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Vainglory dev Super Evil Megacorp raises $10.5 million as it refocuses on next project

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 6 November 2019 - 5:38am

Vainglory developer Super Evil Megacorp is turning its attention toward its next project and handing off day-to-day management of Vainglory to a different studio. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Specbee: Marketing Simplified - Top Drupal 8 Modules for Marketing Automation Every Marketer Needs

Planet Drupal - 6 November 2019 - 5:07am
Marketing Simplified - Top Drupal 8 Modules for Marketing Automation Every Marketer Needs Shefali Shetty 06 Nov, 2019 Top 10 best practices for designing a perfect UX for your mobile app

What are your main objectives of a marketing automation strategy? Every organization has a varied set of goals to be achieved with marketing automation tools. According to a study, the most important objective is to optimize productivity. The other significant goals are to increase marketing ROI, acquiring more leads, analyzing performance and to align marketing and sales. With tons of marketing automation platforms available in the market today, it is hard to choose the most effective tools that will work for you. 

Drupal CMS lets you create compelling digital experiences. Its ease of use and powerful features make it a great platform for a marketer. Integrating Drupal with marketing automation tools will not just enable you to enhance the user experience but it can turn into an intelligent lead generation and nurturing tool. Drupal 8 offers seamless integration modules with top marketing automation tools like Hubspot, Mailchimp, Google Analytics and many more.

Why do I need a Marketing Automation Tool you ask?

 “Good marketing makes the company look smart; Great marketing makes the customers feel smart” - Joe Chernov (VP Marketing @ Pendo)
Great marketing needs more than just a physical team who can manually manage your marketing workflows. Great marketing needs a Marketing Automation tool to help you nurture your leads and expedite your whole marketing process. Did you know lead nurturing can increase your revenue growth by 85%?

  • Marketing Automation tools help converting raw leads to nourished and qualified marketing leads that are turned over to the Sales team for further customer relation management. This implies for both B2B and B2C organizations.
  • It helps track your prospective customer’s activities right from when they visit your website to reading your blogs or filling out a form. 
  • You can also schedule and track your marketing campaigns via email or social media or any other communication.
  • Prospective customers can be easily segmented into suitable mailing lists based on their interests or preferences and will receive/view only relevant content, thus giving you happier (also read ‘less annoyed’) leads. 
  • A ‘drip campaign’ (email campaign) can be scheduled depending on the right time and right interest shown by your leads that will help you stay on top of their minds thereby nurturing your leads. 
  • You will also be able to see the reports/analytics and analyze the success of your marketing campaigns.
Drupal 8 Modules for Marketing Automation 

Drupal is not only known for its robustness and scalability but also for its huge active community of contributors. You will find various contributed Marketing automation modules or plug-ins within Drupal CMS. They are free and out-of-the-box but sometimes might not provide you with as many features as other thirds-party tools. There are a huge number of third-party Marketing Automation software that integrate seamlessly with your Drupal website. 

Webform

No, the Webform module is not a marketing automation module but is one of the most vital building blocks of an integration between Drupal and other third-party marketing automation software. The Drupal Webform module is used to collect user data via forms. You can build forms like surveys, simple newsletter signup forms or contact forms. This submitted data is then pushed to third-party marketing automation systems. Drupal 8 Webforms have a lot more features added like the object-oriented API, source editing, new and improved form elements, extendable plugins, better documentation and more.

                                         
                                              Webform Module for Drupal 8 – Form elements
Marketo MA

Marketo is a very popular and widely used marketing automation tool that automates activities such as lead tracking and nurturing, personalization, analytics, advertisements, social marketing, automated campaigns and much more across multiple devices. The Market MA Drupal module helps you capture lead data during form submission and adds tracking capabilities to your Drupal website with the Marketo Munchkin tracking codes and API. It also integrates with the Webform module. 


                                           Marketo MA Module for Drupal 8 – Setting upEloqua 

The Eloqua marketing automation tool by Oracle allows for marketing campaign management, email automation and tracker, lead management and engagement, and more. Eloqua Drupal module integrates Eloqua tracking and Eloqua Webforms submodule with your Drupal website. In Drupal 8, the Eloqua module has been divided into separate module fragments like the Eloqua Tracking module, webform Eloqua module, Eloqua API Redux (Drupal 8 and Eloqua REST API integration)

                                 
                         Eloqua Module for Drupal 8 - High-level design HubSpot 

HubSpot marketing automation is well-known to provide users with a wide range of inbound automation tools – the marketing hub, the sales hub and the service hub. Each of them can function alone or all together. The HubSpot Drupal module integrates with Webform and the HubSpot API. Once a user enters their information via Drupal 8 Webforms, the records are sent to HubSpot’s lead management tool, where the leads can be tracked and nurtured.


                                                           HubSpot Module for Drupal 8 – Setting upPardot

Pardot, the marketing automation service by Salesforce, offers marketers a host of activities like digital marketing campaign management, customer behavior tracking, SEO, website tracking, lead generation and nurturing, etc. The Pardot Drupal 8 module adds web analytics onto your Drupal website allowing marketing and sales department to create, deploy and manage online marketing campaigns. 

                  
                                                   Pardot Module for Drupal - ConfiguringMautic

By now you must have heard about the acquisition of Mautic, the first open-source marketing automation platform, by Acquia. Mautic allows for multi-channel communications and campaign management, visitor tracking, email marketing, content customization and personalization and more. The best way to integrate Mautic with your Drupal website is with the Webform Mautic module. It lets you add Mautic handlers to the Webform which allows data from to be submitted to the Mautic list. To be able to track website contacts, the Mautic tracking code should be installed in your Drupal website.


