Newsfeeds

National Geographic's brilliant cover

Dries Buytaert - 23 May 2018 - 7:55am

One of the best covers I've seen. Iconic!

Categories: Drupal

Doxie Dash Card Game Up On Kickstarter

Tabletop Gaming News - 23 May 2018 - 7:00am
Ooooooooooh, I can’t get a long, little doggie. I can’t even get one that’s small. I can’t get a long, little doggie. I can’t get a doggie at all! Thank you, Yosemite Sam, for that. Doxie Dash is a game all about long, little doggies. Play as a dachshund (or doxie, for short) and do […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Gnome Stew Notables – Meguey Baker

Gnome Stew - 23 May 2018 - 6:39am

Welcome to the next installment of our Gnome Spotlight: Notables series. The notables series is a look at game developers in the gaming industry doing good work. The series will focus on game creators from underrepresented populations primarily, and each entry will be a short bio and interview. We’ve currently got a group of authors and guest authors interviewing game creators and hope to bring you many more entries in the series as it continues on. If you’ve got a suggestion for someone we should be doing a notables article on, send us a note at headgnome@gnomestew.com. – Head Gnome John

Meet Meguey

Meguey Baker is a quilter, roleplaying game designer, and independent publisher. Notably she has created Apocalypse World, A Thousand and One Nights, and Psi-Run.

Talking With Meguey 1) Tell us a little bit about yourself and your work.

I am a huge history fan and work in as many history museums as I can possibly fit in my life, maybe more. I love stories and storytelling, and find people endlessly fascinating. These two things combine to inform my game design. Flavor that with raising 3 kids, being a sex ed teacher, and living in New England, and it’s pretty much me. Also, rocks are the best thing after toast, which is the best thing. People are not things, so there’s that.

2) What project are you most proud of?

I am very proud of the work I did with the Girl Effect to help re-weave connections between girls in Ethiopia. Working with Jessica Hammer and Julia Ellingboe and Giuila Barbano and John Stavropoulos was just great, and I was able to put so much of my whole self into the work, combining dance and song, sex education work, and shaping and holding space for people to discover their own voices. I am also very pleased with the way that Apocalypse World has helped so many people find a framework to bring forward their own vision and share their designs. Outside of game design, I’m glad to have had the chance to do conservation work on some very challenging and historically valuable textiles, and to spend 12 years helping families navigate postpartum depression.

3) What themes do you like to emphasize in your game work?

Throughout everything, the underlying principal to my work is to seek underrepresented voices and stories and find ways to amplify and share them. So in game design, I think a lot about things like accessibility to diverse players, play in different settings, play across generations and languages and other cultural division lines. The last big project I did before Apocalypse World 2nd ed was Playing Nature’s Year, which is a good example of this desire, to find new places and play games with new people. I also sometimes have a sharpness in the game that is unexpected; people have looked at 1001 Nights thinking it’s all fantastic magical stories, which is true, but it’s also potentially cut-throat small group politics.

4) What mechanics do you like best in games?

2d6, add a stat. Ok, beyond being flippant, I like mechanics that are designed with that exact game in mind, that are not just Oh, I’ll use 2d6, add a stat, that’ll work” because sometimes it really won’t.  The mechanics of the game should be thoughtfully designed the same way the setting of the artwork or the staging of the play is designed The mechanics of the game should be thoughtfully designed the same way the setting of the artwork or the staging of the play is designed; sometimes they are very very similar, and sometimes really not.

5) How would you describe your game design style?

Search for the clearest way to facilitate the most compelling story, then do that. Be ready to kill my darlings, set things aside, and re-interpret my ideas until the game does what I want it to do.

6) How does gender fit into your games?

Everyone should be able to play my games and find themselves in them. If they can’t, I better be exceedingly intentionally clear about that and understand why I did that. That said, I default to a feminist viewpoint on the world, including gender issues, so that is reflected in my games.

7) Do your kids influence your game design?

Parenting is a big deal and an influential part of our design process, first as parents of young kids looking for ways to play in brief chunks of time that had to occasionally flex around kid needs, and now as the kids all become young adults and we are gaming with them and watching them in their own design process. They and their friends in the Baker House Band are now one of our primary test groups, and we have increasingly good design relationships with them as we take game design on as a family business. Later this summer, our son Elliot intends to Kickstart his game Tiny&Chrome, which is a mini Lego road war game and entirely his own design. That is super gratifying as a parent, and a rare treat as a designer to see someone’s development as a game designer so closely, from “pretend we are dinosaurs!” as a toddler through to young adulthood.

