Newsfeeds

Static Site Generator

New Drupal Modules - 30 April 2018 - 11:12am

This module is similar to the Drupal 7 Static Generator module ("static"). Since static is a reserved word in PHP, the project has been renamed "static_generator".

The static module generates a complete copy of your website in html form including all js, css, images and other assets. This can then be transferred to run the website from a simple web server without PHP, MySQL or memcache.

Categories: Drupal

Monday Terrain Corner

Tabletop Gaming News - 30 April 2018 - 11:00am
Let’s try to not focus on the fact that it’s Monday and we’re back at the office (even if it what we do is pretty awesome and we enjoy it a lot). Instead, let’s think back to the weekend we had and all the awesome gaming (at least, I hope you had some awesome gaming. […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Modiphius Releases Ravage: Dungeons of Plunder Board Game

Tabletop Gaming News - 30 April 2018 - 10:00am
Most of the time, when I’m posting about Modiphius, it’s about a new RPG book coming out. However, this is a bit different. Did you know that they make board games, too? Well, if not before, you know now. They have released Ravage: Dungeons of Plunder, a new fantasy dungeon-crawl board game that has competitive, […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Drupal blog: How Drupal influences other Open Source projects

Planet Drupal - 30 April 2018 - 9:48am

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

If you are interested in Open Source and have some time this weekend, watch Steve Francia's DrupalCon keynote called "Drupal and the secret of my success". Steve has been involved in Open Source for over 20 years, and has had the unique opportunity to lead three of the most successful Open Source companies in history. He was Chief Developer Advocate of MongoDB, Chief Operator of Docker, and now he is the Product Lead for the Go programming language at Google. Watch the video to hear Steve's personal story about how Drupal influenced his career, in addition to influencing MongoDB, Docker and Go. I don't often get emotional, but I had to wipe a few tears away during his presentation. Thanks for telling your story and being an inspiration, Steve!

Categories: Drupal

New Releases For Warmachine Available From Privateer Press

Tabletop Gaming News - 30 April 2018 - 9:00am
Yarr arr yarr! I loddie the hotpants! A couple new pirate-themed releases are available from Privateer Press for Warmachine. Why pirate-themed? Because they’re for Cryx, and those undead pirates are everywhere. Though today’s releases include not-undead pirates. But still. Misery cages are a cruel twist on the gibbets used on the mainland to punish pirates. […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

govi_encabezado_institucional

New Drupal Modules - 30 April 2018 - 8:18am

This is a feature of Govimentum which is a Drupal Distribution of Mayor's Office of Bogotá that provides the structure of institucional page header as defined from graphical guidelines of this Mayoralty.

This feature includes:

  • Page title
  • Blocks of search and social network icons
  • Both, view of Entity logo and Colombia logo
  • Baseline main menu
Categories: Drupal

Fantasy Flight Games Previews Darnati Warriors For Runewars

Tabletop Gaming News - 30 April 2018 - 8:00am
The Flesh Rippers aren’t the only new units coming for Runewars from Fantasy Flight. The elves are getting a new unit, too. They’re the Darnati Warriors and they show that Elves don’t just hit from afar, but can run on up into combat and start swinging like everyone else. From the post: The realm of […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

New Winter Bolt Action Releases Available From Warlord Games

Tabletop Gaming News - 30 April 2018 - 7:00am
Here in the Northern Hemisphere, it’s getting warmer and warmer as the days go by. But, eventually, it’ll start heading the other direction and cold will once more set in. Any army out in the field must be prepared for that eventuality, lest their troops simply freeze out in the field. Warlord Games is now […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Third & Grove: Seven Must-Do Checks to Ensure Your Drupal Site Is Ready for GDPR

Planet Drupal - 30 April 2018 - 6:00am
Seven Must-Do Checks to Ensure Your Drupal Site Is Ready for GDPR justin Mon, 04/30/2018 - 09:00
Categories: Drupal

New Idoneth Deepkin, Necromunda, and Blood Bowl Figures Available From Games Workshop

Tabletop Gaming News - 30 April 2018 - 6:00am
Games Workshop’s hitting a bit of everything with this week’s pre-orders over in their shop. There’s some new Idoneth Deepkin heroes to fill out your army. There’s a new book for Necromunda, as well as a new gang. There’s also a new Chaos Blood Bowl team. And dice. There’s also lots of dice. – An […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Gnome Stew Welcomes Camdon Wright!

