DrupalEasy: DrupalEasy Podcast 204 - Tim Lehnen and Neil Drumm - tooling

Planet Drupal - 29 January 2018 - 4:41am

Direct .mp3 file download.

Tim Lehnen, (hestenet), Director of Engineering for the Drupal Association and Neil Drumm (Drumm, Senior Technologist at the Drupal Association join Mike Anello to take a bit of a deep dive into the continuing evolution of tooling - specifically the modernization of the issue queue, patch process, code reviews, and more. Along the way, we try to figure out where (when?) the phrase "feather in your cap" comes from, exactly what Neil does in his free time, and why Mike isn't nearly as cool as he thinks.

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Categories: Drupal

Isotope Bootstrap Grid

New Drupal Modules - 29 January 2018 - 4:23am

This module is an extension for Isotope Views module (part of Isotope module) and provides new Isotope Bootstrap Grid' format that allows to have bootstrap-native grid instead of 'item list' grid (ul li) that is provided by default 'Isotope Grid' format.


Isotope (Isotope and Isotope Views)

Categories: Drupal

Online Play and Table Control

Gnome Stew - 29 January 2018 - 3:00am

She must be playing Call of Catthulhu.

One of the most exciting things the internet has given us (in my opinion) is the ability to play role playing games with geographically distant folks. Playing online solves a number of problems—having trouble meeting like minded gamers in your area? Don’t have child care? Really want to play with your friends in New York, Illinois, and Canada? Ice storm? No problem! The internet is here—with streaming video, handy mapping systems, and dice rolling plugins—to save us! But GMing online comes with some extra challenges that are amplified from playing at an in person table. How can you mitigate these to make playing online the best experience you can?

Some quick definitions

Firstly, so that we’re clear, by playing online I mean you are playing via Google hangouts, Skype, Roll20, etc., and not at a physical table. Specifically, you’re all remote from each other—playing with one or two people remote and other people local presents its own set of challenges, which I have not personally found an effective solution for. (If you have one let me know in the comments!)

Secondly, table control is the ability of the GM to socially keep the table on track or bring it back to order after breaks etc. Table control in person looks like this:

  • Reading verbal and nonverbal cues to push the game faster or slow it down
  • Managing the amount of out-of-game talk to keep it appropriate for your game and play style
  • Managing social dynamics at the table
  • Making sure the spotlight is spread around
  • Making sure no one is bored
  • Making sure everyone is safe
So What’s Different?

 And of course, there are always audio and video glitches, blurs, freezing, and the most fun part where you all turn into Autobots or Decepticons. 

Online, you are responsible for the same things, but you are going to face some different challenges. Online, especially depending on the video quality, it can be much harder to read nonverbal cues. It’s a lot easier to talk over each other, both due to the slight delay in audio, and because it’s easy to say things that would fall to the background at a table but that get picked up by a mic at full volume. It’s also tricky with a max volume of whatever output your players are using because you don’t have a way to raise your voice over everyone else’s to be heard if you need to get things back on track. And of course, there are always audio and video glitches, blurs, freezing, and the most fun part where you all turn into Autobots or Decepticons.

There’s no way to completely eliminate these issues, but there are some practices you can use to mitigate them as much as possible.

  • Use video as much as possible—it helps. Even if it’s blurry or when the quality is less than you might wish, you’ll still pick up more from posture and movement than you’ll get from audio only.
  • Ask for full attention. You’re not at a table. People are more likely to do things like have the Google Hangouts window open and also Twitter and Facebook. There are many more distractions readily available when your players are already looking at their computer screens.
  • Don’t mute other folks when it’s not their turn to talk—joining in on the laughter and small talk is how you create the energy feedback loop like you would have at a real table. If you’re having trouble with interrupting or talking over each other, address it as an online specific table issue, gently. Usually it’s because your players are so excited they just can’t help it! Don’t tell them their enthusiasm is bad, but do let them know we have to be more careful because of the technical limitations than we would at an actual table.
  • Do mute folks talking to their cats, husbands, children, roommates, etc. until they are back at full attention. Just because we’re all sitting at home doesn’t mean we should let those things put the game on hold for everyone. Let the player who needs to deal with another issue mute and carry on until they can rejoin you.
  • Be even more aware of your spotlight time—it’s easier to forget someone and harder to notice them losing interest. If someone hasn’t said anything in a while, it means their image hasn’t jumped up to take over the screen in front of you for just as long, and that makes it easier to miss folks who are starting to lose interest because they haven’t gotten to act.
  • Have cool digital versions of props people can get excited about and engage with—maps, pages of a book, etc. Things that are still exciting to interact with in digital (codes, puzzles, etc.) are best, over just images. Be aware that while there are many more tools that give you access to things like background sounds, many players can find this really hard to concentrate through, so it’s worth asking what is distracting vs. immersive.
  • It takes more energy output because the wire translation eats some of your effort. Know that if you are tired or stressed etc., or your players are tired/stressed etc., it will have an exponentially higher effect on your game. Be willing to refer to the final point below:
  • When all else fails, relax and do your best. Be willing to say when it’s not working and try again next time.

