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Drupal Atlanta Medium Publication: Sponsoring a DrupalCamp is Not About the Return on Investment (ROI).

Planet Drupal - 2 November 2018 - 5:09am
You Can’t Put a Price Tag on Visibility, Creditability, and Collegiality“pink pig” by Fabian Blank on Unsplash

Organizing a DrupalCamp takes a lot of commitment from volunteers, so when someone gets motivated to help organize these events, the financial risks can be quite alarming and sometimes overwhelming. But forget all that mess, you are a Drupal enthusiast and have drummed up the courage to volunteer with the organization of your local DrupalCamp. During your first meeting, you find out that there are no free college or community spaces in the area and the estimated price tag is $25,000. Holy Batman that is a lot of money!

Naturally, you start thinking about how we are going to cover that price tag, so you immediately ask, “how many people usually attend?” Well unless you are one of the big 5, (BadCamp, NYCCamp, GovCon, MidCamp or FloridaCamp) we average between 100 and 200 people. Then you ask, “how much can we charge?” You are then told that we cannot charge more than $50 because camps are supposed to be affordable for the local community and that has been the culture of most DrupalCamps.

Are you interested in attending the first online DrupalCamp Organizers Meeting, on Friday, November 9th at 4:00pm (EST)? RSVP Here.

If Drupal is the Enterprise solution why are all of our camps priced and sponsored like we are still hobbyist in 2002?Why Don’t We Treat DrupalCamps Like It’s the Enterprise Solution?

Drupal is the Enterprise solution. Drupal has forgotten about the hobbyist and is only concerned about large-scale projects. Drupal developers and companies make more per hour than Wordpress developers. These are all things I have heard from people within the community. So if any of these statements are valid, why are all the camps priced like it is 2002 and we are all sitting around in a circle singing Kumbaya? In 2016 for DrupalCamp Atlanta, we couldn’t make the numbers work, so we decided to raise the price of the camp from $45 to $65 (early bird) and $85 (regular rate). This was a long drawn out and heated debate that took nearly all of our 2 hours allotted for our google hangout. At the end of the day, one of our board members who is also a Diamond sponsor said,

“when you compare how other technology conferences are priced and what they are offering for sessions, DrupalCamps are severely under-priced for the value they provide to the community.”Courtesy of Amaziee.io Labs

If a camp roughly costs $25,000 and you can only charge 150 people $50, how in the world are DrupalCamps produced? The simple answer, sponsors, sponsors, and more sponsors. Most camps solely rely on the sponsors to cover the costs. One camp, in particular, BADCamp has roughly 2,000 attendees and the registration is FREE. That’s right, the camp is completely free and did I forget to mention that it’s in San Francisco? Based on the BADCamp model and due to the fact the diamond sponsorship for DrupalCon Nashville was $50,000, getting 10 companies to sponsor your camp at $2,500 will be no sweat. Oh and don’t forget Drupal is the enterprise solution, right?

With all of your newfound confidence in obtaining sponsorships, you start contacting some of the larger Drupal shops in your area and after a week nothing. You reach out again maybe by phone this time and actually speak to someone but they are not committing because they want some more information as to why they should sponsor the camp such as, what other perks can you throw in for the sponsorship, are we guaranteed presentation slots, and do you provide the participant list. Of course, the worst response is the dreaded no, we cannot sponsor your conference because we have already met our sponsorship budget for the year.

At this point, you feel defeated and confused as to why organizations are not chomping at the bit to fork over $2,500 to be the sponsor. Yep, that’s right, twenty-five hundred, not $25,000 to be the highest level, sponsor. Mind you many Drupal shops charge anywhere between $150 — $250 an hour. So that means donating 10–17 hours of your organizations time to support a Drupal event in your local community. Yes, you understand that there are a lot of DrupalCamps contacting the same companies for sponsorship so you ask yourself, what has changed from years past?

Are you interested in attending the first online DrupalCamp Organizers Meeting, on Friday, November 9th at 4:00 pm (EST)? RSVP Here.

What Do Companies Expect to Gain From DrupalCamp Sponsorships?

At DrupalCon Nashville, I got an awesome opportunity to participate in a session around organizing DrupalCamps. It was really interesting to hear about how other organizers produce their camp and what were some of the biggest pain points.