                                                      Mautic Module for Drupal – Setting upGoogle Analytics

Fun fact – Did you know Co-founder of Urchin (now Google Analytics) sold his company to Google on his wedding day (April 2005)? Google Analytics is the most widely used website analytics tool in the world today. No marketing automation is complete without analytics and GA does a great job at it. The Google Analytics Drupal module lets you add a web statistics tracking system to your website. It can track, monitor and support domains, users, files, search system, Adsense, custom code snippets and so much more. To generate reports for all your tracked data, the Drupal module for Google Analytics Reports can be installed.


                                                    Google Analytics Module for Drupal – Setting upMailChimp

MailChimp is a very popular email automation platform that does more than just sending emails. You can create custom campaigns, send and schedule automated emails based on certain predefined triggers, track and monitor customer behavior, personalize, generate reports, etc. The Drupal MailChimp module integrates your Drupal website with Mailchimp which will help in tracking and creating a list of website visitors. This list is sent to the MailChimp list from where email automation and other features can be accessed. You can also create signup forms, campaigns and track activity from your Drupal website. Your visitors can also have a control over which of your email lists they want to be on or off.


                                                   Mailchimp Module for Drupal – Sign up formThere are a few Marketing Automation tools that include a collection of marketing components:

IBM Marketing Cloud is a hybrid marketing automation tool based on Silverpop’s cloud-based marketing automation software, DemandTec’s cloud analytics and Xtify’s mobile messaging models and enhanced by IBM marketing software.

Adobe Marketing Cloud includes components like Adobe Target, Adobe Social, Adobe Campaign, Adobe Media Optimizer and Adobe Analytics. Adobe Analytics (previously SiteCatalyst) is a module that you can integrate with your Drupal website that helps provide detailed statistics about website traffic and can categorize customers based on their locations, preferences and behavioral traits.

Integration of marketing automation tools with your Drupal website will help you convert your leads into happy customers. This will optimize your operational productivity and thereby help in faster revenue growth. At Specbee, our Drupal experts can help you integrate your Drupal website with any third-party marketing automation tools and also offer you a wide array of Drupal services to accelerate your success.

Drupal Planet Shefali ShettyApr 05, 2017 Subscribe For Our Newsletter And Stay Updated Subscribe

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  Shefali ShettyApr 05, 2017 Recent Posts Image Marketing Simplified - Top Drupal 8 Modules for Marketing Automation Every Marketer Needs Image An Introduction to the Meta tag module in Drupal 8 Image How to create a custom Layout builder in Drupal 8 Explore Our Drupal Services TAKE ME THERE Featured Success Stories

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Categories: Drupal

Amazon Product Advertising (Affiliate)

New Drupal Modules - 6 November 2019 - 5:06am

Amazon is soon shutting down their paapiv4 and then paapiv5 is the new active one. This is a fork of the original amazon. I needed to change a lot and removed things too to keep it clean until the base works. module by rfay.
Read the FAQ.
I have documented what i changed. The new paapiV5 is very sensitive to requests and throttles mass requests.

Categories: Drupal

Diba Starterkit

New Drupal Modules - 6 November 2019 - 4:54am

Installation and basic settings for a common Drupal project.

composer require 'drupal/diba_starterkit' --prefer-dist

When the module is installed, it performs the following tasks:

Core modules enabled:

  • locale
  • statistics
  • syslog

Core modules disabled:

  • help
  • tour
  • shortcut
  • quickedit
  • color

Contrib modules installed:

Categories: Drupal

PreviousNext: Getting Started with Skpr

Planet Drupal - 5 November 2019 - 9:12pm

Skpr provides a compelling command line workflow for developers.

In this blog post we will be demonstrating Skpr by going through the fundamental commands: package, deploy and config.

by Nick Schuch / 6 November 2019 Package

Modern applications require a set of steps to prepare the application for deployment, these steps might include:

  • Installing dependencies eg. Composer
  • Building the theme eg. Gulp
  • Installing extra packages

The outcome of this preparation then needs to be stored so it can be deployed onto the platform. This process is known as packaging and is accomplished in Skpr by running the command:

skpr package

As you can see in the diagram below, this command does a lot of heavy lifting. It not only compiles your code, it also splits the application into individually scalable components and pushes them to the Skpr platform, ready for deployment.

Also of note, this command can be run by developers and automation alike. Typically this command would be run as part of a pipeline in conjunction with the deploy command for a continuous deployment workflow.

Deploy

Now that our application is packaged, let’s deploy it!

Deploying the application is as simple as running the below command. Seriously, it’s that easy.

skpr deploy

While simple on the surface, Skpr is actually orchestrating a catalog of cloud managed services.

  • CDN / Cache
  • Certificates
  • Database
  • Storage
  • Search
  • SMTP

These services are then exposed to the application through the Skpr’s configuration system.

Config

The Twelve-Factor app manifesto calls for strict separation of configuration from code. This approach provides several advantages:

  • Sensitive values such as API tokens and private keys will not be leaked if the codebase was ever exposed.
  • There is no need for a switch statement for each environment defining various variables for dev, staging, etc..
  • Feature toggles can be used to dynamically enable functionality without a deployment.

Skpr out of the box will provide configuration for:

  • Database connection details
  • SMTP credentials
  • File storage locations eg. public / private / temporary

As a developer you can also add your own custom configuration eg. API keys for an integration.