One of my other main areas of work is in small local history museums. The way that we tell and reinterpret the story of the past has always intrigued me, and roleplaying games are one way to revisit the same story from different angles and through different lenses: what if Jane Austin was a zombie hunter? What if the steam age ran on magic? What if we centered Native American narratives in looking at North American history? What would an original story of the Lawrence mill strikes look like? Could I play those people? Could I design games to support those stories? Uncovering the connections between one aspect of history and other aspects, like the change in local textile use after the arrival of the railroad, is such incredibly interesting design space for me. I’m working now on a major exhibit on the industrial history of our town, and I’m designing site-specific games to engage visitors with their local history. I’m excited to see what comes next.

8) How did you get into game design?

Star Wars came out and I wanted to play a Jedi, so I asked my DM if we could play D&D but in Star Wars. She said yes. I was 7. She was 10. Her brother was 9 and made us lightsabers out of paper towel tubes. Seriously. I don’t remember not writing and designing games and plays and stories. Once it was the 1990s and print shops and copiers existed, it was a matter of time, and then when the internet and .pdfs existed, it was a sure thing. I designed 1001 Nights in notebooks while strolling around town with my youngest baby, then typed it up and sent it out into the world.

9) What one thing would you change in gaming?

I would somehow give access and time to queer folks, women, people of color, non-English speakers looking to connect with English speaking audiences, and folks with no regular time to sit at a computer and write or take part in on-line community. In practical terms, I want conventions to be cheaper and more accessible for more people. In magic wand terms, I want states and nations to value storytelling and connecting to other people enough to fund major NEA-type projects to get role playing games to every school and every library and every museum and community center and summer camp in the world.

10) What are you working on now?

just launched in Kickstarter, so that’s the current big focus. After that, there’s this suite of site-specific games I’m working on that’s pretty fun and has some applicability in the “magic wand” area I mentioned above.

11) Who/What games are some of your influences?

AD&D, first and foremost. Shadowrun and Cyberpunk and Ars Magica. Lots of school yard games and lots of old string games and puzzle games. I played games with my sister non-stop as a kid, so she’s a big influence, even though we haven’t played together in 30 years except in fleeting moments. We live nearby, but life is very full, and playing games with family is vulnerable and tricky sometimes. Emily Care Boss, of course, and Vincent Baker. Esther Clinton, who no-one knows about, but who is a folklorist and was crucial to my college experience of gaming. More recently, I found a lot of fruitful ground in Dialect, by Kathryn Hymes and Hakan Seyalioglu, Tree House Dreams by Gray Pawn Games and Alas for the Awful Sea! by Storybrewers Veronica and Haley, and Ben Dutter’s Perseverant.

Thanks for joining us for this entry in the notables series.  You can find more in the series here:
and please feel free to drop us any suggestions for people we should interview at headgnome@gnomestew.com.

 

Categories: Game Theory & Design

User Statistics

New Drupal Modules - 23 May 2018 - 6:35am

It provides user statistics like post count, login count, and IP address tracking.

Categories: Drupal

Paizo Previews the Wizard Class From Pathfinder

Tabletop Gaming News - 23 May 2018 - 6:00am
One of the big news stories of late has been the announcement that Pathfinder is getting a new edition. But what’s changing? Well, the core classes are getting an overhaul. So, what can you expect? At PaizoCon, players will get a chance to see these new classes first-hand, but even us that won’t be in […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Datadog P

New Drupal Modules - 23 May 2018 - 5:34am

Integrates datadog into drupal.

Categories: Drupal

Axelerant Blog: Women at Axelerant: Chapter Two

Planet Drupal - 23 May 2018 - 4:23am


I sat down to speak with the amazing women of Axelerant, and they each shared their unique perspectives about what it's like being professionals in their field. In this chapter, Mridulla, Akanksha, Sabreena, and Nikita expound on this—and in their own words.