Group Photo — DrupalCon 2018 Nashville by Susanne Coates

During this session, we were talking about a centralized sponsorship program for all DrupalCamps (that I personally disagree with and will save that discussion for another blog post) and an individual asked the question,

“why should my company sponsor DrupalCamp Atlanta? There is nothing there for me that makes it worth it. We don’t pick up clients, you to don’t distribute the participant list, so why should we sponsor the camp?”

Needless to say, they caught me completely off guard, so I paused then replied,

“DrupalCamp Atlanta has between 150–200 people, most of them from other Drupal shops, so what is it that you are expecting to get out of the sponsorship that would make it worth it to you? Why do you sponsor any DrupalCamps?”Have Drupal Companies Outgrown the Need to Sponsor DrupalCamps?

On the plane ride back to the ATL it got me thinking, why does an organization sponsor DrupalCamps? What is the return on their investment? I started reminiscing of the very first DrupalCamp that I attended in 2008 and all the rage at that time (and still is), was inbound marketing and how using a content strategy and or conference presentations can establish your company as thought leaders in the field, therefore, clients will find your information useful and approach you when its time to hire for services. Maybe this is why so many camps received a ton of presentation submissions and why it was easy to find sponsors, but that was over 10 years ago now and some of those same companies have now been established as leaders in the field. Could it be, that established companies no longer need the visibility of DrupalCamps?

What happens to DrupalCamps when companies no longer need the visibility or credibility from the Drupal community?

The Drupal community thrives when Drupal shops become bigger and take on those huge projects because it results in contributions back to the code, therefore, making our project more competitive. But an unintended consequence of these Drupal shops becoming larger is that there is a lot more pressure on them to raise funding thus they need to spend more resources on obtaining clients outside of the Drupal community. Acquia, the company built by the founder of Drupal, Dries Buytaert, have made it clear that they are pulling back on their local camp sponsorships and have even created their own conference called Acquia Engage that showcases their enterprise clients. Now from a business perspective, I totally understand why they would create this event as it provides a much higher return on their investment but it results in competing with other camps (ahem, this year’s DrupalCamp Atlanta), but more importantly the sponsorship dollars all of us depend on are now being redirected to other initiatives.

Are you interested in attending the first online DrupalCamp Organizers Meeting, on Friday, November 9th at 4:00 pm (EST)? RSVP Here.

Why Should Established Companies Sponsor a DrupalCamp?

The reality of the situation is that sponsoring these DrupalCamps are most likely not going to land your next big client that pays your company a $500,000 contract. So what are true reasons to sponsor a DrupalCamp:

  • Visibility
    When sponsoring these DrupalCamps most of us organizers do a pretty good job of tweeting thanks to the company and if the organization has presenters we usually promote the sessions as well. In addition, most camps print logos on the website, merchandise, and name after parties. Yes, its only a little bit but the internet is forever and the more you are mentioned the better off you are. But you are from a well established Drupal shop so you don’t need any more visibility.
  • Credibility
    Even the companies who are have been established need their staff to be credible. There will always be some amount of turnover and when that happens your clients still want to know if this person is talented. And if your company is new, being associated with Drupal in your local community does provide your company a sense of credibility.
  • Collegiality
    I saved the best for last. Collegiality is highly overlooked when looking at sponsoring camps. Most companies have a referral program for new hires and when the time comes for you to hire, people tend to refer their friends and their professional acquaintances. There is no better place to meet and interact with other Drupalist than a DrupalCamp. What about employee engagement? In a recent focus group I participated in with a Drupal shop, many of the staff wanted more opportunities for professional development. These local camps are affordable and can allow staff to attend multiple events in a year when you have small budgets.

I must end by saying, that there are so many great Drupal companies that I have had the pleasure to work with and if it were not for the Acquia’s of the world Drupal wouldn’t exist. I understand that CEO’s are responsible for their employees and their families so I don’t want to underestimate the pressures that come with making payroll and having a client pipeline. The purpose of this post was to explain how it feels as a volunteer who is doing something for the community and the frustrations that sometimes come with it.

If you are interested in sponsoring a DrupalCamp check out Drupical and sponsor a camp today! All of us organizers need your help!!

Are you interested in attending the first online DrupalCamp Organizers Meeting, on Friday, November 9th at 4:00 pm (EST)? RSVP Here.

