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groups.drupal.org frontpage posts: Drupalcamp New Orleans 2015

Planet Drupal - 22 January 2015 - 6:19pm
Start:  2015-03-28 09:00 - 17:00 America/Chicago User group meeting Organizers:  jeffdiecks jasonawant schmook bberl

http://www.drupalcampnola.com

Join us for the second annual Drupalcamp New Orleans on Saturday, March 28, 2015. Visit www.drupalcampnola.com for more information, to register and to submit a session.

Drupalcamp New Orleans
Saturday, March 28, 2015 - 9 am - 5 pm
Launch Pad
643 Magazine St
New Orleans, LA
www.drupalcampnola.com

Categories: Drupal

Chocolate Lily: Drupal 8 configuration management: what about small sites and distributions?

Planet Drupal - 22 January 2015 - 4:02pm

In a recent blog post, Drupal 8 co-maintainer Alex Pott highlighted a seismic shift in Drupal that's mostly slipped under the radar. In Drupal 8, he wrote, "sites own their configuration, not modules".

To see why this change is so far-reaching, it's useful to back up a bit and look at where exportable configuration comes from and what's changed.

Categories: Drupal

Chapter Three: Designing the Berkeley Institute for Data Science from scratch

Planet Drupal - 22 January 2015 - 3:34pm

Berkeley approached us to not only build a website for an exciting new project but to also develop its brand identity from scratch.



The project was the Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS), a new initiative to provide a common collaborative space for research fellows, faculty and anyone at Berkeley working with data science in some way.



The White House hosted an event to announce the initiative, which is funded by a $37.8 million grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Berkeley is one of three institutions to receive this funding, in addition to New York University and the University of Washington.



Now that the site is live, I’d like to share some of the processes I used to develop the identity and site design.

Categories: Drupal

Taxonomy autolink

New Drupal Modules - 22 January 2015 - 3:01pm

This module scans content on a Drupal site and automatically link occurrences of taxonomy terms on content pages to their term pages.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association News: Drupal.org 2015 Advertising Initiatives

Planet Drupal - 22 January 2015 - 2:49pm

I was hired by the Drupal Association in October 2014 to develop a new revenue stream from advertising on Drupal.org. For some time we’ve been trying to diversify revenue streams away from DrupalCon, both to make the Association more sustainable and to ensure that DrupalCons can serve community needs, not just our funding needs. We’ve introduced the Drupal Jobs program already and now, after conversations with the community, we want to put more work into Drupal.org advertising initiatives.

This new revenue stream will help fund various Drupal.org initiatives and improvements including better account creation and login, organization and user profile improvements, a responsive redesign of Drupal.org, issue workflow and Git improvements, making Drupal.org search usable, improving tools to find and select projects, and the Groups migration to Drupal 7.

We spent time interviewing members of the Drupal Association board, representatives of the Drupal Community, Working Groups, Supporting Partners, and Drupal Businesses, both large and small to help develop our strategy and guidelines. Our biggest takeaways are:

  • Advertising should not only appeal to advertisers, but also be helpful to our users and/or our mission.
  • When possible, only monetize users who are logged out and not contributing to the Project. If you’re on Drupal.org to do work and contribute, we don’t want you to see ads.
  • Don’t clutter the site, interfere with navigation or disrupt visitors, especially contributors.
  • Do not put ads on pages where users are coming to work, like the issue queue.
  • Advertising products should be inclusive, with low cost options and tiered pricing. We want to make sure that small businesses without huge marketing budgets have the opportunity to get in front of the Drupal Community.
  • Create high impact opportunities for Partners that already support the Community.
  • Address the industry-wide shift to Programmatic Advertising, which is the automated buying and selling of digital advertising.

There are already advertising banners on Drupal.org, however we need to expand their reach to hit our goals. We’re trying to address challenges for our current advertisers, including a relatively low amount of views on pages with ads, which makes it difficult for them to reach their goals.

We’re also facing industry-wide challenges in Digital Advertising. Advertisers are looking for larger, more intrusive ads that get the users’ attention, or at the very least use standard Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) ad sizes, which are larger than the ads we offer on Drupal.org.