Categories: Drupal

The RPGnet Interview: David Donachie, Solipsist

RPGNet - 23 May 2018 - 12:00am
A talk with the designer of Solipsist and a contributor to many others.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Gizra.com: Understanding Media Management with Drupal Core

Planet Drupal - 22 May 2018 - 10:00pm

But I just want to upload images to my site…

There is a clear difference between what a user expects from a CMS when they try to upload an image, and what they get out of the box. This is something that we hear all the time, and yet we, as a Drupal community, struggle to do it right.

There are not simple answers on why Drupal has issues regarding media management. As technology evolves, newer and simpler tools raise the bar on what users expects to see on their apps. Take Instagram for example. An entire team of people (not just devs) are focused on making the experience as simple as possible.

Therefore it’s normal to expect that everyone wants to have this type of simplicity everywhere. However, implementing this solutions is not always trivial, as you will see.

Continue reading…

Categories: Drupal

Virtuoso Performance: Configuring migrations via a form

Planet Drupal - 22 May 2018 - 7:29pm
Configuring migrations via a form mikeryan Tuesday, May 22, 2018 - 09:29pm

Frequently, there may be parts of a migration configuration which shouldn’t be hard-coded into your YAML file - some configuration may need to be changed periodically, some may vary according to environment (for example, a dev environment may access a dev or test API endpoint, while prod needs to access a production endpoint), or you may need a password or other credentials to access a secure endpoint (or for a database source which you can’t put into settings.php). You may also need to upload a data file for input into your migration. If you are implementing your migrations as configuration entities (a feature provided by the migrate_plus module), all this is fairly straightforward - migration configuration entities may easily be loaded, modified, and saved based on form input, implemented in a standard form class.

Uploading data files

For this project, while other CSV source files were static enough to go into the migration module itself, we needed to periodically update the blog data during the development and launch process. A file upload field is set up in the normal way:

$form['acme_blog_file'] = [ '#type' => 'file', '#title' => $this->t('Blog data export file (CSV)'), '#description' => $this->t('Select an exported CSV file of blog data. Maximum file size is @size.', ['@size' => format_size(file_upload_max_size())]), ];

And saved to the public file directory in the normal way:

$all_files = $this->getRequest()->files->get('files', []); if (!empty($all_files['acme_blog_file'])) { $validators = ['file_validate_extensions' => ['csv']]; if ($file = file_save_upload('acme_blog_file', $validators, 'public://', 0)) {

So, once we’ve got the file in place, we need to point the migration at it. We load the blog migration, retrieve its source configuration, set the path to the uploaded file, and save it back to active configuration storage.

$blog_migration = Migration::load('blog'); $source = $blog_migration->get('source'); $source['path'] = $file->getFileUri(); $blog_migration->set('source', $source); $blog_migration->save(); drupal_set_message($this->t('File uploaded as @uri.', ['@uri' => $file->getFileUri()])); } else { drupal_set_message($this->t('File upload failed.')); } }

It’s important to understand that get() and set() only operate directly on top-level configuration keys - we can’t simply do something like $blog_migration->set(‘source.path’, $file->getFileUri()), so we need to retrieve the whole source configuration array, and set the whole array back on the entity.

Endpoints and credentials

The endpoint and credentials for our event service are configurable through the same webform. Note that we obtain the current values from the event migration configuration entity to prepopulate the form:

$event_migration = Migration::load('event'); $source = $event_migration->get('source'); if (!empty($source['urls'])) { if (is_array($source['urls'])) { $default_value = reset($source['urls']); } else { $default_value = $source['urls']; } } else { $default_value = 'http://services.example.com/CFService.asmx?wsdl'; } $form['acme_event'] = [ '#type' => 'details', '#title' => $this->t('Event migration'), '#open' => TRUE, ]; $form['acme_event']['event_endpoint'] = [ '#type' => 'textfield', '#title' => $this->t('CF service endpoint for retrieving event data'), '#default_value' => $default_value, ]; $form['acme_event']['event_clientid'] = [ '#type' => 'textfield', '#title' => $this->t('Client ID for the CF service'), '#default_value' => @$source['parameters']['clientId'] ?: 1234, ]; $form['acme_event']['event_password'] = [ '#type' => 'password', '#title' => $this->t('Password for the CF service'), '#default_value' => @$source['parameters']['clientCredential']['Password'] ?: '', ];