If you are also interested in contributing to the Atlanta Drupal Users Group (ADUG) Medium Blog publication, please feel free to reach out to us at info@drupalatlanta.org

Sponsoring a DrupalCamp is Not About the Return on Investment (ROI). was originally published in Drupal Atlanta on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Categories: Drupal

Pathfinder Playtest Review, Part 4

Gnome Stew - 2 November 2018 - 5:00am

This is part 4 of my review of the Pathfinder Playtest from Paizo. You can see part 1 here, part 2 here, and part 3 here. In this part of the review, I’ll finish up my comments in this series with Game Mastering through Appendices.

If you’re interested in reading along with me during the review, you can pick up the free PDF of the playtest rulebook at Paizo’s site: Game Mastering

The section starts off with six bullet points to give overall guidance to the GM. I think the guidance misses the mark a bit, but it’s a good start. Unfortunately, the advice given out in that brief segment makes it appear as if the bulk of the work for the world, characters, events, and storytelling land firmly on the GM’s shoulders. This is, to some extent, true. However, I feel that this was a grand opportunity to let the GM know that they are not the driver in the storytelling effort, but a participant with the players in the storytelling. The advice given is solid, but the tone here sets the stage for making new GMs think they are in charge. Any veteran GM will certainly tell you that this is not the case once the players start rolling with their own ideas.

Starting a Session

The segment that covers how to start a session is fantastic! I hope to see this expanded a bit in the final book, but this is a wonderful set of advice. I even learned a few new tips and tricks in this area. Well done, Paizo!

Adjudicating the Rules

This area gives great advice about not looking up specific rules and gives guidance on how to “wing it” when necessary. This is something every “core” rulebook for every RPG should have.

Sharing Responsibilities

This section is given in a brief sidebar. I have a problem with this because quite a few readers of RPGs will skim those areas thinking they are not important. This is a perception thing because if it were important, it would be in the main text, right? I think the six bullet points I mentioned above could be combined with this sidebar to create a new approach to collaborative gaming that excels at great fun and excellent storytelling. Merging these two concepts, I think, would lead to a more powerful statement.

Modes of Play

Just as a refresher, modes are split up into encounter, exploration, and downtime.

The encounter section is too brief. This is the most technical part of the game, and this can lead to it being the hardest to adjudicate properly because of the number of rules, feats, spells, skills, powers, items, monsters, and characters involved. I know. I know. Many books (and articles!) have been dedicated to this very topic, and I don’t expect Paizo to replicate what’s already been covered. However, I think a deeper dive into encounters would be best.

The exploration and downtime modes are covered very well. These two sections are lengthy and solidly give the GM the right information to execute what is a new concept for Pathfinder. The guidance and tips found within these two sections will make running them go very smoothly for an experienced or fresh GM.

Now that I’ve read the entire “Modes of Play” section, I think I figured out what is bothering me with the encounter section beyond its brevity. The encounter section was written for experienced GMs. The exploration and downtime sections were written in a manner that targets new GMs. I feel that Paizo needs to take a fresh look at the encounter section and rewrite it (and expand it) as if they were attempting to teach a brand new GM (as in, brand new to RPGs, not just Pathfinder) how to run an encounter. If they revisit and expand the encounter section with this in mind, I feel it would be a much stronger contribution to the GM section of the book.

Difficulty Classes

I’m going to be brief here. These three pages are well thought out, clear, and give some great examples on how to come up with target numbers on the fly or apply adjustments where necessary. Paizo’s team did an excellent job on this section.

Rewards

I’ve been looking forward to hitting this section ever since I learned that each level requires an even 1,000 XP to obtain instead of an upward-climbing slope of more experience points for the next level than the current one.

Unfortunately for me, the “kill a monster” XP is listed in the supplemental bestiary, which I haven’t taken the time to flip through the PDF yet. I guess that’ll be next on my list of reading (but not reviewing). On the flip side, the XP awards for minor, moderate, and major accomplishments are laid out as 10, 30, and 80, respectively. Even though they call it “group XP” it’s not divided between all the characters. If the group accomplishes a moderate goal, then all the PCs involved gain 30 XP.

There’s a sidebar for “Story-Based Leveling” that is in this section that calls for the GM to decide if and when the characters level up. This puts a sour taste in my mouth. It’s a personal opinion here, but I really don’t like these approaches at all. The players should see the steady gain of XP for their characters (even if they don’t level yet), so there is a sense of accomplishment in that area. Having the GM suddenly decree, “You go up a level.” feels too much like the GM is controlling things. Of course, this could just be me and my experiences with GMs wanting to have too much control. Your mileage may vary in this area.

