Newsfeeds

Computed Twig Field

New Drupal Modules - 8 August 2018 - 8:05pm

Computed Field with Twig

Categories: Drupal

Drupal core announcements: Core JavaScript will be formatted using Prettier (many patches will need rerolls)

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2018 - 7:32pm

Drupal 8.6.x is now in a beta phase, which means we will now undertake disruptive cleanup tasks like adjusting coding standards. The main standards change in this release cycle will be the adoption of Prettier code formatter.

Work is underway to patch core for this change, which will touch many files, so be aware that you will need to reroll patches for conflicts and adjust them to use the new code style rules set by Prettier by running yarn prettier.

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: How to Speed Up Drupal Websites with Google AMP

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2018 - 5:53pm
Google’s AMP is an open source project that stands for Accelerated Mobile Pages. As the name implies, this project aims to serve mobile pages instantly without long load times. You can get a feel for AMP by searching for anything on your mobile on Google and clicking on links with a lightning sign beside them. Speed is an important factor for any website as it has a number of benefits including making a massive impact on a site’s SEO. In this post, let’s take a look at AMP for Drupal 8 and a brief overview of its implementation on the CMS.   There’s a module for that! As always, there’s a… READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

Tired of legal threats, emulation hub EmuParadise drops its ROM library

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 8 August 2018 - 12:41pm

ROMs and ISOs are no longer available on the retro games site EmuParadise. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Drupal Association blog: 2018 Q1 & Q2 Financials Statement Summary

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2018 - 12:15pm

Our board of directors is responsible for the Drupal Association’s financial health and as part of their duty, they review and then vote to approve monthly financial statements. The board met virtually on July 25, 2018 and voted to approve the Q1 & Q2 2018 financial statements, which can be found here.

Each month we compare our results against the financial KPIs we have set with the advice of our virtual CFO, Summit CPA. These KPIs were set to help us focus on increasing our net income so we can build a stronger cash reserve to ensure the organization’s sustainability.  

Our 2018 Financial KPIs are:

  • Cash Reserve: have a cash balance of 15% of Total Revenue
  • Net Income Profit Margin: end 2018 with a net income profit of 4%
  • Increase our Non-Event Revenue to $1.6M
  • DrupalCon Profit Margin of 27%

As of our June financial statement, which was approved by the board, the organization is tracking well against these KPIs.


KPI analysis through June 30 is looking positive for money in the bank, net income, non-event revenue, and event profit margin.

You can see that April was lower than the ideal target, due to missing revenue in a couple of areas. One with DrupalCon Nashville, where ticket sales came in lower than expected, and the second was some hosting contracts coming in later. These contracts will be reflected in future months.

We will monitor all KPIs through the year to ensure we are on track. However, one KPI is now complete: Nashville profit margin. DrupalCon Nashville was forecasted to come in at a net profit of $445K at the close of the conference in April, 2018, or 22%. While training tickets under-performed, resulting in a lower than expected ticket revenue, we still exceeded our net profit goal due to a decrease in expenses and an increase in sponsorship revenue. The final net profit was $481K or 25% which is 2% under the set KPI.  


Details for the DrupalCon Nashville forecast and actual income

While we did exceed our net profit forecast, it should be noted that this event did not generate as much for the project as past DrupalCons. This is because Nashville’s cost per attendee was higher than usual due to the location. However, at the time of selecting the venue, it was the best option compared to the other available cities. The Drupal Association continues to seek ways to diversify revenue so we are not so reliant on one event to fund the project.


The overall trend shows Nashville coming in lower than recent DrupalCon North America net income margins

Drupalcon is evolving and we are making changes.  While the programming, speakers, sessions make up the core of DrupalCon, our event staff is retooling and creating more value to serve everyone in the Drupal ecosystem.

We would not be able to do our mission-driven work without the support and contributions of our community. Contributions come in many forms, through the purchase of DrupalCon tickets and event sponsorships, through our Supporters and Members, Drupal.org sponsors, recruiters who post jobs on Drupal Jobs and many other fantastic ways our community supports the Drupal ecosystem. We are deeply grateful for everyone who contributes time, talent, and treasure to move Drupal forward.

