Newsfeeds

3 Reasons Your Game is Slow (and what you can do about it) - by Joseph Lewis

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 6 November 2017 - 6:44am
Your mobile game is live. But user reviews say it loads slow. Mobile users are very impatient when it comes to performance, and you really only get one first impression. What makes a mobile game load slow, and what can be done to fix the problem?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

My Top Tips For Mobile App and Game Developers in 2017 - by Abhinav Gupta

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 6 November 2017 - 6:44am
My Top Tips and Advice in 2017 For Indie Mobile App and Game Developers, Number 4 is a MUST in 2017!
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Field Permissions OG

New Drupal Modules - 6 November 2017 - 6:25am
Description

This module extends the Field Permissions module by adding Organic Group membership level permissions as access requirement options for each field.

Categories: Drupal

Mindjammer: The Mindjammer Companion

New RPG Product Reviews - 6 November 2017 - 6:17am
Publisher: Modiphius
Rating: 4
This book presents the Outremer Subsector, located on the extreme edge of Commonality Space. It's the setting of the adventure Dominion and much of the material here is in the Traveller version of the Mingjammer rules, but it's now been completely rewritten for those using the original Fate system rules.

Situated on the edge of Commonality Space, Outremer straddles several interstellar political regions and contains unaligned and unclaimed planetary systems as well. If you think you'd like to set your game here, in these pages you will find detailed planet and star system details for the Heritage Contestation, octant zeta of the subsector, including planetary maps, and more outline material on the rest of the subsector - so plenty of space to add the elements you fancy.

First off, some history of the region. Like much of the rim, planets here were colonised long ago in earlier diasporas, but contact was re-established some 130 years ago just before contact was made with the Venu. Indeed many battles in the war with the Venu occurred here, and the situation is still tense with violence flaring up occasionally.

Maps in the endpapers show all eight octants with political markings, and the various groupings planets can belong to are discussed next. Some are friendly towards the Commonality, others hostile or at best undecided; and of course there is an unclaimed region as well. Plenty of xenomorphs and even plant-based intelligences are to be found (and yes, the necessary information to play one of the latter as a character is included). Details of the natures of each group are provided, to aid in the development of individuals and the overall look and feel of each one.

The discussion then moves on to the economy of the area which, quite frankly, is a mess. It is chaotic with various factions trying to exert control be it for themselves or for the common good. Various economic systems are to be found and it can be fun when those accustomed to one suddenly find themselves in a completely different one. Then we meet other groups: the corporacies. Several are detailed, there's even the suggestion that the party might like to hire out to one or even set up one of their own. Technology and space travel round out this chapter.

Next is Chapter 2, which goes into more detail about the Heritage Contestation octant. It bore the brunt of the fighting during the recent unpleasantness with the Venu and as a result has aquired the nickname 'The Anvil'. There is a detailed map, including an anomaly called the Hammer - space is unstable there, possibly due to the presence of a black hole. Notes - and maps - of individual worlds are provided, excellent if the party wishes to travel in this region. It's a wonderful gazetteer whether you are looking for just the right planet for the adventure you have in mind or if you want to go exploring.

This is all setting material - magnificent setting material. You may find that reading through it spawns some plot ideas, or you may want to run a game that involves exploring or trading... or even a diplomatic mission. However, whilst providing you with a well thought out setting, the adventures will have to come from you.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

New Tyranid Codex And More Available To order From Games Workshop

Tabletop Gaming News - 6 November 2017 - 6:00am
One of my first armies back when I started playing miniatures games was a Tyranid force for 40k. They were still relatively new back in 2nd edition. They were just so cool and alien (and I’d not even seen Alien at the time). Well, for those that might want to get into the faction, there’s […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Colorbox filter

New Drupal Modules - 6 November 2017 - 5:24am
Categories: Drupal

ThinkShout: My First BADCamp

Planet Drupal - 6 November 2017 - 4:30am

We’re fresh off of BADCamp (Bay Area Drupal Camp), and we’re eager to share our experience with you! If you’ve ever thought about going to one of the local Drupal Camps in your area, or attending BADCamp yourself, we hope our takeaways persuade you to seek this out as a professional development opportunity.