Having the internet gives us so many new options for playing RPGs in situations where we’ve previously been limited, but it definitely has its own challenges. Do you play games online? What are your best recommendations for keeping things going smoothly despite the lack of physical proximity?

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Entertaining players while waiting for matchmaking - by Joost van Dongen Blogs - 29 January 2018 - 2:07am
If high quality matchmaking is important, waiting times to find suitable opponents are often unavoidable. This post discusses the problems we had in Awesomenauts with our initial approach to this and how we made waiting a bit less boring later on.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Amazee Labs: GraphQL for Drupalers - part 4 - fetching the entities

Planet Drupal - 29 January 2018 - 1:47am
GraphQL for Drupalers - part 4 - fetching the entities

GraphQL is becoming more and more popular every day. Now that we have a beta release of the GraphQL module (mainly sponsored and developed by Amazee Labs) it's easy to turn Drupal into a first-class GraphQL server. In this series, we'll try to provide an overview of its features and see how they translate to Drupal.

Blazej Owczarczyk Mon, 01/29/2018 - 10:47

In the last post we talked about the basic building blocks of every GraphQL query - the fields. We've discussed their types and traits as well as described the rules according to which Drupal fields turn into GraphQL fields. This week we were going to expand the topic further and cover field creation, but Daniel Noyola asked an interesting question in the comment below one of the recent articles:

How can I filter the results in a nodeQuery? Like I would in a normal View or with the "where" clause in a SQL Statement. I noticed that it receives a NodeQueryFilterInput but I don't see how to use it.

Fetching entities based on a filter or a set of filters is a common use case, so let's focus on that first.


There are two ways to query the entity repository. First one would be through the entityQuery fields which are shipped with the core module but are limited in functionality. They only allow us to filter by base fields and there's no way to use an operator other than equals to. The other approach is much more powerful, as it's based on Views. It requires an additional module - graphql_views - to be installed though. Let's start with the built-in way.

The nodeQuery

Each entity type in the system gets its own query field. Let's see in the explorer how it looks like for nodes:

So it's a field (blue) with 3 arguments: offset, limit and filter (purple) which returns a value of type EntityQueryResult (all types are in yellow).

The first two arguments, offset and limit, are for paging and they work the same way as in SQL. Both are integers and both have default values of 0 and 10 respectively (green). Arguments that have default values can be omitted. We'll use this feature in a while.

The last argument - filter - is of a complex type NodeQueryFilterInput. Let's click it:

So it comprises all the base fields of the entity type that is being queried. It's not enough to issue arbitrary queries but it will suffice for a simple use case. This is how we could fetch a list of articles created by a given user:

We haven't specified the offset nor the limit, so they'll get their default values. It means that the output will contain at most 10 results, starting from the result number 0.

That's cool, but what if we wanted to order the articles by node id (nid) to only show the latest articles? Or filter by tags? Or fetch the title text of an image that is attached to a media entity that is connected with the first event that starts after the article's release date?

Use The Views

The answer is: we can do it like we'd normally do it in Drupal - with a view. Views integration has been moved to a separate project, so it has to be downloaded with composer (composer require drupal/graphql_views), from or from github.

With graphql_views enabled we can add a GraphQL display to any view in the system.

Now we can sort the results, filter based on content fields and add relationships. We also have the option to return either the full entities, just a selection of fields, or even search results taken straight from a search server.

Contextual filters set in the view will automatically turn into the arguments of the GraphQL field. Let's see an example:

This field represents a simple view showing nodes. It has one contextual filter - Content: Authored by - so the corresponding input type consists of just one field:

and its row type is set to Entity (as pictured on the screenshot above), so the result will be of type NodeArticle:

We can use the filed like this:

Views integration is a pretty broad topic, so in the next post we might try to cover it in more detail. There are quite a few more interesting aspects like sorting, exposed filters, and attaching views to entities, so we'll focus on that in an attempt to fully answer Daniel's question. For those interested in the back-end side of things I'd recommend the great Extending GraphQL series by Philipp Melab. The first post that explains how to create fields is here: Extending GraphQL: Part 1 - Fields.

P.S. GraphQL Views is not stable yet. In fact, two issues were spotted and fixed in the process of writing this article. If you spot a bug please report it on github  or let us know in the #graphql channel at Drupal slack.