Thank you!

Categories: Drupal

PUBG dev launches 'Fix PUBG' website to address longstanding bug complaints

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 8 August 2018 - 11:31am

PUBG Corp†™s new site seeks to address longstanding quality of life issues that plague its popular battle royale game with significant transparency along the way. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Devs, pitch your great and clever Design talks for GDC 2019!

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 8 August 2018 - 10:37am

If you've been sitting on a great idea for a talk on game design at Game Developers Conference 2019, organizers want to hear it -- before next Thursday, August 16th! ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Facebook introduces AR games to Messenger

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 8 August 2018 - 10:33am

Facebook has launched a handful of internally developed augmented reality games that can be played during Messenger video chats. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Webform E-petition

New Drupal Modules - 8 August 2018 - 8:50am

Webform E-petition provides a postcode lookup field to find details and emails on your local parliamentary representatives.

Currently it only supports the UK api They Work for You in order to send E-petitions to MP, MSPs and MLAs. But others can be added in the future to support campaigns in other countries if needed.

Categories: Drupal

Webform Send Multiple Emails

New Drupal Modules - 8 August 2018 - 8:50am

Extends the Webform module Email Handler to send individual emails when multiple recipients are added to the email "to" field.

Categories: Drupal

InternetDevels: Mail in Drupal 8: the built-in system and useful modules

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2018 - 7:00am

The dream of many website owners is to have email sending opportunities on their websites. Of course, it’s possible with Drupal 8, because it has infinite powers.

Read more
Categories: Drupal

The Good and Bad of Video Game Addiction - by Josh Bycer

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 August 2018 - 7:00am
Understanding the difference between an engaging and an addictive experience is becoming important given the recent discussions over video game addiction, but in this piece, Josh Bycer will elaborate on when a game goes too far.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

DeepDribble: Simulating Basketball with AI - by Anna Ploegh

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 August 2018 - 6:57am
Researchers form DeepMotion and CMU have taught virtual basketball players entirely physically simulated dribbling skills.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

TEN7 Blog's Drupal Posts: Episode 036: Matthew Tift

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2018 - 6:54am
Dr. Matthew Tift, Senior Drupal Developer at Lullabot, musicologist, podcast host and educator, sits down with Ivan Stegic to discuss his fascinating career and passion for those things open source. Discussing: Matthew's midwest ties, Walking meetings, The advantage of working at home, Working with Wisconsin Public Radio, Sea Grant Non-Indigenous Species Project. Dogpile and Metacrawler, Automate that process, C#, ColdFusion, VB6 Discovering Drupal, TTBOOK (To The Best of Our Knowledge), Accessible public information, Teaching kids to code, Finch Robots, Tonka Coder Dojo, "The Open School House", Live coding, Algorithmic Music, Algoraves, Toplap.org, Syncthing.
Categories: Drupal

How to make a Discord RPG: part 2 - by Adrian Hawkins

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 August 2018 - 6:53am
In part 1 we introduced our Discord react interface: part 2 of this blog series covers in more depth the design of the combat and exploration systems, as well as onboarding new players and Discord channel structure.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Mediacurrent: Marketer’s Guide to Drupal 8: Healthcare Marketing Q&A

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2018 - 6:09am

Alan Onnen is the Associate Director of Marketing for the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab. Recognized as #1 in rehabilitation for 27 years in a row. AbilityLab introduces its revolutionary care through 5 Innovation Centers - state-of-the-art hospital facilities and equipment for exceptional patient care provided by the best medical and nursing support.

With 15 years of experience in the marketing industry, the past 5 being with SRA and being a part of the team that helped adopt Drupal, Onnen has seen firsthand how Drupal 8 powers digital strategy. 

Mediacurrent Interview with Alan Onnen 

Mediacurrent: What does “digital transformation” mean for you? 

Alan Onnen: Digital transformation means a constant evolution. There’s no single transformation; it’s a constant state of change, staying on top of trends at once. As a digital marketer, you need to know a little bit about everything, UI, UX, nerdy stuff, best practices, changes in the digital environment, what people expect from websites in your vertical, etc. Some people think transformation is a binary term - something new - but it's not.