BADCamp is essentially three days of intense workshops and sessions for Drupal users to hone their skills, meet other open source contributors, and make valuable connections in the community. Amongst the ThinkShout team, two had never attended BADCamp before. We were eager to hear their perspective on the conference and their key takeaways.

Sessions they attended ranged from learning about component-based theming tools, object oriented php, module development, debugging JavaScript; to Drupal 9 and backward compatibility and the importance of upgrading to D8 now.

Let’s hear from Mario and Lui–I mean Amy and Jules, on what their first BADCamp experience was like!

Amy and Jules on Halloween. Costumes are not required at BADCamp.

What did you learn at BADCamp?

Amy: Component-based theming is a hot topic these days for those building sites due to a number of reasons. Here are a couple of them:

  • It encourages a DRY (Don’t Repeat Yourself) and more organized theming code base.
  • It decouples site building in such a way that backend and frontend developers can work on the site at the same time, rather than the backend code needing to be built first before the frontend developer can do their work.
  • It provides clients with an interactive experience of their site (including responsiveness) before the database and backend elements are hooked up to it. This allows the client more time to provide feedback in case they want to change behaviors before they’re completely built.

I also attended a session called: React, GraphQL, and Drupal. This talk was largely about an opportunity to create multiple suites using the same API. The team used “headless Drupal” (to serve as the API), React.js to build the sites, and GraphQL to explore data coming from the API in a much more direct and clear way. It seemed like a great solution for a tricky problem, in addition to giving this team the opportunity to learn and use cutting edge technologies - so much fun!

Jules: I learned a lot about the Drupal Community. This was my first BADCamp, and also my first Drupal conference. I was excited about how generous the community is with knowledge and tools, working together so we can succeed together.

I learned about some of the changes to Drupal releases from @Webchick’s talk (Drupal 9 and Backward Compatibility: Why Now is the Time to Upgrade to Drupal 8). If I keep up with the incremental point releases (ie: 8.x), upgrading to 9 should be pretty painless, which is a relief. Knowing the incremental releases will be coming out with a regular six month-ish cadence will make planning easier. I’m also excited about the new features in the works; including Layouts, Work Spaces, a better out of the box experience on first install, a better UI admin experience (possibly with React?).

What would you tell someone who is planing to attend BADCamp next year?

Amy: Definitely invest in attending the full-day sessions if they interest you. The information I took away from my Pattern Lab day was priceless, and I came back to ThinkShout excited and empowered to figure out a way to make component based theming part of our usual practice.

Jules: The full day sessions were a great way to dive into deeper concepts. It’s hard to fully cover a subject in a shorter session. It also helps to show up with an open mind. It’s impossible to know everything about Drupal, and there are so many tools available. It was valuable just meeting people and talking to them about their workflows, challenges, and favorite new tools.

Do you consider BADCamp to be better for networking, professional development, or both?

Amy: My big focus was on professional development. There were so many good training days and sessions happening that those filled my schedule almost entirely. Of course, attending sessions (and being a session speaker!) is a great way to network with like-minded people too.

Jules: My goal was to immerse myself in the Drupal community. Since I’m new to Drupal, the sessions were really valuable for me. Returning with more experience, that might not be the case. It was valuable to see new ideas being presented, challenged, discussed, and explored with mutual respect and support. We’re all in this together. Some talks were stronger than others, but every speaker had a nugget of gold I could take with me. It was encouraging to meet peers and to see all of the great work people are doing out in the world. It also served as a reminder that great strides can come from many small steps (or pushes)!

Make time to learn

It can be difficult to take time away from project work and dedicate yourself to two or three days of conferencing. But when you disconnect and dive into several days of leaning, it makes your contributions back at the office invaluable. As Jules commented to me after her first day of sessions, “it was like php church!”

Getting out of your usual environment and talking to other people opens your mind up to other ways of problem solving, and helps you arrive at solutions you otherwise wouldn’t get through sitting in your cubicle. We hope you’re inspired to go to a local Drupal Meetup or Camp – or even better, meet us at DrupalCon or NTC’s Drupal Day!

