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PreviousNext: Scrum Masters are only effective when they are co-located with their teams

Planet Drupal - 21 August 2017 - 9:18pm
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Browsing through the interweb I happened across this bold statement a few weeks ago. A statement so bold, it inspired me to write a blog post in response.

by irma.kelly / 22 August 2017

Scrum Masters being co-located with their teams, sure it is the best and most favourable scenario for teams working on complex projects, but to go as far as to say that Scrum Masters are ONLY effective in this instance - nope. Sorry, I have to graciously disagree.

Obviously there are different challenges that come with facilitating Agile ceremonies and interacting with the team remotely as opposed to face-to-face. A completely different approach needs to be taken on my behalf to keep the team engine purring away.

Personally for me, the “different approach” I take with managing remote teams, as opposed to co-located teams is to ensure uber transparency and over-communication on my part in regards to the all of the work that the team currently have in-flight. On my part this includes:

  • Ensuring that work in flight includes “Acceptance Criteria” and a “Definition of Done” agreed to by both the team and the client. This ensures that both the client and the team have an agreed vision of the product we are building. More importantly, it removes the need to make assumptions about a solution on both sides

  • The use of an online and up-to-date Kanban board that both the client and the team can freely access

  • Complete honesty with the client and the team in regards to all aspects of the project. Especially during the trickier and stressful moments of project delivery. If something is starting to go pear shaped, call it out early - don’t hide it!​

There are a plethora of tools now available that help enable remote collaboration. I thought it might be worthwhile sharing some of the tools that the teams at PNX use to make remote collaboration simpler.

Slack / Go To Meetings / Google Hangouts

With a large percentage of our internal staff located across Australia, these are PNX’s go-to tools for remote collaboration. We utilise both GoToMeeting and Google Hangouts (depending on individual client preferences) as tools to enable our daily stand-ups with our clients. Daily stand-ups and the ability to quickly ask via a hangout or GoToMeeting has drastically reduced the amount of email correspondence between PNX and our clients. The result? A reduction in idle time, as questions can be answered relatively quickly instead of waiting for a reply via email.

Access to an online Kanban board

The ultimate in uber transparency. There is nothing more satisfying for an Agile Delivery Manager than to see tickets move to the right of the board. Likewise for our clients! Each ticket on the board details who the work is assigned to and the status of the task. At a glance, anyone with access to the project kanban board can see the status of work for a given sprint.

Google Sheets - My favourite go-to tool, when it comes to interactive Agile ceremonies

The most common question I’m asked about working with remote teams is “how do you facilitate an Agile ceremony like a Retrospective with a remote team?” My favourite go-to tool for this is Google Sheets. Before each retro, I spend a half hour putting the retro board together on a Sheet. I try and mix it up every retro as well, using different Retro techniques to keep things interesting.  I mark defined spaces on the sheet where comments are to go, and I share the sheet with the team. Facilitating the Retrospective via a video conference (if possible), I timebox the retro using a timer app shared on my desktop. The team then fill in the Google Sheet in real time. The virtual equivalent of walking up to a physical board, and placing a post-it up there! I have replaced all of the original text captured during the retro with lorem ipsum text. What's said in retro - stays in retro! We had a little fun with the below retro as you can see!

For sensitive conversations - A video conference (or the phone)

The tools above are handy for enabling remote collaboration but for sensitive conversations with a colleague or client in a remote location, a video conference (where you can see each other) is a must. Sensitive conversations are fraught with danger via chat or email and a neutral tone is difficult to convey when we’re in the thick of things. If a video conference is not possible, though, simply pick up the phone.

I’d love to hear about some of the tools you use with your team to enable remote working. What are your recommended tools of choice?

Tagged Remote Working

Posted by irma.kelly
Agile Delivery Manager

Dated 22 August 2017

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Categories: Drupal

Chapter Three: How to Prevent Duplicate Terms During a Drupal 8 Migration

Planet Drupal - 21 August 2017 - 8:26pm

In this post I will show a custom process plugin that I created to migrate taxonomy terms. The plugin handles the creation of new terms and prevents duplicates.

Below is a portion of the migration template. In the example, I am migrating new terms into keywords vocabulary via field_keywords field.

field_keywords: - plugin: existing_term # Destination (Drupal) vocabulary name vocabulary: keywords # Source query should return term name source: term_name - plugin: skip_on_empty method: row

This is the source code for the process plugin.