Gnome Stew - 30 April 2018 - 5:00am


We’re super excited to announce a new Staff Writer here at Gnome Stew – Camdon Wright! We’re going to let Camdon say hey in his own words, and you’ve probably read some in the guest posts he’s done himself or with other gnomes or from some of his most recent work like One Child’s Heart or Madness and Desire.  Join us in welcoming Camdon!
– John Arcadian, Head Gnome Who Can’t Think Of  Witty Tagline Right Now

Hi everyone! I’m Camdon Wright and I’m currently living in Westminster, Colorado. In this wonderland of thin air and plentiful sunshine I create games, tend to my children, and ride motorcycles as often as possible. I do my best to be honest with my words and vulnerable with my emotions. My mother is an immigrant from Ethiopia who moved to the United States when she was a teenager to go to high school. My father was born in Arizona and is of German heritage.

I’ve been reading TTRPG books since the late 70s but didn’t actually get to play anything until the mid-80s. I’ve made money writing ad copy, grants, website copy, and anything else people would pay me to do. Haikus, game adventures, and half-finished short stories dominated my personal writing projects. In the last year I’ve really committed myself to game design; pushing forward projects that I love.

I’ve found my best friends at a gaming table. I learned to speak from my heart and embrace the truth of others while telling imaginary stories. The family of my choosing that I discovered while gaming fought for me, told me I was worth loving, and reflected the best parts of me so that I could see them too. When I say that I love games I mean it from the deepest part of my heart. People make the hobby and people will be the reason it survives into the next generation.

I’m looking forward to bringing my voice to the chorus of amazing writers already at Gnome Stew. As a biracial man I feel like I can add a different perspective to the conversation about TTRPGs. It is my firm belief that inclusivity and representation must be at the foundation of the gaming world as we move forward. That won’t happen by accident so I work to challenge expectations in gaming culture. I support LGBTQ+, women, and people of color on their journey and include them in mine.

TLDR: There’s a new Gnome in town. I came here to write blog posts, feel emotions, and eat the stew. I’m all out of stew.

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Dries Buytaert: Mollom: The story of my first SaaS startup

Planet Drupal - 30 April 2018 - 4:57am

Last month, Acquia discontinued service and support for Mollom, the spam service I started more than ten years ago. As a goodbye, I want to share the untold story of how I founded Mollom.

In 2007, I read Tim Ferriss' book The 4-Hour Work Week, and was hooked. The book provides a blueprint for how entrepreneurs can structure and build a business to fund the lifestyle of their dreams. It's based on Ferriss' own experience; he streamlined his business, automated systems and outsourced tasks until it was not only more profitable, but also took less of his time to operate. The process of automation and outsourcing was so efficient, Ferriss only spent four hours a week to run his business; this gave him time and freedom to take "mini-retirements", travel the world, and write a book. When I first read Ferriss' book, I was inspired by the idea of simultaneously having that much free time and being financially stable.

While I was reading Ferriss' book, I was also working on a website spam filter for my blog, called Mollom. I had started to build Mollom as a personal project for exclusive use on my own blog. Inspired by the 4-Hour Work Week, I was convinced I could turn Mollom into a small SaaS service with global customers, complete self-service, and full automation. This would allow me to operate Mollom from anywhere in the world, and would require just a few hours of my time each week. Because I was starting to use machine learning, I enlisted the help of one of my best friends, Benjamin Schrauwen, a professor in machine learning at the University of Ghent.

In the same year, Jay Batson and I met at DrupalCon Sunnyvale, and we had already started to explore the idea of founding Acquia. My oldest son Axl was also born in the summer of 2007, and I was working hard to finish my PhD. Throughout all of this, we were also working to get Drupal 6 released. Needless to say, it was a busy summer.

With my PhD nearly complete, I needed to decide what to do next. I knew that starting Acquia was going to have a big impact, not just on Drupal but also on my life. However, I was also convinced that Mollom, while much smaller in scope and ambition, could provide a path to the freedom and independence Ferriss describes.

Mollom's foundational years

Exciting 2007, I determined that both Acquia and Mollom were important opportunities to pursue. Jay and I raised $7 million in venture capital, and we publicly launched Acquia in November 2007. Meanwhile, Ben and I pooled together €18,000 of our own money, bootstrapped Mollom, and publicly launched Mollom in March 2008.

