.1, then that is the version that is provided with Drupal core 8.7.0 downloaded from drupal.org regardless of when you download it. But, when using the DCDP as-is, if since the release of Drupal core 8.7.0 the development dependency was updated to 1.3.2, then when the project is installed using "composer create-project", your project will be using version 1.3.2 of the dependency. While this seems minor, it has led to some issues

Also - be aware that there are different versions of webflo/drupal-core-require-dev for every minor version of Drupal core. So, if you're updating your site from Drupal core 8.6.x to 8.7.x, then you must also update to webflo/drupal-core-require-dev to 8.7 as well. This is the reason the update command for DCDP includes webflo/drupal-core-require-strict: composer update drupal/core webflo/drupal-core-require-dev "symfony/*" --with-dependencies

After learning this, I had an obvious question: what's the advantage of having Composer install updated versions of Drupal core dependencies? The only thing I found was that if you're a core or contrib developer, then it would be useful to know if your code breaks using updated dependencies. I'm hard-pressed to think of another reason when this makes sense. For most Drupal 8 projects, I think it would be beneficial to use the exact dependencies that the particular version of Drupal core ships with. This way, we can be 100% certain that our project has the same dependency versions that the community's testing infrastructure has validated for the particular version. Luckily, that's what webflo/drupal-core-strict is for. 

It works almost the exact same way as webflo/drupal-core-require-dev except that it includes exact versions for all dependencies of Drupal core - for both development ("require-dev") and non-development ("require") packages. The exact versions are the ones that have been tested and are included in the "official" version of Drupal core (for each minor version) downloadable from drupal.org. Like webflo/drupal-core-require-dev, there is a minor version of webflo/drupal-core-strict for each minor version of Drupal core.

So, why does DCDP use webflo/drupal-core-require-dev? Well, there's some debate about if it should or not. 

As a side-note, if you host on Pantheon, and use their Pantheon-flavored version of DCDP, then you're probably already using webflo/drupal-core-strict.

Starting a project with DCDP using webflo/drupal-core-strict

First, the bad news - if you want to start a new project using webflo/drupal-core-strict, you can't use DCDP out-of-the-(virtual)-box. But, there's a couple of possibilities. At first glance, it seems that you could fork DCDP, make the relevant change to webflo/drupal-core-strict in the composer.json file, then use "composer create-project" on your fork. But, this would also require posting your fork on Packagist (which is discouraged), updating your fork's README (for the create-project and update commands) as well as keeping your fork up-to-date with any DCDP updates. I wouldn't recommend this method.

A better option is to use the "--no-install" option of Composer's "create-project" command:

1.  Use the recommended command on the DCDP page, but add a "--no-install" at the end of it:

composer create-project drupal-composer/drupal-project:8.x-dev some-dir --no-interaction --no-install

This will download DCDP to your local, but not install dependencies. 

2.  Edit the composer.json file with:

  • New project name
  • New project description
  • Remove "webflo/drupal-core-require-dev" from the "require-dev" section
  • Add "webflo/drupal-core-strict": "^8.7.0", to the "require" section (ensure the version matches drupal/core).
  • Change the version requirement for drupal/console to: "drupal/console": "^1.0", (to avoid version conflicts)
  • Change the version requirement for drush/drush to: "drush/drush": "^9.0", (to avoid version conflicts)
  • Remove "composer/installers" from the "require" section (it is already specified in webflo/drupal-core-strict). 

3.  Run "composer install". 

You'll need to remember that when you want to update Drupal core, you'll want to use the following command (instead of what is in the DCDP README):

composer update drupal/core webflo/drupal-core-strict "symfony/*" --with-dependencies

If you're not crazy about either of these two options, there is a third (future?) - leave a comment on this issue and ask for webflo/drupal-core-strict to be used in DCDP. 

Change an existing project from webflo/drupal-core-require-dev to webflo/drupal-core-strict

What if you already have a project based on DCDP and you want to change it from using webflo/drupal-core-require-dev to webflo/drupal-core-strict? Here's some possible ways of doing it:

As always, to be safe, please test things like this on a copy of your project.

