Skip to Content

Newsfeeds

The Musical Box #30: Shepard Can Dance - by Marcelo Martins

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 March 2015 - 12:39am
The Musical Box features 30 articles focusing on game music production and implementation. Edition #30: Mass Effect 3
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Particles spawned at mesh vertices: Recreating inFamous Second Son neon run effect in Unity3D - by Marek Stromsky

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 March 2015 - 12:39am
I've tried to recreate inFamous Second Son effect (spawning particles at object vertices) in Unity3d that could be used also on mobile devices.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Sunless Sea Sales and Funding Deep Dive, Part III: Early Access and Final Release - by Adam Myers

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 March 2015 - 12:39am
Sales figures for Sunless Sea in early access and after launch, with charts.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

GDC BizDev Diaries: Managing 150+ Meetings for Twelve Companies Without Losing My Mind (Part 1 of 3) - by Jay Powell

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 March 2015 - 12:39am
The first in a series of posts outlining how our consulting firm handled business development and marketing meetings for twelve very different companies simultaneously at GDC 2015.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

The Balance of Meta-game Design Featuring Age of Empires - by Josh Bycer

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 March 2015 - 12:39am
Age of Empires for the last few games became one of the first strategy series to have Meta-game design and today's post examines the differing philosophies and challenges of adding this model to your game.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Views HTTP Headers

New Drupal Modules - 26 March 2015 - 11:12pm

This module provides a views area plugin that allows you to specify custom http headers that should be output when the view is displayed.

For instance, you can output Cache-Control headers on a view that provides API data via JSON, thus ensuring your API always provides current information.

Alternatives

There are a few other modules that could help you do the same thing:

Categories: Drupal

Chen Hui Jing: 542 days as a Drupal developer

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2015 - 5:00pm

I’ve just listened to the latest episode of the Modules Unraveled podcast by Bryan Lewis, which talked about The current job market in Drupal. And it made me think about my own journey as a Drupal developer, from zero to reasonably competent (I hope). The thing about this industry is that everything seems to move faster and faster. There’s a best new tool or framework released every other day. Developers are creating cool things all the time. And I feel like I’m constantly playing catch-up. But looking back to Day 1, I realised that I did make quite a bit of progress since then.

Learning on the job

I’ve been gainfully employed as a Drupal architect...

Categories: Drupal

Zynga faces revived fraud lawsuit: Did its execs lie to investors?

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 26 March 2015 - 4:41pm

In a ruling in San Francisco, U.S. District Judge Jeffrey White ruled that shareholders can pursue claims alleging that its execs took advantage of investors. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Isovera Ideas & Insights: 6 Ways to Increase ROI on Your Drupal Project

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2015 - 3:28pm
Drupal is a great choice for your enterprise-level web application project, and maybe even your website. Like every other framework under the sun, it’s also a terrible choice if you’re cavalier about the management of its implementation. Things go awry, scope creeps, budgets get drained, and hellfire rains down from the sky… You get it. The good news is that there are steps you can take to prevent this from happening.
Categories: Drupal

Palantir: Increasing Velocity and Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2015 - 3:12pm

Palantir CEO Tiffany Farriss recently keynoted MidCamp here in Chicago where she spoke about the economics of Drupal contribution. In it, she explored some of the challenges of open-source contribution, showing how similar projects like Linux have managed growth and releases, and what the Drupal Association might do to help push things along toward a Drupal 8 release. You can give her presentation a watch here.

With this post, we want to highlight one of the important takeaways from the keynote: the Drupal 8 Accelerate Fund.

Some of you are clients and use Drupal for your sites, others build those sites for clients around the world, and still others provide technology that enhances Drupal greatly. We also know that Drupal 8 is going to be a game changer for us and our clients for a lot of reasons.

While we use a number of tools and technologies to drive success for our clients, Drupal is in our DNA. In addition to being a premium supporting partner of the Drupal Association, we also count amongst our team members prominent Drupal core and contributed module maintainers, initiative leads, and Drupal Association Board, Advisory Board, and Working Group members.

We've all done our part, but despite years of support and contributions from countless companies and individuals, we need to take a new approach to incentivize contributors to get Drupal 8 done. That’s where the Drupal 8 Accelerate Fund comes in.