We came up with a new line of products that we feel will help us reach our goals, but not disrupt the Drupal.org experience, or the Drupal Association Engineering Team roadmap. We want our Engineering Team to fix search on Drupal.org, not spend time developing and supporting major advertising platforms.

2015 Advertising Initiatives:

  • The ongoing development of curated content with banner ads including resource guides, content by industry and in the future, blog posts.
  • Continued display of banner ads on high profile pages like the Homepage, Marketplace and Case Studies Section.
  • Sponsored listings from Supporting Technology Partners (similar to Hosting Listings).
  • Opt-in email subscriptions with special offers from our Supporters.
  • Audience Extension: a secure, anonymous, non-interruptive way to advertise to Drupal.org visitors. It allows advertisers to programmatically reach the Drupal.org audience while on other websites through Ad Networks and Exchanges.

I wanted to spend most of my time explaining Audience Extension, since its unlike anything we’ve done in the past, and it may prompt questions. This product makes sense because it addresses all of the challenges we’re facing:

  • It’s affordable for small businesses; they can spend as little as $200 on a campaign
  • We don’t need to flood the site with ads and disrupt the user experience.
  • It’s relatively easy to implement - we won’t interrupt the engineering team or their efforts to improve Drupal.org.
  • We will only target anonymous (logged out) users.
  • We will support “Do Not Track” browser requests.
  • This is an industry-wide standard that we’re adopting.
  • Anonymous users will have the option to opt-out.
  • This improves the ad experience on other sites with more relevant, useful ads that also support the community.

How does Audience Extension Work?

We’re partnering with Perfect Audience, a company that specializes in retargeting, and offers a unique audience extension solution called Partner Connect.  We add a Perfect Audience JavaScript tag to the Drupal.org source code. This tag will be loaded on the page to logged out users. The tag places a Perfect Audience cookie in the visitor's browser that indicates that they recently visited Drupal.org. Once that cookie is in place, an advertiser looking to reach out to the Drupal.org community can advertise to those visitors on Facebook, Google's ad network, and many other sites that participate in major online ad networks. Advertisers create and manage these campaigns through their Perfect Audience accounts. They pay for the ads through Perfect Audience and we split the revenue with Perfect Audience and the ad networks that serve the ads.

  • The program is anonymous. No personally identifiable information (such as email address, name or date of birth) is gathered or stored.
  • No data is sold or exchanged, this merely gives advertisers the opportunity to buy a banner ad impression within the Perfect Audience platform.
  • It's easy to opt-out. You can just click over to the Perfect Audience privacy page and click two buttons to opt out of the tracking. Here's the link.
  • Drupal.org will support “Do Not Track” browser requests and only users who have not logged in (anonymous) will be included in the program.
  • It does not conflict with EU privacy rulings. Advertiser campaigns for Partner Connect can only be geotargeted to the United States and Canada right now.
  • Only high quality, relevant advertisers who have been vetted by an actual human will be able to participate in this program. Some good examples of Perfect Audience advertisers would be companies like New Relic and Heroku.
  • Perfect Audience is actually run by a Drupaler! The first business started by founder Brad Flora back in 2008 was built on Drupal. He spent countless hours in the IRC channel talking Drupal and posting in the forums. He understands how important it is to keep sensitive pages on Drupal.org an ad-free experience and he’s very excited to be able to help make that happen.
  • This program has the potential to generate significant revenue for the Drupal Association and Project over time as more advertisers come on board.


It’s important that we fund Drupal.org improvements, and that we do so in a responsible way that respects the community. We anticipate rolling out these new products throughout the year, starting with Audience Extension on February 5th.  Thanks for taking the time to read about our initiatives, and please tell us your thoughts!

Personal blog tags: advertisingdrupal.org
Categories: Drupal

Roy Scholten: FOSDEM 2015 will have an open source design track

Planet Drupal - 22 January 2015 - 2:26pm

On January 31 and February 1 the 15th edition of the FOSDEM event will be held in Brussels, Belgium. FOSDEM (Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting) is the largest gathering of open source community members in Europe. More than 5000 people will come from all parts of the world to meet, share ideas and collaborate.

