Newsfeeds

Don't Miss: GDC has launched a new podcast!

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 6 September 2019 - 11:48am

Game Developers Conference has a new monthly podcast! Don't miss the August episode, featuring Kris Graft and Alissa McAloon, along with game production expert Grant Shonkwiler as the first guest. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

POWr Form Builder

New Drupal Modules - 6 September 2019 - 11:19am
Download POWr Form Builder Drupal 8 Extension! Close sales 75% faster in less than 5 minutes with POWr Form Builder.

POWr Form Builder is the solution for non-technical emerging Shopify merchants looking to sell faster, sell more and save time without any coding or steep learning curve. Simple and intuitive to build, you’ll have it up on your site in 5 minutes!

Categories: Drupal

Hook 42: Web Accessibility at BADCamp

Planet Drupal - 6 September 2019 - 10:04am
Web Accessibility at BADCamp Lindsey Gemmill Fri, 09/06/2019 - 19:45
Categories: Drupal

How Steam users see your game - by Chris Zukowski

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 6 September 2019 - 9:43am
If you have wondered what you should put on your Steam store page, I have completed a research project to identify exactly what the average Steam user is looking for.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

GitHub Cards

New Drupal Modules - 6 September 2019 - 9:28am
Categories: Drupal

Code Karate: Using Drupal as your Gatsby Data Source

Planet Drupal - 6 September 2019 - 8:03am
Episode Number: 3

In this episode, we learn how to set up your Gatsby website to pull data from Drupal. We will cover:

  1. Setting up JSON:API on your Drupal site
  2. Installing the gatsby-source-drupal plugin
  3. Configuring the gatsby-source-drupal plugin
  4. Use GraphiQL to view your Drupal data
  5. Load Article nodes using gatsby-node.js
  6. Create Article Template to pull in Article data
Tags: GatsbyJSReactDrupalDrupal 8Drupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

Rotate, zoom and move your camera with your mouse in unity3d - by Hector Xiang

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 6 September 2019 - 7:22am
I've been working on a new project, which will use mouse to move and rotate your camera. Here is the code!
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Kliuless #48: Deconstructing Fun in Archero & Rush Wars - by Kenneth Liu

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 6 September 2019 - 7:21am
Each week I compile a gaming industry insights newsletter that I publish broadly. Opinions are mine.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

An indie game developer discovering the world of user acquisition and advertising (with numbers) - by Francois Guibert

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 6 September 2019 - 7:18am
My latest game Tents and Trees had many organic downloads, making it quite successful. I wanted to try user acquisition, as the big guys do. I’m sharing here my results, my process and some numbers obtained along the way.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Did you forget about COPPA? Here are 170 million reasons to remember it. - by Roy Smith

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 6 September 2019 - 7:17am
A deep dive into the circumstances and motivations behind Google's $170M COPPA settlement and why they signal a new era in privacy concerns for game publishers
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Fortnox API

New Drupal Modules - 6 September 2019 - 6:47am
Categories: Drupal

WYSIWYG media embedding in Drupal 8.8

Dries Buytaert - 6 September 2019 - 6:30am

I'm excited to share that when Drupal 8.8 drops in December, Drupal's WYSIWYG editor will allow media embedding.

You may wonder: Why is that worth announcing on your blog? It's just one new button in my WYSIWYG editor..

It's a big deal because Drupal's media management has been going through a decade-long transformation. The addition of WYSIWYG integration completes the final milestone. You can read more about it on Wim's blog post.

Drupal 8.8 should ship with complete media management, which is fantastic news for site builders and content authors who have long wanted a simpler way to embed media in Drupal.

Congratulations to the Media Initiative team for this significant achievement!

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: WYSIWYG media embedding in Drupal 8.8

Planet Drupal - 6 September 2019 - 6:30am

I'm excited to share that when Drupal 8.8 drops in December, Drupal's WYSIWYG editor will allow media embedding.

You may wonder: Why is that worth announcing on your blog? It's just one new button in my WYSIWYG editor..

It's a big deal because Drupal's media management has been going through a decade-long transformation. The addition of WYSIWYG integration completes the final milestone. You can read more about it on Wim's blog post.

Drupal 8.8 should ship with complete media management, which is fantastic news for site builders and content authors who have long wanted a simpler way to embed media in Drupal.

Congratulations to the Media Initiative team for this significant achievement!

Categories: Drupal

Jouve Project Version Manager

New Drupal Modules - 6 September 2019 - 6:24am

Manage your project version with a version file in your project composer route.

Install the module & visit admin/reports/status

Categories: Drupal

Hierarchy Manager

New Drupal Modules - 6 September 2019 - 4:40am

Drupal provides a draggable table to manage the hierarchy of menu links and taxonomy terms. The Drupal draggable table is not able to present a massive hierarchy in one page.