I always made a point to run both businesses separately. Even after I moved from Belgium to the US in the summer of 2010, I continued to run Mollom and Acquia independently. The Mollom team was based in Europe, and once or twice a week, I would get up at 4 AM to have a two-hour conference call with the team. After my conference call, I'd help my family get ready for the day, and then I was off to work at Acquia.

By 2011, Mollom had achieved the goals our team set out to accomplish; our revenues had grown to about €250,000 annually, our gross margins were over 85 percent, and we could pretty much run the business on autopilot. Our platform was completely self-serviced for our users, the anti-spam algorithms self-learning, the service was built to be highly-available, and the backend operations were almost entirely automated. I often joked about how I could run Mollom from the beach in Greece, with less than an hour of work a day.

However, our team at Mollom wasn't satisfied yet, so instead of sitting on the beach, we decided to invest Mollom's profits in feature development. We had a team of three engineers working on adding new capabilities, in addition to re-architecting and scaling Mollom to keep up with its growth. On average, Mollom handled more than 100 web service requests per second, and we regularly saw peaks of up to 3,000 web service request per second. In a way, Mollom's architecture was ahead of its time — it used a micro-services architecture with a REST API, a decoupled administration backend and relied heavily on machine learning. From day one, our terms of service respected people's privacy, and we never had a data breach.

A photo of the Mollom team at an offsite in 2011: it includes Daniel Kudwien, Benjamin Schrauwen, Cedric De Vleeschauwer, Thomas Meire, Johan Vos and Vicky Van Roeyen. Missing in the picture is Dries.

In the meantime, Acquia had really taken off; Acquia's revenue had grown to over $22 million annually, and I was often working 60 hour work weeks to grow the company. Acquia's Board of Directors wanted my full attention, and had even offered to acquire Mollom a few times. I recognized that running Mollom, Acquia and Drupal simultaneously was not sustainable — you can only endure regular 4 AM meetings for so long. Plus, we had ambitious goals for Mollom; we wanted to add many-site content moderation, sentiment analysis and detection for certain code of conduct violations. Doing these things would require more capital, and unless you are Elon Musk, it's really hard to raise capital for multiple companies at the same time. Most importantly, I wanted to focus more on growing Drupal and driving Acquia's expansion.

Acquia acquires Mollom

By the end of 2012, Ben and I agreed to sell Mollom to Acquia. Acquia's business model was to provide SaaS services around Drupal, and Mollom was exactly that — a SaaS service used by tens of thousands of Drupal sites.

Selling Mollom was a life-changing moment for me. It proved that I was able to bootstrap and grow a company, steer it to profitability and exit successfully.

Selling Mollom to Acquia involved signing a lot of documents. A photo of me signing the acquisition paperwork with Mary Jefts, Acquia's CFO at the time. It took three hours to sign all the paperwork.
Acquia retires Mollom

By 2017, five years after the acquisition, it became clear that Mollom was no longer a strategic priority for Acquia. As a result, Acquia decided it was best to shut down Mollom by April 2018. As the leader of the product organization at Acquia, I'm supportive of this decision. It allows us to sharpen our focus and to better deliver on our mission.

While it was a rational decision, it's bittersweet. I still believe that Mollom could have continued to have a big impact on the Open Web. Not only did that make the web better, it saved people millions of hours moderating their content. I also considered keeping Mollom running as part of Acquia's "Give back more" principle. However, Acquia gives back a lot, and I believe that giving back to Drupal should be our priority.

Mollom's end-of-life announcement that replaced the old https://mollom.com.

Overall, Mollom was a success. While I never got my 4-hour work week, I enjoyed successfully creating a company from scratch, and seeing it evolve through every stage of its life. I learned how to build and run a SaaS service, I made some money in the process, and best of all, Mollom blocked over 15 billion spam comments across tens of thousands of websites. This translates to saving people around the world millions of hours, which would otherwise be devoted to content moderation. Mollom also helped to protect the websites of some of the world's most famous brands; from Harvard, to The Economist, Tesla, Twitter, Sony Music and more. Finally, we were able to offer Mollom for free to the vast majority of our users, which is something we took a lot of pride in.

If you were a user of Mollom the past 10+ years, I hope you enjoyed our service. I also want to extend a special thank you to everyone who contributed to Mollom over the past 11 years!

