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How to Maintain a High Star Rating for Your App & Why it Matters - by Eric Tan

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 October 2017 - 7:27am
How do you make sure your app maintains a high average star rating in the app store and why is it important? A veteran of several major app store successes, Adam shed light on the art of user review analysis.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Noticeboard

New Drupal Modules - 12 October 2017 - 7:21am

A virtual notice board.
Used to provide users information about time-sensitive things across the site.

Categories: Drupal

Day 25 of 100 Days of VR: Creating Victory State After We Defeat All Enemies - by Josh Chang

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 October 2017 - 7:20am
Welcome back to day 25! Today is going to be relatively short, we’re going to finish our Enemy Spawning system by adding a victory state.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Vardot: SEO Checklist Before Launching Your Drupal Website

Planet Drupal - 12 October 2017 - 7:11am
SEO Checklist Before Launching Your Drupal Website Dmitrii Susloparov Thu, 10/12/2017 - 17:11

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) might not be the first thing you think of when designing a new website, but building an optimized framework from the start will help you drive traffic to your site and keep it there. With our Drupal SEO-checklist in hand you can build an excellent website that draws customers from launch day. Briefly speaking, here is a bullet list of what to check before the launch day. Below we’ll speak about each point in more detail.

 

  • Check that all web pages have unique titles using the Page Title module

  • Check if XML Sitemap and Google News Sitemap are configured properly

  • Check if Redirect module is enabled and configured

  • Check if Global Redirect module is enabled and configured

  • Check that .htaccess redirect to site with/without www

  • Check that the homepage title includes a slogan, and is descriptive for the function of the site

  • Check if Meta Tags is filled with descriptive information

  • Check that OG tags are filled correctly and with descriptive information.

  • Check if site's information appears well when shared on Facebook

  • Check if Path aliases patterns are meaningful

  • Check if Google Analytics is enabled and configured

  • Check if Page Title module is enabled and configured

  • Check if Google News Sitemap is enabled and configured

  • Check if Site verification is enabled and configured

  • Check if Search 404 module is enabled and configured

 

Drupal SEO: 12 Things that Will Improve Your Site's Ranking Check that all web pages have unique titles...

...and make sure to write them correctly. All of your pages should be easily identifiable to the end user. Not only should they have unique titles, they should have meaningful titles. Having multiple pages with the same titles (like “Get in touch”, “Contact us” and “Make a booking”) will simply confuse your end users and search engine crawlers.

 

Not only do good page titles help customers who are already on your site, but they help with social sharing, and picking your site out of search engine results. Titles are the first element that any user will see, whether they come directly to your site, find it in a search engine, or see it shared on social media.

 

Writing good titles is extremely important, and having keywords in your title that match a user's search greatly improves the chances of them clicking on your page.

 

Ensuring all your pages have a unique name will help users navigate, boost your SEO ratings, and increase the chances that someone will type the right keywords into a search engine to bring them to your site.

 

You can set up unique page titles much easier if you install the Drupal Page Title module.

10 Drupal Modules that Will Boost Your Website’s SEO

 

 

Check if XML Sitemap and Google News Sitemap are configured properly

The XML Sitemap module creates a robot friendly map of your site that Google and other search engines can crawl to categorise your website. There are a few settings you can alter for your site at admin/config/search/xmlsitemap and you can view the sitemap from http://yoursite.com/sitemap.xml.

 

You should configure XML Sitemap early in your site build for the best effect, but you can also alter the settings later on if needed.

 

Google News Sitemap offers a similar but different service that creates a Google specific map - as suggested in the name. These two modules work nicely side by side to make your site easy for search engines to crawl and index.

 

Please note that if your site contains AMPs, there is no need to create sitemaps for them. The rel=amphtml link is enough for Google to pick up on the accelerated mobile page version, which means you can easily gain traffic from Top Stories carousels and mobile search. Creating AMP on your Drupal site became easy with our step-by-step guide.