Palantir is one of seven anchor donors who are raising funds alongside the Drupal Association to support Drupal 8 development. These efforts relate directly to the Drupal Association's mission of uniting a global open source community to build and promote Drupal, and will (and already have) support contributors directly through additional dollars for grants.

The fund breaks down like this:

  • The Drupal Association has contributed $62,500
  • The Drupal Association Board has raised another $62,500 from Anchor Donors
  • Now, the Drupal Association’s goal is to raise contributions from the Drupal community. This is the chance for everyone from end users to independents to Drupal shops to show your support for Drupal 8. Every dollar donated by the community has already been matched, doubling your impact. That means the total pool could be as much as $250,000 with your help.

 
Drupal 8 Accelerate is first and foremost about getting Drupal 8 to release. However, it’s also a pilot program for Drupal Association to obtain and provide financial support for the project. This is a recognition that, as a community, Drupal must find (and fund) a sustainable model for core development.

This is huge on a lot of levels, and those in the community have already seen the benefits with awards for sprints and other specific progress in D8. Now it’s our turn to rally. Give today and spread the word so we can all help move Drupal 8 a little closer to release.

Fundraising Websites - Crowdrise

 

Categories: Drupal

Daniel Pocock: WebRTC: DruCall in Google Summer of Code 2015?

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2015 - 2:58pm

I've offered to help mentor a Google Summer of Code student to work on DruCall. Here is a link to the project details.

The original DruCall was based on SIPml5 and released in 2013 as a proof-of-concept.

It was later adapted to use JSCommunicator as the webphone implementation. JSCommunicator itself was updated by another GSoC student, Juliana Louback, in 2014.

It would be great to take DruCall further in 2015, here are some of the possibilities that are achievable in GSoC:

  • Updating it for Drupal 8
  • Support for logged-in users (currently it just makes anonymous calls, like a phone box)
  • Support for relaying shopping cart or other session cookie details to the call center operative who accepts the call
Help needed: could you be a co-mentor?

My background is in real-time and server-side infrastructure and I'm providing all the WebRTC SIP infrastructure that the student may need. However, for the project to have the most impact, it would also be helpful to have some input from a second mentor who knows about UI design, the Drupal way of doing things and maybe some Drupal 8 experience. Please contact me ASAP if you would be keen to participate either as a mentor or as a student. The deadline for student applications is just hours away but there is still more time for potential co-mentors to join in.

WebRTC at mini-DebConf Lyon in April

The next mini-DebConf takes place in Lyon, France on April 11 and 12. On the Saturday morning, there will be a brief WebRTC demo and there will be other opportunities to demo or test it and ask questions throughout the day. If you are interested in trying to get WebRTC into your web site, with or without Drupal, please see the RTC Quick Start guide.

Categories: Drupal

Acquia: 2014 greatest hits - 30 Awesome Drupal 8 API Functions you Should Already Know - Fredric Mitchell

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2015 - 2:02pm
Language Undefined

Looking back on 2014, it was a great year of events and conversations with people in and around Acquia, open source, government, and business. I think I could happily repost at least 75% of the podcasts I published in 2014 as "greatest hits," but then we'd never get on to all the cool stuff I have been up to so far in 2015!

Nonetheless, here's one of my favorite recordings from 2014: a terrific session that will help you wrap your head around developing for Drupal 8 and a great conversation with Frederic Mitchell that covered the use of Drupal and open source in government, government decision-making versus corporate decision-making, designing Drupal 7 sites with Drupal 8 in mind, designing sites for the end users and where the maximum business value comes from in your organization, and more!

Categories: Drupal

Chris Hall on Drupal 8: D8 theming first impression

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2015 - 1:11pm
D8 theming first impression Thu, 03/26/2015 - 20:11 chrishu Introduction

After upgrading this site to a nice shiny Beta, I was itching to try themeing on Drupal 8, I have left off up to now as a few simple experiments showed me that even a simple sub-theme broke quickly under the pace of Drupal change, now though I should be able to upgrade any efforts and improvements without too much difficulty.

I theme Drupal every now and again and spend more time doing back-end and server related work, I usually have to have a good understanding of the mechanics of the themeing though even when not actively doing it. 

Often in the past I have been at odds with the themeing philosophy of teams I am working with (and have had to capitulate when outnumbered ;)) as I am more in the camp and would rather strip out most of the guff that Drupal inserts and break away from the 'rails' that make many Drupal sites turn out kind of samey apparently the 33% camp.

