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The Maps of Block Star Party: A Fresh Wind - by Junxue Li Blogs - 19 November 2015 - 11:00pm
This article is a review of the map art of a successful Match-3 game: Block Star Party, from the angle of an art producer. And if you're preparing maps for your game, hope this article may give you a bit of light.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Writing a Game Engine from Scratch - Part 3: Data & Cache - by Michael Kissner Blogs - 19 November 2015 - 11:00pm
Writing an Engine from scratch can be a daunting task. With a broad understanding of Memory Management, we delve deeper into the fine details.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

A Lesson on Control in Game Design: Modifiers - by Josh Bycer Blogs - 19 November 2015 - 11:00pm
Today's post looks at the concept of command modifiers and what they mean for control schemes and game design.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Baked Soft Shadows in Unity 5 - by Tino van der Kraan Blogs - 19 November 2015 - 11:00pm
This blog looks at soft shadows and how to create this in Unity 5 by utilizing lightmapping techniques.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Around the World - by James Bennett Blogs - 19 November 2015 - 11:00pm
This week Krees and I finished up the travel screens in Conquest!. Read on for more details!
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Make Trailers That Capture the Player's Emotional Journey - by Mjoshua Cauller Blogs - 19 November 2015 - 11:00pm
Players need to go on an emotional journey through your game's trailer if they're thinking about hitting that "buy" button. Here's some tips on how to take them for a ride.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Inside the world of Yo-Kai Watch - by Christian Nutt Blogs - 19 November 2015 - 10:43pm
What the heck is Yo-Kai Watch and how does the game actually work? What are its strengths? Christian Nutt dives in.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Facetapi hierarchical select

New Drupal Modules - 19 November 2015 - 7:57pm

This module provides a hierarchical select widget plugin for the Facet API module

Categories: Drupal

Freelock : Content Management on the Web has changed. Today.

Planet Drupal - 19 November 2015 - 5:03pm
November 2015

Today marks the release of Drupal 8, and the birthday of its founder, Dries Buytaert. This release is more than just a new digit, it's an entirely new platform with something for everyone to love, but it's particularly big for web site owners.

What's the big deal? The biggest, most powerful, one of the most successful open source projects in the world has two major, fundamental changes that change everything you thought you knew about it.

Well, not everything. Lots of the things that people love about Drupal are getting some nice improvements:

  • Mobile, responsive support straight out of the box -- it's actually a nice experience administering a D8 site on your phone!
  • The information architecture is the same as always -- content types, vocabularies, comments, anything you've learned about how content is organized in Drupal is the same, but...
  • Lots of powerful modules like Views and CKEditor are now in core, and much less quirky than ever before
  • Deploying updates and configuration settings between multiple copies of the site is completely overhauled, and now very simple to do
  • Caching support is baked in, enabled by default, so in spite of doubling in code size it uses less computing resources and responds much faster, especially on busy sites
  • Loads of other improvements.

All of that is great, and we could go on for hours, days about how much of an improvement this is. And that is the stuff you will notice today, next week, next month. But that's not the big change, that's not the killer feature of this upgrade for site owners.

The killer feature is what happens in 6 months, in 1 year, in 5 years. And that is, the great big upgrade cost you don't have, when it's time to upgrade to 8.1.0, or 8.2.0, or even 9.0.0.

Two Fundamental Changes.

Ask any Drupal site owner where their biggest pain is. You'll run into two big complaints: How hard it is to find decent Drupal developer talent, and how painful it is to migrate to the next version. Those both change with Drupal 8.

The next version

The current version of Drupal 7 is 7.41. The new version of Drupal 8 is 8.0.0. The next version of Drupal 7 will be 7.42. The next version of Drupal 8 will be 8.0.1. Notice anything different? It's called "Semantic versioning," and yes, it's just one more number between the dots (or added to the end). But the change behind that simple little version number is enormous.

Drupal is changing its entire release process to have "minor" version releases every 6 months. That means 6 months from now will be 8.1.0, and in a year, 8.2.0. These are calendar-based releases that contain new functionality, AND maintain backwards compatibility with the previous minor version. Upgrades from 8.0.4 to 8.1.0 should be completely transparent, nothing breaking as a result -- but new stuff available.

