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Code Karate: Code Karate is Back and Ready for Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 25 October 2018 - 4:33pm
Episode Number: 210

I know it's been awhile since I last posted, but I think we are all ready for some Drupal 8 videos! Let me know in the comments what you want to see posted in the future.

Check ou the Code Karate Patreon page

Tags: DrupalDrupal 8Drupal PlanetGeneral Discussion
Categories: Drupal

Image Link

New Drupal Modules - 25 October 2018 - 1:48pm

Image Link is a field type that allows you to have one field that contains both an image and a link.

This is perfect for badges, social media links, and more.

Categories: Drupal

DICE offers internship for grad student to study toxicity in Battlefield

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 25 October 2018 - 11:10am

Battlefield V developer DICE has listed an internship on its job board soliciting graduate students to analyze toxic and disruptive behavior that takes place in its online shooter.  ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Node Types Toolbar

New Drupal Modules - 25 October 2018 - 10:30am

This module creates a new toolbar that lists node types (bundles) alphabetically.

This is helpful for large sites with many node types to easily access the
subpages of the node type, such as the "Manage fields" or "Manage display"
local tasks for a particular node type.

Categories: Drupal

typo in name

New Drupal Modules - 25 October 2018 - 10:21am

typo in name, need to delete

Categories: Drupal

OpenSense Labs: Anatomy of Continuous Delivery with Drupal

Planet Drupal - 25 October 2018 - 9:21am
Anatomy of Continuous Delivery with Drupal Shankar Thu, 10/25/2018 - 21:51

Audi’s implementation of Continuous Delivery into its marketing has had an astronomical impact on its competitive advantage. For instance, when Audi released its new A3 model along with all other new releases, it wanted to communicate the new features, convey the options, and assist people in understanding the differences among body types, engines and things like that. Continuous Delivery turned out to be the definitive solution. It helped in refining the messaging and optimising it on the fly to make sure that the people are understanding what the automaker is trying to communicate.


Continuous Delivery (CD) is a quintessential methodology which makes the management and delivery of projects in big enterprises like Audi more efficient. When it comes to Drupal-based projects, Continuous Delivery can bring efficacy to the governance of projects. It can lead to better team collaboration and on-demand software delivery.

Read more on Continous Integration with Drupal

Building and Deploying using Continuous Delivery Source: Atlassian

For many organisations, shipping takes a colossal amount of effort. If your team is still living with manual testing preparing for releases and manual or semi-scripted deploys for carrying out releases, it can be toilsome. No wonder software development is moving towards continuity. In the continuous paradigm, quality products are released in a frequent and predictable manner to the customers thereby reducing the risk factor.

In 2010, Jez Humble and David Farley released a book called Continuous Delivery: Reliable Software Releases through Build, Test, and Deployment Automation.

In this book, they argued that “software that’s been successfully integrated into a mainline code stream still isn’t a software that’s out in production doing its job”. That is, no matter how fast you assemble your product, it does not really matter if it is just going to be stored in a warehouse for months.

Continuous Delivery is the software development practice for building software in such a way that it can be released to production at any time.

Continuous Delivery refers to the software development practice for building software in such a way that it can be released to production at any time. So, if your software is deployable throughout its lifecycle, you are doing Continuous Delivery. In this, the team gives more priority to keeping the software deployable than working on new features. This ensures that anybody can get quick and automated feedback on the production readiness of their systems whenever alterations are done. 

Thus, Continuous Delivery enables push-button deployments of any software version to any environment on demand.

How does Continuously Delivery work? Source: Amazon Web Services

For achieving Continuous Delivery, you need to continuously integrate the software built by the development team, build executables and run automated tests on those executables for detecting problems.

Then, the executables are required to be pushed into increasingly production-like environments to make sure that the software is in working condition when pushed to production. This is done by implementing a deployment pipeline that provides visibility into the production readiness of your applications. It gives feedback on every alteration to your system and allows team members to perform self-service deployments into their environments.

Continuous Delivery requires a close, collaborative working relationship between the team members which is often referred to as DevOps Culture. It also needs extensive automation of all possible parts of the delivery process using a deployment pipeline.

Continuous Delivery vs Continuous Integration vs Continuous Deployment

Continuous Delivery is often confused with Continuous Deployment.

In Continuous Deployment, every alteration goes through the pipeline and are automatically pushed into production which results in many production deployments every day.

