Newsfeeds

The psychology of matchmaking - by Joost van Dongen

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 7 March 2019 - 10:53pm
Whichever multiplayer game you look for and no matter how good it is, you'll always find tons of complaints from users claiming the matchmaking for that particular game sucks. This post explores the psychological factors that cause this.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Kliuless #26: Aligning Business Models to Markets - by Kenneth Liu

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 7 March 2019 - 10:53pm
Each week I compile a gaming industry insights newsletter that I share with other Rioters, including Riot’s senior leadership. This edition is the public version that I publish broadly every week as well. Opinions are mine.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Search API Date Popup

New Drupal Modules - 7 March 2019 - 8:13pm

Base on project https://www.drupal.org/project/date_popup

Provides a HTML 5 date popup for all Search API date views filters.

Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: Lullabot Podcast: Real Life Data Migrations

Planet Drupal - 7 March 2019 - 4:00pm

Mike and Matt gather the Lullabot team around the campfire to discuss real world data migrations into Drupal, and everything that goes into it.

Categories: Drupal

Palantir: MidCamp 2019

Planet Drupal - 7 March 2019 - 3:43pm
MidCamp 2019 March 20 - 23, 2019 brandt Thu, 03/07/2019 - 17:43 DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois MidCamp (official site)

This year is the sixth annual Midwest Drupal Camp (aka MidCamp). Palantir is excited to sponsor this year’s event and also have multiple Palantiri presenting sessions!

Palantir Sessions and Events

Community Working Group Update and Q&A by George DeMet

The mission of the Drupal Community Working Group (CWG) is to uphold the Drupal Code of Conduct and maintain a friendly and welcoming community for the Drupal project. In this session, CWG members George DeMet (gdemet) and Michael Anello (ultimike) will provide an update on some of the CWG's recent activities and what the group is working on in 2019, as well as answer audience questions.

  • Thursday @ 2:50pm
  • Room 314A


Federated Search with Drupal, SOLR, and React (AKA the Decoupled Ouroboros) by Matt Carmichael and Dan Montgomery

Our session will begin with a tour through a recent project developed by Palantir.net for the University of Michigan — bringing content from disparate sites (D7, D8, Wordpress) into a single index and then serve results out in a consistent manner, allowing users to search across all included properties. We’ll discuss how we got started with React, our process for hooking up to SOLR, and how we used Drupal to tie the whole thing together.

  • Friday @ 9am
  • Room 324


Overcoming Imposter Syndrome: How Weightlifting Helped Me Accept My Place in Tech by Kristen Mayer

Weightlifting and tech. On the surface, these two things may not seem to have much in common, but as a woman trying to navigate both of these male-dominated spheres, I’ve often been intimidated and doubted whether I really belonged. In this session, I’ll look at the strategies that helped me overcome imposter syndrome in the gym, and my journey of applying them to my professional life. I hope that anyone attending this session will walk away feeling empowered about their position and skills within the tech community!

  • Thursday @ 3:40pm
  • Room 312


Understanding Migration Development in Drupal 8: Strategies and Tools to See What's Happening by Dan Montgomery

Migrations in Drupal can be challenging for developers because the tools and strategies to get started and peer behind the curtain are different than those used in most backend development. This is an intermediate topic intended for developers who have a basic understanding of Drupal 8 concepts including plugins and the way entities and fields are used in Drupal to manage content.

  • Thursday @ 11:40am
  • Room 314B


Game Night!

Head to the second floor for a fun night of board games, camaraderie and conversation. Camp registration is required to attend this event.

  • Thursday from 6-9pm
  • 2nd Level


We'll see you there!

Thu, 03/07/2019 - 12:00
Categories: Drupal

Lingotek Comment Profile

New Drupal Modules - 7 March 2019 - 11:02am

Allows comments to inherit the Lingotek profile from the commented entity.

Categories: Drupal

Andrew Allanson, Ackk Studios: Life after YIIK - by Jessica Paek

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 7 March 2019 - 8:07am
We got to talk to Andrew Allanson, one of the developers behind YIIK: A Postmodern RPG, to discuss their most recent release and learn a little bit about their upcoming project, Starstruck.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

The Sego Blog: Long Island Drupal Meetup - "Decoupled Drupal in Practice Review"

Planet Drupal - 7 March 2019 - 7:55am
03/07/2019Long Island Drupal Meetup - "Decoupled Drupal in Practice Review"

In our last meetup here on Long Island, we reviewed Preston So's recent book "Decoupled Drupal in Practice". We had the opportunity to record the meetup, figured it can't hurt to post it here!