In submitForm(), we again load the migration configuration, insert the form values, and save:

$event_migration = Migration::load('event'); $source = $event_migration->get('source'); $source['urls'] = $form_state->getValue('event_endpoint'); $source['parameters'] = [ 'clientId' => $form_state->getValue('event_clientid'), 'clientCredential' => [ 'ClientID' => $form_state->getValue('event_clientid'), 'Password' => $form_state->getValue('event_password'), ], 'startDate' => date('m-d-Y'), ]; $event_migration->set('source', $source); $event_migration->save(); drupal_set_message($this->t('Event migration configuration saved.'));

Note that we also reset the startDate value while we’re at it (see the previous SOAP blog post).

Tags Drupal Planet Drupal Migration Use the Twitter thread below to comment on this post:

Configuring migrations via a form https://t.co/EZTiUKBazX

— Virtuoso Performance (@VirtPerformance) May 22, 2018

 

Categories: Drupal

Kalamuna Blog: Drupalistas Spent Our Entire Swag Budget. Where did the Money Go?

Planet Drupal - 22 May 2018 - 3:09pm
Drupalistas Spent Our Entire Swag Budget. Where did the Money Go? Shannon O'Malley Tue, 05/22/2018 - 15:09

This April at DrupalCon Nashville, in addition to wanting to meet colleagues and soak up the great talks, we wanted to create a forum for the international Drupal community to do good. That’s why we used our sponsor booth wall as a space for attendees to promote nonprofits that work for causes that matter to them.

Categories Articles Community Drupal Nonprofits Author Shannon O'Malley
Categories: Drupal

CKEditor Text Transform

New Drupal Modules - 22 May 2018 - 2:45pm

This module integrates the CKEditor Text Transform Selection plugin.

Categories: Drupal

New Releases Available For Avatars of War

Tabletop Gaming News - 22 May 2018 - 2:00pm
It might be called the Empire of Men, but there’s some kick-ass women lining up on the battlefield, too. This month’s releases from Avatars of War include the Warrior Priestess and Sunna of Sonnstahl. To celebrate these ladies’ arrival, everything for the Empire of Men faction is on sale for 15% off this week. From […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

EA acquires GameFly's cloud gaming service

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 22 May 2018 - 1:54pm

Electronic Arts announced its acquisition of the cloud gaming technology assets and personnel of GameFly today. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Email To Image

New Drupal Modules - 22 May 2018 - 1:23pm

Email to image module, avoids the email scrapping technique to identify emails inside the source code and send spam, we encrypt the email and the css styles data, generating an image with that data, and replacing the email text with the generated hash and image. Therefore when user clicks on mailto link, the email is not sent as plain text to the local email client in the OS, just sent the encrypted hash to a custom form that do the work sending the email.

Categories: Drupal

BYU Slideshow

New Drupal Modules - 22 May 2018 - 1:03pm

Allows the user to add an image slideshow paragraph type to embed a slideshow.

Categories: Drupal

Rebel Minis Releases Qwik: A Game of the Wastelands

Tabletop Gaming News - 22 May 2018 - 1:00pm
Rebel Minis is pleased to announce that they’ve released Qwik: A Game of the Wastelands. It’s a new fantasy sports game set in a post-apocalyptic world. Hey, when not running away from nuclear mutants, you still wanna just play around some, right? Grab the dog skull and get in there! From the announcement: Rebel Minis […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

My thoughts on Adobe buying Magento for $1.68 billion

Dries Buytaert - 22 May 2018 - 12:20pm

Yesterday, Adobe announced that it agreed to buy Magento for $1.68 billion. When I woke up this morning, 14 different people had texted me asking for my thoughts on the acquisition.

Adobe acquiring Magento isn't a surprise. One of our industry's worst-kept secrets is that Adobe first tried to buy Hybris, but lost the deal to SAP; subsequently Adobe tried to buy DemandWare and lost out against Salesforce. It's evident that Adobe has been hungry to acquire a commerce platform for quite some time.

The product motivation behind the acquisition

Large platform companies like Salesforce, Oracle, SAP and Adobe are trying to own the digital customer experience market from top to bottom, which includes providing support for marketing, commerce, personalization, and data management, in addition to content and experience management and more.