In this example we are adding an API key for mailchimp and flagging it as a secret to avoid the key from being accidentally exposed (see the [secret] in the command line image above).

skpr config set --secret dev mailchimp.key xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Details on how to configure your application to consume these configuration key/values can be found here.

Conclusion

Skpr provides a simple set of commands for developers to "get the job" done.

If you would like to dive into more of the Skpr commands check out our documentation site, or contact us for a demo via the skpr.io website.

Tagged Skpr, Drupal Hosting
Categories: Drupal

Migrate: EMS Platform

New Drupal Modules - 5 November 2019 - 2:01pm

Provides examples and some custom functionality for migrating data from EMS Platform using standard Drupal 8 migration processes.

Categories: Drupal

1xINTERNET blog: We are Makers!

Planet Drupal - 5 November 2019 - 1:02pm
We are Makers! dorina Tue, 11/05/2019 - 22:02

At “DriesNote”, last Tuesday at DrupalCon Amsterdam, Dries Buytaert, the founder and project lead of Drupal, spoke about his vision of contributors and sponsors and their impact on Drupal’s future. Time and speed are the biggest factors looking ahead. If we want to want to see Drupal continue to grow, and be competitive in the open source market, we need to make sure all aspects are nurtured. This should ensure that both beginners and experts choosing Drupal will enjoy the experience.

Categories: Drupal

Acro Media: Ubercart is Dead:  Roundtable with Shawn McCabe Recap

Planet Drupal - 5 November 2019 - 11:45am

Shawn McCabe, Acro Media’s CTO, recently made waves when he proclaimed through our blog that Ubercart is dead. We received both praise and criticism from the Drupal community for saying it, but the truth of the matter is that Ubercart, once the primary module businesses relied on for adding ecommerce functionality into the Drupal CMS, has yet to have a stable Drupal 8 release (even though Drupal 8 was released 4 years ago in November, 2015). It’s currently stuck in “alpha” and overall usage has been steadily declining for years. Read the initial post for more information.

We put out that post as an attempt to inform businesses that are currently using Ubercart that they should be planning their migration to something else ASAP, before Drupal 7 reaches end-of-life. Our suggestion for these businesses is to move to the Drupal Commerce module for Drupal 8. Drupal Commerce is the successor to Ubercart and was founded by one of the Ubercart creators. It’s the natural choice for these businesses and overall it’s a much better platform in every way.

Of course, when you tell a business that they need to replatform because their ecommerce software is “dying,” that’s not an easy thing for business owners to hear. Many flat-out ignore it to be honest, but those who understand the warning want to know more about how it will affect their business. From the reaction we received to the initial post, we understood that more needed to be said. Businesses using Ubercart now have questions that need to be answered. Because of this, we held an “Ubercart is Dead Roundtable” webinar-style discussion where we put Shawn in the spotlight to answer the questions that have come in. The goal of this discussion was to be both informative and demystifying, a general discussion instead of a sales pitch.

So without further ado, here is the roundtable recap video. A list of timestamped discussion topics are shown below the video. If you have any other questions not mentioned here, send us a message. We would be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Watch the roundtable

Host: Jace Anderson
Specialist: Shawn McCabe, CTO

00:00 - Introduction
00:45 - Who is Shawn McCabe
01:55 - Why do you [Shawn] think Ubercart is Dead?
03:07 - Why is Drupal Commerce the next platform of choice?
04:02 - Why should I move off of Ubercart when our business is currently operating fine?
05:58 - Is there a performance difference between Ubercart and Drupal Commerce?
08:06 - Is it possible to move off of Ubercart but stay on Drupal 7?
09:29 - How do we know Drupal Commerce won’t see the same fate as Ubercart?
11:00 - Is there a big difference in the features from Ubercart to Drupal Commerce? Is Drupal Commerce more robust?
13:35 - Is there a big learning curve for the backend administrators when using Drupal Commerce?
15:21 - How big of an undertaking is the migration from Ubercart to Drupal Commerce? Can an IT team of 5 complete it?
16:44 - What website components add to the complexity of a migration?
18:00 - Would a migration interrupt my business? Will it affect the customer experience?
18:54 - How would a migration impact my internal operations?
20:25 - How do we know Drupal Commerce won’t see the same fate as Ubercart (second part)?
21:26 - Currently we use multi-currency. Does Drupal commerce support this too?
22:41 - We use MailChimp for abandoned cart recovery. Can it still be used with Drupal Commerce?
23:10 - Are there other alternatives to Drupal Commerce? Is it the only option to continue using Drupal?
24:04 - How does Drupal Commerce perform on mobile?
25:02 - From your blog post, there looks to be companies using Ubercart on Drupal 8. What would prompt this?
25:57 - Can Drupal Commerce be used for custom customer experiences?
27:20 - Based on my research, Drupal Commerce is defined as having a difficult user interface. How can we ensure our team will be able to manage the backend?
28:28 - Can I manage my orders from my mobile device?
29:19 - What does Drupal Commerce offer for legacy software integration?
30:51 - What are the key specifications in a migration that attribute to an increased cost when doing a migration?
32:31 - Is my data migrated automatically? Can I also move order history, receipts and customer data?
33:40 - For a migration, where does one find support?
34:52 - What process is involved in managing coupons and promotions?
37:01 - How does bundling differ from Ubercart to Drupal Commerce?
38:00 - Does Drupal Commerce have subscription payment functionality?
40:05 - Is Drupal Commerce catalog taxonomy based?
41:10 - Shawn’s final words to those still on Ubercart who are not planning their move away from it yet.