Categories: Drupal

PHP Spreadsheet

New Drupal Modules - 6 September 2019 - 3:57am
Categories: Drupal

Equiz

New Drupal Modules - 6 September 2019 - 3:14am
Categories: Drupal

Applying Dramatic Structure to Escape Room Game Narratives - by Alastair Aitchison

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 6 September 2019 - 2:50am
Escape Room (ER) games deliver greater immersion than a videogame, and more agency than a theatrical play, yet the narrative told in many ERs is little more than a cliched action movie plot. Can ERs use classical dramatic structure to tell better stories?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Find Your Joy

Gnome Stew - 6 September 2019 - 1:00am

What makes us happy can be different, and that’s okay.

If it wasn’t obvious from the fact that I’ve been writing for the Stew since 2014 or that I constantly talk about roleplaying games, let me state for the record that I love gaming. Gaming is such a source of joy in my life that when I was without it, I finally dredged up the courage to go seek it out on my own. The creativity and community of RPGs is firmly and adamantly something I claim as mine and I’m not planning on giving it up in this lifetime.

Thing is, that’s me and my joy. Not everyone finds joy in exactly the same ways and sometimes it’s important to recognize when the things that motivate us might be changing.

Recently, while doing #RPGaDay2019, in response to one of the prompts, a friend confessed that he hasn’t been enjoying gaming as much as he used to. It surprised and concerned him that he was losing interest and he wasn’t really sure what to do about it. We didn’t really talk about it deeply, but I felt a great deal of sympathy for him losing that spark. While I could try and give advice on how to get the magic back, I want to take a moment here and talk about how it’s important to understand how our interests and passions change.

Let’s state the most obvious thing here. You need to take care of yourself. When you find that you’re no longer enjoying a thing and it’s become a chore you complain about, it’s time to take a step back examine the situation. Maybe you can determine how to change that negative energy back into the positive energy it once was, but if you can’t do that, maybe it’s time to move on to something else.

  • Understand what about gaming makes you happy. The first step is going to be figuring out what about gaming once made you happy. It can be easy in the rush of gaming’s awesome moments to not really understand what about it makes you happy. Is it the types of games you play? Maybe the people you play with? Could it have been the place you played them at? If the things that made you enjoy it have changed, then maybe that’s the problem. Or, it could be external factors like work or family that are making it harder to find the joy you once had with gaming. Regardless of the reason is, you need to figure out what you enjoyed and what’s changed so you can determine whether or not it can be fixed.
  • Your gaming does not have to meet anyone else’s expectations. Because gaming is a communal affair, it is very easy to get caught up in a community and lose yourself in trying to make your gaming look like what other people are doing. Take for example the Critical Role issue, where we have GMs bemoaning their inability to run games like Matt Mercer. Thing is, no one is Matt Mercer but Mat Mercer himself. Maybe many of the gamers you admire like attending conventions, but you find them overwhelming and stressful. Don’t let yourself get caught up in FOMO (fear of missing out) when you know you wouldn’t have a good time. Recognize when you’ve been changing your gaming to meet someone else’s expectations of what gaming is supposed to be. The only definition that matters is yours and the people you’re sharing a table with, and I bet they’re more flexible than you think.
  • Most joyful thing on the face of the planet is a happy dog.

    Make the changes that work for you. If you know what the problem is, try and change it. This doesn’t mean the change will be easy, but things won’t get better if you don’t try. If you realize it’s the games you’re playing, change them, even if it means going back to an old favorite for a little while. If it’s the people you’re playing with, change it up. Yeah, I know this can be hard, but there are tons of online gaming communities at your fingertips. Recognize that you don’t have to keep engaging with the things that are making you miserable.

  • Sometimes taking a break is necessary. So, you’ve examined what you enjoy and come to an understanding of what the problem is, but it’s not something you can really change at this time. Taking a step away for a break might be the best choice available to you. I’ve known many people who’ve had to take a break when they started families because it became just too much to try and balance everything along with having to take care of a tiny new human. Or maybe it’s a new job you need to focus on for a while. It’s okay to step back and come back when you’re ready. It might even renew your appreciation of the hobby when you do come back.
  • It’s also okay to decide to move on. I know it may be odd hearing someone who writes for a dedicated RPG blog say this, especially when she’s someone who has stated on the podcast that this hobby is for life, but if you’re burnt out, you’re not getting joy from gaming any longer, and nothing seems to fix that, it’s okay to walk away. As I said above, you need to take care of yourself, and forcing yourself to continue a hobby you’re no longer enjoying is self-destructive.

My hope is that everyone facing a time when gaming (whether the games themselves or the community surround it) is making them miserable can find a way to step back, re-examine what they’re doing and what they need, and find a way to enjoy the hobby once more. That’s why we’re all here, isn’t it?

Categories: Game Theory & Design

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