Mediacurrent: How does open source fit into the equation?

AO: Open source is something that’s not new but it’s getting so mainstream its part of that digital transformation. It’s about adjusting to the new worlds where open source doesn't mean unsecure - it means that it’s open and honest. We had to get buy-in from stakeholders. They dismissed it at the beginning of the RFP bc they thought you needed a Sitecore or an AEM. It took a long time and a lot of agency people to show how safe it is to help make them believe that open source isn’t a dirty word.

Mediacurrent: What current challenges are you trying to solve for?

AO: It is a constant struggle to keep up with Google - making sure our content is optimized for search algorithms. Our overall challenge is to keep our content fresh, navigating innovative best practices for our website while keeping up with legal and social constructs.

Mediacurrent: How are you using Drupal 8 to solve those problems? 

AO: One of the big reasons we chose Drupal was because of its customization ability. Our knowledge base is spread across so many people so Drupal’s ability to customize the backend experience and offer the fields and plain English way we need to talk about things is really important. Even just the simple need for content creators to be able to edit things and be able to customize that experience.

Another big reason was the fact that its open source and the community surrounding Drupal. If you have an idea you can find someone who has half baked or full-baked into that particular module or idea to help give your devs a headstart solution. With Drupal, you don’t have to start from scratch when you need something new to move the website forward. Chances are, someone has had a similar idea you can pull from.

Mediacurrent: Has this been your first experience with Drupal or have you worked with previous versions of Drupal in the past? What did Drupal 8 give you from a marketers/content editors perspective?

AO: I came to SRA on a proprietary healthcare based CMS. It was designed to serve mid to small hospital systems and we didn’t have access to the backend part of the site before. SRA put out an RFP for a replatforming and redesign of our website . We talked to different agencies, and Drupal kept coming up - there were no licensing fees with open source. The spin up on Drupal is more robust than most paid CMS experiences. The cost point of view is having it be free and open was very appetizing and Drupal had other features that appealed to us. 

Mediacurrent: Since launching on Drupal 8 have you noticed an increase in website conversions?  What would you attribute to that success (or lack of success)? By use of marketing automation strategies? Bc of easy integration?

AO: Drupal can be leveraged any which way you want it to be. We take advantage of the extensive list of modules. We have seen nice conversions off the YAML module & the webform module. It’s true of the module philosophy to be able to build how you want them too. 

With Drupal, our web traffic has been up. We have 3 very different facets of our site - rehab measures database, research educational platform, home site - and Drupal can support them all very well. It’s a testament to Drupal - with a flexible CMS, reporting, user interfaces, and a back end that can be robust enough to bring things together in an organic and seamless way. 

Mediacurrent: What are 3 factors you look at when evaluating an agency? Cost? Reputation? Their own web design? Logos they've sold? 

AO: With our RFP out, we began evaluating the superficial - books, examples, case studies, white papers, if their leadership had given talks and what they had talked about, the look and feel for brand consciousness, - exploring that space of ability. We didn’t want someone who was making cookie cutter websites and we didn’t want to stay looking just in the healthcare vertical. Our list was narrowed down to those whose work we respected and admired. 

In the RFP, the CMS wasn’t a consideration. We didn’t tell people which platform you needed to be on. We asked for the cost, their preferred CMS and why, and we never cared about where the agency was located. It’s important to know the the people are the agency - communication is critical. For instance, in their responses to those RFP’s are there timelines? Are they realistic? Do they make sense? It’s easy to see how much effort they did.

No one else did research like you guys [Mediacurrent] did before they got there for a face to face meeting. Your team said “oh, well we’ve already talked to discharge managers, nurses, planners.” They went through example personas, guessing on journeys, patients - and they were smart with how they handled it and took the initiative that early in the process. That showed us a lot about them. It wasn’t a giant new business budget and they didn’t ask for money up front. 

In all, the RFP process was about 4 months.

