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Students in Games: Achievement Unlocked, Get it on Steam - by Claire Barilla

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 26 April 2016 - 9:56am
This article is a summation of the team’s presentation at Play by Play, New Zealand's first international gaming festival. In it we cover each member's specialized work on the game and what we did collaboratively to get Split onto Steam.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

True Spring Chickens: A Rite to Flight: a Point-and-Cluck Adventure Postmortem - by Gregory Lane

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 26 April 2016 - 9:47am
An *egg-cellent* look back at the successes and pitfalls of a team (comprised mostly of first-time game developers) as they create a short old-school point-and-click adventure game, using the Global Game Jam and local demo nights as milestones.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

LOL EU LCS 2016, Learn From The Best Player - by Don Lynd

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 26 April 2016 - 9:47am
With the League of Legends Championship Series EU LCS schedule coming to a close. Here look at the match history and team plays strategies, learn from something the best players
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Zombocalypse - defend the world from zombie invasion - by Vlatko Spasov

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 26 April 2016 - 9:47am
Zombocalypse offers you the opportunity to see the world in a zombie apocalypse simply by playing an entertainment flash game on your computer.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Administration menu - Content languages

New Drupal Modules - 26 April 2016 - 8:42am

Provides a dropdown menu with available languages when adding content for all content types that default to the current language in the Administration menu.

This can be useful when the "Set current language as default for new content." multilingual setting is checked for a content type.

Requires the following modules:

Categories: Drupal

Acquia Developer Center Blog: 3 Media Challenges in Drupal, and How to Use the Media Module to Vanquish Them

Planet Drupal - 26 April 2016 - 7:07am

Drupal 7 out the box offers a good implementation for uploading media, but it has three significant challenges.

Challenge 1: Files should be entities

In Drupal, files should be entities so you can add additional fields to the file type. As an example, when you upload an image you will want your standard image alt attribute, which specifies alternate text for an image, if the image cannot be displayed, or the user is using a screen reader. But you may want to have additional fields, such as photo credit or image caption.

Tags: acquia drupal planet
Categories: Drupal

Drupalize.Me: Custom Drupal-to-Drupal Migrations with Migrate Tools

Planet Drupal - 26 April 2016 - 6:15am

Drupal 8.1 now provides a user interface (UI) for conducting a Drupal-to-Drupal migration. Since there is no direct upgrade path for Drupal 6 or 7 to 8, you should become familiar with the migrate system in Drupal, as it will allow you to migrate your content from previous versions to Drupal 8.

Categories: Drupal

Village Backdrop: Wellswood System Neutral Edition

New RPG Product Reviews - 26 April 2016 - 1:31am
Publisher: Raging Swan Press
Rating: 5
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of RSP's Village Backdrop-series is 11 pages long, 1 page front cover, 2 pages advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD and 1 page back cover, leaving us with 5 pages of content, so let's take a look at the settlement


In this installment of Raging Swan Press' by now legendary series, we travel to the village of Wellswood - which is aptly-named: Situated in the midst of a gorgeous forest, the settlement sports numerous wells - both natural ones and those crafted by dwarven hands, for the settlement sports a significant dwarven population, who faithfully serves the local dour and somewhat greedy, but none too unpleasant lord Ilmari Issakainen.


The uncommon occurrence of a forest-bound dwarven clan also results in a surprising amount of fortified stone buildings jutting forth from the massive forest. While secure, the rather significant taxes imposed are not to be trifled with, though merchants and travelers won't have too much of a problem paying them. No less than three inns (all coming with information on accommodation-prices and food) are detailed within these pages, as befitting of a village under the auspice of a church of travelers - which btw. includes a brief deity-write-up. Industry-wise, the local lake with its fishing (requiring permission of the lord...which is, again, taxed) is based mostly on the massive influx of travelers passing through.


Oh, but I've failed to mention the interesting component here: You see, aforementioned lake, much like the hold of the dwarven clan, is subterranean and heavily regulated - though that does not mean that there are no means of getting down there sans the lord knowing...if you know whom to ask. Yes, the subterranean lake actually writes adventures of itself, considering the plethora of potential dangers there and the mere presence of it makes a potentially cataclysmic earthquake all the more dangerous - so yes, plenty of development options are provided here, from the local color (the village sports notes on nomenclature, clothing, magic items for sale etc.) to more massive storylines - after all, there is a reason the dwarves are here - but to know that, you'll have to travel to Wellswood yourself!


Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn't notice any glitches. Layout adheres to RSP's smooth, printer-friendly two-column standard and the pdf comes with full bookmarks as well as a gorgeous map, of which you can, as always, download high-res jpegs if you join RSP's patreon. The pdf comes in two versions, with one being optimized for screen-use and one to be printed out and sports a great artwork of a fishing trip on the subterranean lake.


Creighton Broadhurst's Wellswood is a compelling settlement that manages to strike a precarious balance: On the one hand, it is a pretty pleasant place that, in itself, is not yet an adventure and the lack of a central conflict means that you don't have a streamlined narrative cut out for you. However, unlike many a supplement with such a broad focus, Wellswood still manages to retain a sense of holistic integrity, a feeling of concise options, ready to be explored at any time. From politics to potential threats, whether as just a waystation or as a new home for the PCs, the village manages to support and accommodate threats both significant and trivial. While the supplement does not achieve the highest echelons of the series, it remains an excellent book that does offer a significant, tight array of interesting options for GMs and players to explore and, more important, a tight and unique place to visit. The system-neutral version loses nothing of the brilliance that made me love the original iteration - hence, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

The RPGnet Newsletter: RPGnet Newsletter #51

RPGNet - 26 April 2016 - 12:00am
A satanic panic and more.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Unimity Solutions Drupal Blog: How Drupal helped in launching an Enterprise Class Application

Planet Drupal - 25 April 2016 - 11:46pm

Here is a case study of how Drupal helped in implementing a customer portal for a major utility service provider in the US.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal governance announcements: Coding standards proposals for final discussion on 4/29

Planet Drupal - 25 April 2016 - 7:33pm

The TWG coding standards committee is announcing two coding standards changes for final discussion. These appear to have reached a point close enough to consensus for final completion. The new process for proposing and ratifying changes is documented on the coding standards project page.

The four new issues being proposed are:

Issues still open for comment:

These proposals will be re-evaluated during the next coding standards meeting currently scheduled for April 29th. This is a shorter window and a longer list than the committee generally provides and these issues will likely not be finalized until the following meeting (date TBD due to DrupalCon). The normal timeline was shifted by the arrival of committee member's babies, everyone's happy and healthy but timelines went whacky. At that point the discussion will likely be extended, or if clear consensus has been reached the policy may be dismissed or ratified and moved to the ‘update documentation’ step.

Categories: Drupal

groups.drupal.org frontpage posts: Google Summer of Code 2016 - Selected Projects

Planet Drupal - 25 April 2016 - 1:12pm

Did you know Drupal was accepted into Google Summer of Code 2016 and that 11 Drupal projects were accepted? In other words, Google is funding 11 people to contribute to Drupal for 10 weeks worth a total of $60,500 USD (thank you Google!). Congratulations to selected students who are collectively credited on more than 100 issues fixed in the past 3 months on drupal.org. Coding starts May 23rd and ends August 23rd.

Majority of projects are focused on work related to Drupal 8 contributed modules. Drupal's students are from 4 different continents and we currently have 26 mentors from 12 countries with over 150 years of experience on drupal.org. As always, we're excited about this summer and we hope community members will provide an extra helping hand if you see students in queues. Learn more about our projects below.

Project: Social API
Student: Getulio Sánchez "gvso" (Paraguay).
Mentors dahacouk (UK), e0ipso (Spain), pcambra (Spain).

Project: Solving content conflicts with merge algorithms in Drupal 8
Student: Rakesh Verma "rakesh_verma" (India).
Mentors: dixon (Sweden), timmillwood (UK), jeqq (Moldova).

Project: Port Mailhandler to Drupal 8
Student: Milos Bovan "mbovan" (Serbia).
Mentors: miro_dietiker (Switzerland), Primsi (Slovenia).

Project: CKEditor plugins for TMGMT
Student: Saša Nikolič "sasanikolic" (Slovenia)
Mentors: miro_dietiker (Switzerland), Berdir (Switzerland).