Rest in peace, Mollom! Thank you for blocking so much spam. I'll think about you next time I visit Greece.

Categories: Drupal

Mollom: The story of my first SaaS startup

Dries Buytaert - 30 April 2018 - 4:57am

Last month, Acquia discontinued service and support for Mollom, the spam service I started more than ten years ago. As a goodbye, I want to share the untold story of how I founded Mollom.

In 2007, I read Tim Ferriss' book The 4-Hour Work Week, and was hooked. The book provides a blueprint for how entrepreneurs can structure and build a business to fund the lifestyle of their dreams. It's based on Ferriss' own experience; he streamlined his business, automated systems and outsourced tasks until it was not only more profitable, but also took less of his time to operate. The process of automation and outsourcing was so efficient, Ferriss only spent four hours a week to run his business; this gave him time and freedom to take "mini-retirements", travel the world, and write a book. When I first read Ferriss' book, I was inspired by the idea of simultaneously having that much free time and being financially stable.

While I was reading Ferriss' book, I was also working on a website spam filter for my blog, called Mollom. I had started to build Mollom as a personal project for exclusive use on my own blog. Inspired by the 4-Hour Work Week, I was convinced I could turn Mollom into a small SaaS service with global customers, complete self-service, and full automation. This would allow me to operate Mollom from anywhere in the world, and would require just a few hours of my time each week. Because I was starting to use machine learning, I enlisted the help of one of my best friends, Benjamin Schrauwen, a professor in machine learning at the University of Ghent.

In the same year, Jay Batson and I met at DrupalCon Sunnyvale, and we had already started to explore the idea of founding Acquia. My oldest son Axl was also born in the summer of 2007, and I was working hard to finish my PhD. Throughout all of this, we were also working to get Drupal 6 released. Needless to say, it was a busy summer.

With my PhD nearly complete, I needed to decide what to do next. I knew that starting Acquia was going to have a big impact, not just on Drupal but also on my life. However, I was also convinced that Mollom, while much smaller in scope and ambition, could provide a path to the freedom and independence Ferriss describes.

Mollom's foundational years

Exciting 2007, I determined that both Acquia and Mollom were important opportunities to pursue. Jay and I raised $7 million in venture capital, and we publicly launched Acquia in November 2007. Meanwhile, Ben and I pooled together €18,000 of our own money, bootstrapped Mollom, and publicly launched Mollom in March 2008.

I always made a point to run both businesses separately. Even after I moved from Belgium to the US in the summer of 2010, I continued to run Mollom and Acquia independently. The Mollom team was based in Europe, and once or twice a week, I would get up at 4 AM to have a two-hour conference call with the team. After my conference call, I'd help my family get ready for the day, and then I was off to work at Acquia.

By 2011, Mollom had achieved the goals our team set out to accomplish; our revenues had grown to about €250,000 annually, our gross margins were over 85 percent, and we could pretty much run the business on autopilot. Our platform was completely self-serviced for our users, the anti-spam algorithms self-learning, the service was built to be highly-available, and the backend operations were almost entirely automated. I often joked about how I could run Mollom from the beach in Greece, with less than an hour of work a day.

However, our team at Mollom wasn't satisfied yet, so instead of sitting on the beach, we decided to invest Mollom's profits in feature development. We had a team of three engineers working on adding new capabilities, in addition to re-architecting and scaling Mollom to keep up with its growth. On average, Mollom handled more than 100 web service requests per second, and we regularly saw peaks of up to 3,000 web service request per second. In a way, Mollom's architecture was ahead of its time — it used a micro-services architecture with a REST API, a decoupled administration backend and relied heavily on machine learning. From day one, our terms of service respected people's privacy, and we never had a data breach.

A photo of the Mollom team at an offsite in 2011: it includes Daniel Kudwien, Benjamin Schrauwen, Cedric De Vleeschauwer, Thomas Meire, Johan Vos and Vicky Van Roeyen. Missing in the picture is Dries.

In the meantime, Acquia had really taken off; Acquia's revenue had grown to over $22 million annually, and I was often working 60 hour work weeks to grow the company. Acquia's Board of Directors wanted my full attention, and had even offered to acquire Mollom a few times. I recognized that running Mollom, Acquia and Drupal simultaneously was not sustainable — you can only endure regular 4 AM meetings for so long. Plus, we had ambitious goals for Mollom; we wanted to add many-site content moderation, sentiment analysis and detection for certain code of conduct violations. Doing these things would require more capital, and unless you are Elon Musk, it's really hard to raise capital for multiple companies at the same time. Most importantly, I wanted to focus more on growing Drupal and driving Acquia's expansion.