Categories: Drupal

Srijan Technologies: Do away with Security Risk Through AppSec Shift-Left Approach

Planet Drupal - 5 November 2019 - 9:15am

With developers under the constant pressure of completing the software development process expeditiously, more and more facets of the process are compelled to make a “shift-left”, and bob up in the software development lifecycle (SDLC).

Categories: Drupal

Learn what makes Apex Legends' ranked leagues tick at GDC 2020!

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 5 November 2019 - 9:12am

Respawn's Apex Legends is one of the biggest games in the world, and at the Game Developers Conference next year you'll have an opportunity to learn how its rock-solid Ranked leagues work! ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Dries Buytaert: State of Drupal presentation (October 2019)

Planet Drupal - 5 November 2019 - 7:45am

Last week, many Drupalists came together for Drupalcon Amsterdam.

As a matter of tradition, I presented my State of Drupal keynote. You can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 20:44 minutes), or download a copy of my slides (149 MB).

Drupal 8 innovation update

I kicked off my keynote with an update on Drupal 8. Drupal 8.8 is expected to ship on December 4th, and will come with many exciting improvements.

Drupal 8.7 shipped with a Media Library to allow editors to reuse images, videos and other media assets. In Drupal 8.8, Media Library has been marked as stable, and features a way to easily embed media assets using a WYSIWYG text editor.

I'm even more proud to say that Drupal has never looked better, nor been more accessible. I showed our progress on Claro, a new administration UI for Drupal. Once Claro is stable, Drupal will look more modern and appealing out-of-the-box.

The Composer Initiative has also made significant progress. Drupal 8.8 will be the first Drupal release with proper, official support for Composer out-of-the-box. Composer helps solve the problem of Drupal being difficult to install and update. With Composer, developers can update Drupal in one step, as Composer will take care of updating all the dependencies (e.g. third party code).

What is better than one-step updates? Zero-step updates. We also showed progress on the Automated Updates Initiative.

Finally, Drupal 8.8 marks significant progress with our API-first Initiative, with several new improvements to JSON:API support in the contributed space, including an interactive query builder called JSON:API Explorer. This work solidifies Drupal's leadership position as a leading headless or decoupled solution.

Drupal 9 will be the easiest major update

Next, I gave an update on Drupal 9, as we're just eight months from the target release date. We have been working hard to make Drupal 9 the easiest major update in the last decade. In my keynote at 42:25, I showed how to upgrade your site to Drupal 9.0.0's development release.

Drupal 9 product strategy

I am proud of all the progress we made on Drupal 8. Nevertheless, it's also time to start thinking about our strategic priorities for Drupal 9. With that in mind, I proposed four strategic tracks for Drupal 9 (and three initial initiatives):

Strategic track 1: reduce cost and effort

Users want site development to be low-cost and zero-maintenance. As a result, we'll need to continue to focus on initiatives such as automated updates, configuration management, and more.

Strategic track 2: prioritizing the beginner experience

As we saw in a survey Acqua's UX team conducted, most people have a relatively poor initial impression of Drupal, though if they stick with Drupal long enough, their impression of Drupal grows significantly over time. This unlike any of its competitors, whose impression decreases as experience is gained. Drupal 9 should focus on attracting new users, and decreasing beginners' barriers to entry so they can fall in love with Drupal much sooner.

Beginners struggle with Drupal while experts love Drupal.Drupal's sentiment curve goes in the opposite direction of WordPress', AEM's and Sitecore's. This presents both a big challenge and opportunity for Drupal.

We also officially launched the first initiative on this track; a new front-end theme for Drupal called "Olivero". This new default theme will give new users a much better first impression of Drupal, as well as reflect the modern backend that Drupal sports under the hood.

Strategic track 3: drive the Open Web

As you may know, 1 out of 40 websites run on Drupal. With that comes a responsibility to help drive the future of the Open Web. By 2022-2025, 4 billion new people will join the internet. We want all people to have access to the open web, and as a result should focus on accessibility, inclusiveness, security, privacy, and interoperability.

Strategic track 4: be the best structured data engine

We've already seen the beginnings of a content explosion, and will experience 300 billion new devices coming online by 2030. By continuing to make Drupal a better and better content repository with a flexible API, we'll be ready for a future with more content, more integrations, more devices, and more channels.

Over the next six months, we'll be opening up these proposed tracks to the community for discussion, and introducing surveys to define the 10 inaugural initiatives for Drupal 9. So far the feedback at DrupalCon Amsterdam has been very positive, but I'm looking forward to much more feedback!

Growing sponsored contributions

In a previous blog post, Balancing Makers and Takers to scale and sustain Open Source, I covered a number of topics related to organizational contribution. Around 1:19:44, my keynote goes into more details, including interviews with several prominent business owners and corporate contributors in the Drupal community.

You can find the different interview snippet belows:

  • Baddy Sonja Breidert, co-founder of 1xINTERNET, on why it is important to help convert Takers become Makers.
  • Tiffany Farriss, CEO of Palantir, on what it would take for her organization to contribute substantially more to Drupal.
  • Mike Lamb, Vice President of Global Digital Platforms at Pfizer, announcing that we are establishing the Contribution Recognition Committee to govern and improve Drupal's contribution credit system.
Thank you

Thank you to everyone who attended Drupalcon Amsterdam and contributed to the event's success. I'm always amazed by the vibrant community that makes Drupal so unique. I'm proud to showcase the impressive work of contributors in my presentations, and congratulate all of the hardworking people that are crucial to building Drupal 8 and 9 behind the scenes. I'm excited to continue to celebrate our work and friendships at future events.