As the name says, the event is highly developer centric, so the main focus has always been on the technology and the code. But open source software has graphical user interfaces too! Buttons to click, sliders to drag, forms to fill out, boxes to check, screens to swipe and what have you.

Useful software attracts users. To keep them around and attract more users, the useful has to be made usable. Which means uncovering and prioritising user goals and needs and doing the work to find out how to best serve those. That’s where design comes in.

This year FOSDEM will have it’s first ever “devroom” dedicated to the topic of open source design. User experience architects, interaction designers, information architects, usability specialists and designer/coder unicorns will share experiences and discuss the good and bad of design in open source environments.

Open source software is a driving force behind all things online. As more aspects of business, culture, society, humanity as a whole move into the digital domain it becomes just as more important to ensure that people don’t get left behind because of the sheer complexity of it all. There’s a lot that the craft of design can contribute to ensure this.

I’ll deliver a short talk about how we started, grew and maintain a user experience design team within the Drupal project. Otherwise, the schedule is looking great. I’m looking forward to meet my open source designer colleagues.

See you there?

Tags: designfosdemdrupalplanetSub title: Lets make better things.
Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: Don’t write a new SSO system (if you can help it)

Planet Drupal - 22 January 2015 - 1:56pm

A somewhat common request for projects, especially intranets, is to provide a single sign-on (SSO) system. At a rudimentary level, an SSO system allows one site to handle all logins (authentication) for a group of sites, rather than a visitor needing a separate login for each one. For an organization with several sites it can greatly reduce the headache for its clients, customers, employees, etc increase visitor satisfaction, reduce maintenance costs, and potentially increase sales.

Categories: Drupal

orkjerns blogg: Twice the fun: Twig on the server, twig on the client.

Planet Drupal - 22 January 2015 - 1:29pm
Twice the fun: Twig on the server, twig on the client. admin Thu, 01/22/2015 - 22:29

A couple of weeks ago I hacked together a quick proof of concept of editing the same template for using on the client side and the server side with Drupal 8. It looked like this:

Sunday hack. Make #headlessdrupal use #twig for client side templates http://t.co/OQiVya0cu8 #drupal #drupaltwig.

— eiriksm (@orkj) January 4, 2015

If you click the link you can see an animated gif of how I edit the Bartik node template and it reflects in a simple single page app. Or one of these hip headless Drupal things, if you want.

So I thought I should do a quick write up on what it took to make it work, what disadvantages comes with it, what does not actually work, and so on. But then I thought to myself. Why not make a theme that incorporates my thoughts in my last post, "Headless Drupal with head fallback". So I ended up making a proof of concept that also is a live demo of a working Drupal 8 theme with the first page request rendered on the server, and the subsequent requests rendered fully client side. They both use the same node template for both full views and the node listing on the front page. So if you are eager and want to see that, this is the link. 

Next, let's take a look at the inner workings:

Part 1: Twig js

Before I even started this, I had heard of twig.js. So my first thought was to just throw the Drupal templates to it, and see what happened. 

Well, some small problems happened.

The first problem was that some of the filters and tags we have in Drupal is not supported out of the box by twig.js. Some of these are probably Drupal specific, and some are extensions that is not supported out of the box. One example is the tag {% trans %} for translating text. But in general, this was not a big problem. Except that I did as I usually do when doing a POC. I just quickly threw together something that worked, resulting for example in that the trans tag just returns the original string. Which obviously is not the intended use for it. But at least now the templates could be rendered. Part one, complete.

Part 2: Enter REST

Next I needed to make sure I could request a node through the REST module, pass it to twig.js and render the same result as Drupal would do server side. This turned out to be the point where I ended up with the worst hacks. You see, ideally I would just have a JSON structure that represents the node, and pass it to twig.js. But there are a couple of obvious problems with that.

Consider this code (following examples are taken from the Bartik theme):

<a href="{{ url }}" rel="bookmark">{{ label }}</a>

This is unproblematic. If we have a node.url property and a node.label property on the object we send to twig.js, this would just work out of the box. Neither of these properties are available like that in the default REST response for a node, however, but a couple of assignments later, that problem went away as well.

