Skip to Content

Newsfeeds

Some thoughts about getting your content stolen - by Zachary Strebeck

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 13 January 2015 - 11:49pm
Game lawyer Zachary Strebeck talks about how it feels to get content stolen and what can be done about it.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Walking in a Painting: Interior Daytime Lighting in Elsinore - by Val Reznitskaya

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 13 January 2015 - 11:49pm
A hand-painted aesthetic and dynamic lighting - how and why we combined them to bring the world of our game Elsinore to life.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Modeling a Stylized Character - by Kieran Lampert

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 13 January 2015 - 11:49pm
A broad overview of the modeling and texturing process of a stylized character, using the Robot from the upcoming game by AtomJack as an example.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Cheating vs. Exploiting in Game Design - by Josh Bycer

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 13 January 2015 - 11:49pm
Last week's post on Gamasutra regarding the cheating going on in Destiny was inspiration for this post taking a closer look at the difference between exploiting and cheating when it comes to game design.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

YesCT: Making MidCamp more accessible

Planet Drupal - 13 January 2015 - 11:10pm
Making MidCamp more accessible

Even though it's still two months away, I know that MidCamp 2015 (March 19 - 22) is going to be special. The venue hosting MidCamp this year is the University of Illinois at Chicago. UIC is both my alma mater and present employer. Student Center East (where the training and conference sessions will take place) may be familiar grounds to me, but these days I am looking at it from the perspective of a visitor who is completely unfamiliar with its layout.

UIC Student Center East entrance from Polk and Halsted streetsVenue accessibility

Liz Henry's article Unlocking the Invisible Elevator identifies some of the ways in which conference organizers can be proactive about event accessibility:

Some information is great to have in advance. Maps and explanations of access paths work well. It helps if they’re in web-accessible formats, usable by screen readers, and downloadable. Some information has to be embedded in your conference venue. Signs should clearly mark the accessible paths. Maps are very helpful so that people can estimate distances; this is a big deal for those of us who are exhausted and in pain. Put maps next to your signs please!

In late November, I did a preliminary walkthrough of Student Center East. I meandered around the building, photographing the main entrance to Student Center East, the location, interiors and paths to elevators, escalators and stairways, major "landmarks" for points of reference, and the conference area hallways and rooms. It may sound a bit like I was casing the place, but I learned about traffic flow, congestion areas and different points of entry to each floor, whether by escalator and stairs or elevator.

Next, I contacted folks from UIC Office of Facility and Space Planning to obtain floor plans for each of the buildings and floors where MidCamp events are going to take place. They were quick to respond and the floor plans I got are very detailed. I annotated them, marking session rooms, elevators, restrooms and possible traffic flow. The annotations will serve as blueprint for locations of signs, as well as written directions that will be posted to the website.

Annotated floor plan of Student Center East ground floor, with photos of elevator #6 and escalator overlaid.

This week, MidCamp organizers and I plan to do another walkthrough at UIC. Together we hope to identify and address any accessibility and navigation pitfalls. Photos, annotated floor plans, and navigation information will be posted to the MidCamp website. We want to make sure that there is good information about the venue available ahead of time, as well as informative signs on the spot when you attend MidCamp.

Of course, floor plans and elevators are not the only aspect of conference accessibility. Childcare, real-time captioning, transcripts and captioning of session videos are some of the other ways in which events are made more accessible to diverse audiences. It's a direction that I hope MidCamp will follow.

Anonymized session selection

Another reason why I'm excited about is that MidCamp session submission is now open (it will close on Monday January 19). The session selection committee will pick from anonymized submissions for 20 and 50 minute talks. From the conference website:

  1. A volunteer who is NOT on the selection team will anonymize and remove gendered pronouns from abstracts/bios.
  2. The team will make a first round of selections from the anonymized submissions.
  3. A second round will then make sure we have not selected speakers multiple times (excluding panel participants).

