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Nepal bans PUBG over addiction concerns in children

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 11 April 2019 - 12:14pm

The Nepal Telecommunications Authority has ordered a ban on PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds "because it is addictive to children and teenagers." ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Weedcraft Inc facing advertising hurdles due to subject matter

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 11 April 2019 - 11:38am

Weedcraft Inc's very nature has led to some advertising difficulties on platforms like Facebook and YouTube.  ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

OPTASY: How Does Using Component-Based Development in Drupal 8 Benefit Your Team More Precisely?

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2019 - 9:53am
How Does Using Component-Based Development in Drupal 8 Benefit Your Team More Precisely? silviu.serdaru Thu, 04/11/2019 - 16:53

With the Twig templates replacing the old PHP templates, Drupal has been brought to a whole new “era”. We can now leverage the advantages of a component-based development in Drupal 8. But what does that mean, more precisely?

How does this (not so) new approach in software development benefit you? Your own team of developers...

And everyone's talking about tones of flexibility being unlocked and about the Twig templates' extensibility. About how front-end developers, even those with little knowledge of Drupal, specialized in various languages, can now... “come right on board”. Since they're already familiar with the Twig engine...

Also, we can't ignore all the hype around the advantage of the streamlined development cycles in Drupal and of the consistent user experience across a whole portfolio of Drupal apps/websites.

Categories: Drupal

Open Badges Issuer

New Drupal Modules - 11 April 2019 - 9:34am

A Mozilla Open Badges implementation for Drupal.

Categories: Drupal

Amazee Labs: DrupalCon Seattle Day 3 Recap: Sessions & Splash Awards

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2019 - 9:02am
DrupalCon Seattle Day 3 Recap: Sessions & Splash Awards

When conversations began a few months back about DrupalCon Seattle, I was so thrilled about the prospect of heading west and being fully indoctrinated with all things Drupal for the first time! As a newcomer to the field, I have been eager to simply be surrounded by, and learn from, so many in this community. Additionally, DrupalCon is providing the perfect opportunity to hang out with some incredible colleagues.

Liz Lockwood Thu, 04/11/2019 - 18:02 The Day Begins: People

The feel of day three was noticeably more vibrant as the surge of conference attendees began to fill the halls of the Washington State Convention Center. It’s been great to see representation from all over the country and be surrounded by an association with such rich diversity.

I learned quickly that there is no lack of learning opportunities at DrupalCon. The number of sessions to choose from felt like a buffet for your mind -- where you could pick and choose, and tailor your experience to be as uniquely tailored to you as you want.

I chose sessions that I knew would provide helpful reminders to me on practices and processes I already have in place, as well as topics in which I simply want to increase my awareness or hear a different perspective.

Wednesday Learnings

Much of the late morning to the afternoon was spent in periodic spurts of catching up on work, popping into sessions and dropping by our booth. Here are a few of the sessions I went to, with three key learnings from each:

Getting an Angry Wet Cat to Purr: Turning an Unhealthy Client Relationship Into a Productive One (Donna Bungard, Project Strategist at Tandem)

  • Communication: Everything comes down to having an open, honest, direct conversation. This is the key manner in which you build trust with your team.

  • Hearing is good. Understanding is better.

  • There are always the next steps to be taken. You simply need to identify them.

Lead, Follow or Get out of the Way: Managing Global Teams Harmoniously (Yuriy Gerasimov, Organizer at Drupal Ukraine Community and Clyde Boyer)

  • Active Trust is foundational to team success.

  • A common mistake on distributed teams is not recognizing isolation in your team members. Take notice if the communication style of a team member changes (this may point to something not being well in their world).

  • You don’t talk your way to trust. You have to earn it, mostly with time.

Design Strategies: Our Process for Building User-centered Websites (Valerie Neumark Mickela, Board Member at Full Circle Funds and Andrew Goldsworthy, Co-Founder at Rootid)

(I actually sat down in this session by mistake, but by the time I realized, it was too late to leave without causing disruption . . . it wouldn’t be a full conference experience without a mishap along the way, right?!)

  • Design and development communications can be challenging: You absolutely cannot rely on assumptions.

  • In design, you are most often thinking through a psychological lens, versus a creative one.

  • When considering a feature, don’t ask “Is it possible?” (all things are possible with time and money!) Ask “Is it hard?” (this will provide a more realistic barometer for time and cost)

Finding Your Way: Practical Strategies for Navigating Your Career (Gus Childs, Senior Software Engineer at Mondo Robot)

  • Be selfish with your career - you should be doing work that’s fulfilling.

  • You should be excited about these three things when it comes to your career: People, Projects and Money.

  • Never burn bridges.