Now, consider this:

{{ content|without('comment', 'links') }}

Let's start with the filter, "without". Well, at least that should be easy. We just need a filter that will make sure comment and links properties on the node.content object will not be printed here. No problem.

Now to the problem. The content variable here should include all the rendered fields of the node. As was the case of label and url, .content is not actually a property in the REST response either. This makes the default output from the REST module not so usable to us. Because to make it generic we would also have to know what fields to compose together to this .content property, and how to render them. So what then?

I'll just write a module, I thought. As I often do. Make it return more or less the render array, which I can pass directly to twig.js. So I started looking into what this looked like now, in Drupal 8. I started looking at how I could tweak the render array to look more or less like the least amount of data I needed to be able to render the node. I saw that I needed to recurse through the render array 0, 1 or 2 levels deep, depending on the properties. So I would get for example node.content with markup in all its children, but also node.label without children, just the actual title of the node. Which again made me start to hardcode things I did not want in the response, just like I just had started hardcoding things I wanted from the REST response.

So I gave up the module. After all this is just a hacked together POC, so I'll be frank about that part. And I went back to hardcoding it client side instead. Not really the most flexible solution, but at least - part two: complete.

Part 3: Putting the pieces together

Now, this was the easy part. I had a template function that could accept data. I had transformed the REST response into the pieces I needed for the template. The rest was just adding a couple of AJAX calls and some pushState for the history (which reminds me. This probably does not work in all browsers at all). And then bundling things together with some well known front-end tools. Of course, this is all in the repo if you want all the details.

Conclusions

Twig on the server and on the client. Enough said, right? 

Well. The form this demo is now, this is not something you would just start to use. But hopefully get some ideas. Or inspiration. Or maybe inspire (and inform) me of the smartest way to return a "half-rendered render array".

Also, I would love to get some discussion going regarding how to use this approach in the most maintainable way.

Some thoughts on how I would improve this if I would actually use it:

  • Request templates via ajax.
  • Improve escaping.
  • Incorporate it into a framework (right now it just vanilla js).
  • Remove hacks, actually implement all the filters.

Finally: The code is up at github. There is a demo on a test site on pantheon. And huge props just mostly go out to both twig and twig js authors. Just another day standing on the shoulders of giants.

I'm going to end this blog post with a classy gif from back in the day. And although it does not apply in the same way these gifs were traditionally used, I think we can say that things said in this blog post are not set in stone, neither in regards to construction or architectural planning.

Tags:
Categories: Drupal

Ryan Szrama: Come to DrupalCon Latin America 2015

Planet Drupal - 22 January 2015 - 11:08am

I've been privileged to attend almost every DrupalCon since Barcelona in 2007. I missed Paris in 2009, but I had a good excuse - my wife was due to give birth to our first child around the same time.

The relocation of the Commerce Guys headquarters to Paris has given me plenty of time to catch up on the missed sightseeing, but I still need to figure out how to get to Sydney after missing that one.

Without access to those hundreds of Drupal developers and enthusiasts in 2007, I never would have known anyone was even using Ubercart. I didn't know how to engage other developers remotely (my early forays into IRC were similar to webchick's, I believe), and there wasn't much going on in Louisville, KY where I called home. Meeting others in the Drupal community, learning from my peers, and being mentored directly by many of the same has grown me personally and professionally in ways I never would have expected.

That's why I'm excited about the opportunity to travel to Bogotá, Colombia for the first DrupalCon in Latin America, February 10-12. I can't wait to hear the keynotes from both Dries and Larry, two of my Drupal heroes, and to learn more about the latest developments in Drupal 8 core and contributed modules.

I'll personally be addressing two topics: Drupal Commerce 2.x for Drupal 8 (on behalf of bojanz) and growing a Drupal based product business. I also look forward to the conversations, shared meals, and sprints that make the conference so rewarding.

I strongly encourage you to come if you're in a position to do so!