Environment

There are several pages dedicated to terrain, climate, and hazards. While the lists aren’t complete (I’m assuming they will be more comprehensive in the final, larger book), what is listed there and how the various environmental conditions impact the game are well stated. I like what I see as a set of building blocks toward more content.

The hazards section is very well done. A hazard is the generic term for traps, pits, dangers, and magical effects that can harm or impede the PCs. There are ways to find, trigger, disable, destroy, and/or dispel various hazards depending on their nature. The playtest book came with a sample of three hazards. I had kind of hoped for a few more, but I’m assuming they didn’t want the playtest book to bloat up too much. I’m looking forward to seeing what the final product (and the various expansion books and adventures) have along these lines.

Treasure

The loot! We’re finally at the gold and shiny and magic and wonderful stuff portion of the book. Yeah, I’m a little excited here because I’m interested in seeing how things change up in this section, if at all.

This section opens up with the usual text explaining what they’re going to be talking about, teaching some keywords, and generally laying out the approach to treasure.

After this comes all sorts of tables outlining (almost proscribing) what treasure different level parties should (must?) receive for a fair and equitable game to be run. The fact that the treasure allotment is so heavily proscribed makes me extraordinarily sad.

No more random treasure.

Yeah. You read that right. There are no more dice rolls involved in generating treasure with Pathfinder. This breaks my heart, to be honest. As a GM, I always loved rolling up treasure because it would spark new ideas, thoughts, plot arcs, and cool stuff in my brain. Yeah, if I happened to roll up a majorly disruptive magic item for a low-level group, I’d probably shift things around a bit (or re-roll). However, randomly creating magic items for folks to find is gone. I’ll be over here in the corner shedding a tear for days gone by.

Okay. I’ve had my cry. I’m mostly better now. Looking at the new approach at handing out treasure is fair and balanced. It will assist new GMs from overloading their group with disruptive items while keeping the party well-equipped for future challenges. This is super helpful for new GMs, and I can appreciate this approach at handing out goods. I just wish they’d kept gems, jewelry, and/or artwork as a form of gaining wealth because those can, once again, inspire stories and side plots, not just a gain of wealth. Now, the party will just gain some gold from the hoard and move on.

If I ever run this version of Pathfinder, I’ll most likely break out my 2nd edition AD&D treasure generators (or the first Pathfinder versions) and run with those. They’re more fun than hand-picking treasure, to be honest.

After the list o’ treasure tables ends, the book delves into materials, which is one of the best write-ups of “non-normal” materials I’ve ever seen. Excellent job here. Obviously, the list isn’t complete, but I expect it to expand in the final version.

While flipping through the treasure section, I hit the sections for snares (crafting, detecting, triggering, etc.) and I was baffled here. I’m not sure why these were listed here under treasure, instead of above with the hazards. Did the wrong pages get dropped into the layout in the wrong place?

After snares, comes the alchemical items. This is a cool section. I highly encourage everyone to check this part out. There are oodles of examples, tons of ideas, and great information about how they play in the game. Loud applause for you here, Paizo.

Runes come next, and this is the part of enhancing weapons and armor with special powers. I love how weapons and armor must now be etched with cool-looking runes to become super special. This adds flavor to the world and storytelling options (as well as some neat intimidate/perception uses when someone wearing a well-etched suit of armor walks in the door) to the whole feel of the game.

Last come the details of the various magic items that don’t fall into “weapons and armor.” This comprises the bulk of the treasure section, and I’m not going to detail each item or neat thing. I do want to say that I really want to play an archer (preferably with the elven ancestry) with an Oathbow.

Appendices

This is probably going to be my shortest write-up of any of the sections in the book. The appendices simply are: traits and glossary.

The traits are all of the capitalized keywords (such as Strike) used within the book. The glossary is a good collection of phrases, terms, and things found within the book that may not be readily known to every player.

Final Thoughts

I think the most telling part of “is this a promising product” would be to answer the question, “Would J.T. play this game?”

The answer is, “Yes.”

This is a good foundational book for what promises to be a pretty cool system. There are some rough edges (as there are with any playtest document), but I figure Paizo is wise enough to listen to the feedback sent to them (and hopefully this series of articles) to improve the game.

There is another question looming, however. That question is, “Would J.T. play this version instead of the original Pathfinder?”

The answer is, “No.”

There are a few reasons for this.