Categories: Drupal

OSIRIS. Part 1. Preparing for an Early Access. Trip to the Heaven. Dark Dubstep. - by Azat Khafizov

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 7 March 2019 - 7:49am
This is the first article about OSIRIS game, which is producing by Azat Khafizov Design. Short description of the project and future plans are given.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

CKeditor inline image style

New Drupal Modules - 7 March 2019 - 7:43am

Allow user to select image style while adding inline images using CKEditor

Categories: Drupal

Gnomecast #61 – Meet a New Gnome: Pete Petrusha

Gnome Stew - 7 March 2019 - 5:06am

Join Ang and get to know one of the newest Gnomes, Pete, in this “Meet a New Gnome” episode of Gnomecast! Learn about Pete’s gaming origin story and his plans for future games and Gnome Stew articles! Will Pete be able to avoid the stew this week?

Download: Gnomecast #61 – Meet a New Gnome: Pete Petrusha

Check out Pete’s game Dreamchaser, available for print purchase from the Imagining Games shop or Indie Press Revolution and available in PDF on DriveThruRPG.

Keep up with all the gnomes by visiting gnomestew.com, following @gnomestew on Twitter, or visiting the Gnome Stew Facebook Page. Subscribe to the Gnome Stew Twitch channel, check out Gnome Stew Merch, and support Gnome Stew on Patreon!

Follow Pete at @vembranor on Twitter and check out his work at the Imagining Games website or on Facebook.

Follow Ang at @orikes13 on Twitter.

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Apigee Edge Extras

New Drupal Modules - 7 March 2019 - 4:57am

Additional enhancements for the Apigee Edge module by Pronovix.

Categories: Drupal

Rest Entity Recursive

New Drupal Modules - 7 March 2019 - 4:54am

Provides new "json_recursive" REST format which exposes all fields and referenced entities by default.

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: DrupalCamp London 2019: Impressions from my first Drupal event

Planet Drupal - 7 March 2019 - 4:51am

We attended DrupalCamp London the first weekend in March of 2019. This was also the very first Drupal event for me, and I wanted to share my experience with the community. I hope you enjoy the read!

READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

Apigee Edge UI

New Drupal Modules - 7 March 2019 - 4:42am

Enhancements for Apigee Edge App related UIs by Pronovix.

Categories: Drupal

Wayback Submit to Archive.org

New Drupal Modules - 7 March 2019 - 4:21am

You're producing high quality work and you'd like to keep a public record of it on Archive.org.

The Wayback Submit module will submit all your url's to The Wayback Machine at Archive.org.

Thus you should be able to prove that you came up with some great idea first. Or, if your research is taken offline for political reasons, you'll still be able to point to it at The Wayback Machine.

The Wayback Submit module enables you to save your entire site to The Wayback Machine

Categories: Drupal

mark.ie: PatternLab: Linking to Patterns

Planet Drupal - 7 March 2019 - 3:27am
PatternLab: Linking to Patterns

Here's two approaches to linking to patterns in PatternLab.

markconroy Thu, 03/07/2019 - 11:27

When using PatternLab, you can link to a pattern by creating a variable such as {{ url }}. Then in your corresponding JSON or YML file, you can setting this variable equal to something like
url: link.pages-contact
or
url: link.pages-homepage.

We often use this when creating menu items, since in Drupal our menu items template looks for two parts to the menu link: title and url, something like this:

  1. menu:
  2.   items:
  3.   item_1:
  4.   title: 'About Us'
  5.   url: link.sample-pages-basic-page
  6.   item_2:
  7.   title: 'Contact Us'
  8.   url: link.sample-pages-basic-page-contact-us

This works great when working with a template that has a specific variable for the URL, such as the link to a node in node.html.twig, so we can link the title in our teaser template in PL to our sample blog pattern, for example.

But if we have a link field, such as a Call to Action in a paragraph bundle we might have something like this in our pattern:

  1. {{ cta_link }}

and this in our corresponding YML file:

  1. cta_link: '"#">Click Me!'

We don't have PL paths in those links, because if we swap `#` for a `link.sample-pages-basic-page` it'll just render that as a string. And we don't want to break the variable into two parts, because in the Drupal template, we want to be able to {% set cta_link = content.field_cta %} and let Drupal do all its render magic.

The solution? Don't break up variable into two parts, concatenate what you want in YML instead to allow us to link to specific patterns:

  1. cta_link:
  2.   join():
  3. - '"'
  4. - link.sample-pages-basic-page-with-quote
  5. - '">See Ways to Help'

Now, the first part will render as a string, the second as a variable to the pattern you want to link to, and the third part as a string.