Categories: Drupal

User Sanitize

New Drupal Modules - 6 November 2017 - 4:05am

Module to Sanitize users within the database. Can be executed via UI or using drush. Improves upon functionality provided by drush sql-sanitize.

Great for user sanitization when importing data from another system.

Options:

Categories: Drupal

In All Their Looks & Words: Introducing Queer History To Your Games

Gnome Stew - 6 November 2017 - 3:00am

**Initial note: the word “queer” has a complex history for a lot of people in the LGBT+ community. For some it’s a painful slur that brings up traumatic events, for others it’s a powerful reclaimed umbrella term for all sorts of identities and orientations. In this series I’ll be using specific terms when possible (“Bisexual” or “Lesbian”) but whenever I need to be general about multiple identities or orientations I will be using “Queer”.

Although it’s been a long running event at GenCon, this was my first year attending the Queer As A 3 Sided Die panel thrown by the Tabletop Gaymers organization. Last year was my first Gen Con ever and by the time I had my badge and registered, tickets for the panel had already sold out. This year, however, it was the first thing I registered for, in addition to another event run by that organization, Queering Your Setting.

The two events run by Tabletop Gaymers that I attended were some of the highlights of a life-changing Gen Con 50 for me.

I loved both panels so much, seeing people in respected positions in the gaming world such as Jeremy Crawford, Crystal Frasier, and Tanya DePass was inspiring and encouraging. It may be an access or reach problem, but I feel like I have to try hard to find resources talking about queerness in games the way this information was presented. Much of these panels were about how many big titles (I’ll steal the phrase AAA from video games) are starting to add more queer inclusion into their lore and setting with queer characters. Blue Rose was talked up for good reason, and Pathfinder and Dungeons & Dragons both were mentioned as making efforts to put more queer characters on the page. I think inclusion is great, obviously representation is important, but it got me thinking, especially after reading an article about how adding queer characters is a promise D&D is making, about what’s next.

So What Is Next?

A question I’ve been going over is “How can we make games more queer beyond simply including queer characters in lore?” Again, representation is a powerful thing, especially given roleplaying’s feet-dragging at getting to a healthy portrayal of queerness in its games. “Queer people exist” should not be the end of this discussion. To me, that’s baseline, a given, that’s ground floor. Still, I think inclusion is a great first step and I want to know what the next steps can be. Smaller, more niche games can center queerness and queer stories in ways larger games seem reluctant to do, so how do we start moving AAA game spaces towards centering queerness? 

I want to make it clear that I don’t have an easy or quick answer at the moment, and that’s the driving force behind setting out to write more, podcast more, and develop more about the role of queerness & LGBT+ issues in tabletop. Because I don’t have an answer to “What’s next after we prove we exist?” I want to keep mulling these points over. Part of my growth as a bisexual man includes teaching myself about queerness, since mainstream culture and our public education system has done kind of a subpar job at that. In the past few years after coming out to myself and others, I’ve learned so much that I would have never discovered. Maybe by teaching some of this awesome queer history, I will learn myself. Using history as a vehicle to incorporate queer elements into games seems an obvious choice. From Feudal Japan, to the Viking North, to Medieval Europe or any of the hundreds of analogues of these, tabletop has had a fascination with history. In this series, I’ll be highlighting moments, figures, and themes in queer history and exploring how to incorporate these into your games. “Queer people exist” should not be the end of this discussion.

While I don’t know that I have a great answer to my question yet, at least I can take the queer characters represented in games and put them at the forefront. Exploring the lives of queer history can not only help me learn about an underrepresented segment of history, but also give myself a chance to explore that history in play. By highlighting these historical events, maybe we can put the focus on their context and not only check the box of “Does this game have a queer person in it?” but learn why that’s an important box to check.

I’m In, Let’s Go!