In Continuous Delivery, you are able to do frequent deployment and if the certain businesses demand a slower rate of deployment, you may choose not to perform the frequent deployment. So, for performing Continuous Deployment, you must be doing Continuous Delivery.

Continuous Delivery builds on Continuous Integration and deals with the final stages that are required for production deployment.

So, where does Continuous Integration come into the picture? It allows you to integrate, build, and test code within the development environment. Continuous Delivery builds on this and deals with the final stages that are required for production deployment.

Benefits of Continuous Delivery

The major benefits of Continuous Delivery are:

  • Minimised Risk: As you are deploying smaller alterations, there’s reduced deployment risk and it is easier to fix whenever a problem occurs.
  • Trackable progress: By tracking work done, you can get a believable progress. If developers declaring a work to be “done”, it is less believable. But if it is deployed into a production environment, you actually see the progress right there.
  • Rapid feedback: One of the pivotal challenges of any software development is that you can wind up building something that is not useful. So, earlier you get the working software in front of real users with higher frequency, faster you get the feedback for finding out how valuable it really is.
Continuous Delivery with Drupal

Drupal Community has been a great catalyst for digital innovation. To make software development and deployment better with Drupal, the community has always leveraged technological innovations.


A session held at DrupalCon Amsterdam had an objective of bringing enterprise Continuous Delivery practices to Drupal with a comprehensive walkthrough of open-sourced CD platform called ‘Go’. The ‘Go’ project started off as ‘Cruise Control’ in 2001 rooted in the first principle of the Agile Manifesto: Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.

It outlined principles of CD practice, exhibited how easy it is to get a Drupal build up and running in Go and illustrated the merits of delivering in a pipeline. It involved setting up of a delivery pipeline. Then, configuring of build materials, build stages, build artefacts, jobs and tasks were done. Furthermore, it drilled down to familiar Drush commands and implemented the basic principles of the CD.

Basically, the build configuration was shown that deploys Drupal sites using Phing, Drush and other tools with the possibility of calling out to Jenkins as another way for managing tasks. Multiple steps of testing and approval were shown with a separate path for content staging as separate from code thereby deploying a complex Drupal site.

Later, it emphasised on testing and previewing on production before cutting over a release, zero downtime releases, secure and simple rollback options, and making the release a business decision rather than a technical decision.

Moreover, it showed that Go’s trusted artefacts can take the ambiguities out fo the build with spectacular support for administering dependencies between different projects.

This session is very useful for the developers who use Drush and have some understanding of DevOps and knows about all-in-code delivery. Even those who undertake less technical roles like QA(Quality Assurance), BA(Business Analyst) and product owner will find it beneficial as the CD practice is all about the interaction of the team as well as the tools and techniques. 

How the future of continuous delivery looks like?

A report on Markets and Markets stated that the Continuous Delivery Market was valued at USD 1.44 Billion in 2017 and would reach USD 3.85 Billion by 2023 at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 18.5% during the forecast period of 2018-2023.

Open source Continuous Deliver projects and tools will dominate the commercial CD tools segment


Another report on Mordor Intelligence states that the market for Continuous Delivery is seeing a tremendous rise. It is due to the adoption of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning, rapid deployment of connected infrastructure and the proliferation of automated digital devices. But open source CD projects and tools will dominate the commercial CD tools segment.

The North American region is projected to have the largest growth in demand during the forecast period (2028-2023) because of the early adoption of cloud computing and IoT by the United States. The continuous evolution of new technologies (as shown above) have been the prime factor behind large-scale investments in the CD segment. Retail, healthcare, communications and manufacturing application in North America are going to see a massive growth rate in the forecast period.

Conclusion

On-demand software delivery and enhanced team collaboration is a sort of combination that every major enterprise can benefit from. Continuous Delivery is one such mechanism that can help software development projects to be production-ready always. And this can work in favour of projects involving Drupal development and deployment.

Opensense Labs has been steadfast in its goals of offering marvellous digital experience with its suite of services.

Contact us at hello@opensenselabs.com to know how can continuous delivery be implemented for your business in Drupal-based projects.

blog banner blog image continuous delivery Drupal Continuous Delivery Continuous Delivery with Drupal Continuous Integration Continuous deployment Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On
Categories: Drupal

Wim Leers: State of JSON API (October 2018)

Planet Drupal - 25 October 2018 - 7:22am

Mateu, Gabe and I just released the first RC of JSON API 2, so time for an update!