 

 

Check if Redirect module is enabled and configured

Redirect is a handy module for making sure users always make it to your site. It uses case-insensitive matching to help catch broken links with redirects and tracks how often users are hitting those redirects. You can use redirects to capture any broken links, set up promotional links, or simply capture typos users are entering when trying to access your site.

 

Check if Global Redirect module is enabled and configured

If you’re using Drupal 8 you can skip this one because the functionality has been rolled into the redirect module. Otherwise install Global Redirect to work in tandem with Redirect to catch any broken links. Global Redirect will test all links with and without a trailing slash, ensure links are case-insensitive and if a link is truly broken it will return a user to your home page, rather than an ugly 404 page that decrease the position of your site in SERPs.

Check that .htaccess redirects to site with/without www

Some users attempting to visit your site will navigate to www.yoursite.com, while others will simply type yoursite.com. By setting up your site to handle either request you can be sure you won’t miss any visitors.

 

 

Check that the homepage title includes a headline, logo and primary image and is descriptive for the function of the site

The headline as well as the slogan represent who you are as a business. Make your first impression a good one as this will also be visible on search engines. This is a good opportunity to stack your website with SEO friendly keywords, but don’t go overboard and sacrifice your image for it - keyword stuffing may not only decrease the trust index of your site, but also its conversion rates.

Ensure Metatags are filled with descriptive information

Writing SEO-optimized metatags is highly important, because they remain one of the top on-page ranking factors. Make sure to install the Metatag module on your site to have an easy, user friendly interface for updating metadata. With the module installed you can easily populate metadata with keywords, page descriptions, and more.

 

SEO tips for your Drupal site

 

The Metatag module will also give you extra control over how your site appears when shared on Twitter or Facebook.

Check that OG tags are filled correctly and with descriptive information.

OG tags are metatags specifically designed to ensure your site communicates nicely with Facebook. By setting these tags correctly you will be able to control exactly how your site appears on Facebook, including what images and what taglines are used.

Check if site's information appears well when shared on Facebook and Twitter

After configuring the metatag module and OG tags, pop over to Facebook and make sure that your site shares the way you would like it too. It’s important to test this out now before users start sharing your site around.

 

Similarly try tweeting a couple of your pages to see how well your Twitter Cards come through. If you don’t want to show your site to your audience until you are sure it is set up properly, you can check Twitter Cards using the Card Validator.

 

For more information on configuring Twitter cards, check out the Twitter user guides.

 

Check if Path aliases patterns are meaningful

By default Drupal will set your URLs to node/123 - while this works great for the database back end, it doesn’t work well for your end users, or for search engines.

 

You can use the Pathauto module to create rules and patterns for your URLs that will significantly cut down on your maintenance times and simplify your site navigation.

Check if Google Analytics is enabled and configured

While having Google Analytics configured won’t improve your SEO, it will give you all the data you need to understand where your users are coming from and how they behave once they hit your site.

 

Installing the Google Analytics module makes setting up and configuring Google Analytics a breeze.

Check if Site verification is enabled and configured

The Site verification module makes it easy to check the boxes that tell search engines that your site is truly yours. Having your site verified will improved how search engines crawl your site, and for Google will allow you to access private search data. With site verification you will receive better data and better search engine rankings for just a few minutes work.

 

Check if Search 404 module is enabled and configured

The Search 404 module is a saving grace for reducing your bounce rate, your SEO and improving your customer experience. Instead of your users finding an ‘Error: Page not Found” in place of the content they were hoping for, they will be offered a search of your site based on the URL string. For example if “www.yoursite.com/great-seo-tips” doesn’t exist, users this module will automatically search your site for ‘Great SEO tips” and show the users the results.

 

 

Bottom line

While SEO may seem like a tricky subject to wrap your head around, the basics are easy with the right modules and the right guidance. Drupal is a great content management system for building search engine optimized websites.

 

With our SEO checklist you can get off on the right foot, and here at Vardot we love educating our customers to build top quality websites. If you’re looking for even more ways to improve your sites SEO, have a look at SEO articles in our blog or get in touch with us.