Also when working with talented front-end developers who don't necessarily deal mostly with Drupal it seems such a shame to clip their wings, I would rather try and start with a theme like Mothership.

The challenge

The assumption I had was that Drupal 8 will be much easier to customise and "go your own way" than Drupal has ever been before. The mini-challenge I set myself was to re-implement the look from another site chris-david-hall.info  which runs on ExpressionEngine and use the same CSS stylesheet verbatim (in the end I changed one line). 

The theme is pretty basic, based on Bootstrap 3, but even despite that has a few elements of structure that are not very Drupally, so made an interesting experiment.

More than enough for my first attempt.

The result

Well this site no longer looks like a purple Bartik, and does bear more than a passing resemblance to the site I ripped the CSS from.

It was pretty easy to restructure things and Twig theming in Drupal is a massive improvement, I am now convinced that Drupal 8 wins hands down over Drupal 7 for themeability.

There is still a lot more stuff I could strip out, this was a first pass, I am going to take a breather and come back to it. I have a couple of style-sheets left from Drupal to keep the in-line editing and admin stuff (mostly) working. I would prefer to target those bits more selectively.

The theme is on Github, just for interest and comparison at the moment, but depending on later experiments might turn into something more generically useful. 

Still a few glitches

It is a bit difficult working out if I have done something wrong or whether I am encountering bugs in the Beta, I will take the time to find out if issues have been raised when I get the chance. There are problems, for example for an anonymous user the home link is always active and some blocks seem to leave a trace even when turned off for a page (which messes with detecting whether a sidebar is active for example), both of these problems also exhibit in Bartik though.

I plucked the theme from my site at chris-david-hall.info and needs a lot of work anyway, I am hoping to improve both sites in tandem now. 

Comments Add new comment Your name Subject Comment About text formats Restricted HTML
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <h4> <h5> <h6>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Web page addresses and email addresses turn into links automatically.
Leave this field blank
Categories: Drupal

User experience insights: Criminal Case

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 26 March 2015 - 1:01pm

How could the popular casual title's UX be improved? This post by a Gameloft UX designer takes a critical look at the hit, and offers suggestions for making it better. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Wunderkraut blog: How to combine two facet items in Facet API

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2015 - 12:31pm

How to change solr search query for one facet using these modules: Search API, Search API solr, facet API, Facet API bonus and some custom code.

I have configured these modules to have a search page showing content that you search for and a list of facet items that you can filter the search result on. In my case the facet items was an representation of node types that you could filter the search result with. There are tons of blogpost how to do that, Search API solr documentation.

The facet item list can look like this (list of node types to filter search result on):

- Foo (22) - Bar (18) - Elit (10) - Ipsum (9) - Ultricies (5) - Mattis (2) - Quam (1)

What I wonted to achieve was to combine two facet items to one so the list would look like this:

- Foo and Bar (40) - Elit (10) - Ipsum (9) - Ultricies (5) - Mattis (2) - Quam (1)

The solution was using Search API hook hook_search_api_solr_query_alter(). I need to only change the query for the facet Item (node type) "Foo" and try to include (node type) "Bar" in the search query. So I fetched the facet item name by digging deep into the argument "$query".

<?php
function YOUR_CUSTOM_MODULE_search_api_solr_query_alter(array &$call_args, SearchApiQueryInterface $query) {

  // Fetching the facet name to change solr query on.
  $facet_item = $query->getFilter()->getFilters();
  if (!empty($facet_item)) {
    $facet_item = $facet_item[0]->getFilters();

    if (!empty($facet_item[0])) {
      if (!empty($facet_item[0][1])) {
        $facet_item = $facet_item[0][1];
        // This is my facet item I wont to change solr query on "Foo" and also add node type "Bar" to the filter.
        if ($facet_item === 'foo') {
          $call_args['params']['fq'][0] = $call_args['params']['fq'][0] . ' OR  ss_type:"bar"';
        }
      }
    }
  }
}
?>

We have now altered the solr query, but the list looks the same, the only differences now is that if you click on the "Foo" facet you will get "Foo" and "Bar" (node type) nodes in the search result.