Project: Port search configuration module to Drupal 8
Student: Joyce George "joyceg" (India)
Mentors: naveenvalech (India), heykarthikwithu (India), neetu (India).

Project: Integrate Google Cloud Vision API to Drupal 8
Student: Arpit Jalan "ajalan065" (India)
Mentors: naveenvalech (India), penyaskito (Spain).

Project: Port Google Login Authenticator To Drupal 8
Student: Mehul Gupta "therealssj" (India)
Mentors: nerdstein (USA), attiks (Belgium).

Project: Media Solution Module
Student: Vijay Nandwani "royal121" (India)
Mentors: slashrsm (Slovenia), paranojik (Slovenia).

Project: Web Component-ize Drupal 8
Student: Tianlei Zheng "ztl8702" (Australia)
Mentors: skyredwang (China), Wimleers (Belgium).

Project: Add Password-based Public-key Encryption to Drupal 8
Student: Talha Paracha "talhaparacha" (Pakistan)
Mentors: nerdstein (USA), colan (Canada), jibran (Pakistan).

Project: Porting Comment alter module to Drupal 8
Student: Anchal Pandey "anchal29" (India)
Mentors: Boobaa (Hungary), czigor (Hungary).

Final call for mentors. Are you interested in helping any of the projects above? Contact Slurpee on drupal.org, find us in #drupal-google on Freenode, and join us at https://groups.drupal.org/google-summer-code.

A special "Thank you" goes out to Drupalize.me for providing all of our students a free account.

Categories: Drupal

DrupalCon News: Training Spotlight: Project Management & Team Building

Planet Drupal - 25 April 2016 - 12:19pm

Not a developer? Not a problem! Each year, we see an increased number of project managers and professionals in non-technical roles such as business development, sales, marketing and HR at DrupalCon. We have training opportunities for you, too!

Categories: Drupal

Video: Can we save the open web?

Dries Buytaert - 25 April 2016 - 11:50am

In March, I did a presentation at SxSW that asked the audience a question I've been thinking about a lot lately: "Can we save the open web?".

The web is centralizing around a handful of large companies that control what we see, limit creative freedom, and capture a lot of information about us. I worry that we risk losing the serendipity, creativity and decentralization that made the open web great.


While there are no easy answers to this question, the presentation started a good discussion about the future of the open web, the role of algorithms in society, and how we might be able to take back control of our personal information.

I'm going to use my blog to continue the conversation about the open web, since it impacts the future of Drupal. I'm including the video and slides (PDF, 76 MB) of my SxSW presentation below, as well as an overview of what I discussed.

Here are the key ideas I discussed in my presentation, along with a few questions to discuss in the comments.

Idea 1: An FDA-like organization to provide oversight for algorithms. While an "FDA" in and of itself may not be the most ideal solution, algorithms are nearly everywhere in society and are beginning to impact life-or-death decisions. I gave the example of an algorithm for a self-driving car having to decide whether to save the driver or hit a pedestrian crossing the street. There are many other life-or-death examples of how unregulated technology could impact people in the future, and I believe this is an issue we need to begin thinking about now. What do you suggest we do to make the use of algorithms fair and trustworthy?

Idea 2: Open standards that will allow for information-sharing across sites and applications. Closed platforms like Facebook and Google are winning because they're able to deliver a superior user experience driven by massive amounts of data and compute power. For the vast majority of people, ease-of-use will trump most concerns around privacy and control. I believe we need to create a set of open standards that enable drastically better information-sharing and integration between websites and applications so independent websites can offer user experiences that meet or exceeds that of the large platforms. How can the Drupal community help solve this problem?

Idea 3: A personal information broker that allows people more control over their data. In the past, I've written about the idea for a personal information broker that will give people control over how, where and for how long their data is used, across every single interaction on the web. This is no small feat. An audience member asked an interesting question about who will build this personal information broker -- whether it will be a private company, a government, an NGO, or a non-profit organization? I'm not really sure I have the answer, but I am optimistic that we can figure that out. I wish I had the resources to build this myself as I believe this will be a critical building block for the web. What do you think is the best way forward?