By anonymizing session selection, we hope to give thorough consideration to everyone's proposals without biases ("oh, I know this speaker," or "I've never heard of this speaker"). Having a diverse lineup of speakers from all experience levels is important to us. A few weeks ago, Cathy Theys brainstormed a list of topics spanning social, technical, business, and other aspects of Drupal ecosystem that would be welcome at MidCamp. The list is long, but by no means exhaustive.

Are you on the fence about submitting a proposal? Take a look at the variety of suggestions for topics and fill out the submission form (the deadline is Monday, January 19). I want to see you at MidCamp!

References and resources

Contact me on Drupal.org or on Twitter. -alimac

Categories: Drupal

differently - a new (free) press kit creation tool - by Brandon Sheffield

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 13 January 2015 - 10:08pm
Making press kits is no fun. We found that the existing software to make it easier wasn't flexible enough for us, so we created a new one, available for free, called differently.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Capgemini Engineering: Drupal 8 PSR-4 Form compatibility in Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - 13 January 2015 - 4:00pm

Up until Drupal 8 there has been little to encourage well organised code. It now has PSR-4 autoloading so your classes are automatically included. Even though Drupal 8 is just round the corner, a lot of us will still be using Drupal 7 for quite a while, however that doesn’t mean we can’t benefit from this structure in Drupal 7.

This post covers two parts:

  1. Autoloading class files.
  2. Avoiding extra plumbing to hook into your class methods.

You’re probably familiar with drupal_get_form(‘my_example_form’) which then looks for a function my_example_form(). The issue is that your form definition will no longer be in such a function but within a method in a class. To cover both these parts we will be using two modules:

  1. XAutoLoad - Which will autoload our class.
  2. Cool - Which allows us to abstract the usual functions into class methods.

Drupal 8 was originally using PSR-0 which has been deprecated in favour of PSR-4. As a consequence the Cool module uses PSR-0 in its examples although it does support PSR-4. We will create an example module called psr4_form.

The information on autoloading and folder structure for PSR-4 in Drupal 8 states that we should place our form class in psr4_form/src/Form/FormExample.php however the cool module instead loads from a FormControllers folder: psr4_form/src/FormControllers/FormExample.php.

We can get round this by providing our own hook_forms() as laid out in the Cool module:

/** * Implements hook_forms(). */ function psr4_form_forms($form_id, $args) { $classes = \Drupal\cool\Loader::mapImplementationsAvailable('Form', '\Drupal\cool\Controllers\FormController'); unset($classes['Drupal\\cool\\BaseForm']); unset($classes['Drupal\\cool\\BaseSettingsForm']); $forms = array(); foreach ($classes as $class_name) { $forms[$class_name::getId()] = array( 'callback' => 'cool_default_form_callback', 'callback arguments' => array($class_name), ); } return $forms; }

If you are ok placing your class in the FormControllers folder then you can omit the above function to keep your .module file simple or you could put the hook in another module. Potentially the Cool module could be updated to reflect this.

This class requires a namespace of the form Drupal\<module_name>\Form. It also extends the BaseForm class provided by the Cool module so we don’t need to explicitly create our form functions:

namespace Drupal\psr4_form\Form; class FormExample extends \Drupal\cool\BaseForm { ... }

Within our FormExample class we need a method getId() to expose the form_id to Drupal:

public static function getId() { return 'psr4_form'; }

And of course we need the form builder:

public static function build() { $form = parent::build(); $form['my_textfield'] = array( '#type' => 'textfield', '#title' => t('My textfield'), ); return $form; }

All that is left is to define your validate and submit methods following the Drupal 8 form API.

At the time of writing, the Cool module isn’t up to date with Drupal 8 Form API conventions. I started this blog post with the intention of a direct copy and paste of the src folder. Unfortunately the methods don’t quite follow the exact same conventions and they also need to be static:

Drupal 7 Drupal 8 getId getFormId build buildForm validate validateForm submit submitForm

This example module can be found at https://github.com/oliverpolden/psr4_form.