Acquia acquires Mollom

By the end of 2012, Ben and I agreed to sell Mollom to Acquia. Acquia's business model was to provide SaaS services around Drupal, and Mollom was exactly that — a SaaS service used by tens of thousands of Drupal sites.

Selling Mollom was a life-changing moment for me. It proved that I was able to bootstrap and grow a company, steer it to profitability and exit successfully.

Selling Mollom to Acquia involved signing a lot of documents. A photo of me signing the acquisition paperwork with Mary Jefts, Acquia's CFO at the time. It took three hours to sign all the paperwork.
Acquia retires Mollom

By 2017, five years after the acquisition, it became clear that Mollom was no longer a strategic priority for Acquia. As a result, Acquia decided it was best to shut down Mollom by April 2018. As the leader of the product organization at Acquia, I'm supportive of this decision. It allows us to sharpen our focus and to better deliver on our mission.

While it was a rational decision, it's bittersweet. I still believe that Mollom could have continued to have a big impact on the Open Web. Not only did that make the web better, it saved people millions of hours moderating their content. I also considered keeping Mollom running as part of Acquia's "Give back more" principle. However, Acquia gives back a lot, and I believe that giving back to Drupal should be our priority.

Mollom's end-of-life announcement that replaced the old https://mollom.com.

Overall, Mollom was a success. While I never got my 4-hour work week, I enjoyed successfully creating a company from scratch, and seeing it evolve through every stage of its life. I learned how to build and run a SaaS service, I made some money in the process, and best of all, Mollom blocked over 15 billion spam comments across tens of thousands of websites. This translates to saving people around the world millions of hours, which would otherwise be devoted to content moderation. Mollom also helped to protect the websites of some of the world's most famous brands; from Harvard, to The Economist, Tesla, Twitter, Sony Music and more. Finally, we were able to offer Mollom for free to the vast majority of our users, which is something we took a lot of pride in.

If you were a user of Mollom the past 10+ years, I hope you enjoyed our service. I also want to extend a special thank you to everyone who contributed to Mollom over the past 11 years!

Rest in peace, Mollom! Thank you for blocking so much spam. I'll think about you next time I visit Greece.

Categories: Drupal

Are immersive simulations the final frontier? - by Colm McAndrews

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 30 April 2018 - 3:19am
Should divided genres still exist, or should videogames be, or at least aim for complete simulations?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

How Learning Games Get Funded - by Wick Perry

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 30 April 2018 - 3:18am
While working on my neuroscience simulator, I ran up against that eternal question: "how do I get paid?" — I interviewed a handful of very smart developers working in educational games & assembled a comprehensive list of funding avenues.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Atari VCS: Dragonstomper - by John Harris

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 30 April 2018 - 3:17am
Another excerpt from the VCS book, this one covers the early RPG Dragonstomper, which has some amazing features for 1982! Anyone interested in the early history of CRPGs needs to take a look at it.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Six Days in Fallujah Campaign - by Nathan Cheever

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 30 April 2018 - 3:17am
The mission arc in Six Days in Fallujah went through several drafts. Here's a glimpse at threading the real life events into meaningful paced encounters.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

A Final MDA Analysis of The Quiet Sleep - by Nikhil Murthy

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 30 April 2018 - 3:16am
I go over the features of The Quiet Sleep and how they work towards my desired aesthetics for the game.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Launching Today: A Brief Reflection - by Andrew Miller

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 30 April 2018 - 3:13am
Magic Masks is launching today, April 30, on Steam - a casual, colorful, puzzle adventure game that has spent about 3.5 part-time years in development. Here is some insight into the team, the game, and my reflection on what I believe the game is.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Inline Form Errors - Transitions

New Drupal Modules - 30 April 2018 - 3:12am

This module provides a layer of page navigation on top of Drupal core's Inline form errors.

This module is really helpful when you are dealing with complex and big forms. After enabling the module you can configure how slow, fast users will be able to scroll to errors.

This module also adds a configurable back-to-top button when there are errors on the page.

Categories: Drupal

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