Mediacurrent: As a marketer using Drupal, what are some of the hot topics you'd like to know more about today? Personalization, marketing automation, etc.

AO: I’d like to know more about:

  • Integrations with personalization
  • Integrating with Google Analytics, tracking to AEM, adwords, & api that moves page data to backend sites
  • Marketing Automation capabilities

Mediacurrent: What advice would you give other CMO’s/VP’s/Director’s who are hesitant to move to Drupal 8?

AO: I would say it depends on what their hesitation is. You have to be committed to the build of your site. You need to be able to really understand your content creators, the users of your CMS, the scope of what they want to be doing, and understand what they could be doing on the front end. It’s important to know the ingredients - you can muck up Drupal and waste dev hours if you don’t know how the workflows to go and to know your taxonomy and pathing modules. 

Drupal requires a Digital Marketer to have a vision for what they want it to be before they start developing - or else they risk having to go back and retrofit into their CMS environment that they could have efficiently put in the first time.

The journey of CMS and Drupal needs to be a thoughtful one.

______________________________________________________

We want to extend a big THANK YOU to Alan for participating in this interview. In the next part of the blog series, we will dig into the top reasons for Drupal 8 and why enterprise marketers choose Drupal.

Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: Break it Down For Me, Shrop: Tackling Drupal Security Update SA-CORE-2018-005

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2018 - 5:29am

Security maintenance — and the ability to apply security updates quickly — is part and parcel to open source project success. 

Updating is typically done as part of the normal software release cycle, however, there are times when a security advisory needs to be released ASAP. A strong incident response plan builds a first defense line to mitigate and patch vulnerabilities. 

But what does a successful security response look like in action?

On the heels of a recent Drupal security update on August 1, 2018, Mediacurrent’s Senior Project Manager Christine Flynn had the same question. To find out, she interviewed our Open Source Security Lead, Mark “shrop” Shropshire, to get a layperson’s perspective on the security team’s approach.

 

“An off-cycle Drupal security advisory dropped on August 1, 2018. What does that mean for folks who aren’t developers?”

Flynn: I was watching the Slack channel as our team fixed sites, and I got some idea of what was happening. I’m not going to jiggle anybody’s elbows while they’re applying a security update, but I’m really curious now that the fixes are all in. 

Shrop: The official Drupal Security Advisory came out late in the day, after Symphony published their announcement in the morning. There was also one from Zend.

Flynn: I read all of those links while the team was applying the security update, but I feel like I didn’t totally understand the implications. I’d love to get a better picture from you of what they mean.

Shrop: You bet! I hope you can hear me, I’m at a coffee shop right now.

Flynn: Are you on their unsecured WiFi?

Shrop: Nope! I’m on a hotspot and on VPN. It’s funny, the more you know about security, the more it changes what you do. Other people think you’re paranoid. But you’re not! You just understand the realities. 

Flynn: Ha! Why am I not surprised? All right, let’s dig in.

“What was the security update for?”

Shrop: Drupal Core was updated because there were some security releases for Symfony. We call those “upstream” in the biz, which means that Drupal depends on them, and they are actively worked on outside of Drupal. I understand the Symfony project worked closely with the Drupal Security Team to make sure Symfony and Drupal were both updated and ready to be announced publicly at the same time. Drupal version 8.5.6 pulls in the Symfony updates as part of the Drupal update process. 

Flynn: Was that the only update?

Shrop: No, at the same time, there was also an update to Zend Framework, but that was only an issue for users who were making use of modules or sites that used Zend Feed or Daictoros. There is a core issue to update the related Zend libraries for those who require or need the updates. 

“If not updated, what could a malicious user do to a site?”

Shrop: This is a hard one to answer this soon after the release of the security advisory. I’m going to do some checking to see if I can get more information on this for academic purposes, but the Drupal Security Team is not going to make any statements that could help someone attack a site. It is up to security teams and researchers to dig into the code and determine more about the risks involved.

Based on the Symfony project’s blog post, it appears that a specially crafted request could allow a user access to a URL they do not have access to, bypassing access control provided by web servers and caching mechanisms. That’s a fancy-pants way of saying that a website visitor could gain access to pages you don’t want them to see.