The Day Ends: Splash Awards and Ping Pong Party

The awards ceremony was held at a beautiful location, inside a music venue called The Triple Door, just a couple blocks from the Pike Place Market. After being at the conference for a few days, meeting new friends and getting to know my colleagues better, Splash Awards was a perfect opportunity to catch up and talk about work and life with everyone who attended. While Amazee did not walk away with any awards, it was really fun to celebrate with others, and celebrate the incredible Amazee work that was nominated:

From the Splash Awards, we walked over to Spin Seattle for one of the evening parties. Spin was packed from wall-to-wall with conference attendees and was a really fun way to end the day.

In closing, I will just say that I have been really encouraged by how warm the Drupal community is, and am so grateful for the opportunity to be at DrupalCon Seattle 2019.

Categories: Drupal

Participatory process

New Drupal Modules - 11 April 2019 - 8:04am

Work in progress.

Participatory process to vote ideas and expose participation results.

Categories: Drupal

Top animation tools for digital artists you should know - by Anastasiya Rashevskaya

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 11 April 2019 - 7:58am
Even when you are fed up with managing a project and spending hours grinding your teeth, you still enjoy the moments of making your characters alive. To assist you in this process, we prepared the list of 8 best animation tools you should know in 2019!
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Game Dev Roles that Define the Success of Any Title - by Veronika Chebotareva

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 11 April 2019 - 7:57am
Whenever game producers, publishers, or developers choose an external game dev team to join their project they are trying to find the suitable cooperation model between ‘trust and let go’ and ‘overcontrol at each stage’.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Web Omelette: Drupal 8 module development - 2nd edition. Yeey!

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2019 - 7:45am

I am proud to announce that the 2nd edition of my book, Drupal 8 module development, was recently published. I’ve been working on this in the past few months and it has kept me quite busy.

The purpose of this update is to bring all the code and practices covered in the first version up to date with the newest version of Drupal 8. That is 8.7. I know. It’s not even released yet but everything you find in the new book should work with 8.7 already. I’ve been following the change records quite closely during this cycle. If, however, you do discover any issues or that I'm peddling some deprecated code, I’d appreciate an errata report.

Since 8.2 (the focus of the first version), there were quite a few changes in Drupal. There were some new things pertinent to this book, but also quite a lot of changes in practices that resulted in deprecated classes and functions. It’s important to keep up to date with these things. Why? Because Drupal 9 will basically be the latest version of Drupal 8 without all the deprecated code. So if you keep up to date, you won’t have such a big problem upgrading to Drupal 9. Read this blog post from Dries Buytaert on the plans for Drupal 9 to get more details on what I mean. Ah, and did I mention that he was kind enough to write the foreword for my book? So make sure you check that out as well.

Enjoy the book and a million thanks for the support! As usual, you can buy it from lots of places.

Categories: Drupal

Why NarraScope? Motivations for Organizing a Game Narrative Conference - by Justin Bortnick

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 11 April 2019 - 7:44am
A reflection on the motivation for helping organize the upcoming Narrative Games Conference, NarraScope.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

How Punishment Systems Hurt Gameplay - by Josh Bycer

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 11 April 2019 - 7:40am
Games may be built on win and lost states, but we're going to talk about punishment systems and how they tend to take things too far in kicking the player when they're down
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Wim Leers: Backwards Compatibility vs Evolvability vs Maintainability

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2019 - 6:59am

Details to follow :)

Video: Conference: DrupalCon SeattleLocation: Seattle, WA, United StatesDuration: 30 minutesExtra information: 

See https://events.drupal.org/seattle2019/sessions/backwards-compatibility-burden-benefit.

Categories: Drupal

Webform Payment

New Drupal Modules - 11 April 2019 - 3:05am

Allows payments to be processed by webforms, early days.

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: Top Drupal blog posts from March 2019

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2019 - 1:22am

Same as every month, we wanted to share with you our favorite Drupal blog posts from the previous month. So, here's a list of 8 Drupal-related posts from March that we found the most interesting. Enjoy!

READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

Sandy's Soapbox: So, any PhDs Out There Looking for Work?

RPGNet - 11 April 2019 - 12:00am
Where has Sandy been?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Flocon de toile | Freelance Drupal: Generate an automatic summary with Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 10 April 2019 - 4:14pm
The generation of an automatic summary for relatively long articles is a recurring need for content publishing. A summary provides better visibility for the reader, and an effective way to navigate within an article as soon as it is a little dense. Let's discover the Toc.js module which allows us to easily generate a summary in a modular way whatever the page of a Drupal 8 site.
Categories: Drupal

Workbench Menu Access

New Drupal Modules - 10 April 2019 - 4:04pm

Workbench Menu Access is an extension module that applies Workbench Access logic to menus.

This module adds access controls to menu editing and the menu links within a specific menu, both in stand-alone and node-editing contexts.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: The privilege of free time in Open Source

Planet Drupal - 10 April 2019 - 2:44pm

In Open Source, there is a long-held belief in meritocracy, or the idea that the best work rises to the top, regardless of who contributes it. The problem is that a meritocracy assumes an equal distribution of time for everyone in a community.