Categories: Drupal

Plaid Hat Games Previews Lumpy For Stuffed Fables

Tabletop Gaming News - 12 October 2017 - 7:00am
In Stuffed Fables, players take on the role of stuffed animals, going on adventures in the night. The game uses an innovative game book that not only gives you the rules for the various encounters and scenarios, but also acts as the map. It has been garnering a lot of attention since its announcement, and […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Lullabot: Incredible Decoupled Performance with Subrequests

Planet Drupal - 12 October 2017 - 6:52am

In my previous post, Modern Decoupling is More Performant, we discussed how saving HTTP round-trips has a very positive impact on performance. In particular, we demonstrated how the JSON API module could help your application by returning multiple entities in a single request. Doing so eliminates the need for making an individual request per entity. However, this is only possible when fetching entities, not when writing data and only if those entities are related to the entry point (a particular entity or collection).

Sometimes you can solve this problem by writing a custom resource in the back-end every time, but that can lead to many custom resources, which impacts maintainability and is tiresome. If your API is public and you don’t have prior knowledge of what the consumers are going to do with it, it’s not even possible to write these custom endpoints.

The Subrequests module completes that idea by allowing ANY set of requests to be aggregated together. It can aggregate them even when one of them depends on a previous response. The module works with any request, it's not limited to REST or any other constraint. For simplicity, all the examples here will make requests to JSON API.

Why Do We Need It?

The main concept of the Subrequests module is that instead of sending multiple requests to your Drupal instance we will only send a single request. In this master request, we will provide the information about the requests we need to make in a JSON document. We call this document blueprint.

A blueprint is a JSON document containing the instructions for Drupal to make all those requests in our name. The blueprint document contains a list of subrequest objects. Each subrequest object contains the information about a single request being aggregated in the blueprint.

Imagine that our consumer application has a decoupled editorial interface. This editorial interface contains a form to create an article. As part of the editorial experience, we want the form to create the article and a set of tags in the Drupal back-end.

Without using Subrequests, the consumer application should execute the following requests when the form is submitted:

  • Query Drupal to find the UUID for the tags vocabulary.
  • Query Drupal to find the UUID of the user, based on the username present in the editorial app.
  • Create the first tag in the form using the vocabulary UUID.
  • Create the second tag in the form using the vocabulary UUID.
  • Create the article in the form using the user UUID and the newly created tags.

We can query for the user and the vocabulary in parallel. Once that is done, and using the information in the vocabulary response, we can create the tag entities. Once those are created, we can finally create the article. In total, we would be making five requests at three sequential levels. And, this is not even a complex example!

undefined

A JavaScript pseudo-code for the form submission handler could look like:

console.log('Article creation started…'); Promise.all([ httpRequest('GET', 'https://cms.contentacms.io/api/vocabularies?filter[vid-filter][condition][path]=vid&filter[vid-filter][condition][value]=tags'), httpRequest('GET', 'https://cms.contentacms.io/api/users?filter[admin][condition][path]=name&filter[admin][condition][value]=admin'), ]) .then(res => { const [vocab, user] = res; return Promise.all([ Promise.resolve(user), httpRequest('POST', 'https://cms.contentacms.io/api/tags', bodyForTag1, headers), httpRequest('POST', 'https://cms.contentacms.io/api/tags', bodyForTag2, headers), ]) }) .then(res => { const [user, tag1, tag2] = res; const body = buildBodyForArticle(formData, user, tag1, tag2); return httpRequest('POST', 'https://cms.contentacms.io/api/articles', body, headers); }) .then(() => { console.log('Article creation finished!'); }); Using Subrequests

Our goal is to have JavaScript pseudo-code that looks like:

console.log('Article creation started…'); const blueprint = buildBlueprint(formData); httpRequest('POST', 'https://cms.contentacms.io/api/subrequests?_format=json', blueprint, headers) .then(() => { console.log('Article creation finished!'); });

We've reduced our application code to a single POST request that contains a blueprint in the request body. We have reduced the problem to the blueprint creation. That is a big improvement in the developer experience of consumer applications.

undefined Parallel Requests

In our current task we need to perform two initial HTTP requests that can be run in parallel:

  • Query Drupal to find the UUID for the tags vocabulary.
  • Query Drupal to find the UUID of the user based on the username in the editorial app.