Thanks to the 641 individuals who worked on Drupal 8.8 so far.Thanks to the 243 different individuals who contributed to Drupal 8.8 to date.
Categories: Drupal

State of Drupal presentation (October 2019)

Dries Buytaert - 5 November 2019 - 7:45am

Last week, many Drupalists came together for Drupalcon Amsterdam.

As a matter of tradition, I presented my State of Drupal keynote. You can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 20:44 minutes), or download a copy of my slides (149 MB).

Drupal 8 innovation update

I kicked off my keynote with an update on Drupal 8. Drupal 8.8 is expected to ship on December 4th, and will come with many exciting improvements.

Drupal 8.7 shipped with a Media Library to allow editors to reuse images, videos and other media assets. In Drupal 8.8, Media Library has been marked as stable, and features a way to easily embed media assets using a WYSIWYG text editor.

I'm even more proud to say that Drupal has never looked better, nor been more accessible. I showed our progress on Claro, a new administration UI for Drupal. Once Claro is stable, Drupal will look more modern and appealing out-of-the-box.

The Composer Initiative has also made significant progress. Drupal 8.8 will be the first Drupal release with proper, official support for Composer out-of-the-box. Composer helps solve the problem of Drupal being difficult to install and update. With Composer, developers can update Drupal in one step, as Composer will take care of updating all the dependencies (e.g. third party code).

What is better than one-step updates? Zero-step updates. We also showed progress on the Automated Updates Initiative.

Finally, Drupal 8.8 marks significant progress with our API-first Initiative, with several new improvements to JSON:API support in the contributed space, including an interactive query builder called JSON:API Explorer. This work solidifies Drupal's leadership position as a leading headless or decoupled solution.

Drupal 9 will be the easiest major update

Next, I gave an update on Drupal 9, as we're just eight months from the target release date. We have been working hard to make Drupal 9 the easiest major update in the last decade. In my keynote at 42:25, I showed how to upgrade your site to Drupal 9.0.0's development release.

Drupal 9 product strategy

I am proud of all the progress we made on Drupal 8. Nevertheless, it's also time to start thinking about our strategic priorities for Drupal 9. With that in mind, I proposed four strategic tracks for Drupal 9 (and three initial initiatives):

Strategic track 1: reduce cost and effort

Users want site development to be low-cost and zero-maintenance. As a result, we'll need to continue to focus on initiatives such as automated updates, configuration management, and more.

Strategic track 2: prioritizing the beginner experience

As we saw in a survey Acqua's UX team conducted, most people have a relatively poor initial impression of Drupal, though if they stick with Drupal long enough, their impression of Drupal grows significantly over time. This unlike any of its competitors, whose impression decreases as experience is gained. Drupal 9 should focus on attracting new users, and decreasing beginners' barriers to entry so they can fall in love with Drupal much sooner.

Beginners struggle with Drupal while experts love Drupal.Drupal's sentiment curve goes in the opposite direction of WordPress', AEM's and Sitecore's. This presents both a big challenge and opportunity for Drupal.

We also officially launched the first initiative on this track; a new front-end theme for Drupal called "Olivero". This new default theme will give new users a much better first impression of Drupal, as well as reflect the modern backend that Drupal sports under the hood.

Strategic track 3: drive the Open Web

As you may know, 1 out of 40 websites run on Drupal. With that comes a responsibility to help drive the future of the Open Web. By 2022-2025, 4 billion new people will join the internet. We want all people to have access to the Open Web, and as a result should focus on accessibility, inclusiveness, security, privacy, and interoperability.

Strategic track 4: be the best structured data engine

We've already seen the beginnings of a content explosion, and will experience 300 billion new devices coming online by 2030. By continuing to make Drupal a better and better content repository with a flexible API, we'll be ready for a future with more content, more integrations, more devices, and more channels.

Over the next six months, we'll be opening up these proposed tracks to the community for discussion, and introducing surveys to define the 10 inaugural initiatives for Drupal 9. So far the feedback at DrupalCon Amsterdam has been very positive, but I'm looking forward to much more feedback!

Growing sponsored contributions

In a previous blog post, Balancing Makers and Takers to scale and sustain Open Source, I covered a number of topics related to organizational contribution. Around 1:19:44, my keynote goes into more details, including interviews with several prominent business owners and corporate contributors in the Drupal community.

You can find the different interview snippet belows:

  • Baddy Sonja Breidert, co-founder of 1xINTERNET, on why it is important to help convert Takers become Makers.
  • Tiffany Farriss, CEO of Palantir, on what it would take for her organization to contribute substantially more to Drupal.
  • Mike Lamb, Vice President of Global Digital Platforms at Pfizer, announcing that we are establishing the Contribution Recognition Committee to govern and improve Drupal's contribution credit system.
Thank you

Thank you to everyone who attended Drupalcon Amsterdam and contributed to the event's success. I'm always amazed by the vibrant community that makes Drupal so unique. I'm proud to showcase the impressive work of contributors in my presentations, and congratulate all of the hardworking people that are crucial to building Drupal 8 and 9 behind the scenes. I'm excited to continue to celebrate our work and friendships at future events.

Thanks to the 641 individuals who worked on Drupal 8.8 so far.Thanks to the 243 different individuals who contributed to Drupal 8.8 to date.
Categories: Drupal

Drupal Agency Marketing (Promote Drupal): Promote Drupal Pitch Deck - Everyone is welcome!