Categories: Drupal

Healthz

New Drupal Modules - 21 August 2017 - 7:25pm

Monitoring via the application

Categories: Drupal

Sony put the kibosh on cross-console play, says Ark: Survival Evolved dev

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 21 August 2017 - 12:40pm

Though the dev team has it working internally, Ark: Survival Evolved won't launch with cross-console play at Sony's behest. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Memsource Connector for TMGMT

New Drupal Modules - 21 August 2017 - 11:15am
Categories: Drupal

An object at rest

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 17 May 2008 - 2:03pm

So obviously, the pendulum of progress stopped swinging on my game.  As much as I tried to prevent it, pressing obligations just wouldn’t take a back seat (nor would the burglars who, a few weeks ago, stole 90% of my wardrobe and who last week stole my monitor).  So after a string of hectic weekends and even crazier weeks, this weekend has been pretty wide open for doing whatever I want to do.  And not a moment too soon!

So after doing all the other things I try to do with my weekends, I finally loaded up the ol’ Inform 7 IDE and started working on my game.  To get me back in the swing of things, so to speak, I started reading through what I’d already written.  It was an interesting experience.

Strangely, what impressed me most was stuff I had done that I have since forgotten I learned how to do.  Silly little things, like actions I defined that actually worked, that had I tried to write them today, probably would have had me stumped for a while.  Go me!  Except, erm, I seem to have forgotten more than I’ve retained.

I also realized the importance of commenting my own code.  For instance, there’s this snippet:

A thing can be attached or unattached. A thing is usually unattached. A thing that is a part of something is attached.

The problem is, I have no idea why I put it in there – it doesn’t seem relevant to anything already in the game, so I can only imagine that I had some stroke of genius that told me I was going to need it “shortly” (I probably figured I’d be writing the code the next night).  So now, there’s that lonely little line, just waiting for its purpose.  I’m sure I’ll come across it some day; for now, I’ve stuck in a comment to remind myself to stick in a comment when I do remember.

It reminds me of all the writing I did when I was younger.  I was just bursting with creativity when I was a kid, constantly writing the first few pages of what I was sure was going to be a killer story.  And then I’d misplace the notebook or get sidetracked by something else, or do any of the million other things that my easily distracted self tends to do.  Some time later, I’d come across the notebook, read the stuff I’d written and think, “Wow, this is great stuff!  Now… where was I going with it?”  And I’d never remember, or I’d remember and re-forget.  Either way, in my mother’s attic there are piles and piles of notebooks with half-formed thoughts that teem with potential never to be fulfilled.

This situation – that of wanting to resume progress but fumbling to pick up the threads of where I left off –  has me scouring my memory for a term I read in Jack London’s Call of the Wild.  There was a part in the book where Buck’s owner (it’s late, his name has escaped me) has been challenged to some sort of competition to see if Buck can get the sled moving from a dead stop.  I seem to remember that the runners were frozen to the ground.  I thought the term was “fast break” or “break fast” or something to that effect, but diligent (does 45 seconds count as diligent?) searching has not confirmed this or provided me with the right term.  Anyway, that’s how it feels tonight – I feel as if I’m trying to heave a frozen sled free from its moorings.

The upside is, I am still pleased with what I have so far.  That’s good because it means I’m very likely to continue, rather than scrap it altogether and pretend that I’ll come up with a new idea tomorrow.  In the meantime, I’ll be looking for some SnoMelt and a trusty St. Bernard to get things moving again.


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Time enough (to write) at last…

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 14 April 2008 - 3:24pm

So I didn’t get as much coding done over the weekend as I had hoped, mainly because the telephone company *finally* installed my DSL line, which meant I was up til 5:30 Saturday am catching up on the new episodes of Lost.  That, in turn, meant that most of the weekend was spent wishing I hadn’t stayed up until such an ungodly hour, and concentration just wasn’t in the cards.

However, I did get some stuff done, which is good.  Even the tiniest bit of progress counts as momentum, which is crucial for me.  If the pendulum stops swinging, it will be very hard for me to get it moving again.