I’m no expert at Queer Studies. I took as many classes as I could in college and I take an active role in seeking out info on the subject, but there’s still an ocean of information out there. I’ll do my best at laying out the information I find while reading and learning, and by tying it into games, let’s do our best to work through this process together. I’m bound to get something wrong at some point. If that happens, let me know & I’ll try to fix it, or if I can’t fix it, I’ll try to do better next time. If you have a subject or question you’d like to see addressed, let me know! Otherwise, let’s jump right in and see what we can learn. The next installment of this series will start to dive into what may be the first ever recorded instance of same-sex affection, from around 4,500 years ago. Stay tuned!

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: Why rejecting projects due to resourcing challenges is avoidable

Planet Drupal - 6 November 2017 - 2:49am
Even though I have been with AGILEDROP for little over than three months now, I already found myself in a situation when two of our potential clients were on the verge of declining their clients. The reasons for that were different, I'll go into more detail later. The agencies we approached differed in size, one being bigger (more than 50 people) the other smaller (less than 10 people). And the challenges they faced were also different. As you will see we could help both of them, but in the end, only one of the agencies trusted us that we are capable of delivering.  From a simple… READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

OSTraining: How to Highlight the Differences Detween Two Images with Zurb Twenty Twenty Module

Planet Drupal - 6 November 2017 - 12:41am

Zurb TwentyTwenty module is mostly intended to highlight the difference between two images on a Drupal site. You certainly saw those advertising images for skin products, for example. 

They would present half of the face before applying the product and half of the face after applying it. Besides such comparisons, you can use this module for other purposes as well. In this tutorial, you will learn how Zurb TwentyTwenty module works.

Categories: Drupal

Automatic Alternative Text

New Drupal Modules - 6 November 2017 - 12:26am

The module uses the Microsoft Azure Cognitive Services API to generate an Alternative Text for images when no Alternative Text has been provided by user.

About the API:

Categories: Drupal

Fuzzy Thinking: Bad Dice!

RPGNet - 6 November 2017 - 12:00am
What do you do with bad dice?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Appnovation Technologies: My First Book - Drupal 8 Module Development (Or Where I Have Been Lately)

Planet Drupal - 6 November 2017 - 12:00am
My First Book - Drupal 8 Module Development (Or Where I Have Been Lately) If you’ve been wondering where I’ve been and why I haven’t been writing any articles lately, I am here to put your mind at ease: I've been working heavily on my first book about Drupal, called Drupal 8 Module Development. And I am happy to announce that it has finally been published and is available for purch...
Categories: Drupal

Address Checkout

New Drupal Modules - 5 November 2017 - 9:07pm
Information

Address checkout modules simply fetches the profiles from user dashboard & prefills the address form at checkout process to avoid replication of address on every purchase.

How to use:

To use this module, download it and enable the module.

Categories: Drupal

Video Game Deep Cuts: Donkey Crossing? Let's Observer!

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 5 November 2017 - 7:41pm

Some of this week's longform article & video highlights include a look at the new F2P Animal Crossing, Donkey Kong 64's speedrun history, and the cyberpunk horror of Observer. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Smarty Streets API Integration

New Drupal Modules - 5 November 2017 - 6:47pm

SmartyStreetsAPI
Drupal Module to Integrate smartystreets.com API

This module is being built in order to validate a US address and to also lookup the county of an address. It uses the smartystreets.com PHP SDK (included in the module).

The reason this is being done is to potentially help make using the tax module within drupal commerce 2.0 more usable in US states that need to take into account the county, city, and state when applying the proper sales tax to a sale.

Categories: Drupal

Validate Address Module Example for SmartyStreetsAPI

New Drupal Modules - 5 November 2017 - 6:39pm

Validate Address

This module was created in order to test/use the service in the SmartyStreetsAPI module.

There should be a form link called "ValidateAddress testing form" under the development configuration area to use for testing.

The main Smarty Streets API Integration project that this uses is found here
https://www.drupal.org/project/smartystreetsapi

Categories: Drupal

Messed up project (bad short name)

New Drupal Modules - 5 November 2017 - 6:33pm

wrong shortname for this project, ignore.

Categories: Drupal

Configuration Form

New Drupal Modules - 5 November 2017 - 11:42am

Automatically generates settings form using configuration and config schema.

Categories: Drupal

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