That translates to the following blueprint:

[ { "requestId": "vocabulary", "action": "view", "uri": "/api/vocabularies?filter[vid-filter][condition][path]=vid&filter[vid-filter][condition][value]=tags", "headers": ["Accept": "application/vnd.application+json"] }, { "requestId": "user", "action": "view", "uri": "/api/users?filter[admin][condition][path]=name&filter[admin][condition][value]=admin", "headers": ["Accept": "application/vnd.application+json"] } ]

For each subrequest, we can observe that we are providing four keys:

  • requestId A string used to identify the subrequest. This is an arbitrary value generated by the consumer application.
  • action Identifies the action being performed. A "view" action will generate a GET request. A "create" action will generate a POST request, etc.
  • uri The URL where the subrequest will be sent .
  • headers An object containing the headers specific for this subrequest.

The response to this blueprint (after adjusting the permissions in Drupal to view users and vocabularies) will return the response to both subrequests:

{ "vocabulary": { "headers": { "content-id": ["<vocabulary>"], "status": [200] }, "body": "{\"data\":[{\"type\":\"vocabularies\",\"id\":\"47ce8895-0df6-44a4-af43-9ef3b2a924dd\",\"attributes\":{\"status\":true,\"dependencies\":{\"module\":[\"recipes_magazin\"]},\"_core\":\"HJlsFfKP4PFHK1ub6QCSNFmzAnGiBG7tnx53eLK1lnE\",\"name\":\"Tags\",\"vid\":\"tags\",\"description\":\"Use tags to group articles on similar topics into categories.\",\"hierarchy\":0,\"weight\":0},\"links\":{\"self\":\"http:\\/\\/localhost\\/api\\/vocabularies\\/47ce8895-0df6-44a4-af43-9ef3b2a924dd\"}}],\"links\":{\"self\":\"http:\\/\\/localhost\\/api\\/vocabularies?filter%5Bvid-filter%5D%5Bcondition%5D%5Bpath%5D=vid\\u0026filter%5Bvid-filter%5D%5Bcondition%5D%5Bvalue%5D=tags\"}}" }, "user": { "headers": { "content-id": ["<user>"], "status": [200] }, "body": "{\"data\":[{\"type\":\"users\",\"id\":\"a0b7af80-e319-4271-899f-f151d3fbfc8e\",\"attributes\":{\"internalId\":1,\"name\":\"admin\",\"mail\":\"admin@example.com\",\"timezone\":\"Europe\\/Madrid\",\"isActive\":true,\"createdAt\":\"2017-09-15T15:47:26+0200\",\"updatedAt\":\"2017-09-15T20:06:15+0200\",\"access\":1505565434,\"lastLogin\":\"2017-09-15T20:06:07+0200\"},\"relationships\":{\"roles\":{\"data\":[]}},\"links\":{\"self\":\"http:\\/\\/localhost\\/api\\/users\\/a0b7af80-e319-4271-899f-f151d3fbfc8e\"}}],\"links\":{\"self\":\"http:\\/\\/localhost\\/api\\/users?filter%5Badmin%5D%5Bcondition%5D%5Bpath%5D=name\\u0026filter%5Badmin%5D%5Bcondition%5D%5Bvalue%5D=admin\"}}" } }

In the (simplified) response above we can see that for each subrequest, we have one key in the response object. That key is the same as our requestId in the blueprint. Each one of the subresponses contains the information about the response headers and the response body. Note how the response body is an escaped JSON object.

This blueprint is not sufficient to create an article with two tags, but it's a great start. Let's build on top of that to create the tags and the article.