To change the facet item list, I used drupal hook_facet_items_alter() provided by contrib module Facet API Bonus

<?php
function YOUR_CUSTOM_MODULE_facet_items_alter(&$build, &$settings) {

  if ($settings->facet == "type") {

    // Save this number to add on the combined facet item.
    $number_of_bar = $build['bar']['#count'];

    foreach($build as $key => $item) {
      switch ($key) {
        case 'foo':
          // Change the title of facet item to represent two facet items
          // (Foo & Bar).
          $build['foo']["#markup"] = t('Foo and Bar');

          // Smash the count of hits together.
          if ($build['foo']['#count'] > 0) {
            $build['foo']['#count'] = $build['foo']['#count'] + $number_of_bar;
          }
          break;

        // Remove this facet item now when Foo item will include this node type in the search result.
        case 'bar':
          unset($build['bar']);
          break;
      }
    }
  }
}
?>

After this should the list look like we want.

- Foo and Bar (40) - Elit (10) - Ipsum (9) - Ultricies (5) - Mattis (2) - Quam (1)

I also have a text printed out by Facet API submodule Current Search. This module lets you add blocks with text and tokens. In my case I added text when you searched and filtered to inform the user what he just searched for and/or filtered on. This could be done by adding existing tokens in the configuration of Current Search module configuration page "admin/config/search/current_search". The problem for me was that the token provided was the facet items that facet API created and not the one I changed. So I needed to change the token with text "Foo" to "Foo & Bar". This can be accomplished by hook_tokens_alter().

<?php
function YOUR_CUSTOM_MODULE_tokens_alter(array &$replacements, array $context) {

  if (isset($replacements['facetapi_active:active-value'])) {
    switch ($replacements['[facetapi_active:active-value]']) {

      case 'Foo':
        $replacements['[facetapi_active:active-value]'] = 'Foo and Bar';
        break;
    }
  }
}
?>

And that's it.
Link to all code

Categories: Drupal

Angie Byron: How and why D8 Accelerate is spending your hard-earned cash

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2015 - 12:13pm

Hopefully you've heard the news about the Drupal Association's new D8 Accelerate grants program, and the fundraising drive we have currently going on. If not, the gist is that the Drupal Association has created a central fund, managed by the Drupal core committers, to fund both "bottom-up" community grants for things like targeted sprints or "bug bounties," as well as "top-down" spending driven from the core committers on larger strategic initiatives that help accelerate Drupal 8's release. All D8 Accelerate grants that are provided are tracked centrally at https://assoc.drupal.org/d8accelerate/awarded, including what the money was used for, how much was spent, to whom it went, and a report from the grant recipient(s) that outlines the work that was accomplished.

However, it can be a little hard to parse from that format the larger meaning/context of this work, especially if you don't spend upwards of 30 hours per week in the core queue like most of these folks. :) As Chief Wearer of Many Hats™, I sit on both the Drupal Association board as well as the committee who manages these funds. This puts me in a good position to provide a bit of "behind the scenes" info on how the funding process works, as well as provide some of the larger story of how these funds are benefitting not only Drupal 8 core, but the larger Drupal ecosystem.

Drupal 8 Acceleration Performance


Source: https://www.drupal.org/node/2370667

As noted in my post-DrupalCon Bogotá critical issue run-down, performance improvements are a large chunk of the work remaining in Drupal 8. We had deliberately postponed most of this work until post-beta to avoid premature optimization and to allow all the major architectural chunks to be in place. However, we definitely can't release Drupal 8 while it is much slower than Drupal 7.

The D8 Accelerate fund has been instrumental in not only helping to address critical performance regressions, but also in accelerating the development of Drupal 8's next-generation cache system.

Or, to sum it up in a cheesy catch-phrase:

For less than $10,000, we're making Drupal 8 twice as fast! :D

Win!

Unblocking the beta-to-beta upgrade path

The second large focus of D8 Accelerate grants has been around D8 upgrade path blockers. These are extremely strategic, because they unblock a beta-to-beta upgrade path between Drupal 8 releases, which is extremely important for early Drupal 8 adopters.

For example, one large chunk of work D8 Accelerate has funded is in making sure Entity Field API and Views work well together. This is critical for features such as Multilingual, so content shows up in the right languages when expected, and it's necessary to complete this work prior to providing an upgrade path since it would be horrendous to write hook_update_N() functions for some of the necessary changes.

We're also exploring other alternatives to provide a beta-to-beta upgrade path to early adopters sooner, which is viable now that the hardest data-model-changing issues are done.