The first is that I’m already heavily invested with knowledge, money, habits, and familiarity in the first version of Pathfinder. I have too much “edition inertia” going on to abandon Pathfinder 1.0 for Pathfinder 2.0. If the shift were more subtle between the two, I could see picking it up. However, everything will require major conversions to get from 1.0 to 2.0.

The second is that I’m extremely concerned with the lack of random treasure. Yeah. It’s that big of a deal. I feel it’s a departure too far from the “source material” that was created way back in the 1970s. I don’t like that one bit.

The third is that I don’t see anything drastically improving the game that much. There are tons of incremental improvements and quite a few major changes in the playtest document, but none of them really blew my socks off. There are some new concepts and ideas in here that I think I could shift back into a Pathfinder 1.0 game, but that now leaves me with Pathfinder 1.0 and some house rules (which I already have).

Final question is, “If J.T. were completely new to RPGs and presented with both versions, which one would he pick?”

I’d probably go with the playtest version, to be honest. It’s a better game, and my prejudices built up from playing RPGs for decades (and my Pathfinder edition inertia) would not be a factor in choosing which game to go with.

I know. I know. I’m giving a mixed message here, but there are different angles to look at things.

Paizo put out a solid effort here. I’m impressed with the amount of thought, care, effort, and experience that went into developing this game. They’ve certainly evolved the game. There are some high points in the evolution and some low points as well. I think the high drastically outweighs the low.

I’m very much looking forward to the final version of the game. I’ll take a look at it then and reevaluate things at that time to determine if my stance on moving forward to the new version will change.

Thanks to the Gnome Stew readers out there that stuck with me through these very long articles!

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Elfsight Twitter Feed

New Drupal Modules - 2 November 2018 - 4:33am

Introduction
With Elfsight Twitter Feed, you can add on your site a customized feed of one of the most popular social media. Embed your own Twitter feed with header and action buttons, create a collection of Tweets by hashtag or display customer testimonials about your products from Twitter. Allow your users all Tweet actions right on the website: retweet, reply, like, share. Choose the best layout, add colors and find the right proportions of the module. Increase the number of followers and grow engagement on your site with lively and interactive feed.

Categories: Drupal

Wunderkraut Sweden Blog: Using open source Minio and the Flysystem S3 module to handle Drupal files

Planet Drupal - 2 November 2018 - 3:20am
We are in the process of transforming the way we host our applications to a docker based workflow. One of the challenges we face is the file storage. At the heart of our business are open source technologies and tools, therefore  we have looked into in using Minio (more or less the same as Amazon S3 for file storage) instead of local filesystem (or Amazon S3). We are going to use the Drupal module Flysystem S3 - that works both with Amazon S3 and Minio (compatible with the Amazon S3). Flysystem is a filesystem abstraction library for PHP which allows you to easily swap out a local filesystem for a remote one - or from one remote to another. For a new site it is pretty straight forward, for a legacy site you need to migrate your files from one storage to another - that I am going to look… Read More
Categories: Drupal

Phone field

New Drupal Modules - 2 November 2018 - 1:48am

The Phone field project provides a phone field for Drupal 7 that supports the HTML5 tel:-schema.

Categories: Drupal

User Menu Avatar

New Drupal Modules - 1 November 2018 - 9:24pm

Drupal 8.x

User Menu Avatar Description:

This module replaces the "My account" link text with the user_picture or username if no user_picture exists. Currently only for the User Menu, future work is focused on including admin config to set menu/link placement.

Requirements:

1. user_picture field

If the user_picture field is not in your Drupal site you can do a single config import:

Categories: Drupal

Twig Suite

New Drupal Modules - 1 November 2018 - 9:10pm

Twig Suite

Categories: Drupal

Field Union Construction Kit

New Drupal Modules - 1 November 2018 - 6:47pm
Categories: Drupal

PreviousNext: Introducing Entity Access Audit module

Planet Drupal - 1 November 2018 - 5:32pm

As part of the session I presented in Drupal Europe, REST Ready: Auditing established Drupal 8 websites for use as a content hub, I presented a module called “Entity Access Audit”.

by Sam Becker / 2 November 2018

This has proved to be a useful tool for auditing our projects for unusual access scenarios as part of our standard go-live security checks or when opening sites up to additional mechanisms of content delivery, such as REST endpoints. Today this code has been released on Drupal.org: Entity Access Audit.