Taking it further

Drupal 8 is just round the corner but a lot of us will still be using Drupal 7 for the foreseeable future. Taking this approach allows us to learn and make use of Drupal 8 conventions as well as making it easier to migrate from Drupal 7. It would be nice to see the Cool module be brought up to date with the current API, perhaps something I will be helping with in the not so distant future.

Links Modules Information

Drupal 8 PSR-4 Form compatibility in Drupal 7 was originally published by Capgemini at Capgemini on January 14, 2015.

Categories: Drupal

Hide user signature

New Drupal Modules - 13 January 2015 - 3:35pm

This module allow hide user signature in comments.

Support Views and Rules with Entity API.

Categories: Drupal

S3 File System Migrate

New Drupal Modules - 13 January 2015 - 2:50pm

This module integrates with the S3 File System (S3FS) module (version 2.x). S3FS enables storing newly uploaded and generated files on Amazon's Simple Storage Service. S3FS Migrate allows migrating existing locally stored files to S3. S3FS Migrate has the following features:

Categories: Drupal

This Week in Video Game Criticism: Ludocentricism and the 'Age of Games'

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 13 January 2015 - 2:45pm

This week, our partnership with game criticism site Critical Distance brings us picks from Mark Filipowich on topics ranging from the 'ludocentrism' of games discourse to a different take on Eric Zimmerman's 'Ludic Century.' ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Mediacurrent: Level up your Drush-Fu with aliases that work across all environments

Planet Drupal - 13 January 2015 - 1:40pm

Have you noticed how your remote drush aliases (e.g., @my-dev-server) don't work when you're logged into the remote server? It's because aliases with the "remote-host" key specified can't work locally. Quite annoying!

Categories: Drupal

Drupal core announcements: Drupal core updates for January 12, 2015

Planet Drupal - 13 January 2015 - 12:40pm
What's new with Drupal 8?

Happy New Year everyone! Since the last Drupal Core Update on December 3rd, Drupal 8 passed over 2500 contributors (congratulations to tadityar on becoming the 2500th D8 contributor on December 9)!

Some other highlights of the month were:

How can I help get Drupal 8 done?

See Help get Drupal 8 released! for updated information on the current state of the release and more information on how you can help.

Drupal 8 In Real Life Whew! That's a wrap!

Do you follow Drupal Planet with devotion, or keep a close eye on the Drupal event calendar, or git pull origin 8.0.x every morning without fail before your coffee? We're looking for more contributors to help compile these posts. You could either take a few hours once every six weeks or so to put together a whole post, or help with one section more regularly. If you'd like to volunteer for helping to draft these posts, please follow the steps here!

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Watchdog: MySQL Query Optimization

Planet Drupal - 13 January 2015 - 9:52am
Feature

A large part of MySQL optimization lies in improving poorly performing SQL queries. While tuning is important, it often has nowhere near the impact of actually fixing a poorly performing query. Fixing queries is also a lot more fun. Obviously query optimization is a large subject, and can’t possibly be covered in full in a single article. I highly recommend that you get a book on this subject; for any Drupal developer, it is well worth learning.

As a web developer using a CMS, you are only slightly removed from the SQL layer. Not completely knowing how to use this layer and how to optimize it is very limiting. To get you started, we will cover some very basic optimization, index usage, and join optimization techniques.

Index Basics

Even though indexes are very important for database performance, they are not completely understood by many developers, which often leads to easily-avoidable problems. The main issue is the mystical belief that the MySQL optimizer should be able to quickly run a query if an index so much as touches the columns in question. Sadly, indexes are not magical.

It is best to think of an index as a tree, largely because they are trees in most DB systems. (B+Trees, specifically; for more information, see http://wdog.it/4/1/btree.)