Security


Source: http://www.codepositive.com/code-positive/about

Obviously, we do not want to release Drupal 8 with known security vulnerabilities, but neither do we want to release an "upgrade path beta" that we encourage early adopters to use with known security vulnerabilities. Hence, we are trying to get any critical security issues taken care of sooner than later.

For example, one chunk of work that D8 Accelerate is funding in this area is tightening security around Drupal 8 entity API. Numerous form validation functions in core contain entity-level validation, to the wild dismay of anyone who's ever tried to implement web services on top of Drupal. The reason that's bad is because if you attempt to save something using just the Entity API (as you will in a REST API scenario where there are no forms), you will end up skipping validation routines and could end up with invalid and/or insecure data entry.

Targeted Sprints to Crush Criticals


Source: https://groups.drupal.org/node/456353

As demonstrated at the Ghent critical issue sprint last year, nothing is better for D8's velocity than getting a bunch of awesome contributors in the same place to pound on the critical queue together. D8 Accelerate funded a fantastic Menu link critical sprint at DrupalCamp New Jersey which, in addition to turning this area of criticals from "OMGWTFBBQ" to an actionable plan, resulted directly or indirectly in all of the related critical issues in this area being closed, within a couple of weeks after the sprint.

We aim to do more of these same types of targeted sprints throughout the year, the next one being the DrupalCI sprint in a couple of weeks. More on that in a sec.

Drupal Community acceleration Testbot modernization


Source: https://www.previousnext.com.au/blog/architecting-drupalci-drupalcon-ams...

Our beloved Drupal.org testbot has been showing its age. https://qa.drupal.org/ is still on Drupal 6, and largely on life-support these days. Testbot doesn't support testing on multiple PHP versions and databases, both of which are Drupal.org (websites/infra) blockers to a Drupal 8 release.

The DrupalCI: Modernizing Testbot Initiative is being driven by numerous devops-inclined community members from around the world. It aims to rebuild testbot from a collection of Drupal modules to a more standard CI stack (using big fancy words like Jenkins and Docker and Puppet and Travis and Silex) that your average PHP/devops folk can both understand and help maintain.

There's been a lot of work on DrupalCI already, and the upcoming D8 Accelerate sprint on DrupalCI: Modernizing Testbot Initiative will bring all the various contributors together to form DrupalCI Voltron to get an MVP of all the various pieces working together. Actual deployment will happen some time later, and both the new and old testbot will run alongside each other for a good while so any kinks can be worked out while D8 development stays stable.

This particular improvement not only allows Drupal 8 to ship, it also will provide great new functionality to all projects on Drupal.org! The architecture allows for ample room for later expansion as well, so we could start doing things like automated code reviews, performance testing, front-end testing, etc.

People power!

Here are some of the awesome Drupal contributors who've benefited from these funds:


Daniel Wehner (dawehner)
Daniel is a major driving force in Drupal core, as well as the person with the most commit mentions in Drupal 8. His work spans not only the Views in Drupal Core initiative, but in all other areas upon which he sets his sights. No issue is safe! :)
Lee Rowlands (larowlan)
Lee is another powerhouse core generalist who tries to tackle a #CriticalADay. You can learn more about Lee in this Community Spotlight.
Andrei Mateescu (amateescu)
Andrei is a co-maintainer Drupal 8 Core's Entity reference field, Field API/UI, and the transliteration system. He's also contributed to dozens of contributed projects.
Francesco Placella (plach)
Fancesco has been a significant contributor to internationalization functionality since the Drupal 7 days. In Drupal 8 he's a key fixture in the D8 Multilingual Initiative.
Wolfgang Ziegler (fago)
Wolfgang has worked with Drupal since 2005. In addition to his major contributions to Drupal 8's Entity Field API, he also maintains various widely-used contributed modules such as Rules and Profile2.
Klaus Purer (klausi)
In addition to his work driving Drupal 8's REST functionality, Klaus is also a member of Drupal's Security Team and a driver of automated tools for coding standards checking.
Fabian Franz (Fabianx)
In addition to being a mad performance scientist extraordinaire, Fabian has also been a prominent contributor to the Twig in core initiative.
Jelle Sebreghts (Jelle_S)
One of the drivers of mobile improvements in Drupal 8, Jelle also maintains dozens of contributed modules through his work at Attiks. Not just code!