Compared to the other platform companies, Adobe was missing commerce. With Magento under its belt, Adobe can better compete against Salesforce, Oracle and SAP.

While Salesforce, SAP and Oracle offer good commerce capability, they lack satisfactory content and experience management capabilities. I expect that Adobe closing the commerce gap will compel Salesforce, SAP and Oracle to act more aggressively on their own content and experience management gap.

While Magento has historically thrived in the SMB and mid-market, the company recently started to make inroads into the enterprise. Adobe will bring a lot of operational maturity; how to sell into the enterprise, how to provide enterprise grade support, etc. Magento stands to benefit from this expertise.

The potential financial outcome behind the acquisition

According to Adobe press statements, Magento has achieved "approximately $150 million in annual revenue". We also know that in early 2017, Magento raised $250 million in funding from Hillhouse Capital. Let's assume that $180 million of that is still in the bank. If we do a simple back-of-the-envelope calculation, we can subtract this $180 million from the $1.68 billion, and determine that Magento was valued at roughly $1.5 billion, or a 10x revenue multiple on Magento's trailing twelve months of revenue. That is an incredible multiple for Magento, which is primarily a licensing business today.

Compare that with Shopify, which is trading at a $15 billion dollar valuation and has $760 million of twelve month trailing revenue. This valuation is good for a 20x multiple. Shopify deserves the higher multiple, because it's the better business; all of its business is delivered in the cloud and at 65% year-over-year revenue growth, it is growing much faster than Magento.

Regardless, one could argue that Adobe got a great deal, especially if it can accelerate Magento's transformation from a licensing business into a cloud business.

Most organizations prefer best-of-breed

While both the product and financial motivations behind this acquisition are seemingly compelling, I'm not convinced organizations want an integrated approach.

Instead of being confined to proprietary vendors' prescriptive suites and roadmaps, global brands are looking for an open platform that allows organizations to easily integrate with their preferred technology. Organizations want to build content-rich shopping journeys that integrate their experience management solution of choice with their commerce platform of choice.

We see this first hand at Acquia. These integrations can span various commerce platforms, including IBM WebSphere Commerce, Salesforce Commerce Cloud/Demandware, Oracle/ATG, SAP/hybris, Magento and even custom transaction platforms. Check out Quicken (Magento), Weber (Demandware), Motorola (Broadleaf Commerce), Tesla (custom to order a car, and Shopify to order accessories) as great examples of Drupal and Acquia working with various commerce platforms. And of course, we've quite a few projects with Drupal's native commerce solution, Drupal Commerce.

Owning Magento gives Adobe a disadvantage, because commerce vendors will be less likely to integrate with Adobe Experience Manager moving forward.

It's all about innovation through integration

Today, there is an incredible amount of innovation taking place in the marketing technology landscape (full-size image), and it is impossible for a single vendor to have the most competitive product suite across all of these categories. The only way to keep up with this unfettered innovation is through integrations.

An image of the Marketing Technology Landscape 2018. For reference, here are the 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 versions of the landscape. It shows how fast the marketing technology industry is growing.

Most customers want an open platform that allows for open innovation and unlimited integrations. It's why Drupal and Acquia are winning, why the work on Drupal's web services is so important, and why Acquia remains committed to a best-of-breed strategy for commerce. It's also why Acquia has strong conviction around Acquia Journey as a marketing integration platform. It's all about innovation through integration, making those integrations easy, and removing friction from adopting preferred technologies.

If you acquire a commerce platform, acquire a headless one

If I were Adobe, I would have looked to acquire a headless commerce platform such as Elastic Path, Commerce Tools, Moltin, Reaction Commerce or even Salsify.

Today, there is a lot of functional overlap between Magento and Adobe Experience Manager — from content editing, content workflows, page building, user management, search engine optimization, theming, and much more. The competing functionality between the two solutions makes for a poor developer experience and for a poor merchant experience.

In a headless approach, the front end and the back end are decoupled, which means the experience or presentation layer is separated from the commerce business layer. There is a lot less overlap of functionality in this approach, and it provides a better experience for merchants and developers.

Alternatively, you could go for a deeply integrated approach like Drupal Commerce. It has zero overlap between its commerce, content management and experience building capabilities.

For Open Source, it could be good or bad

How Adobe will embrace Magento's Open Source community is possibly the most intriguing part of this acquisition — at least for me.