It’s been three months since the previous “state of JSON API” blog post, where we explained why JSON API didn’t get into Drupal 8.6 core.

What happened since then? In a nutshell:

  • We’re now much closer to getting JSON API into Drupal core!
  • JSON API 2.0-beta1, 2.0-beta2 and 2.0-rc1 were released
  • Those three releases span 84 fixed issues. (Not counting support requests.)
  • includes are now 3 times faster, 4xx responses are now cached!
  • Fixed all spec compliance issues mentioned previously
  • Zero known bugs (the only two open bugs are core bugs)
  • Only 10 remaining tasks (most of which are for test coverage in obscure cases)
  • ~75% of the open issues are feature requests!
  • ~200 sites using the beta!
  • Also new: JSON API Extras 2.10, works with JSON API 1.x & 2.x!
  • Two important features are >80% done: file uploads & revisions (they will ship in a release after 2.0)

So … now is the time to update to 2.0-RC1!

JSON API spec v1.1

We’ve also helped shape the upcoming 1.1 update to the JSON API spec, which we especially care about because it allows a JSON API server to use “profiles” to communicate support for capabilities outside the scope of the spec. 1

Retrospective

Now that we’ve reached a major milestone, I thought it’d be interesting to do a small retrospective using the project page’s sparklines:

The first green line indicates the start of 2018. Long-time Drupal & JSON API contributor Gabe Sullice joined Acquia’s Office of the CTO two weeks before 2018 started. He was hired specifically to help push forward the API-First initiative. Upon joining, he immediately started contributing to the JSON API module, and I joined him shortly thereafter. (Yes, Acquia is putting its money where its mouth is.)
The response rate for this module has always been very good, thanks to original maintainer Mateu “e0ipso” Aguiló Bosch working on it quite a lot in his sparse free time. (And some company time — thanks Lullabot!) But there’s of course a limit to how much of your free time you can contribute to open source.

  • The primary objective for Gabe and I for most of 2018 has been to get JSON API ready to move into Drupal core. We scrutinized every area of the existing JSON API module, filed lots of issues, minimized the API surface, maximized spec compliance (hence also minimizing Drupalisms), minimized potential for regressions to occur, and so on. This explains the significantly elevated rate of the new issues sparkline. It also explains why the open bugs sparkline first increased.
  • This being our primary objective also explains the response rate sparkline being at 100% nearly continously. It also explains the plummeted average first response time: it went from days to hours! This surely benefited the sites using JSON API: bug fixes happened much faster.
  • By the end of June, we managed to make the 1.x branch maximally stable and mature in the 1.22 release (shortly before the second green vertical line) — hence the “open bugs” sparkline decreased). The remaining problems required BC breaks — usually minor ones, but BC breaks nonetheless! The version of JSON API that ends up in core needs to be as future proof as possible: BC breaks are not acceptable in core. 2 Hence the need for a 2.x branch.

Surely the increased development rate has helped JSON API reached a strong level of stability and maturity faster, and I believe this is also reflected in its adoption: a 50–70 percent increase since the end of 2017!

From 1 to 3 maintainers

This was the first time I’ve worked so closely and so actively on a small codebase in an open-source setting. I’ve learned some things.

Some of you might understandably think that Gabe and I steamrolled this module. But Mateu is still very actively involved, and every significant change still requires his blessing. Funded contributions have accelerated this module’s development, but neither Acquia nor Lullabot ever put any pressure on how it should evolve. It’s always been the module maintainers, through debate (and sometimes heartfelt concessions), who have moved this module forward.

The “participants” sparkline being at a slightly higher level than before (with more consistency!) speaks for itself. Probably more importantly: if you’re wondering how the original maintainer Mateu feels about this, I’ll be perfectly honest: it’s been frustrating at times for him — but so it’s been for Gabe and I — for everybody! Differences in availability, opinion, priorities (and private life circumstances!) all have effects. When we disagree, we meet face to face to chat about it openly.

In the end I still think it’s worth it though: Mateu has deeper ties to concrete complex projects, I have deeper ties to Drupal core requirements, and Gabe sits in between those extremes. Our discussions and disagreements force us to build consensus, which makes for a better, more balanced end result! And that’s what open source is all about: meeting the needs of more people better :)

API-first Drupal with multiple consumers @DrupalConNA :D pic.twitter.com/GhgY8O5SSa

— Gábor Hojtsy (@gaborhojtsy) April 11, 2018

Thanks to Mateu & Gabe for their feedback while writing this!