D8 Accelerate funds are being used not only to fund development work, but also to fund patch reviews as well as more "project management"-y tasks like "triaging" a set of issues to find the truly critical ones, research on different approaches, etc. Wherever possible, the core committers explicitly look for opportunities to fund two people, usually a developer and a patch reviewer, in order to maintain the sanctity of Drupal core's peer review process.

I think this is great, because it highlights that it's not just raw PHP that's going to get Drupal 8 out the door; it's a joint effort of many complementary skills coming together.

Show me the money!


Source: https://blackincense.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/skeptical-cat-is-fraugh...

Why $250k to accelerate D8?

This is a very reasonable question to ask, particularly in light of the widely-cited statistic of 2,750+ contributors to Drupal 8, and various Drupal companies employing major contributors to Drupal core. Here are a few points:

  1. Drupal 8 will be a truly revolutionary release, not only by providing tons more useful functionality out of the box for site builders and content authors (WYSIWYG, mobile support, Views, configuration management, etc.), but by modernizing the underlying code base to address years of technical debt, and help "future-proof" Drupal for the next 10+ years. Unsurprisingly, this means that the total amount of work that has already gone into D8, and that remains needed to move D8 from a late beta to a release, is larger than it was for earlier versions of Drupal. Most technology maturations follow that pattern.

    Drupal 8's release also unlocks the move to a new release cycle that introduces backwards-compatible feature releases every 6 months. This allows us to "release early, release often," as opposed to "release every 4+ years, coupled with lots and lots of API breaks." ;)

  2. For these reasons, as well as many others, there's significant community benefit for 8.0.0 to be released as soon as possible, both so that sites can be built on it, and so that the 8.1.x branch can be opened for development for everyone with a feature idea itch to scratch. Additionally, many organizations and individuals who would benefit from D8 getting released sooner than later don't have the expertise or time to solve the remaining critical issues. These organizations/people might be willing to contribute money, but don't know who to best send it to or don't want to deal with the administration of contracting directly with individual core contributors. This fund is an opportunity for those organizations/people to make a difference without dealing with that administration.

    Make no mistake: Drupal 8 will get done, with or without this money. The goal of the fund is not about saying that our current awesome core contributor base is incapable of completing the work; it's only a recognition that funding work can make it happen faster.

  3. Why is this so? It's a common misconception that most core developers are paid for their work, either by Drupal companies who employ them, or by their customers. In reality, those directly financially compensated for their contributions to core (and especially to Drupal 8, which is not yet commercially viable for the masses) are a tiny fraction of the overall number of contributors.

    While there are numerous contributors who have already spent literally years contributing to core during their nights and weekends, and as a result have developed the kind of expertise needed to finish some of the remaining hard critical issues, relying on their ongoing availability of free time is not sustainable. These include contributors who work as freelance developers for clients, and it's certainly unfair to expect these people to turn down paid client work in order to have free time to work on core, or to quit being freelancers and become employees of forward-thinking Drupal companies who provide company time for core contribution. One of my favorite aspects of D8 Accelerate is that it is helping to "level the playing field" by making it possible for these people to have time to work on core regardless of their current employment situation.

  4. It's also important to emphasize here that injecting funding into the "bug fix slog" phase of major Drupal releases, when all the fun stuff that tends to motivate volunteers is long exhausted, is nothing new. That should come as no surprise, given that there have always been companies with financial interests in having a given version of Drupal ready sooner. For example, in Drupal 6, Acquia funded release manager Gábor Hojtsy full-time to help get that release done. In Drupal 7, in addition to employing core contributors full-time, Examiner.com paid numerous "bug bounties" out to folks to help slay specific critical issues. The difference here is that the DA as a non-profit organization needs to be extremely transparent in anything it's doing with the community's money, so there is greater visibility on things this time around.

If you don't want to donate, that's totally okay. You'll still be able to use Drupal 8 all you want, for free, when it's ready. Donating to this fund is only an opportunity to help make that happen sooner, if that's sufficiently valuable to you.

For a lot more "deep thinking" around these topics, see:

Many thanks to effulgentsia for his extensive help on this part!

How do you decide on how money gets spent?