So the other day, as I was going over the blog (which really is as much a tool for me as it is a way for me to share my thoughts with others), I realized I had overlooked a very basic thing when coding the whole “automatically return the frog to the fuschia” bit…

As the code stood, if the player managed to carry the frog to another room before searching it, the frog would get magically returned to the fuschia.  This was fairly simple to resolve, in the end – I just coded it so that the game moves (and reports) the frog back to fuschia before leaving the room.  I also decided to add in a different way of getting the key out of the frog – in essence, rewarding different approaches to the same problem with success.

Which brings me to the main thrust of today’s post.  I have such exacting standards for the games I play.  I love thorough implementation.  My favorite games are those that build me a cool gameworld and let me tinker and explore, poking at the shadows and pulling on the edges to see how well it holds up.  A sign of a good game is one that I will reopen not to actually play through again, but to just wander around the world, taking in my surroundings.  I’ve long lamented the fact that relatively few games make this a rewarding experience – even in the best games, even slight digging tends to turn up empty, unimplemented spots.

What I am coming to appreciate is just how much work is involved in the kind of implementation I look for.  Every time I pass through a room’s description, or add in scenery objects, I realize just how easy it is to find things to drill down into.  Where there’s a hanging plant, there’s a pot, dirt, leaves, stems, wires to hang from, hooks to hang on, etc.  Obviously, unless I had all the time in the world, I couldn’t implement each of these separately, so I take what I believe to be the accepted approach and have all of the refer to the same thing.  Which, in my opinion, is fine.  I don’t mind if a game has the same responses for the stems as it does for the plant as a whole, as long as it has some sort of relevant response.  Even so, this takes a lot of work.  It might be the obsessive part of me, but I can’t help but think “What else would a person think of when looking at a hanging plant?”

Or, as I’ve come to think of it:  WWBTD?

What Would Beta Testers Do?

I’ve taken to looking at a “fully” implemented room and wondering what a player might reasonably (and in some cases unreasonably) be expected to do.  This is a bit of a challenging process for me – I already know how my mind works, so trying to step outside of my viewpoint and see it from a blind eye is hard.   I should stop for a second to note that I fully intend to have my game beta tested once it reaches that point, but the fewer obvious things there are for testers to trip over, the more time and energy they’ll have for really digging in and trying to expose the weaknesses I can’t think of.

I’ve found one resource that is both entertaining and highly informative to me:  ClubFloyd transcripts.  ClubFloyd, for the uninitiated (a group among which I count myself, of course) is a sort of cooperative gaming experience — if anyone who knows better reads this and cares to correct what may well be a horrible description, by all means!– where people get together on the IFMud and play through an IF title.  The transcripts are both amusing and revealing.  I recently read the Lost Pig transcript and it was quite interesting.  The things people will attempt to do are both astonishing and eye-opening.  In the case of Lost Pig (which, fortunately, I had already played before reading the transcript), what was even more amazing was the depth of the game itself.  I mean, people were doing some crazy ass stuff – eating the pole, lighting pants on fire, and so on.  And it *worked*.  Not only did it work, it was reversible.  You obviously need the pole, so there’s a way to get it back if, in a fit of orc-like passion, you decide to shove it in down Grunk’s throat.

Anyway, my point is, the transcripts gave me a unique perspective on the things people will try, whether in an effort to actually play the game, to amuse themselves, or to amuse others.  Definitely good stuff to keep in mind when trying to decide, say, the different ways people will try to interact with my little porcelain frog.

Other Stuff I Accomplished

So I coded in an alternate way to deal with the frog that didn’t conflict with the “standard” approach.  I also implemented a few more scenery objects.  Over the course of the next few days, I’m going to try to at least finish the descriptions of the remaining rooms so that I can wander around a bit and start really getting to the meat of it all.  I also want to work on revising the intro text a bit.  In an effort to avoid the infodumps that I so passionately hate, I think I went a little too far and came away with something a bit too terse and uninformative.  But that’s the really fun part of all of this – writing and re-writing, polishing the prose and making it all come together.

Whattaya know.  Midnight again.  I think I’m picking up on a trend here.


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Day Nothing – *shakes fist at real life*

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 8 April 2008 - 12:13pm

Grrr… I’ve been so bogged down in work and client emergencies that progress on the game is at a temporary (no, really!  Only temporary) standstill.  I’ve managed to flesh out a few more room and scenery descriptions, but have not accomplished anything noteworthy in a few days.  Hopefully after this week most of the fires on the work front will be extinguished, and I’ll have time to dive into the game this weekend.

(She says to no one, since there’s been one hit on this blog since… it started.)


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