“When will we know more?”

Shrop: Within days - sometimes hours - we might start to see exploit methods posted on the Internet. Taking security seriously and responding quickly once a drupal.org security advisory is announced is a way to stay ahead of these concerns.

Mediacurrent doesn’t want to fearmonger, but it is better to be safe than sorry. That’s why I always push to update as soon as possible while weighing in on mitigating factors that may lessen the severity of the issue for a particular application. But I will keep digging. I’m curious! 

“If you had to tell a CEO or CFO the value that implementing this security update swiftly provided, what would you say? Let’s say this CEO does not have a strong background in technology or security.”

Flynn: I could see an executive with a strong public safety or physical security background being pretty understanding of why you want to apply a security update for a potential vulnerability quickly, but what if it’s someone who doesn’t have that experience, and isn’t a technologist?

Shrop: Check out this link from Acquia about the security update. This helped me so much. They published this shortly after the PSA came out, and although they’ve updated the text since then, they said at the time, “It is advised that customers set aside time for a core upgrade immediately following.” When I read, “immediately,” I knew that we had to get the update out within hours. If I was asked to get on a call with the executives from any company, at that point, I am confident. If Acquia is saying it, we need to do it. That’s enough to stand on with anybody. I’m not saying that the Acquia team has more information, but they have a very robust security team. They always dig in quickly. They have to, to know if they can mitigate the issue by adding web application firewall rules.

Flynn: Firewall rules? How does that work? 

Shrop: The last few core updates, Pantheon and Acquia put mitigations into their WAF - that’s Web Application Firewall. Pantheon confirmed the night of the security advisory release that they were blocking attempts on their platform, and Acquia did the same thing. So if someone tried to exploit a site that was hosted there before Drupal was updated, they were there, helping to prevent that site from being attacked successfully. It’s a great extra layer of protection. Now, me and Acquia and Pantheon will always still want to update Core on each site, because WAF-level mitigation might not catch everything. But I am super happy when I see it because there’s a good chance that it will catch anything that happens while a team is still implementing a security update.

Security is all risk assessment and mitigation. You want to layer defenses. And something like this, we are going to make sure we deal with this problem. That’s why Acquia, Pantheon, Platform.sh, and others in the community immediately add those extra mitigations to their firewalls. It’s to buy time so that people can get their updates in. That’s not where mitigation ends, but it helps. 

“What type of sites were affected by this? Does everyone use Symfony?”

Flynn: When I first read about the upcoming security advisory, I saw that it affected “third party libraries.” That made me think that some of our clients might not be affected because it would only affect certain modules. Can you tell me what types of sites were affected?

Shrop: Got a link for you, but basically, anything on Drupal 8 was affected. Drupal 8 uses components from the Symfony project. The Drupal community made the decision to use Symfony so that we didn’t have to maintain everything ourselves. So this is a great example of the power of open source, with the Symfony and Drupal security teams working together to release this fix. We all end up benefiting from having a larger community to fix issues. There’s no way an internal team working by themselves can write as secure applications on their own compared to open source software, in my opinion. It has nothing to do with how good you are, it’s the nature of development. With open source, you have a greater team with Drupal and then again, with Symfony, an even greater team to lean on. With each community that is included you are expanding your team and your ability to detect and prevent threats. 

“How was the security vulnerability discovered?”

Shrop: That’s generally never disclosed because you never want to tell malicious users how you found an opening. 

But we do have a few people to thank: Michael Cullum and @chaosversum were thanked by Symfony for separately reporting the two issues addressed in Symfony security releases. They also thanked Nicolas Grekas for implementing the fix. I would also give a huge thanks to Symfony and the Drupal Security Team for coming together to implement the fix and for coordinating the announcements. It’s hard work, and it shows the community at its best.

“So when we have an off-cycle security release, first the PSA comes out. Can you tell me a bit about what Mediacurrent does from the time the PSA comes out to just before the security advisory drops?”

Flynn: As someone on the team at Mediacurrent, I can see some of the things you do. But I’m wondering what else happens behind the scenes? 