  1. The spec does not specify how filtering and pagination should work exactly, so the Drupal JSON API implementation will have to specify how it handles this exactly. ↩︎

  2. I’ve learned the hard way how frustratingly sisyphean it can be to stabilize a core module where future evolvability and maintainability were not fully thought through. ↩︎

Categories: Drupal

Game design deep dive: The creation of Gunhouse - by Brandon Sheffield

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 25 October 2018 - 7:22am
A deep dive into the creation of Gunhouse, a puzzle-meets-tower defense game, as filtered through conversations with various game developers and regular human beings like Cliff Bleszinski, Rami Ismail, and Simon Carless.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Paper.io 2: A Natural Difficulty Curve - by Olin Olmstead

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 25 October 2018 - 7:19am
This arena based io game has a very elegant difficulty curve. As the player conquers more territory, the game space shrinks, making the game more hectic!
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Playing videogames: a rambling essay about hating what you love - by Keith Burgun

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 25 October 2018 - 7:18am
What does it mean to "play videogames"? What do the games we play say about who we are?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Disclosing an Affiliation in Sponsored Gameplay - by Kimberly Culp

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 25 October 2018 - 7:18am
Influencers help games get attention and succeed in a crowed market. Influencers and the games they promote (as well as any agents between them) must work together to avoid scrutiny by the Federal Trade Commission and other watch-dogs.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Using a graphics tablet as a programming tool - by Jean-David Moisan

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 25 October 2018 - 6:37am
About one year ago, I discovered a software called Milton. It's a drawing application that lets you draw on an infinite canvas with an amazing zooming function. It’s incredibly fast and the interface doesn't get in your way.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Good news for immersive journalism: Look at your audience

Virtual Reality - Science Daily - 25 October 2018 - 5:40am
A new study shows that in virtual reality news experiences, basic interactivity can increase buy-in without compromising faithful reporting.
Categories: Virtual Reality

Agiledrop.com Blog: Drupal meetup in Maribor

Planet Drupal - 25 October 2018 - 2:59am

Last week we organised a Drupal meetup in Maribor (the second largest town in Slovenia, where Agiledrop has the second office). As a member of Drupal Slovenia, we organised two presentations and sponsored a reception with networking after the event. Are you interested what those two lecturers were about?

READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

Imperfect GM: Play Styles

RPGNet - 25 October 2018 - 12:00am
It\'s all about communication.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Spectra Analytics Connector API

New Drupal Modules - 24 October 2018 - 11:22pm

This is an API module that facilitates connections to a Spectra Analytics server. This module does nothing by itself - install only if you are using a module which requires it, or plan to use a module which requires it.

Categories: Drupal

The magic of flying in a window seat

Dries Buytaert - 24 October 2018 - 9:05pm
Categories: Drupal

Ashday's Digital Ecosystem and Development Tips: Drupal Module Spotlight: Paragraphs

Planet Drupal - 24 October 2018 - 1:03pm

 

I really don’t like WYSIWYG editors. I know that I’m not alone, most developers and site builders feel this way too. Content creators always request a wysiwyg, but I am convinced that it is more of a necessary evil and they secretly dislike wysiwygs too. You all know what wysiwygs (What You See Is What You Get) are right? They are those nifty fields that allow you to format text with links, bolding, alignment, and other neat things. They also can have the ability to add tables, iframes, flash code, and other problematic HTML elements. With Drupal we have been able to move things out of a single wysiwyg body field into more discrete purpose-built fields that match the shape of the content being created and this has helped solve a lot of issues, but still didn’t cancel out the need for a versatile body field that a wysiwyg can provide.

Categories: Drupal

China ends 'green channel' game approvals amid ongoing licensing freeze

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 24 October 2018 - 12:44pm

Regulators in China have seemingly ended a program that gave some game companies a way to have their games approved for launch in the country during its yet-ongoing freeze on issuing game licenses.  ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Gamigo confirms acquisition of Trion Worlds

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 24 October 2018 - 10:16am

Free-to-play game publisher Gamigo has released a press release detailing its acquisition of Trion Worlds, confirming rumors from earlier this week. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

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