Drupal has never maintained backwards compatibility like this before -- this is a fundamental change in the project, and it represents the maturity the platform has reached.

There will only be a Drupal 9 when there's enough changes that are not backwards compatible that it's time for a new major release. But this "minor release" plan provides plenty of notice of functionality being deprecated to allow people to transition away from those things that are going away, long before 9 arrives.

That means an update to Drupal 9, will mostly be a matter of making sure you've either moved away from stuff being changed in Drupal 8, or have added an alternative. And then update, potentially like any other minor release.

No more completely rebuilding your site in the new version! For the first time ever, major version updates in Drupal should be relatively painless, as long as you keep your site relatively current and pay attention to changes as they develop.

"Drupal Developers"

Drupal has always come with a steep learning curve, particularly for developers. This is because it has developed out of procedural code, with a "hook" system and naming conventions that make a lot of things happen "automagically". It takes a couple years to get your head around the many Drupalisms, code patterns, hooks, conventions that are not seen or used in most other projects. You need to be very proficient in coding, using a debugger, and having an open mind to be a good Drupal developer... until now.

"Object Oriented" is a term that came in vogue in development circles... in the 1960s. It became the dominant way of programming in the 1990s, particularly with the rise of Java in popularity, and it's at the heart of .NET as well as many open source practices. And while Drupal uses a lot of object-oriented concepts in its information architecture, it has never been fully object-oriented in its code... until Drupal 8.

Why should a site owner care about this? Two huge benefits -- the same two I'm talking about here:

  • Drupal development now shares the same programming architecture as 90% of the rest of the industry, instead of being its own thing. Now you don't need to find a good "Drupal developer" -- a good developer should be able to pick it up and figure it out without years of learning the specific incantations and magic charms of all those Drupalisms.
  • Updates. Because we now encapsulate all this code into objects that extend other classes, this allows for upgrading smaller bits of functionality without affecting the rest of the site. This means that it should be possible to upgrade some modules to Drupal 9, before the site itself.

I think a lot of people in the Drupal community don't fully realize how huge a change this is (and it is interesting to see some backlash to the changes from those who may fear some of this change).

In other words, when Drupal 9 eventually arrives, it won't be such a big deal -- it should be possible to run exactly the same contributed modules for Drupal 8 and Drupal 9, with no changes whatsoever -- and even if something important does need to change, it can be changed by inserting a "shim" class that translates the API changes as appropriate -- it will almost certainly be possible to run Drupal 9 modules in Drupal 8, and vice versa. And you won't have to find a Drupal-specific developer to do this for you, either.

The new world of web applications

Drupal has long been a compelling platform in terms of functionality, the speed that new functionality becomes available, and the power built into the system. Drupal 8 is not just another release -- it is the maturing of this platform into something that is completely up-to-date and capable of staying that way for at least the next decade, if not more.

If you are looking for a new content management system, a new project management system, a new platform for managing all kinds of communications between groups of people, you can't pick a better base for doing so than Drupal 8. Give us a call, and let's discuss what you want to build!

Categories: Drupal

Out & About On The Third Rock: An Engagement Manager’s Guide To Site Building In Drupal 8 – Week 03

Planet Drupal - 19 November 2015 - 4:02pm
More a log than a guide, but you get the idea! its a lengthy log this week, a lot got undone, done and then some. Day 1 Backlog for the week: Fonts Contact Form (customise it) Translations (Lingotek)   Take the site online  Toy around with Drush Not part of the backlog, decided to update core, followed the instructions to the letter, used Drush and broke […]
Categories: Drupal

OSTraining: The Drupal 8 Beginner Class is Here and is Free

Planet Drupal - 19 November 2015 - 3:43pm

Congratulations to the Drupal community. Today, they released Drupal 8!