Planet Drupal - 5 November 2019 - 7:26am

The Drupal Pitch deck has been created, as part of the Promote Drupal initiative, to support and strengthen the position of those in sales roles who present Drupal to decision makers and buyers. We want to help elevate Drupal via agencies, co-ops, and independents. It is an initiative I have led, in close partnership with Suzanne Dergacheva and Ricardo Amaro and involving over 100 contributors.

Born out of a meeting of European Drupal leaders in Darmstadt. In just 12 months ago The Drupal Pitch Deck has come a long way. Version 2.0 of the deck is available now, contains 108 slides in all, and 73 case studies representing the best Drupal projects from agencies across the globe

It was fantastic to see the project featured during introductions ahead of the DriesNote and Suzanne Dergacheva present The story of how the pitch deck came to be at the Drupal Initiatives Keynote at DrupalCon Amsterdam. Seeing non code contributions from so many people being celebrated on this global stage was a real highpoint of the conference for me.

Call for content remains open, you can Add Your Slide Here. With the latest and greatest Drupal projects celebrated at the International Splash Awards we are calling all agencies to submit their incredible new case studies.

In preparation for DrupalCon the team at CTI Digital worked to deliver a solution which allowed all deck content to be transferred into Drupal 8. Integrated to Lingotek at translation management system which enables us to start the internationalisation of the pitch deck. Special thanks must go to Richard Roberts at Lingotek who worked tirelessly over the week of DrupalCon on boarding community translators.

Now that we have systems in place we are actively inviting people to volunteer to translate slides into their language here.

Call for front end developers

All but stage 7 is complete now. We are keen to attract front end developers to join the effort to produce the presentation layer, a Drupal theme. What we have in mind is detailed here

Promote Drupal Pitch Deck Version 2.0 released

During the Birds of a Feather “Bof” meeting we released Version 2.0 of the Pitch Deck which you can download now.

Photo: Alex Moreno

Contribution day

Non code contributions to Drupal is a theme close to my heart. So I was delighted to see 2 tables full of people translating and creating new content at the Contribution Day.


 

Not only this, some of the team were first time contributions and only registered on Drupal.org for 3 weeks. For me this is what success looks like.

In addition to translation we saw several subject experts drafting new slides providing supporting evidence as to why Drupal is a prime choice in Higher Education and for Government.

We still need volunteers in far greater numbers to achieve the translation into 16 languages which is underway. Right now we are calling for people speaking English and the following languages to volunteer.

  • Arabic
  • Bulgarian
  • Catalan
  • Dutch
  • English
  • Farsi (Persian)
  • French
  • French
  • German
  • Hebrew
  • Hindi
  • Hungarian
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Polish
  • Portuguese
  • Slovak
  • Spanish
  • Thai
  • Turkish

In conclusion the Pitch Deck Initiative has achieved far more than we could ever have imagined on that day in Darmstadt last year. With the right support from community members we will soon deliver decks in 19 languages. It really is down to you! It’s an ideal opportunity to contribute your skills in bite size chunks. As you’ve already seen there are plenty of ways to join our movement.

On behalf of Ricardo, Suzanne and myself many thanks to all who have participated. We look forward to meeting you too, everyone is welcome!

Categories: Drupal

Drupal @ Penn State: Alpha Release for Drupal 8 version of Cosign

Planet Drupal - 5 November 2019 - 6:54am

With Drupal 9 coming this summer, my team at the Eberly College of Science at Penn State felt it necessary to get all of the custom modules we have written (or are mission critical contrib modules) updated and as future-ready as possible. A happy side effect of that process is that we've taken the time to modernize the code in the Drupal 8 version of Cosign (https://www.drupal.org/project/cosign). After joining the Cosign project, I'm happy to announce that we have released an official Alpha version of the Drupal 8 version of Cosign. 

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: Top Drupal blog posts from October 2019

Planet Drupal - 5 November 2019 - 4:58am

November has arrived, and, with another successful European DrupalCon in the books, it’s time to start planning for the upcoming big things in Drupal and further developing on ideas the ‘Con has inspired. Before you do, however, take a look at our recap of last month’s top Drupal-related posts for some additional inspiration.

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Categories: Drupal

Afterlife–Wandering Souls Review

Gnome Stew - 5 November 2019 - 4:30am

Death often defines the RPGs that we play, even when we don’t realize it. The style of gameplay of many games is determined by the frequency of character death, but even in games where that isn’t a consideration, the absence of character death is often a consideration in reinforcing the tone and themes of a game.

Instead of death being an aspect of the wider game, the game I’m reviewing today is entirely about death, and what comes after. Today, we’re looking at Afterlife—Wandering Souls, a game about finding out who you were in life, now that you are dead.

The Book of the Dead

This review is based on the PDF for the game, which is 153 pages long. This includes a two-page character sheet and a single page index at the back of the book. The book itself has clear headers and table entries, but saying that feels like I’m definitely underselling this book.

When I say this book has full-color art, I mean there are gorgeous borders on each page, as well as full-page chapter illustrations, and various half-page illustrations for various entries in the book. Vibrant flowers contrast with grey skulls and characters that encompass both extremes in appearance throughout the book.

Traveling the Dark

The book begins with an explanation of the setting of the game. The Tenebris is shadowy real that isn’t the afterlife that you should have reached. It’s kind of a strange world between worlds, where the player characters aren’t natives.

Player characters are Wanderers, trying to collect Resonance to unlock memories that lead to Death Marks, which appear on their skin once they have had a Break that allows them to reintegrate a memory. Enough Death Marks, and the character can find their way out of the Tenebris and into their intended afterlife.