With the help of Carlos Ospina, I've recorded a personal invitation in Spanish that I trust doesn't have me saying anything embarrassing. I'm sure my Spanish will be better for at least a week after spending time at the conference.

Categories: Drupal

Don't Miss: 20 fun facts about hex grids

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 22 January 2015 - 11:01am

One game developer shares twenty "of the interesting (and obscure) facts we uncover in our quest to know everything we can about grids and their use in games." ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Major breakthrough in reading ancient scrolls

Virtual Reality - Science Daily - 22 January 2015 - 8:44am
Revolutionary software is making a breakthrough in reading 2,000-year old Herculaneum scrolls, computer scientists report. After working for more than 10 years on unlocking an ancient piece of history, what lies inside damaged Herculaneum scrolls, one researcher will accomplish the next step in allowing the world to read the scrolls, which cannot be physically opened.
Categories: Virtual Reality

A Narrative Dream... The Unfinished Swan Part III - Motivation - by Eric Guadara

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 22 January 2015 - 8:27am
Themes, allusions, and symbols are plentiful in TUS, emphasizing the natural wonderment felt by the player and bolstering the experience with rich content. I've chosen to break up my writings into chapters to parallel the game's structure/narrative.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Games Everyone Anticipating but Know Nothing About - by Devis Lengren

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 22 January 2015 - 8:26am
Games I am Anticipating but Know Nothing About.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Auto Save for Unity - by Lior Tal

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 22 January 2015 - 8:25am
A simple and useful editor code for Unity that perform Auto Save for the currently open scene every few minutes.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

100 Games in 5 Years: The Halfway Mark - by James Cox

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 22 January 2015 - 8:25am
A few years ago, I set a goal for myself: Make 100 games in 5 years. This post is an update at the 2.5 year mark.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Randomly Interesting Combat - by Sam Coster

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 22 January 2015 - 8:15am
Post-alpha we found the combat in our open world survival game to be a bit too monotonous. To empower the Mastery elements of its design, we went back to the drawing board and found a solution in randomness.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Page2Images

New Drupal Modules - 22 January 2015 - 7:15am

Page2Images module allows user to create a website thumbnail preview in the content using only a website URL.

This module is sponsored by: Jeney Repro Ltd.

The module requires a free or paid account from Page2Images, who is the service provider.

Categories: Drupal

Elder Scrolls Online goes free-to-play: Was Zenimax stupid...like a fox?

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 22 January 2015 - 7:12am

I'm beginning to think that repeated initial use of subscription with later conversion to an F2P option is not a failure of publishers to come to grips with reality. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Bluespark Labs: Start your content + commerce revolution

Planet Drupal - 22 January 2015 - 6:59am

Shifting to a content-driven commerce focus is a daunting challenge.

Whether you are a media company adding commerce to your site or a retail site wanting to add richer editorial, there are very different skillsets required to sell product versus those needed for writing and curating content. How do you successfully blend these skillsets — much less these seemingly disparate websites — into a single, cohesive whole?

It ain’t easy, but it’s worth it.

From Media to Commerce

Adding commerce to a media site is tricky. On the one hand, product recommendations can add a new dimension of value to both you and your readers. Just like advertising, though, (and maybe more so), you run the risk of corrupting a brand that your readers have come to trust.

Promotion!

If you are making the step into content-driven commerce, you must be willing to promote products on your site. Sounds like a no-brainer, right? But integrity is one of the things that readers value from media sites. And if they feel like they are being pushed toward a bad product (or even an unrelated product), they will likely revolt.

Now, the promotions don’t have to be in your face, “everything must go”, car-sales promotions. In fact, those are the exact promotions that will spark revolution. But you must be willing to add tasteful product descriptions and honest reviews and recommendations. This means putting your trusted brand behind a product that you like — and, more importantly, one that you think your readers will like.

Not selling out

There is a fine line between promoting product and selling out. Sometimes it’s easy to find. Don’t like a product? Think a product is cheaply made? Don’t recommend it no matter how sweet that affiliate commission looks.

But what about a product you love versus one that you like? The one you love, right? But what if that second product has a much better affiliate program?