We could also create a link pattern, and do something like this:

  1. cta_link:
  2.   include():
  3.   pattern: 'organisms-link'
  4.   with:
  5.   url: 'link.sample-page-homepage'

I don't, because, in general, I don't like patterns to depend on other patterns. This is simply so I can drag and drop them from project to project without any friction. Each component has everything it needs contained within it. It also means in case of something like a link field, we can let Drupal do as much of the heavy lifting as possible.

Categories: Drupal

ComputerMinds.co.uk: Let's say NO to unsanitised inputs

Planet Drupal - 7 March 2019 - 2:36am

Last night saw the popular EU Cookie Compliance module fall from grace, as the Drupal community discovered that numerous inputs in the admin form were not being sanitised.

To me, this shows some serious failings in how our community is handling security awareness. Let's do some fixing :)

1) We need to make this OBVIOUS, with clear examples

One of the most important things when trying to get people to write secure code is making them aware of the issues. We need Drupalers of all levels of experience to know and understand the risks posed by unsanitised input, where they come up and how to fix / avoid them.

I did a little internet searching, and found that there's actually a great guide to writing Drupal modules on Drupal.org. It covers a whole bunch of things, and is compiled really nicely.

I noticed that it says how to do forms, but it manages to NOT mention security anywhere. This should be a key thought right now, no? There is a guide to handling text securely, but it's just there and isn't really linked to.

Similarly, the page of Drupal 7 sanitize functions is easily findable, but only if you know to look for it in the first place

Guys and girls, if we're going to help our Drupalers to write secure code we simply have to make it obvious. We shouldn't be assuming young new Drupalers will think to browse around the internet looking for sanitization functions. We shouldn't be assuming they know all the niggly bits that present security issues. We shouldn't be assuming that anyone really know when to use tokens in URLs and when not to. We should be putting all these things right there, saying hey! don't forget to use these! here's why!. We should have articles and guides for writing forms that take the time to cover how to handle the security side of things.

In that vein, surely the Form API reference should surely have a reminder link? A little sidebar with some links to all these guides and articles on writing secure code?

I'm going to go start some conversations and some edits - Drupal documentation is maintained by us, the Drupalers, after all.
Who else out there wants to help move things in the right direction? :)

2) We need to be aware of what we're installing

81,086 modules report use of the EU Cookie Compliance module. That's a whole bunch of blind installs! Nobody thought to check through the code? Nobody missed the lack of check_plain?

Well, you don't, do you? It's far too easy to assume that things are just fine. Our wonderful Open Source world, protected by our numbers, means that code is safe because it has a thousand people keeping eyes on it. Unless, of course, we're all assuming that somebody else is looking. In that case, as evident here, nobody really takes responsibility - and that's why we end up with module maintainers burning out trying to fight battles alone. In the presence of other people who we know could also do something, humans are significantly less likely to take responsibility.

I've said this before in my previous article discussing security risks to Drupal as we mature - if we took a little more of a moment to check through the modules that we install, we might catch a whole bunch of missed bugs!

I must make explicit that this call isn't just to the big bods and the experienced Drupalers. This task is for you, too, freelancers and small Drupal shops. We all have unique perspectives and unique opportunities that will allow us to see what others have missed - but if nobody is looking then nobody will see anything.

3) Contrib security reviews need help

Unless we're going to go through every module by hand, we need to think about writing some tool to do a basic sanity check on our contrib modules. How hard can it be to see if there's even one instance of a check_plain in a .admin.inc file?

It's admirable and encouraging to see the Drupal Security Team making huge progress on really key modules. Well done guys :) But, as far as I can guess, they're going through modules by hand, line by line. What other way is there?

If I had £50k going spare, I'd put a huge bounty out for anyone that can write an automated tool for spotting missing check_plains. Alas, I really don't have that! But I reckon there must be a decent tool for at least getting a start?

If we can solve this problem for contrib, then we can also solve it for every site's custom modules. And that will be of huge security benefit for Drupalers worldwide.

Huge publicity awaits whoever solves this problem, I'm sure.
Inventors and innovators in the Drupal world, this is your moment!

Categories: Drupal

Character Class: Multi-Classing: The Butt-Kickers

RPGNet - 7 March 2019 - 12:00am
Smash stuff and fight!
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Dev shares real talk about the personal costs of living in fear of layoffs

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 6 March 2019 - 2:40pm

Game developer Katie Chironis discusses the personal costs of living in fear of layoffs. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

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