There are two primary interfaces for viewing access results, the overview screen and a detailed overview for each entity type. Here is a limited example of the whole-site overview showing a few of the entity types you might find in core or custom modules:

Here is a more detailed report for a single entity type:

The driving motivation behind these interfaces was being able to visually scan entity types and ensure that the access results align with our expectations. This has so far helped identify various bugs in custom and contributed code.

In order to conduct a thorough access test, the module uses a predefined set of dimensions and then uses a cartesian product of these dimensions to test every combination. The dimensions tested out of the box, where applicable to the given entity type are:

  • All bundles of an entity type.
  • If the current user is the entity owner or not.
  • The access operation: create, view, update, delete.
  • All the available roles.

It’s worth noting that these are only common factors used to determine access results, they are not comprehensive. If access was determined by other factors, there would be no visibility of this in the generated reports.

The module is certainly not a silver bullet for validating the security of Drupal 8 websites, but has proved to be a useful additional tool when conducting audits.

Tagged Entity Access
Categories: Drupal

Question/Answer field

New Drupal Modules - 1 November 2018 - 2:26pm

The provides a new field type called Question, which can be used to add generic questions as a field.

The field can have a question, an answer type (checkbox, checkboxes, radios, select, number, or textfield), a default answer, and answer options (in the case of checkboxes, radios, and select).

There are two field formatters, one for displaying the question form and the other for displaying the question answers.

Categories: Drupal

Kanopi Studios: BADCamp 2018: Learning while having fun

Planet Drupal - 1 November 2018 - 1:26pm

 

BADCamp 2018 just wrapped up last Saturday. As usual it was a great volunteer organized event that brought together all sorts of folks from the Drupal Community.

Every year Kanopi provides organizational assistance, and this year was no exception. We had Kanopian volunteers working on; writing code for website, organizing fundraising, general operations planning, assisting as room monitors, and working the registration booth.

An event like this doesn’t happen without a lot of work across a lot of different areas and we’re very proud of Kanopi’s contributions.

Personally, Kanopi was able to send me down from Vancouver, Canada to spend time doing a day long training course, as well as doing the regular conference summits and sessions.

The course I chose was “Component-based Theming with Twig” which was really informative. We covered the basics Pattern Lab and then worked on best practice methods to integrate those Pattern Lab tools in to a Drupal theme.

Some of the takeaways:

  • The Gesso (https://www.drupal.org/project/gesso) theme is a great starting place for getting Pattern Lab in to your project.
  • Make sure you are reusing all your basic html components and make the templates flexible. Resist the urge to simply copy and paste markup into a new template.
  • The best way to map Pattern Lab components in Drupal is to use Paragraph types and their display modes.
  • To get the most out of Twig template, make sure you are using the module Twig Tweak (https://www.drupal.org/project/twig_tweak)

For the regular conference sessions, the most interest seemed to lie in the possibilities of GatsbyJS (https://www.gatsbyjs.org/). All the developers with whom I spoke are focused on the performance and security perspective, as it can be completely decoupled from Drupal, allowing for fewer security issues. One interesting talk on Gatsby was this one by Kyle Mathews.

Kanopi was also fortunate enough get four sessions selected:

All in all BADCamp 2018 was a great experience. It’s terrific to meet our distributed co-workers as well as see friends from other parts of the Drupal community.

The post BADCamp 2018: Learning while having fun appeared first on Kanopi Studios.

Categories: Drupal

Elevated Third: Connecting Drupal 8 with Salesforce

Planet Drupal - 1 November 2018 - 12:16pm
Connecting Drupal 8 with Salesforce Connecting Drupal 8 with Salesforce Judd Mercer Thu, 11/01/2018 - 13:16

As Drupal 8 has matured as an enterprise content management system, so has its ability to connect with enterprise SaaS CRMs such as Salesforce. As the undisputed IBM of CRM solutions (for now, anyway) Salesforce is a cornerstone for most businesses. And now with tighter integrations than ever before, Drupal 8 can be too.

With that, let's explore some key considerations involved in connecting Drupal 8 with Salesforce. 

All Hail the Cloud

At its most basic core, Salesforce is really a database of contacts in the same way that Drupal is a database of content. Yes, Drupal also has users and Salesforce often houses products, events, etc., but you get the idea. What’s important is that customers interact with both systems. Whether it’s reading website content or opening an email from a salesperson, customer data across all fronts is critical to consolidate, manage and leverage.