Shrop: The first thing that happens is that I’m notified about the PSA coming out. I’m signed up for updates via email, Twitter, and RSS feeds from https://www.drupal.org/security, and so are a lot of other folks at Mediacurrent. Internally, we have some processes that we have standardized over time for how to deal with security updates that we follow across the company. We centralize information we have on the security PSA/advisory, recommend client communications, and talk about how to prepare as a team. We have multiple communication threads internally, as well, so no one can miss it. I send an email to the staff and I post in our Slack in a few places to get us ready.

Flynn: I know that we often clear time in advance for the team to implement the security updates.

Shrop: Yep. All of us share more information as a team as official information is released or as our own investigations reveal information. For example, early on the day the security advisory was released, our DevOps Lead, Joe Stewart, noticed that Symfony had put out a notice that they were also going to be releasing a security update that day, so that gave us a heads up that it might be related. We couldn’t know for sure until the security advisory actually came out, though. No one can do it by themselves, which is why we have a whole team working on it - it’s the only way to handle these things. ​​​​​​

“So then the security advisory drops. How did we go about fixing the issue?” 

Shrop: First, we reviewed the advisory to assess risk and for any mitigations that help determine how quickly we need to perform updates. With this advisory, it was needed pretty much immediately, so we started to update Drupal core for our clients and pushed to test environments. Our QA team performed regression testing related to the update. Once QA approved each update for each client, we worked with folks to approve the updates and release them to the live environments. 

The important points are to line everyone and everything up in advance, have the talent in-house who can work on clients of all shapes and sizes and needs, and then to work as a team to resolve the issue on every client site as quickly as possible. 

“Were there any sites that were trickier to update? Why?”

Shrop: Clients that were on older versions of Drupal Core, who had delayed upgrading, were harder to update. Every site was updated within a short time, regardless, but even though they started at the same time, those clients did not finish first, because there was more development and testing needed on each site.

Flynn: What was different about the process to update those sites? 

Shrop: If a client wasn’t on version 8.5.x, the lead technologist on the project had to work on an alternative update to secure the site or application, since there wasn’t a security update released for it. Figuring out an alternative process on the fly always introduces risk. It’s part of the value that we bring, that we have team members that have the expertise to evaluate that sort of thing. For example, we had one new client that was on an older version of Drupal 8 core. So one of our Senior Drupal Developers, Ryan Gibson, had to go in and determine what to do. He ended up updating Symfony itself to mitigate the risk. 

Flynn: I’m guessing that we are going to recommend to that client that we update Drupal core for them very soon?

Shrop: Yes. The big takeaway is you’re lowering your risk of problems by staying on the most recent, up-to-date minor version of Drupal 8. Version 8.5.x is current and stable right now, so you should be on that.

Flynn: Why would a client not update?

Shrop: There are always dynamics. I hear lots of good excuses, and I’m not exaggerating, they are good, real reasons! The client is busy, the client has multiple workstreams, it’s hard - but it is getting to a point where I want to recommend even more strongly to clients that it is more expensive to not upgrade. It is going to cost them more when there is an update because we have these additional evaluation and update tasks. The whole point of Drupal 8’s release cycle is to spread the maintenance cost over years rather than getting hit all at once. 

Flynn: And it introduces greater risk. A security breach is an order of magnitude more expensive than extra mitigation steps.

Shrop: Definitely.

“When is the next version of Drupal Core coming out?”

Shrop: Version 8.6.0 will be released in September. Our teams are already starting to test the early versions of this release on some of our projects. If a security update comes out in September, we want all of our clients to be prepared by being on the currently supported version of Drupal core. That way, they will receive security updates.

Flynn: One of the nice things about the Drupal development community is that they provide the betas of the next version of Drupal core so you can get ahead of the next release, right?

Shrop: Yes. When the community starts releasing betas or release candidates, especially release candidates, you want to start testing ahead of time. If you have a Drupal site, you can get your developers to test. If you find a problem, it may not be with your site, it might be an issue with Drupal core and this is a great opportunity to contribute your findings back to drupal.org and help the greater community. There might be a security release weeks after a version comes out and you want to be prepared to implement it.