Method one: manually downgrade dependencies

This is definitely a tedious process. It involves first removing webflo/drupal-core-require-dev using:

composer remove webflo/drupal-core-require-dev

Then, attempt to require drupal-core-strict:

composer require webflo/drupal-core-strict:^8.7.0

Depending on a number of factors you're likely to get a bunch of "Your requirements could not be resolved to an installable set of packages." messages. How many you get is mostly a result of the length of time since the previous minor release of Drupal core - the longer it has been, the more dependencies have probably been updated. For each dependency listed, you'll need to downgrade it using something like:

composer require symfony/yaml:3.4.26

What is happening is that webflo/drupal-core-require-dev allows dependencies to get upgraded outside of the Drupal core release timeline, while webflo/drupal-core-strict does not. So, you'll need to downgrade dependencies that have been updated. You'll have to do it one-at-a-time - try requiring webflo/drupal-core-strict, see the error message, downgrade the offending dependency, then repeat. In some cases, it isn't immediately obvious which dependency needs to be downgraded, or which version it needs to be downgraded to, so be prepared to use the "composer depends" command a few times. 

Eventually, requiring webflo/drupal-core-strict will succeed and you'll know that you're done.

There is one major downside to this method though - by requiring specific versions of each dependency, the versions are effectively pinned in the composer.json file. So, the next time you update Drupal core (and webflo/drupal-core-strict), these specific version constraints will conflict with the updated webflo/drupal-core-strict. One solution would be to remove all of these dependencies from the "require" section of your composer.json file. 

Method two: rebuilding your codebase

If Method one is tedious and precise, then this method is more of a (less tedious) big hammer. Depending on the complexity of your codebase, this might be a better option for simpler projects. In short, make a copy of your composer.json (for reference), then use "composer remove" to remove dependencies on drupal/core, webflo/drupal-core-require-dev, and anything that depends on them. Then, use "composer require" to add back drupal/core and webflo/drupal-core-strict: 

composer require webflo/drupal-core-strict:^8.7.0 drupal/core:^8.7.0

Then, add back (composer require) all the dependencies you had to remove. Be sure to add back the same versions of each dependency (this includes Drupal profiles, modules, and themes!) to end up where you were when you started. Once everything is back, then you'll probably want to "relax" the version constraints of your dependencies in your composer.json by adding a "^". For example, if you re-add a contrib module using:

composer require drupal/pathauto:8.1.3

Then in the "require section" of your composer.json you'll have:

"drupal/pathauto": "8.1.3",

This will prevent drupal/pathauto from being updated. So, you'll want to change this to:

"drupal/pathauto": "^8.1.3", Method three: delete and update

While researching this topic, I posted an issue in the webflow/drupal-core-require-dev queue and Greg Anderson was kind enough to offer another method:

[One] solution is to modify your composer.json file, attach the same version limit to drupal/core and drupal-core-strict (e.g. ^8.7.3) to limit what [composer update] needs to look at, and then [delete] both your composer.lock and your vendor directory and run "composer update".

One caveat about this method is that it will update everything. Any outstanding dependency updates (including Drupal profiles, modules, and themes) will be applied (unless you constrain them in your composer.json). Here's what Greg suggests:

  • Pin your contrib modules that are not updated to an exact version in composer.json.
  • Remove vendor and composer.lock, add webflo/drupal-core-strict [to your composer.json], and generate a new lock file [with "composer update"].
  • Remove the pins of your contrib modules in your composer.json by adding ^ [similar to the example in the previous method.]
  • Run composer update --lock
Method four: ???

Is there an easier way to do this? If so, I'd love to hear about it. Let me know in a comment below.

Which to use?

So which one should you use? If all your contrib projects are up-to-date, then I'd go with Method 3. If not, then I'd recommend Method 2 or 3 depending on which you're more comfortable with.

The future

Of course, in the future, much of this may be moot (for new projects, at least), as there is an active effort to bring an official version of DCDP to Drupal, including a new scaffolding dependency (committed to drupal/core on July 10, 2019!) and something akin to drupal-core-require-dev and drupal-core-strict. To find out more, check out the Composer Support in Core Initiative

Thanks to Greg Anderson, one of the Composer in Core Initiative coordinators, for his input and review of this article.