Dependent Requests

The next task we need to execute is the creation of the two tag entities:

  • Create the first tag in the form using the vocabulary UUID.
  • Create the second tag in the form using the vocabulary UUID.

To do this, we will need to expand the blueprint. However, we don't know the vocabulary UUID at the time we are writing the blueprint. What we do know is that the vocabulary UUID will be in the subresponse to the vocabulary subrequest. In particular, we can find the UUID in data[0].id.

We will use that information to create a blueprint that can create tags. Since we don't know the actual value of the vocabulary UUID, we will use a replacement token. At some point, during the blueprint processing by Drupal, the token will be resolved to the actual UUID value.

Replacement Tokens

We can use replacement tokens anywhere in the body or the URI of our subrequests. For those to be resolved, a token needs to be formatted in the following way:

{{<requestId>.<"body"|"headers">@<json-path-expression>}}

In particular, the replacement token for our vocabulary UUID will be:

{{vocabulary.body@$.data[0].id}}

What this replacement says is:

  1. Use the subresponse for the vocabulary subrequest.
  2. Take the body from that subresponse.
  3. Extract the string under data[0].id, by executing the JSON Path expression $.data[0].id. You can execute any JSON Path expression as long as it returns a string. JSON Path is a very powerful way to extract data from an arbitrary JSON object, in our case the body in subresponse to the vocabulary subrequest.

This is what our blueprint looks like after adding the subrequests to create the tag entities. Note the presence of the replacement tokens:

[ { "requestId": "vocabulary", "action": "view", "uri": "/api/vocabularies?filter[vid-filter][condition][path]=vid&filter[vid-filter][condition][value]=tags", "headers": {"Accept": "application/vnd.api+json"} }, { "requestId": "user", "action": "view", "uri": "/api/users?filter[admin][condition][path]=name&filter[admin][condition][value]=admin", "headers": {"Accept": "application/vnd.api+json"} }, { "action": "create", "requestId": "tags-1", "body": "{\"data\":{\"type\":\"tags\",\"attributes\":{\"name\":\"My First Tag\"},\"relationships\":{\"vocabulary\":{\"data\":{\"type\":\"vocabularies\",\"id\":\"{{vocabulary.body@$.data[0].id}}\"}}}}}", "uri": "/api/tags", "headers": {"Content-Type": "application/vnd.api+json"}, "waitFor": ["vocabulary"] }, { "action": "create", "requestId": "tags-2", "body": "{\"data\":{\"type\":\"tags\",\"attributes\":{\"name\":\"My Second Tag\",\"description\":null},\"relationships\":{\"vocabulary\":{\"data\":{\"type\":\"vocabularies\",\"id\":\"{{vocabulary.body@$.data[0].id}}\"}}}}}", "uri": "/api/tags", "headers": {"Content-Type": "application/vnd.api+json"}, "waitFor": ["vocabulary"] } ]

Note that to use a replacement token in a subrequest, we need to add a dependency on the subresponse that contains the information. That's why we added the waitFor key in our tag subrequests.

Finishing the Blueprint undefined

Using the same principles that we used for the tags we can add the subrequest for:

  • Create the article in the form using the user UUID and the newly created tags.

That will leave our completed blueprint as:

[ { "requestId": "vocabulary", "action": "view", "uri": "/api/vocabularies?filter[vid-filter][condition][path]=vid&filter[vid-filter][condition][value]=tags", "headers": {"Accept": "application/vnd.api+json"} }, { "requestId": "user", "action": "view", "uri": "/api/users?filter[admin][condition][path]=name&filter[admin][condition][value]=admin", "headers": {"Accept": "application/vnd.api+json"} }, { "action": "create", "requestId": "tags-1", "body": "{\"data\":{\"type\":\"tags\",\"attributes\":{\"name\":\"My First Tag\"},\"relationships\":{\"vocabulary\":{\"data\":{\"type\":\"vocabularies\",\"id\":\"{{vocabulary.body@$.data[0].id}}\"}}}}}", "uri": "/api/tags", "headers": {"Content-Type": "application/vnd.api+json"}, "waitFor": ["vocabulary"] }, { "action": "create", "requestId": "tags-2", "body": "{\"data\":{\"type\":\"tags\",\"attributes\":{\"name\":\"My Second Tag\",\"description\":null},\"relationships\":{\"vocabulary\":{\"data\":{\"type\":\"vocabularies\",\"id\":\"{{vocabulary.body@$.data[0].id}}\"}}}}}", "uri": "/api/tags", "headers": {"Content-Type": "application/vnd.api+json"}, "waitFor": ["vocabulary"] }, { "action": "create", "requestId": "article", "headers": {"Content-Type": "application/vnd.api+json"}, "body": "{\"data\":{\"type\":\"articles\",\"attributes\":{\"body\":\"Custom value\",\"default_langcode\":\"1\",\"langcode\":\"en\",\"promote\":\"1\",\"status\":\"1\",\"sticky\":\"0\",\"title\":\"Article Created via Subrequests!\"},\"relationships\":{\"tags\":{\"data\":[{\"id\":\"{{tags-1.body@$.data.id}}\",\"type\":\"tags\"},{\"id\":\"{{tags-2.body@$.data.id}}\",\"type\":\"tags\"}]},\"type\":{\"data\":{\"id\":\"article\",\"type\":\"contentTypes\"}},\"owner\":{\"data\":{\"id\":\"{{user.body@$.data[0].id}}\",\"type\":\"users\"}}}}}", "uri": "/api/articles", "waitFor": ["user", "tags-1", "tags-2"] } ] More Powerful Replacements

Imagine that instead of creating an article for a single user, we wanted to create an article for each one of the users on the site. We cannot write a simple blueprint, like the one above, since we don't know how many users there are in the Drupal site. Hence, we cannot write an article creation subrequest for each user.

To solve this problem we can tweak the user subrequest, so instead of returning a single user it returns all the users in the site:

[ … { "requestId": "user", "action": "view", "uri": "/api/users", "headers": {"Accept": "application/vnd.api+json"} }, … ]

Then in our replacement tokens, we can write a JSON Path expression that will return a list of user UUIDs, instead of a single string. Subrequests will accept JSON Path expressions that return either strings or an array of strings for the replacement tokens.

In our article creation subrequest we will need to change {{user.body@$.data[0].id}} by {{user.body@$.data[*].id}}. The Subrequests module will create a duplicate of the article subrequest for each replacement item. In our case this will have the effect of having a copy of the article creation subrequest per each available user in the user subresponse.

The Final Response

The modified blueprint that generates one article per user will have a response like:

undefined

We can see how a single subrequest can generate n subresponses, and we can use each one of those to generate n other subresponses, etc. This highlights how powerful this technique is. In addition, we have seen that we can combine different type of operations. In our example, we mixed GET and POST in a single blueprint (to get the vocabulary and create the new tags).

Conclusion

Sub requests is a great way to fetch or write many resources in a single HTTP request. This allows us to improve performance significantly while maintaining almost the same flexibility that custom code provides.

Further Your Understanding

If you want to know more about the blueprint format you can read the specification. The Subrequests module comes with a JSON schema that you can use to validate your blueprint. You can find the schema here.

The hero image was downloaded from Frankenphotos and use without modifications with a CC BY 3.0 license.

Categories: Drupal

The Free Game Development Tools Used Today - by Juned Ghanchi

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 October 2017 - 6:39am
In today’s world, mobile game development ecosystem is growing at an unprecedented pace. Many developers are moving into the game development zone. With this trend, we find some mobile game development tools are arriving into the market.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

How Software Powered the Rise of Independent Game Design - by Dylan Moran

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 October 2017 - 6:38am
The increasing success of independent developers directly correlates with an increase in the quality of their output.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Design Pillars – The Core of Your Game - by Max Pears