For a long time, Magento operated as Open Source in name, but wasn't very Open Source in practice. Over the last couple of years, the Magento team worked hard to rekindle its Open Source community. I know this because I attended and keynoted one of its conferences on this topic. I have also spent a fair amount of time with Magento's leadership team discussing this. Like other projects, Magento has been taking inspiration from Drupal.

For example, the introduction of Magento 2 allowed the company to move to GitHub for the first time, which gave the community a better way to collaborate on code and other important issues. The latest release of Magento cited 194 contributions from the community. While that is great progress, it is small compared to Drupal.

My hope is that these Open Source efforts continue now that Magento is part of Adobe. If they do, that would be a tremendous win for Open Source.

On the other hand, if Adobe makes Magento cloud-only, radically changes their pricing model, limits integrations with Adobe competitors, or doesn't value the Open Source ethos, it could easily alienate the Magento community. In that case, Adobe bought Magento for its install base and the Magento brand, and not because it believes in the Open Source model.

This acquisition also signals a big win for PHP. Adobe now owns a $1.68 billion PHP product, and this helps validate PHP as an enterprise-grade technology.

Unfortunately, Adobe has a history of being "Open Source"-second and not "Open Source"-first. It acquired Day Software in July 2010. This technology was largely made using open source frameworks — Apache Sling, Apache Jackrabbit and more — and was positioned as an open, best-of-breed solution for developers and agile marketers. Most of that has been masked and buried over the years and Adobe's track record with developers has been mixed, at best.

Will the same happen to Magento? Time will tell.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: My thoughts on Adobe buying Magento for $1.68 billion

Planet Drupal - 22 May 2018 - 12:20pm

Yesterday, Adobe announced that it agreed to buy Magento for $1.68 billion. When I woke up this morning, 14 different people had texted me asking for my thoughts on the acquisition.

Adobe acquiring Magento isn't a surprise. One of our industry's worst-kept secrets is that Adobe first tried to buy Hybris, but lost the deal to SAP; subsequently Adobe tried to buy DemandWare and lost out against Salesforce. It's evident that Adobe has been hungry to acquire a commerce platform for quite some time.

The product motivation behind the acquisition

Large platform companies like Salesforce, Oracle, SAP and Adobe are trying to own the digital customer experience market from top to bottom, which includes providing support for marketing, commerce, personalization, and data management, in addition to content and experience management and more.

Compared to the other platform companies, Adobe was missing commerce. With Magento under its belt, Adobe can better compete against Salesforce, Oracle and SAP.

While Salesforce, SAP and Oracle offer good commerce capability, they lack satisfactory content and experience management capabilities. I expect that Adobe closing the commerce gap will compel Salesforce, SAP and Oracle to act more aggressively on their own content and experience management gap.

While Magento has historically thrived in the SMB and mid-market, the company recently started to make inroads into the enterprise. Adobe will bring a lot of operational maturity; how to sell into the enterprise, how to provide enterprise grade support, etc. Magento stands to benefit from this expertise.

The potential financial outcome behind the acquisition

According to Adobe press statements, Magento has achieved "approximately $150 million in annual revenue". We also know that in early 2017, Magento raised $250 million in funding from Hillhouse Capital. Let's assume that $180 million of that is still in the bank. If we do a simple back-of-the-envelope calculation, we can subtract this $180 million from the $1.68 billion, and determine that Magento was valued at roughly $1.5 billion, or a 10x revenue multiple on Magento's trailing twelve months of revenue. That is an incredible multiple for Magento, which is primarily a licensing business today.

Compare that with Shopify, which is trading at a $15 billion dollar valuation and has $760 million of twelve month trailing revenue. This valuation is good for a 20x multiple. Shopify deserves the higher multiple, because it's the better business; all of its business is delivered in the cloud and at 65% year-over-year revenue growth, it is growing much faster than Magento.

Regardless, one could argue that Adobe got a great deal, especially if it can accelerate Magento's transformation from a licensing business into a cloud business.

Most organizations prefer best-of-breed

While both the product and financial motivations behind this acquisition are seemingly compelling, I'm not convinced organizations want an integrated approach.