Categories: Drupal

Steam Labs is Valve's new home for experimental Steam features

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 11 July 2019 - 3:05pm

Valve is shining the spotlight on some new ideas it has been toying with for Steam through a page of experimental features called Steam Labs. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Block Form Alter

New Drupal Modules - 11 July 2019 - 2:28pm

This module addresses #3028391: It's very difficult to alter forms of inline (content blocks) placed via Layout Builder

It provides a hook_block_type_form_alter() function that modifies block forms rendered by both Block Content and Layout Builder.

Categories: Drupal

Group Entityqueue

New Drupal Modules - 11 July 2019 - 2:03pm
Categories: Drupal

Steam embraces machine learning with new interactive recommendation tool

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 11 July 2019 - 1:49pm

Valve has launched a new (but experimental) feature for Steam that builds a layer of interactivity onto the storefront†™s existing recommendation system. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Hook 42: Drupal Core Initiative Meetings Recap - July 8th-12th, 2019

Planet Drupal - 11 July 2019 - 11:49am
Drupal Core Initiative Meetings Recap - July 8th-12th, 2019 Will Thurston-… Thu, 07/11/2019 - 18:49
Categories: Drupal

Hook 42: Drupal + Javascript: Exploring the Possibilities

Planet Drupal - 11 July 2019 - 11:36am
Drupal + Javascript: Exploring the Possibilities Lindsey Gemmill Thu, 07/11/2019 - 18:36
Categories: Drupal

RuneScape dev Jagex says sale is possible, but not set in stone

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 11 July 2019 - 11:27am

RuneScape developer Jagex has countered reports that its parent company has sold its shares in the studio, noting that the situation is "evolving." ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Drupal Association blog: Global Training Days events from June 2019

Planet Drupal - 11 July 2019 - 10:43am

Drupal creates growth of local communities when training events inspire new Drupalers to grow their skills and get involved in the project. This June, events occurred in Sydney, Brisbane, Tokyo, New York City, Nuevo León, and online. Here's the summary from a few of the host trainers:

Kazu Hodota (kazu.hodota), in Tokyo:

"We had Drupal Global Training Day Tokyo on June 29, 2019 and this is a short report. 10 people registered, and 8 people with 1 Skype user joined GTD Tokyo. One person is a Drupal end user, seven are Web business SI, which included three first time Drupalers. Two were evaluating Drupal API functions, for example importing JSON data to Drupal content types, IoT system of digital signage applications with JavaScript Server side applications with Drupal.

I think API application user will be growing near future!"

Drupal global training day Tokyo 2019 June 29 start now @cmslabo #drupal #drupalGTD #learningdrupal pic.twitter.com/4fLqoB678L

— cmslabo (@cmslabo) June 29, 2019

Angel GHR (angel.garza), in Monterrey:

"The Drupal Global Training Days event in Monterrey, Mexico was hosted inside UANL FIME for two days. On June 28, we had conferences starting with Drupal Introduction and all the way to Reacting Drupal, receiving a little over 30 people in the conference and 15 presenters.


Learning Drupal in Monterrey. Photo by Angel Garza.

On June 29, we had two concurrent workshops, the basic one where we presented Drupal from the basic installation, configuration and walkthrough the platform, this workshop had 7 people in it and 6 presenters and the advanced one where we presented Progressively Decoupled Drupal 8 with React and Gatsby and had 6 people in the workshop and 6 presenters.We got a really positive feedback by both the participants and the school in which we hosted the event, getting people interested in future events and open to learn more about Drupal."

David Needham (davidneedham), online training for Pantheon:

"We had a great turnout at the Getting Started with Drupal 8 workshop Pantheon ran on June 28th of Global Training Day with around 200 students attending at once. We recorded the training last time we ran it and published it (feel free to run through it yourself or pass it along to others). This is material that we regularly run in-person at camps and online for GTD. Want to run it at your next event in your own community? Reach out to me directly for more information or fill out the form at https://pantheon.io/trainers."

Interested in helping in the Global Training Days initiative?

We are looking for more volunteers across the Drupal community to organize more GTD events and more local training events. Do reach out to the GTD group / Slack and join a community of passionate training organizers across the world. You would find resources and other people who can help you with organizing your training event. You can also reach out to Anoop John (anoopjohn) if you have questions.