Ultimately, we should be building the web that we want to use, and that we want our children to be using for decades to come. It's time to start to rethink the foundations, before it's too late. If we can move any of these ideas forward in a meaningful way, they will impact billions of people, and billions more in the future.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: Video: Can we save the open web?

Planet Drupal - 25 April 2016 - 11:50am

In March, I did a presentation at SxSW that asked the audience a question I've been thinking about a lot lately: "Can we save the open web?".

The web is centralizing around a handful of large companies that control what we see, limit creative freedom, and capture a lot of information about us. I worry that we risk losing the serendipity, creativity and decentralization that made the open web great.


While there are no easy answers to this question, the presentation started a good discussion about the future of the open web, the role of algorithms in society, and how we might be able to take back control of our personal information.

I'm going to use my blog to continue the conversation about the open web, since it impacts the future of Drupal. I'm including the video and slides (PDF, 76 MB) of my SxSW presentation below, as well as an overview of what I discussed.

Here are the key ideas I discussed in my presentation, along with a few questions to discuss in the comments.

Idea 1: An FDA-like organization to provide oversight for algorithms. While an "FDA" in and of itself may not be the most ideal solution, algorithms are nearly everywhere in society and are beginning to impact life-or-death decisions. I gave the example of an algorithm for a self-driving car having to decide whether to save the driver or hit a pedestrian crossing the street. There are many other life-or-death examples of how unregulated technology could impact people in the future, and I believe this is an issue we need to begin thinking about now. What do you suggest we do to make the use of algorithms fair and trustworthy?

Idea 2: Open standards that will allow for information-sharing across sites and applications. Closed platforms like Facebook and Google are winning because they're able to deliver a superior user experience driven by massive amounts of data and compute power. For the vast majority of people, ease-of-use will trump most concerns around privacy and control. I believe we need to create a set of open standards that enable drastically better information-sharing and integration between websites and applications so independent websites can offer user experiences that meet or exceeds that of the large platforms. How can the Drupal community help solve this problem?

Idea 3: A personal information broker that allows people more control over their data. In the past, I've written about the idea for a personal information broker that will give people control over how, where and for how long their data is used, across every single interaction on the web. This is no small feat. An audience member asked an interesting question about who will build this personal information broker -- whether it will be a private company, a government, an NGO, or a non-profit organization? I'm not really sure I have the answer, but I am optimistic that we can figure that out. I wish I had the resources to build this myself as I believe this will be a critical building block for the web. What do you think is the best way forward?

Ultimately, we should be building the web that we want to use, and that we want our children to be using for decades to come. It's time to start to rethink the foundations, before it's too late. If we can move any of these ideas forward in a meaningful way, they will impact billions of people, and billions more in the future.

Categories: Drupal

Don't Miss: The top 10 weird children of games and neuroscience

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 25 April 2016 - 11:38am

In this classic 2011 feature, indie game developer and former neuroscience researcher Erin Robinson takes a look at ten notably interesting studies to see what they can teach us, as game makers. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Chapter Three: Cache API in Drupal

Planet Drupal - 25 April 2016 - 10:30am
Cache API in Drupal

This is a very simple tutorial that could help you with the performance of your custom modules. I will show you how to use Cache API in Drupal 8 and Drupal 7.

Minnur Yunusov April 25, 2016
Categories: Drupal

Chapter Three: Cache API in Drupal

Planet Drupal - 25 April 2016 - 10:30am

This is a very simple tutorial that could help you with the performance of your custom modules. I will show you how to use Cache API in Drupal 8 and Drupal 7.

You don't have to perform heavy caluclations every time you need to pull data either from third-party API or from database. Instead run it once and cache it. I personally use caching when I need to run complex SQL queries and third-party integrations (Example: get a list of available forms from Hubspot, or available campaign lists from Mailchimp etc).