The core committers have a well-documented process that explains how we decide what to fund. The TL;DR version is we look at criteria like:

  • Is a proposal genuinely a release blocker to Drupal 8, or something that will otherwise directly lead to an accelerated Drupal 8 release? (That's a biggie.)
  • Is a proposal resolving a blocker to other work, especially other release blockers?
  • Is a proposal resolving an "ecosystem" blocker? (For example "D8 upgrade path" issues that block early D8 adoption, blockers to a major portion of contributed modules/themes porting)
  • Is this a place where we can inject funding to take an issue the "last 20%" and get it across the finish line quickly?
  • Is momentum in this area slow, making it unlikely to be fixed "organically" by D8 contributors?
  • Are the people working in this area not directly funded (by an employer or client) to fix it already?
  • Do we have some confidence that funding will lead to a successful outcome?

Proposals that answer "yes" to more of these questions than not are more likely to get funded. And the D8 Accelerate team is constantly on the lookout for things that meet this criteria and proactively reaching out to contributors to help get things started.

In short, we take our responsibility with the community's money very seriously, and have turned down multiple community proposals that were fantastic ideas, but did not fit this criteria. (Where appropriate, we refer folks over to the Community Cultivation Grants instead.)

Also please note that a previous restriction around people asking for funding for their own time has been lifted a month or so back (Thanks, DA!). So if you are a contributor who knows a lot about critical issue #12345, you can request a stipend (initially capped at $500 for five hours) to help push it forward.

If that sounds like you, or you have other creative ideas on how we can get Drupal 8 out faster, apply for a grant today!

Thank you for your support!

I wanted to take the opportunity to give a huge shout-out to the "anchor donors" of the D8 Accelerate campaign:









Thanks to their efforts, every dollar you contribute is already matched by the Drupal Association and these anchor donors, doubling your impact. If you'd like, you can make a donation to my fundraising drive (I've set a very ambitious goal of $20,000 since that's 8% of $250,000 — get it? ;)):

Fundraising Websites - Crowdrise

...or, find your favourite Drupal person at https://www.crowdrise.com/d8accelerate/fundraiser and donate to theirs instead, or create your own! :)

Thanks as well to the folks who somehow stumbled across it and donated to my fundraiser already—Andreas Radloff, Douglas Reith, and Ian Dunn. I thought Ian's note was particularly awesome! :D

And finally, thank YOU for any and all support you can provide that will help us make Drupal 8 the most successful release of Drupal yet! :D If you have any other questions, please feel free to ask!

Tags: drupal 8drupal
Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: The 5 Commandments of Accessible Forms

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2015 - 11:31am

We’ve already discussed why accessibility matters and whetted your appetite on accessibility by providing a few simple things you can do to make your site more accessible.  Now it’s time to look at accessibility in forms, a common component of just about every site.

Categories: Drupal

Shomeya: A cheat sheet for hook_entity_api()

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2015 - 11:10am

The worst time to read software documentation is when you're trying to fix something that is broken and you have no idea why. I'd say it's like shopping when you're hungry, but it's actually the opposite. When stuff breaks for no apparent reason and you're on edge it's easy to notice every little issue with the docs, and you instantly form a very strong opinion on documentation.

The good news is that as a Drupal developer, you have tons of awesome documentation just a click away on api.drupal.org or drupal.org/documentation/develop and contributed module documentation is better than ever. Even though almost everything you could ever want to know about Drupal internals is available on api.drupal.org (even the source code!) sometimes you need to combine that with contributed docs, or dig in a little deeper.

That's exactly what I had to do while working on the first few chapters of Model Your Data with Drupal. Hooks like hook_entity_info() are well documented on api.drupal.org, but the Entity API module adds it's own options to the mix. Entity API has great docs on it's options as well, but there isn't a lot out there that thoroughly documents them together, or the interaction of their options.

Read more
Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: Form API #states

Planet Drupal - 26 March 2015 - 11:00am

Drupal's Form API helps developers build complex, extendable user input forms with minimal code. One of its most powerful features, though, isn't very well known: the #states system. Form API #states allow us to create form elements that change state (show, hide, enable, disable, etc.) depending on certain conditions—for example, disabling one field based on the contents of another. For most common Form UI tasks, the #states system eliminates the need to write custom JavaScript. It eliminates inconsistencies by translating simple form element properties into standardized JavaScript code.

Categories: Drupal
Syndicate content


Google+
about seo