To get involved in Global Training Days, visit the group's event list and add your event.

Categories: Drupal

Sponsored: Learn how to massively scale your multiplayer game with this free webinar

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 11 July 2019 - 10:24am

Join Redis Labs and Gamasutra for this free webinar on how developers can scale their multiplayer games using multiple cloud providers and without driving up costs. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Check Out and Vote In The 2019 ENnies!

Gnome Stew - 11 July 2019 - 10:19am

Head Gnome John Arcadian here with some GS news! The 2019 ENnies voting is live and ready for your eager vote. We’ve got some personal selections and GS affiliated projects we want to encourage you to vote for.

Wait, where’s Gnome Stew? Aren’t you usually in the running?

Yes, Gnome Stew has submitted to the ENnies and won silver or gold for MANY years. We decided not to submit for consideration this year. This year the ENnies changed a few things and merged a few categories. There is no longer a Blog specific category. We could have submitted for Best Online Content, but we’ve had more than a few years to build up an audience and a name. This, alongside the great content and great voices we try to give a platform to, has helped us do very well in the ENnies. Every year  we always consider whether we should step into the field or not since we’ve had a few wins under our belt. With the removal of a blog specific category, we decided this was the year we were going to leave it to others and not nominate ourselves. That being said, we’ve got a few Gnome Affiliated projects and some very good projects out there that we would encourage you to look at. Remember, the ENnies are one person one vote and has a tiered voting system so mark your favorite with 1, second favorite with 2, etc.

Gnome Affiliated Projects

Podcasts – There are two great podcasts with Gnomes on them.

  • She’s A Super Geek with Senda is a podcast featuring female GMs and something you should definitely vote for.
  • Asians Represent! has newer gnome Daniel Kwan and is also something you should vote for.
Other Things We’d Encourage You To Look at
  • Best Online Content – Molten Sulfur Blog by Tristan Zimmerman is a great RPG blog with a focus on bringing in historical emphasis to your games.
  • Best Monster/Adversary – While there is a part of us that loathes suggesting something attached to Kobolds, the Creature Codex is a great supplement for 5e games.
  • Best Layout and Design – Bluebeard’s Bride: Book of Rooms has a fantastic layout and is IGDN affiliated, and many gnomes are IGDN members.
  • Best Electronic Book – Uncaged Volume 1 is a phenomenal resource in every way and well deserving of a vote.
    Best Free Game – Die Laughing, Sliced up is another IGDN product and a very funny one that is fun to play.
  • Best Game – There are many incredible contenders in Best Game. Companions’ Tale and Dialect are two I’ve (John) had wonderful experiences with and are both worthy of your vote.

There are a ton of great entries in the ENnies this year and we applaud the ENnies for the changes they have made to make the event and competition better. Go vote in the ENnies and give your support to some incredible gaming.

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Stadia's dev partners program has received more than 4,000 applications

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 11 July 2019 - 10:13am

The goal of the program is to link Google up with developers interested in launching a game on Stadia, and Google has so far seen over 4,000 applicants. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Paragraph View Mode

New Drupal Modules - 11 July 2019 - 10:11am

Do you ever run into an issue of creating new paragraph type with the same fields only because it looks a bit different?
This tiny module is meant to easily reuse the same paragraph types with different view mode (display mode).
With this module, you can choose which view modes should be available during editing of the content by using the widget settings for a particular type of paragraph.
You can also dynamically choose in which display mode you want to render this specific paragraph when adding the content.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Atlanta Medium Publication: DrupalCamp Atlanta: Founder of Gatsby Kyle Mathews, Session Proposals Due, July 12

Planet Drupal - 11 July 2019 - 8:39am
On September 12–14, at Hilton Garden Inn Atlanta-BuckheadKyle Mathews, 2019 DrupalCamp Atlanta KeynoteWelcome, Kyle Mathews!

This year, DrupalCamp Atlanta is honored to welcome Kyle Mathews as our keynote speaker, creator of the open source project Gatsby. Gatsby was a hot topic at DrupalCon this year, and we’re ready to dive into the software at DrupalCamp this September.

Follow Kyle on Twitter and Github.

Hurry Call for Proposals Due July 12!