Instead of being confined to proprietary vendors' prescriptive suites and roadmaps, global brands are looking for an open platform that allows organizations to easily integrate with their preferred technology. Organizations want to build content-rich shopping journeys that integrate their experience management solution of choice with their commerce platform of choice.

We see this first hand at Acquia. These integrations can span various commerce platforms, including IBM WebSphere Commerce, Salesforce Commerce Cloud/Demandware, Oracle/ATG, SAP/hybris, Magento and even custom transaction platforms. Check out Quicken (Magento), Weber (Demandware), Motorola (Broadleaf Commerce), Tesla (custom to order a car, and Shopify to order accessories) as great examples of Drupal and Acquia working with various commerce platforms. And of course, we've quite a few projects with Drupal's native commerce solution, Drupal Commerce.

Owning Magento gives Adobe a disadvantage, because commerce vendors will be less likely to integrate with Adobe Experience Manager moving forward.

It's all about innovation through integration

Today, there is an incredible amount of innovation taking place in the marketing technology landscape (full-size image), and it is impossible for a single vendor to have the most competitive product suite across all of these categories. The only way to keep up with this unfettered innovation is through integrations.

For reference, here are the 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 versions of the landscape. It shows how fast the landscape is growing.

Most customers want an open platform that allows for open innovation and unlimited integrations. It's why Drupal and Acquia are winning, why the work on Drupal's web services is so important, and why Acquia remains committed to a best-of-breed strategy for commerce. It's also why Acquia has strong conviction around Acquia Journey as a marketing integration platform. It's all about innovation through integration, making those integrations easy, and removing friction from adopting preferred technologies.

If you acquire a commerce platform, acquire a headless one

If I were Adobe, I would have looked to acquire a headless commerce platform such as Elastic Path, Commerce Tools, Moltin, Reaction Commerce or even Salsify.

Today, there is a lot of functional overlap between Magento and Adobe Experience Manager — from content editing, content workflows, page building, user management, search engine optimization, theming, and much more. The competing functionality between the two solutions makes for a poor developer experience and for a poor merchant experience.

In a headless approach, the front end and the back end are decoupled, which means the experience or presentation layer is separated from the commerce business layer. There is a lot less overlap of functionality in this approach, and it provides a better experience for merchants and developers.

Alternatively, you could go for a deeply integrated approach like Drupal Commerce. It has zero overlap between its commerce, content management and experience building capabilities.

For Open Source, it could be good or bad

How Adobe will embrace Magento's Open Source community is possibly the most intriguing part of this acquisition — at least for me.

For a long time, Magento operated as Open Source in name, but wasn't very Open Source in practice. Over the last couple of years, the Magento team worked hard to rekindle its Open Source community. I know this because I attended and keynoted one of its conferences on this topic. I have also spent a fair amount of time with Magento's leadership team discussing this. Like other projects, Magento has been taking inspiration from Drupal.

For example, the introduction of Magento 2 allowed the company to move to GitHub for the first time, which gave the community a better way to collaborate on code and other important issues. The latest release of Magento cited 194 contributions from the community. While that is great progress, it is small compared to Drupal.

My hope is that these Open Source efforts continue now that Magento is part of Adobe. If they do, that would be a tremendous win for Open Source.

On the other hand, if Adobe makes Magento cloud-only, radically changes their pricing model, limits integrations with Adobe competitors, or doesn't value the Open Source ethos, it could easily alienate the Magento community. In that case, Adobe bought Magento for its install base and the Magento brand, and not because it believes in the Open Source model.

This acquisition also signals a big win for PHP. Adobe now owns a $1.68 billion PHP product, and this helps validate PHP as an enterprise-grade technology.

Unfortunately, Adobe has a history of being "Open Source"-second and not "Open Source"-first. It acquired Day Software in July 2010. This technology was largely made using open source frameworks — Apache Sling, Apache Jackrabbit and more — and was positioned as an open, best-of-breed solution for developers and agile marketers. Most of that has been masked and buried over the years and Adobe's track record with developers has been mixed, at best.

Will the same happen to Magento? Time will tell.

Categories: Drupal

UK government takes aim at online games in Internet Safety Strategy response

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 22 May 2018 - 12:13pm

Video games were listed among the many online spaces being scrutinized by the United Kingdom government ahead of new laws that would aim to make the internet and social media safer for UK citizens. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

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