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 October 2017 - 6:31am
I discuss how important it is for you as a developer to find the core of your game. To do this you can use the pillars technique. Originally posted on: http://www.maxpears.com/category/blog/
Categories: Game Theory & Design

The Definition of [Artificial] Insanity: The Systemic AI of Far Cry - by Tommy Thompson

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 October 2017 - 6:31am
Far Cry is a AAA video game franchise built on the principles of systemic gameplay and behaviour. We take a look at how this is managed by AI systems in both Far Cry 3 and 4.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Mediacurrent: Webinar Recap: Security by Design - An Introduction to Drupal Security

Planet Drupal - 12 October 2017 - 6:29am

With cybercrime on the rise, securing data in Drupal has become a hot topic for developers and project stakeholders alike.

In our latest webinar, we were joined by three Drupal security experts from Townsend Security, Lockr and Mediacurrent who shared their approach for building a secure groundwork to protect site data in Drupal.

Categories: Drupal

Virtual humans work better than current ways to identify post-traumatic stress in soldiers

Virtual Reality - Science Daily - 12 October 2017 - 6:10am
Researchers find that soldiers are more likely to open up about post-traumatic stress when interviewed by a virtual interviewer, reports a new study. Virtual interviewers can combine the rapport-building skills of human interviewers with feelings safety provided by anonymous surveys to help soldiers to reveal more about their mental health symptoms.
Categories: Virtual Reality

Spanish National Day Giveaway From Corvus Belli

Tabletop Gaming News - 12 October 2017 - 6:00am
It’s Spain’s National Day! Woo! And while there’s certainly been some unrest in the region lately, Corvus Belli still wants to celebrate the day in their traditional way: a giveaway. Want to get some free Infinity models? Yeah, I know I want some free Infinity models. From the announcement (note: all references to “this Facebook […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Hook Rebuild

New Drupal Modules - 12 October 2017 - 5:47am
A Drupal 7 polyfill for the core hook_rebuild() added in Drupal 8

hook_rebuild() is called after a flush of all Drupal cache's allowing implementing modules to rebuild any required data strcutures using fresh data that is known to be pulled direct from it's data source.

Categories: Drupal

Bitbucket Issues

New Drupal Modules - 12 October 2017 - 3:11am

The Bitbucket Issues module provides a Bitbucket core API layer for managing git issues from your Drupal website.

Installation

Install as usual.

Place the entirety of this directory in the /modules folder of your Drupal
installation. Navigate to Administer > Extend. Check the ‘Enabled’ box next
to the ‘Bitbucket Issues’ and then click the ‘Save Configuration’ button at the bottom.

Populate module settings form with git base url and git user access token.

Categories: Drupal

Config default image

New Drupal Modules - 12 October 2017 - 3:07am

Image field formatter allowing to set a default image deployable through config management. It stores a file path into config, instead of a content uuid.

Categories: Drupal

Views fields as row classes

New Drupal Modules - 12 October 2017 - 3:05am
Categories: Drupal

Where VR&#039;s Going: Thoughts on OC4 Hardware Announcements - by Edward McNeill

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 12 October 2017 - 12:08am
At OC4, Oculus announced two standalone headsets in the works: Oculus Go and the Santa Cruz prototype. What does this mean for VR devs?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Neon Knights Board Game Up On Kickstarter

Tabletop Gaming News - 11 October 2017 - 3:00pm
I love cyberpunk. I honestly do. It’s one of my favorite genres. I know that the new Bladerunner movie has brought it back into the front-and-center. Well, now you can bring a bit of cyberpunk racing to your tabletops with Neon Knights. Grab your custom car, draft for the best drivers, and hit the raceway, […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Plausible Deniability For Skirmish Sangin Available For Pre-orders

Tabletop Gaming News - 11 October 2017 - 2:00pm
Not every operation that the military does is going to be known to the public. There’s all sorts of deeply covert missions going on all the time using teams of super-highly-trained soldiers. These various teams are surgical in their strikes, taking out key enemy personnel and locations. And soon, you’ll be able to bring these […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

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