If they gain too much Stagnation, they become Unrequited, characters that have lost their will to move out of the Tenebris and find their intended afterlife. Characters remember very little about their past lives, and are attempting to find out who they were, before moving Beyond. There is more on Mirages, Limbos, and the people native to the Tenebris later on in the book.

By this point in the book, I was already greatly intrigued at what this kind of surreal journey through the spaces between life and death would look like, and this is a great, evocative chapter to bait the hook.

Mechanics

Characters have a stat for Body, Mind, and Soul. They have Attributes linked to each of these core stats, that represent a specialization in applying that core stat.

In addition to attributes, characters have pools derived from adding a core stat to an attribute. One pool is Concept, and the other is Vitality. Concept can be spent to gain special results when that pool is relevant to what is being done, such as spending points to generate a success on your roll, or to add a success to an allies check. The Vitality pool represents how well you resist stress to the relevant area—for example, Health represents physical wellbeing, Hunger represents want (more on this later), and Will represents your ability to carry on.

Health and Will function as you might expect—zero out your pool and you may need to accept a consequence or you die (again, and permanently this time) or you start gaining Stagnation and eventually become an NPC that doesn’t have the motivation to find out who you are or your final afterlife any longer. You can save yourself from permanent death by giving up Will, and if you zero out Health or Will, you suffer a memory.

Hunger is interesting, because it can track you having your basic needs met, but you can also spend from this pool to buy things, representing you giving up your potential to sustain yourself to secure an item. This is what you do instead of tracking any kind of wealth. If you zero out your Hunger, you start taking Health damage until you aren’t quite so destitute anymore.

When characters fill up their Resonance track, they gain Death Marks, and Death Marks allow characters to pick up abilities like Tricks, which can lower the difficulty of certain tasks. Characters also have an Approach, which is a manifestation of the character’s self. This manifestation is either a Bow, a Shield, or a Sword, and each one gives benefits to checks in different situations. Characters can also have Talents, which are very much like Feats or Stunts from other games—a discreet ability that modifies the game rules in specific circumstances.

While Death Marks and Approaches are manifestations of who the Wanderers are, Wanderers can also obtain Curiosa, items that have a level from 1 to 3 that can increase damage or reduce difficulty when used in an appropriate circumstance.

Making checks involves rolling a pool of d6s derived from adding a Core Stat to an Attribute (with potential bonuses from other aspects of the character), and counting certain numbers as successes. The GM sets difficulties, and when the PCs fail, Things Get Worse, which means that the action in the scene escalates, or the PCs take damage to one of their Vitality pools. The GM never rolls dice.

Two things in particular jump out at me in this design. I am interested to see how the flow of Hunger works as both a substitute for tracking currency and for measuring the “needs” of a character. I’m an easy mark for anything that tracks wealth or resources in a new way. I also like that failure isn’t just failure, it is always escalation. I feel like this is a long term legacy of games derived from Apocalypse World, and a key component to game design that doesn’t involve the GM rolling dice or using the rules that work in a parallel manner to the player facing mechanics.

Playing Afterlife

This chapter details the assumed course of play in a game session. Characters are traveling across the Tenebris and interact with the inhabitants. They find Limbos, which are special “pocket dimensions” where they can gain Resonance. When they gain enough Resonance, they can suffer a Break, which allows them to unlock a Death Mark, which moves them closer to their Requeum, their final trip to their intended afterlife.

Characters can mark XP for each Things Get Worse result that comes up, and these can be used to advance attributes. XP can also be marked by answering questions at the end of a session. Death Marks and their associated abilities are only unlocked through interacting with Limbos and gaining Resonance.

In each Limbo, a character can claim something in that Limbo as a Fragment, a powerful link to a memory that immediately triggers a Break and creates a Death Mark for them. This can only happen once per Limbo, and the same character can’t claim a Fragment in a Limbo until everyone else in the group has done so.

I like the idea of characters being able to name their own fragments and have the agency to say when they will experience a Break and what about that memory helps them to remember who they are. It is a nice interaction between the surreal nature of the setting and player agency to allow this kind of declaration, and I like that the built-in mechanics address who can claim a fragment and when, to keep people from dominating a  trip into a Limbo.


World, Mirages,
and Limbos

The next three chapters detail the settings and give examples of existing people and places in the Tenebris. Mirages are established settlements in the Tenebris, usually populated by people that are native to the Tenebris itself, rather than wandering souls that are either looking to travel Beyond, or have given up that quest.

Limbos are strange pocket dimensions that hold Resonance that the Wanderers need to unlock their memories and gain Death Marks. Limbos tend to be even stranger and more thematic than the Mirage settlements in the Tenebris.

These chapters introduce some of the hazy mythology of the setting, including the giant serpents that live under the sands of the Tenebris and that were present at the dawn of creation.

There are native people of the Tenebris, such as:

  • The Kiin (human appearing, but born to this world)
  • The Nagiin (serpentine natives of the Tenebris that see themselves as heirs of the giant serpents)
  • Venefolk (multi-armed near humans with a talent for Magick)
  • Usurii (small, spiritual bearfolk)
  • Ungkiin (hooved humanoids subdivided between satyrs and centaurs)

There are also the other Wanderers as well as the Unrequited

The Wanderers have philosophical factions based on their view of the true nature of the afterlife Beyond, and there are factions of Unrequited as well. Individual Mirages have political aspirations that might reach across the Tenebris and hinder or harm the efforts of PC Wanderers on their journeys.