It has been an epic journey to get here. Back in March 2011, we sat in the audience at DrupalCon Chicago and listened to Dries' plans for Drupal 8. To get from Chicago to today has taken over 1770 days, 3000 contributors and 350,000 lines of code.

Drupal 8 is far larger, more powerful and more modern than anything Drupal has released before.

Categories: Drupal

Doug Vann: Drupal 8 launches today and here I sit thinking about BackdropCMS

Planet Drupal - 19 November 2015 - 2:52pm

Where I am:

  • Today [11/19/15] is the BIG day! Finally, Drupal 8 launches!
  • I have co-planned a party at my local Drupal group here in Indianapolis.
  • I just paid $12 for this giant, blue “8” balloon! [woot woot!]
  • At that party I will be delivering a show-n-tell of the new Drupal 8 back end.
  • I have shared/authored social media posts to push the BUZZ along.
  • Drupal 7 work still keeps me busy and pays the bills. 

Where I’m going

  • Tomorrow and the day after [11/20/15 & 11/21/15] I will be delivering 2 separate, free, 4hr Drupal 8 trainings for the Drupal Association’s Global Training Days
  • I’m happy to say I’m working on a D8 book for a major publisher! [more on that when allowed]
  • I still have a DEEP desire to work further on my BackdropCMS site which, to date, has served as a playground for exploring functionality.

The longer road ahead, as I see it

I have already stated that I’m a huge fan of what BackdropCMS represents. I believe in the the market viability of BackdropCMS. As you can tell, I’m also very excited at what Drupal 8 represents in the evolution of the web as we know it. I plan on using both as needed.

How do I reconcile the two? It’s quite easy. I have long felt that Drupal 8 is moving “Up Market.” No matter how you define that, it is true on many levels. I have no problem with this. It’s a natural evolution and I agree with those who said was long long long long overdue. I tend to agree. HOWEVER… I’m already on the record as saying that some of the changes in Drupal 8 can, will, and already have cost us some marketshare. This is where I believe BackdropCMS is a highly effective tool for keeping these existing sites from migrating to WP or some proprietary platform. Many clients around the world are super happy with their D7 sites, and they will remain happy for some time to come. It is a matter of time before we start seeing D7 sites move off of D7. Some will head to D8. Many will not. I want to be at the intersection when they change roads!

A few words about the “Ownership Society”

I have also bloviated at length about how Drupal promotes an ownership society where a team of non-CompSci grads can make amazing websites with Drupal. I keep saying that Drupal 8 raises the bar to the point that many of the current satisfied D7 users will need to rely on vendors to do the things that they currently do themselves. Then along comes BackdropCMS. Bringing balance to The Force BackdropCMS will once again empower those who are thriving in the Ownership Society that is, at least to some degree, no longer there in Drupal 8.

Drupal Planet

View the discussion thread.

Categories: Drupal

Jay How To Solve Drupal 8.0.0's Requirements Problem On WampServer

Planet Drupal - 19 November 2015 - 2:02pm

Today is a big day for Drupal, as Drupal 8.0.0 just got released a few hours ago. So since people from all over the world will be installing it today to build websites, I'll show you guys how to solve some unusual problems that you might encounter during the installation process. When you install it on your web server, you should be most likely just fine. However, you will undoubtedly encounter the following three problems if you decide to install it on a brand new installation of WampServer (current version: 2.5):

Drupal 8.0.0 Requirements Problem

Tags: Drupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

Palantir: Drupal 8 is here

Planet Drupal - 19 November 2015 - 11:34am

Drupal 8 launched today, and with it comes a host of enhancements that benefit all of us – clients and partners alike. We're particularly excited because we – alongside thousands of others – helped architect, build, and troubleshoot Drupal 8 through its entire development process. A number of those key core contributors are on the Palantir staff, too (huge thanks to Larry, Ken, Bec, Andrea, Robin, Greg, Kelsey, Joe, and Arthur, among others!).

In fact, Palantir team members have been deeply involved in Drupal 8’s development since its start, providing technical leadership for the Web Services and Context Core and Mobile initiatives, core development support, and sprint organization. We were also an anchor sponsor for the Drupal 8 Accelerate fund which raised over $250,000 for development work on Drupal 8 to get it to completion.