In Drupal 8 use the following code structure:

Categories: Drupal

DrupalEasy: Demystifying Drupal 8's breakpoints.yml file

Planet Drupal - 25 April 2016 - 9:36am

While working through a couple of Drupal 8 projects involving a custom theme, I've been curious about the themename.breakpoints.yml file. I've dutifully updated it with the proper breakpoint values, but I've been a bit mystified with its actual purpose. There's nothing in either of the base themes I've used (Neato and Bootstrap) that actually appears to utilize the data in the breakpoints.yml files. While the breakpoints are defined in this file, they are also defined in the theme's source Sass and LESS files, for use in the processed CSS. 

I decided to dig into the issue a bit more over the past few days in an effort to figure out exactly what the purpose of the breakpoints.yml file is. It turns out that the any module or theme can create a themename.breakpoints.yml or modulename.breakpoints.yml file. The Breakpoint module (included as part of Drupal 8 core) then reads these files and adds them to the site's configuration. At this point, other installed modules and themes can access this configuration and utilize it in their own functionality. This is exactly how the Responsive Image module (also part of Drupal 8 core) works. It accesses the installed theme's breakpoints configuration (via the themename.breakpoints.yml file) and serves up proper responsive images based on that configuration.

But, at this time, there is nothing in Drupal core that automatically allows breakpoints defined in the themename.breakpoints.yml file to be easily used in the theme's CSS. So, when a theme's breakpoints.yml file is modified, nothing will change on the site until the site's CSS is also modified. In effect, most theme's breakpoints will need to be defined in two places - the themename.breakpoints.yml file and the theme's CSS. 

There are methods available (and still being developed) to "link" breakpoints defined in the breakpoints.yml file with the theme's CSS - usually as part of a pre-processing task when working with LESS or Sass. 

Resources
Categories: Drupal

DrupalEasy: DrupalEasy Podcast 167 - Ted Spoils Star Wars (2015 Year in Review)

Planet Drupal - 25 April 2016 - 9:36am

Direct .mp3 file download.

In this very special holiday episode of the DrupalEasy Podcast, (most of) the co-hosts pick our favorite Drupaly things from 2015, including our favorite Drupal moments as well as our favorite things about Drupal 8. Ted teaches us about the spirit of Christmas, Andrew talks about his favorite podcast episode, Ryan makes a surprise appearance, and we meet Kelley Curry (BrightBold), our newest co-host.

Our Favorite Things Drupal moment of the year
  • Mike - DrupalCon Barcelona community keynotes.
  • Ryan - adding new hosts to DrupalEasy Podcast / recording the April Fool's Day Episode / singing the Drupal Oddity song at DrupalCon Karaoke in Los Angeles and watching Mike H freak out.
  • Andrew - Being at work and having my boss ask what happened to the DrupalEasy Podcast. It was the April Fools Day episode. He was afraid we all lost our minds.
  • Kelley - DrupalCon LA prenote / release of D8 with my first 4 core commits / getting asked to join the podcast.
  • Ted - Acquia U, Drupalcon LA Hallway Track.
Drupal 8
  • Mike - View modes being a first-class “thing”.
  • Ryan - that I got to learn Dependency Injection, Services, OOP.
  • Andrew - Namespacing (more PHP but hey, we can now use it). Or more meta, we now fit into the rest of the PHP world.
  • Kelley - Theming improvements: Classy, Stable, Twig debugging.
  • Ted - OOP - CMI - Death to Features.
DrupalEasy News
  • The next session of the 12-week Drupal Career Online course starts in March, 2016 - visit DrupalEasy.com/dco for all the details.
Drupal Association Sponsors Upcoming Events Follow us on Twitter Five Questions (answers only)
  1. Started a 501(c)(3) to support a bilingual public school. Hurley K-8 and Neighborhood Parents for the Hurley School.
  2. Gathered Table iPhone app.
  3. Speak at DrupalCon.
  4. Cheetah.
  5. DrupalCon San Francisco help from Benjamin Doherty (bangpound).
Intro Music

One Christmas at a Time by Jonathan Coulton and John Roderick.

Subscribe

Subscribe to our podcast on iTunes or Miro. Listen to our podcast on Stitcher.

If you'd like to leave us a voicemail, call 321-396-2340. Please keep in mind that we might play your voicemail during one of our future podcasts. Feel free to call in with suggestions, rants, questions, or corrections. If you'd rather just send us an email, please use our contact page.

Categories: Drupal
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