Session submissions are now open for DrupalCamp Atlanta 2019! With Kyle as our keynote, we’re interested to see how others are combining Drupal and Gatsby. In addition, we’re also accepting sessions in the following tracks:

  • Beginner
  • Design, Theming, and Usability
  • Development and Performance
  • Site Building
  • Business Leadership
  • Education and Training

Each session is 40 minutes with 10 minutes for Q&A. Each room will be set classroom style and will have a projection screen and with in house audio.

body[data-twttr-rendered="true"] {background-color: transparent;}.twitter-tweet {margin: auto !important;}

Be sure to grab your early bird tix for #DCATL before 8/12! September will be here before you know it! https://t.co/7vKzR83USk

 — @DrupalCamp_ATL

function notifyResize(height) {height = height ? height : document.documentElement.offsetHeight; var resized = false; if (window.donkey && donkey.resize) {donkey.resize(height); resized = true;}if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var obj = {iframe: window.frameElement, height: height}; parent._resizeIframe(obj); resized = true;}if (window.location && window.location.hash === "#amp=1" && window.parent && window.parent.postMessage) {window.parent.postMessage({sentinel: "amp", type: "embed-size", height: height}, "*");}if (window.webkit && window.webkit.messageHandlers && window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize) {window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize.postMessage(height); resized = true;}return resized;}twttr.events.bind('rendered', function (event) {notifyResize();}); twttr.events.bind('resize', function (event) {notifyResize();});if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var maxWidth = parseInt(window.frameElement.getAttribute("width")); if ( 500 < maxWidth) {window.frameElement.setAttribute("width", "500");}}Trainings

In addition to 50-minute sessions, we’re also looking for volunteer trainers for our full day of trainings on Thursday (9/12) and a half day on Friday (9/13). Training sessions can range across all experience levels. You can submit your call for training here.

Co-Present with Your Clients

One of our goals for this year’s camp was to increase the number of case studies. We encourage web development companies and units to connect with their clients to co-present a session at this year’s DCATL.

We see this as an opportunity to re-engage with a client by highlighting the great work you have done together all while introducing them to the awesome Drupal community we have. So, reach out to some of our clients and propose a presentation today!

SUBMIT YOUR PROPOSAL HERE

DrupalCamp Atlanta: Founder of Gatsby Kyle Mathews, Session Proposals Due, July 12 was originally published in Drupal Atlanta on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association blog: Call for participation: Drupal Business Survey 2019

Planet Drupal - 11 July 2019 - 7:56am

This is the fourth time that the Drupal business Survey has been launched and every year it provides a wealth of information about the use of Drupal. With the survey, the organisers hope to gain more insight into key issues that agency leaders all over the world encounter. The responses will be used to generate anonymized, aggregate report about the state of the Drupal business ecosystem. The results and insights of this survey will be officially published on Drupal.org and presented on Tuesday, October 29, 2019, at the annual Drupal CEO Dinner during DrupalCon Amsterdam.

Focus on Drupal landscape and Drupal 9

The 2019 edition of the survey focuses, among other things, on the development of the Drupal landscape. What are the expectations towards Drupal 9? But it also focuses on what developments you hope to see with regard to Drupal in the coming years.

Contribute to the Drupal project by participating in this Drupal Business Survey

By completing the survey, you contribute to Drupal. Your input is therefore of great value!

Take the Drupal Business Survey here: http://bit.ly/DrupalBusinessSurvey2019

Categories: Drupal

Texas Creative: New Drupal Module: Existing Values Autocomplete Widget

Planet Drupal - 11 July 2019 - 7:44am

Providing the content creator a field with a list of values to choose from is a common requirement when building a Drupal site. It’s also something that can be achieved in a variety of ways, each having pros and cons to the approach. Texas Creative’s web team has developed a module that we believe fills a missing gap in this type of field called Existing Values Autocomplete Widget.

In the following analysis, we will discuss each possible approach, the use case for it, along with an example. The final approach includes using our new module. 

Read More
Categories: Drupal

Seven Standards: 2. Create Value - by Ben Follington

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 11 July 2019 - 7:42am
Demand of your projects that they benefit their audience. Seek more than novelty in your ideas; seek to value your audience and give them something of value.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Pages

Subscribe to As If Productions aggregator