For our clients, this new version introduces hundreds of breakthrough features that will help you deliver the right experience and content for your users, regardless of their location or the device on which they are viewing your site (not to mention how your editors are publishing content).

  • Mobile-first: Allows content authors to publish content on any device. The entire Drupal 8 user interface has been made responsive.
  • Multichannel, Dynamic Content Delivery: Delivers content “as a service” to any site, device, native application, or emerging channel with RESTful APIs.
  • Front-end Flexibility: Embraces client-side frameworks like Ember.js, Angular, and Backbone so front-end developers can get creative with experience delivery.
  • Enhanced Usability: Offers a reimagined, easier-to-use authoring experience, with a new editor tool and streamlined in-line, in-context authoring.
  • Translation and Globalization: Designed to support global digital strategies, Drupal 8 transforms content management localization.
  • Faster Development: Introduces an object-oriented web development framework and includes built-in Symfony components, staged configuration management, and improved unit testing support.
  • Faster Dynamic Content: Accelerates content delivery with dynamic caching for personalized, data-driven user experiences.

We've shared a great deal on Drupal 8 in the past with Larry "Crell" Garfield's D8FTW! blog series and subsequent world tour, other keynotes and presentations, and CEO Tiffany Farriss' keynote for Chicago-based Midcamp, not to mention our Founder and CEO George DeMet's recent post on what Drupal 8 means for sites of the future.

We truly look forward to sharing our vast Drupal 8 knowledge and expertise for our clients, and continuing to act as mentors and thought leaders in our Drupal development community.

For partners like Palantir, Drupal 8 provides us a powerful object-oriented, API-based architecture that enables us to do what we do best with custom PHP code, and makes it even easier for us to create code that makes Drupal play nice with countless PHP technologies and third-party integrations that so many of our clients rely on. We love this flexibility, and the fact that it modernizes the platform in a really important way.

Dries Buytaert, creator and project lead of Drupal and co-founder of Acquia says Drupal 8, “...provides a modern development framework, a reimagined user experience, and tools that empower builders to create digital experiences that are multilingual, mobile and highly personalized."

This is important for our clients since it enables them to meet their business goals more quickly. And we can use our strategy, design, and development expertise combined with our decade of Drupal experience to provide you and your audience a world-class, truly sustainable solution for years to come.

Curious about Drupal 8, and what it means for your organization?
Get in touch today, and we'll be happy to provide even more reasons why this modern, open source solution is not only an incredibly compelling choice for you, but the right one.

Let's all raise our a glass to toast Drupal 8's release, and what it means for all of us. Cheers!

Categories: Drupal

YouTube steps in to help legally defend select videos against DMCA takedowns

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 19 November 2015 - 11:12am

YouTube is making a show of support for videos on its platform that make fair use of copyrighted material by pledging to back select creators against what it perceives to be unfair DMCA takedowns. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Bootstrap Layouts

New Drupal Modules - 19 November 2015 - 10:43am


This project is a combination of Display Suite Bootstrap Layouts and Panels Bootstrap Layouts for Drupal 8.

The idea comes from this comment:

Categories: Drupal

Chapter Three: 8 Months of Drupal 8 On Production

Planet Drupal - 19 November 2015 - 10:21am

As we get ready for our Drupal 8 release party today, over here at Chapter Three, Drupal 8 is starting to feel a lot more like business as usual. We launched our first Drupal 8 production site on 4/11/2015. In the intervening 8 months, we've built a few other Drupal 8 projects, and our team has learned a whole lot about what it means to do continuous development on this new version of Drupal.

Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: The Lullabot Podcast is back! Drupal 8! The Past! The Future!

Planet Drupal - 19 November 2015 - 9:21am
Drupal 8 is here! The Lullabot Podcast is back! It's an exciting time to be alive. We talk about where we've been, before we look ahead to see where we're going. Oh, and we want to hear from you. Leave us listener feedback at 1-877-LULLABOT x789.
Categories: Drupal
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