Flynn: It goes back to risk mitigation.

Shrop: If you are on, say, an 8.2 site right now, you’re on the higher risk side, unfortunately. We advise our clients that it is in their best interest to be on the current, stable version. It costs our clients more in the long run if they don’t update on a steady basis.

Flynn: So if you’re on an older version of Drupal Core, you might not get an easy-to-implement security update when a vulnerability is discovered?

Shrop: The quotes from the Drupal Security team I really want to emphasize are, “Previous minor releases will become unsupported when a new minor release is published,” and, “Any additional security updates for officially unsupported branches are at the sole discretion of the security team.” This is important to understand. For the SA Core 2018-002 fix earlier this year they provided release updates for older versions of Drupal… but they didn’t have to. In the case of the fix last week, they did not.

“What was the best gif exchange of the Drupal core security update process?”

Flynn: I nominate this one, from mid-afternoon:

Shrop: Definitely! 

“What story didn’t we tell yet?”

Shrop: I think we covered most of it. The last thing I’d put out there is for the technical folks reading this. You need to read the security advisories, join Drupal Slack, read what Acquia, Pantheon, and others are saying about each announcement. Then, you take all of that in and make your assessment of what actions you are going to recommend your organization take. This should lead your organization to a documented security plan that you follow. But, you know… 

Flynn: “Update all the things”?

Shrop: Exactly!

Other Resources
7 Ways to Evaluate the Security and Stability of Drupal Contrib Modules | Mediacurrent Pantheon Guest Blog 
Security by Design: An Introduction to Drupal Security | Mediacurrent Webinar

Categories: Drupal

Direct Clear Cache

New Drupal Modules - 8 August 2018 - 5:17am

This module provides you with a button on Admin Menu to clear cache.
To clear cache in Drupal you have to navigate Configuration->Performance->Clear All Caches.
But with this module, you can get a button on Admin Menu to clear cache and Save time.

Categories: Drupal

Work Offline

New Drupal Modules - 8 August 2018 - 4:02am

Work Offline
============
It is a module for Drupal 7 to used to disable cache from browser when enable work offline in browser.

Categories: Drupal

GM's Screen #6: Borderland Keep

New RPG Product Reviews - 8 August 2018 - 3:42am
Publisher: Raging Swan Press
Rating: 3
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This GM-screen-insert clocks in at 6 pages, though only one page of these is actually content.


Now, it should be noted that this insert, structurally, sports dressing that you can spontaneously use, partially compiled from previous Raging Swan Press dressing books.


One column notes 10 entries for dressing, including sparring dummies and smoke rising from a chimney of the fort. Minor complaint here: Dressing outside and inside should probably be separate. The second 10 entries are devoted to sights and sounds, which does have a bit of an overlap with the previous table: A single boot jutting from the mud due to rain (table 1), compared to a raven squatting on the battlements (table 2) – I fail to see a distinct differentiation here. Making one table focus on inside, one on outside, would have probably been smarter. The final column features 10 whispers and rumors, telling us about the strange behavior of the priest, rumored bandit activity and the bedbug infestation of the tavern, these are okay, but nothing too exciting.


Finally, at the bottom of the page is a cool little list spanning the whole width of the insert: This would be “Words have Power”, and it provides neat, descriptive synonyms and miscellaneous information, providing some on the fly variety for your descriptions, with bolded words highlighted to differentiate the general concepts from the examples/synonyms. These include human female and male sample names, alternate names for battlements, castles and wilderness, as well as for soldiers. A few castle descriptors are also noted.


Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant typos. Layout adheres to a 3-column landscape b/w-standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked, in spite of its brevity. The insert also comes in two versions – one intended for screen use and one optimized to be printed out.


I wanted to like this GM-screen insert more than I did – Creighton Broadhurst usually does better and the information has more thematic overlap than the previous screen-inserts. My final verdict will clock in at 3 stars – easily the weakest of the first 6 screen-inserts.

Endzeitgeist out.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

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