Example Mirages include a city built on the back of a giant dinosaur, the towering city of Babel with its 77 circles, a city built on the edge of a chasm, and what appears to be a crashed starship. There are frozen wastes, cities built inside of an enormous skeleton (with districts in the various body parts), a city composed of reflections, and a mirage based on M.C. Escher architecture.

Example Limbos include a region that exists in the flame of an enormous candle, an ever-expanding version of Atlantis, an ever dark jungle, and a giant garden. Other examples are a living steampunk land, a maze of broken glass, a giant void, and a world based on truths established by ancient science and alchemy. Because the Limbos are both highly conceptual and the area where the heart of adventuring is assumed to be taking place, the entries have a section for what themes the Limbo has, as well as various plot hooks listed at the end of the Limbo’s entry.

I don’t always enjoy surrealist fantasy. I may be no fun, as I can’t always enjoy a world that aggressively doesn’t make sense for the sake of reveling in the chaos. That said, there is something very charming and engaging about the Tenebris and its details. Something about the framing device of the setting existing between and outside of the real world and the afterlives that “should be” makes my brain embrace all of the weirdness and want to engage with it, especially with the meta-conceit of essentially seizing the dreamlike qualities of the Limbos in order to regain memories and remember who your character really is.

Running Afterlife

This section summarizes and expands on the mechanics presented in previous sections. It also defines the modes of play and switching between them (in this case, what it is like to travel the Tenebris, versus encountering a Limbo, versus having a Break or suffering a Memory).

It gives advice on setting difficulty and defining what happens when Things Get Worse. There are some guidelines for creating your own Limbos, and charts to help generate inhabitants that the PCs may encounter.

There is also a section on the various factions in the Tenebris, their motivations, and their goals. There is also a section on tracking the activity level of the various powers in the setting, to determine how ascendant and important they are in your version of the Tenebris.

Character Creation

Character creation is situated at the end of the book, most likely because creating characters is essentially a very active “session zero” for the game, where you don’t determine anything about your character until everyone is together on The Boatman’s ship, arriving in the Tenebris together.

Each character gets three dice of Clarity, which allows them the potential to reroll the results they get as they being to remember details about themselves. If characters have Clarity left at the end of character creation, they can spend it to move points from one attribute to another.

Characters rolls on the following charts, which give you base level numbers for your Core stats and Attributes depending on the entries:

  • My Life Was . . .
  • What I Learned . . .
  • What I Know Now . . .

Even once you come up with all of this, you don’t have a huge amount of details on your characters, but you have a framework to start building on, and your memories (which you have more control over defining), will let you add context. Even at that, some of the facts of your life (you murdered someone, you were a liar, etc.) may not be what you want to build on, so you can roll a Clarity die to see if you can reroll on the chart.

This isn’t framed as “that last roll never happened,” but “you started to remember something, but that wasn’t exactly how it was.” I like that this contributes to the fuzzy nature of trying to rebuild your identity in the Tenebris, and how fragmentary memories can be misleading.

That said, I’m not sure that I’m thrilled with the idea that spending your Clarity dice only allows you a random chance to roll a new memory from the charts. While the game is very much about playing to the story, and not manipulating the rules, this mechanic rewards saving your Clarity dice to customize your character at the end more than just having a chance to play with different established details in your past life.

Appendix

The appendix includes the Death Marks, listed in alphabetical order, as well as providing alternate lists for all of the steps of character creation, which could be useful for long-term play, as well as varying results when players end up with similar results within the same group.

Resonance It strikes a wonderful balance between the surreal and the structured, with a set of mythological conceits that provide a container for the chaos within. Share1Tweet1Reddit1Email

There are so many imaginative elements to this setting, and fun details to play with. I love the concept of the Limbos, and the agency that players have in claiming fragments and regaining memories. It is such a strong, fun theme to play with, and the details of the people and the Mirages in the Tenebris act as a really well-defined pacing mechanism so that the players have more to do then just racing to the next Limbo.

Stagnation

I’m not a huge fan of spending a resource for only the chance at rerolling a result, especially when Clarity is the only real input that a player has on their character in character creation driven by random rolls. While players have more agency “on the back end,” first impressions can be strong, and this mechanic feels like its rewarding arranging numbers more than controlling narrative elements. There is discussion in many places in the book about player input and getting the permission of the table for elements of the story, but with some of the themes of the game, I would have liked a more concentrated and direct treatment of table safety. It’s not missing, it’s just not a single reference point that can be accessed.

Recommended–If the product fits in your broad area of gaming interests, you are likely to be happy with this purchase.

This is an imaginative setting, with fun and accessible mechanics, and lots of tools for adding creative content into games. There is space for player agency and contribution to the story, but lots of room for the GM to have fun adding the fantastical to the game. It strikes a wonderful balance between the surreal and the structured, with a set of mythological conceits that provide a container for the chaos within.

Do you love surreal fantasy, and if so, what games have captured the feel that you want the best? How much does a setting need to make sense for you to enjoy it? What other games have you played that dealt with the disposition of souls after death, and what are your favorites? Let us know in the comments below, we’re looking forward to hearing from you.

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Test by Contenttype

New Drupal Modules - 5 November 2019 - 2:48am
Categories: Drupal

The Seven Deadly Sins of Writing Interactive Fiction - by Lucas Zaper

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 4 November 2019 - 11:26pm
Those are my personal guidelines when making text games, and they come from a place of frustration with some common practices in the genre.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

When Theme and Mechanics Collide - by James Margaris

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 4 November 2019 - 11:25pm
Examining the disconnect between mechanics and theme in games like Overland and The Banner Saga
Categories: Game Theory & Design

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