Integration is a Dirty Word

You may be wondering what’s involved with a Drupal integration with Salesforce. Ah, the dreaded “I” word...integration. So often the herald of scope creep and blown budgets. Integrating Salesforce with Drupal 8 can vary between something as simple as submitting contact forms to the CRM, to running a global ABM effort supported by a sophisticated Drupal website equipped with real-time personalization. In either case, leveraging Drupal 8’s API-first architecture and its plethora of open source modules are key. In this case, the Drupal Salesforce module is our starting point.

Modules Make the World Go Round

The Drupal Salesforce Suite module is a testament to both the ingenuity and passion of the Drupal community and the flexibility of Drupal as an enterprise platform. As a contributed module, the Salesforce Suite for Drupal enables out of the box connection with Salesforce, no matter your configuration.

Available free on drupal.org, the module offers:

  • Single Sign-On (SSO) with OAUTH2 authentication, which lets you pass credentials to Salesforce (and log in seamlessly. Salesforce events are also accessible through Drupal 8. Handy!

  • Entity mapping, which means tying fields in your Drupal site to those in Salesforce, such as “Markets” you serve for upcoming events or hidden user fields like “Lead Score.”

  • Ability to push data to Salesforce from Drupal, such as users engaging with gated content, new leads, or activity data to ensure Salesforce has all the information it needs to make decisions. This is critically important with AI advancements such as Salesforce Einstein.

  • Ability to pull data such as new products, syncing events, etc into Drupal. Often, this takes the form of rough data imports for critical fields (like product information) that site admins can add to using Drupal 8’s editing capabilities.

Take it to the Skies

While the Salesforce Suite module is a great start, any complex integration requires an experienced and competent Drupal development team to implement. Establishing an API connection is one thing, but building a Drupal 8 site to adapt to changing conditions on the Salesforce side is critical, as well as sound architecture on the Drupal 8 side to ensure data integrity and easy management for non-technical site admins.  
Looking to connect Drupal 8 with Salesforce? Contact us about your project and see how we can help.

Looking to tighten up your Salesforce integration?

We can help
Categories: Drupal

Important Information Block

New Drupal Modules - 1 November 2018 - 11:28am

This module has been created to enable users to display a section on their site which shows `Important information` to users.

This information could be: Updates to policies, safety information.

The block visibility can be configured from the Block Configuration page. It has been created with a simple-as-possible structure, and without making use of Javascript due to issues with Clientside Rendering which could affect automated tests running on sites with this module installed.

Configuration:

The following can be configured for the module:

Categories: Drupal

TI Media donates $1.3 million as apology for leaking internal Take-Two documents

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 1 November 2018 - 10:31am

As part of the settlement over the publication of details from a "confidential corporate document," TI Media†™s $1.3 million donation was split between three charities selected by Take-Two. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Field Autovalue

New Drupal Modules - 1 November 2018 - 9:26am

Field Autovalue allows fields to be configured to have custom values generated automatically whenever the entities they belong to are saved.

It does so by exposing a plugin system which allows fields to be configured to use a specific plugin to generate the automatic value.

The module does not provide any plugins (except inside the test module).

Categories: Drupal

Phase2: Migrating to Drupal From Alternate Sources

Planet Drupal - 1 November 2018 - 9:05am

Content migration is a topic with a lot of facets. We’ve already covered some important migration information on our blog:

Categories: Drupal

Paragraphs Report

New Drupal Modules - 1 November 2018 - 7:56am

The Paragraphs Report module will parse nodes of certain content types that you check on the settings page, and make a catalog of what paragraphs are used on which pages.

The use case for this report is when you want to know which pages a specific paragraph type is used.

Categories: Drupal

Mixer introduces new monetization for streamers

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 1 November 2018 - 7:02am

Mixer is introducing new ways for streamers to monetize and strengthen their communities, beginning with what the live-streaming platform is calling 'Season 2.' ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

My PAX Australia Indie Showcase Experience - by Tim Veletta

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 1 November 2018 - 6:47am
This past weekend myself along with several friends/playtesters showcased TeleBlast as part of the PAX Australia Indie Showcase. It was an absolutely unreal experience not only to have people come and enjoy the game. Here are some of the things I learned.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Drupal 8 Google Optimize Hide Page

New Drupal Modules - 1 November 2018 - 6:45am

Adds the Google Optimize page-hiding snippet to pages.
See https://developers.google.com/optimize/#the_page-hiding_snippet_code for Google's documentation.

This is a conversion of the D7 module https://www.drupal.org/project/google_optimize_hide_page to D8

Categories: Drupal

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