Other posts in the series
Categories: Drupal

Promet Source: How to Setup and Run Automated Accessibility Testing using Windows 10 OS

Planet Drupal - 29 January 2018 - 1:36am
Tools Needed: Step 1: Install Python then setup in Environment Variables
Categories: Drupal

UberCart Klaviyo Integration

New Drupal Modules - 29 January 2018 - 1:23am


Integrating UberCart with Klaviyo. Here's the data we sync from UberCart after checkout completion.


  • Customer information: First name, Last name, Email
  • Viewed products
  • Add to Cart
  • Started Checkout
  • Purchased Products


Categories: Drupal

Fuzzy Thinking: Adventurer Truism #17

RPGNet - 29 January 2018 - 12:00am
On the quality of fuzzy loot.
Categories: Game Theory & Design We Don't Need an Intro Tune

Planet Drupal - 28 January 2018 - 10:00pm

Amitai and Adam discuss a 1.6 million dollar stamp sale, skill set mastery and technological decision making, and the value of slowing down. Along the way Amitai explains his indifference to Drupal 8 and why Gizra’s Drupal-Elm Starter Kit uses Drupal 7 and Restful 1.x.

Continue reading…

Categories: Drupal

Video Game Deep Cuts: Gorogoa's Lair of Coziness

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 28 January 2018 - 9:45pm

This week's Video Game Deep Cuts includes a deep dive into Gorogoa, what went wrong in the making of Lair, and the concept of 'coziness' in games. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

JS Disclaimer

New Drupal Modules - 28 January 2018 - 9:21pm
Categories: Drupal

OSTraining: Give Your Drupal Articles More Visual Appeal with Boxout

Planet Drupal - 28 January 2018 - 9:10pm

A boxout is a design element used mainly in magazines to enclose related information to the main article while retaining some type of connection. You can use it to add extra links related to your content or a small bio.

The "Boxout" contrib module helps you add this design element to your content directly in CKEditor. In this tutorial, you will learn how to do just that. Let’s start!

Categories: Drupal

SAML 2.0 Authentication

New Drupal Modules - 28 January 2018 - 7:48pm

Coming soon.

Categories: Drupal

Cloudmersive Anti-virus Scanner

New Drupal Modules - 28 January 2018 - 3:30pm

This module integrates with the anti-virus scanner Cloudmersive Antivirus API.

Uploaded files are forwarded to the Cloudmersive Antivirus service and checked.

Infected files
are blocked in the validation routine, so they cannot be saved.

Categories: Drupal

Views Row Insert

New Drupal Modules - 28 January 2018 - 12:21pm

This module provides a view style plugin, which is capable to insert custom row into a views row results after every nth row or once per page.

The inserted row can contain a standard Drupal block or custom content. The row can use the custom class name along with the default row classes like views-row-1 and standard striping (odd/even), first/last row classes or it can go without them.

This module can be used for placing Google Ads or any other code snippets/content into your views blocks/pages.

Categories: Drupal

TGN Recent Changes

Tabletop Gaming News - 28 January 2018 - 9:06am
Hello TGN Readers! My name is Marcus and my company, BV Software acquired TGN from CMON back in December. I’ve been working closely with CMON and Polar_Bear over the past 30 days to ensure a smooth transition. Polar_Bear will be staying on as the editor so news won’t be interrupted. You may have seen the […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Commerce QuickPay gateway

New Drupal Modules - 28 January 2018 - 3:38am

This project integrates Drupal Commerce to the payment provider QuickPay, making it possible to use QuickPay as payment provider on your Drupal Commerce platform.

QuickPay supports three methods of payment; Link, Form and Embedded, but currently this module only supports the Form method, making a full redirect to QuickPay to handle the payments.

Categories: Drupal

Wechat OpenID Connect

New Drupal Modules - 27 January 2018 - 11:07pm


Supported Drupal 8, no plan for v7 support.

Categories: Drupal


New Drupal Modules - 27 January 2018 - 7:49pm

About Mozart

Mozart is a visual content composer for Drupal. Administratiors can create complex grid based pages on the fly through a reactive user interface.

Project Status

The Mozart module is still in the alpha stage. Monthly to bi-monthly releases are planned as we move towards a stable release.

Categories: Drupal

Review Roundup

Tabletop Gaming News - 27 January 2018 - 11:00am
Hello, Saturday. How are you? I’m alright. Still a little sick. Bit of a lingering cough, but I’m working through it. So no gaming will be had by me today (I’m actually just contemplating a nap). But I hope that your Saturday is a bit more exciting than what I’ve got going on. At the […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design


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