It’s tricky. But you can probably find a way to promote both. The Wirecutter (and their sister site, The SweetHome) approach to product reviews is a great example of this. They write in-depth product reviews for different categories of gadgets. Each review has a recommended product along with explanations of why they did and didn’t like some of the other options they reviewed. Each product is a link to Amazon (and other stores) and every link has their affiliate code.

It’s a smart, if intense, solution that allows them to promote a lot of different products without selling out. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. Readers trust the site more because they go into so much detail about so many options.

From Commerce to Media

Now, if you are going in the opposite direction (adding content to your commerce site), then you’ll experience a range of other issues that can be even more challenging. In many respects, they run counter to much of the marketing culture that permeates most retail shops — unless those shops have come to value content-marketing and storytelling as a way to increase online sales.

Content Production

Editorial content is a whole new world. Marketing content goes through a series of edits and reviews. It’s often bland and boring. Intentionally so. You need to put the best foot forward of every product you sell — no matter how much that description might gloss over hard truths.

With a content-driven commerce approach, though, using your marketing-style for your editorial content will sabotage your efforts. You need something with a voice and style that captures people’s attention and engages them on a personal level. Something that product descriptions almost never do.

Willingness to curate

Once you start producing content, you need to start curating it. What products are going to make it onto your top 10 list? Which set of widgets are you going to include in your how-to article? You know those items you promote are going to get more views and more clicks — even a bump in brand perception — that other products won’t.

After you’ve written the piece, then you need to decide what content you’re going to promote on the homepage and throughout the site. Another tough decision. This one, though, fits closely inline with your sales planning process — which sale are promoting and when.

Treating content as a first-class citizen

Another aspect of content-driven commerce that may seem anathema to many commerce sites: treat your content like a first-class citizen. Specifically: give it equal weight on your homepage, which means treating it the same as you would a sale or other promotion. The challenge for many is that this feels like you are losing sales. But you’re trading a bump in short-term sales for long-term engagement.

There are many companies that have seemingly embraced content-driven commerce as a strategy. Big brands like Home Depot, Lowes, and Brooks Brothers are producing some amazing content. A quick glance at their homepages, though, and the only hint at this content is behind a single link. Everything on these pages is focused on the latest sale and other product promotions. This may be a strategic decision or a technological limitation. Regardless, these websites have yet to really embrace content as a cornerstone to their brand.

Admittedly, there are many ways to enter a website—from Google to social media. But what a company includes on their homepage speaks volumes about what a brand values.

Gaining trust

Does your audience see you as an expert on the product you sell (Crutchfield)? Or just as a fancy storefront (Best Buy). In either case, gaining and maintaining the trust of your audience is critical — and, depending on your current relationship with your customers, may be an uphill slog.

Are you willing to write a bad review of a product? Are you willing to pull a product if there are no redeeming qualities? Are you willing to write content that doesn’t directly sell the product?

Imagine if Best Buy started producing content that actually helped their audience better understand and use the technology they were selling. As it is, the store (and by extension, website) has limited audience engagement and does nothing to pull anyone to their site — other than offer product promotions and discounts.

One of the fundamental requirements to succeeding with any kind of content-driven strategy is audience trust. You need to build trust with your audience and you can’t do that if they feel like you are selling them anything and everything.

The move to content-driven commerce

Making the decision to integrate content and commerce has its challenges. The exact challenges you face will really depend on the culture of your organization as well as the abilities and mindset of your staff. But if you’re willing to make the necessary changes to engage your audience and build their trust, you can make the transition.

If you’re moving from a media site into commerce, they key will be maintaining your readers' trust and your own integrity. If you’re moving in the opposite direction, the challenge will be gaining the reader’s trust, which means making some pretty big organizational and cultural changes.

In both cases, though, you’ll find the move well worth the effort.

Tags: Drupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

NASA, Microsoft collaboration will allow scientists to 'work on Mars'

Virtual Reality - Science Daily - 22 January 2015 - 5:58am
NASA and Microsoft have teamed up to develop software called OnSight, a new technology that will enable scientists to work virtually on Mars using wearable technology called Microsoft HoloLens.
Categories: Virtual Reality
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