Open Source is not a meritocracy

I incorrectly made this assumption myself, saying: The only real limitation [to Open Source contribution] is your willingness to learn.

Today, I've come to understand that inequality makes it difficult for underrepresented groups to have the "free time" it takes to contribute to Open Source.

For example, research shows that women still spend more than double the time as men doing unpaid domestic work, such as housework or childcare. I've heard from some of my colleagues that they need to optimize every minute of time they don't spend working, which makes it more difficult to contribute to Open Source on an unpaid, volunteer basis.

Or, in other cases, many people's economic conditions require them to work more hours or several jobs in order to support themselves or their families. Systemic issues like racial and gender wage gaps continue to plague underrepresented groups, and it's both unfair and impractical to assume that these groups of people have the same amount of free time to contribute to Open Source projects, if they have any at all.

These are just a few examples of free time not being equally distributed. What this means is that Open Source is not a meritocracy.

Free time is a mark of privilege, rather than an equal right. Instead of chasing an unrealistic concept of meritocracy, we should be striving for equity. Rather than thinking, "everyone can contribute to open source", we should be thinking, "everyone deserves the opportunity to contribute".

Time inequality contributes to a lack of diversity in Open Source

This fallacy of "free time" makes Open Source communities suffer from a lack of diversity. The demographics are even worse than the technology industry overall: while 22.6% of professional computer programmers in the workforce identify as women (Bureau of Labor Statistics), less than 5% of contributors do in Open Source (GitHub). And while 34% of programmers identify as ethnic or national minorities (Bureau of Labor Statistics), only 16% do in Open Source (GitHub).

It's important to note that time isn't the only factor; sometimes a hostile culture or unconscious bias play a part in limiting diversity. According to the same GitHub survey cited above, 21% of people who experienced negative behavior stopped contributing to Open Source projects altogether. Other recent research showed that women's pull requests were more likely to get accepted if they had a gender-neutral username. Unfortunately, examples like these are common.

Taking action: giving time to underrepresented groups

While it's impossible to fix decades of gender and racial inequality with any single action, we must do better. Those in a position to help have an obligation to improve the lives of others. We should not only invite underrepresented groups into our Open Source communities, but make sure that they are welcomed, supported and empowered. One way to help is with time:

  • As individuals, by making sure you are intentionally welcoming people from underrepresented groups, through both outreach and actions. If you're in a community organizing position, encourage and make space for people from underrepresented groups to give talks or lead sprints about the work they're interested in. Or if you're asked to, mentor an underrepresented contributor.
  • As organizations in the Open Source ecosystem, by giving people more paid time to contribute.

Taking the extra effort to help onboard new members or provide added detail when reviewing code changes can be invaluable to community members who don't have an abundance of free time. Overall, being kinder, more patient and more supportive to others could go a long way in welcoming more people to Open Source.

In addition, organizations within the Open Source ecosystem capable of giving back should consider financially sponsoring underrepresented groups to contribute to Open Source. Sponsorship can look like full or part-time employment, an internship or giving to organizations like Girls Who Code, Code2040, Resilient Coders or one of the many others that support diversity in technology. Even a few hours of paid time during the workweek for underrepresented employees could help them contribute more to Open Source.

Applying the lessons to Drupal

Over the years, I've learned a lot from different people's perspectives. Learning out in the open is not always easy, but it's been an important part of my personal journey.

Knowing that Drupal is one of the largest and most influential Open Source projects, I find it important that we lead by example.

I encourage individuals and organizations in the Drupal community to strongly consider giving time and opportunities to underrepresented groups. You can start in places like:

When we have more diverse people contributing to Drupal, it will not only inject a spark of energy, but it will also help us make better, more accessible, inclusive software for everyone in the world.

Each of us needs to decide if and how we can help to create equity for everyone in Drupal. Not only is it good for business, it's good for people, and it's the right thing to do.

Special thanks to the Drupal Diversity and Inclusion group for discussing this topic with me.

Categories: Drupal

Redfin Solutions: Embedding a React App in a Drupal 8 Site

Planet Drupal - 10 April 2019 - 1:07pm
Embedding a React App in a Drupal 8 Site

Lots of people in the Drupal community are eager to learn React these days, following Dries's announcement that React is coming to Drupal.

At NEDCamp in 2018 I presented on how to dip your toe into embedding a react application into a Drupal framework (video on drupal.tv).

This is the long-delayed blog post to follow up to the presentation.

Chris April 10, 2019
Categories: Drupal

Ubisoft CEO: Live games give devs a chance to refine rather than start from scratch

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 10 April 2019 - 12:30pm

Ubisoft's Yves Guillemot explores the company's trend toward live games and the company's habit of improving a game over rather than "redoing everything each year." ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

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