Thus, if you have an example index test that covers (columnA, columnB), you literally have a tree of columnA values, with columnB values in the leaves. If you have a query that has a WHERE condition on these two columns, MySQL will go through this tree looking for the correct columnA value first, and then go into the leaves of that object, and find the correct columnB value.

Categories: Drupal

OpenLucius: Drupal Grants, what to do with this node access system?

Planet Drupal - 13 January 2015 - 8:48am
Viewing, editing and deleting pages in Drupal

When you have some experience with Drupal it will be clear that you can set your rights for content management in the permission table (/admin/people/permissions).

Check the appropriate permissions and everyone will get the required rights to view, add, edit or delete content. In other words the so-called CRUD actions: Create, Read, Update, Delete.

So far so good.

Categories: Drupal

Embed External

New Drupal Modules - 13 January 2015 - 7:39am

This module is still under heavy development.

The idea is that it should be a generic framework for embedding external content (for instance, a Facebook post or a Tweet or a YouTube video). It also provides a WYSIWYG plugin for inserting these external pieces of content into your local content.

ctools is the only dependency, and you'll also need WYSIWYG if you want to have the insert wizard.

Categories: Drupal

ERPAL: Looking back on 2014 with Drupal business apps

Planet Drupal - 13 January 2015 - 7:30am

The year 2014 was entirely about flexible and open business applications based on Drupal - and we’ll continue to follow this vision in 2015.
In 2014 we staffed up our ERPAL team and won strategic clients who gave us feedback and helped us continue to finance our open source development. This positive resonance provides confirmation that Drupal can become an ever-larger part of the open source business application market.
One of the ERPAL Platform projects of 2014 that we’re very proud of was presented in a featured webinar on open integration with Drupal commerce. The ERPAL Platform based foam creator gives an industrial company the means to let its clients construct and order individually manufactured products – all directly online. The orders are sent to the manufacturing department and production starts. Because the application is fully integrated with the company’s workflow and IT infrastructure, no manual data transfer is needed and the efficiency of the whole sales-to-production process has increased by more than 75%. This unique use case shows the power of Drupal extended well beyond content sites.

Whereas other open source business apps like Odoo focus solely on broadening the palette of business apps available for ERP systems, ERPAL comes from the other direction. We use Drupal as a highly flexible and stable application framework that helps you build any kind of web application at all - and Drupal can do this with almost no coding, just by configuring. Using this strategy we introduced Drupal to some businesses that hadn’t even heard of Drupal. And now that they see its power and flexibility, they wouldn’t want to go without it anymore.
With ERPAL Platform, which we released in 2014, we provide Drupal developers and site builders with a free Drupal distribution for building highly flexible business applications and e-commerce businesses in a Drupal box. It integrates many Drupal modules like Drupal Commerce and Rules, which are known to leverage flexibility. With the help of the Drupal community we implemented an architecture that covers contact management and all components of the sales process such as quotes, orders and invoices. As Drupal became more open, providing web service for all entities in Drupal 8, we implemented the architecture of ERPAL to integrate with other services. Together with a closed beta customer test pool, we are running ERPAL Platform as a fully-integrated agency platform, automating integration tasks between Jira, Mite, Trello, Redmine and toggle. It helps save time in administration and automates billing and controlling processes in project-based business. Thanks to everyone who joined our ERPAL Platform integration survey. This survey is still open and we are looking forward to even more feedback to help us increase our number of beta testers.

Because in 2014 we were deploying more than 25 Drupal-based business apps and always had Drupalgeddon in mind, we decided to go public with our technology for Drupal update automation, which we previously had used only internally for our clients. Drop Guard lets Drupal users and agencies automate Drupal security updates immediately after a new security update release. If you’re interested in further details, workflows and technology, read more in our blog post about how since 2012 we’ve automated Drupal security updates with ERPAL: you can too!

All in all, 2014 was an amazing year for ERPAL and we saw that there’s a market for open source business applications. We’re looking forward to contributing even more code, know-how, webinars and sessions to the Drupal community in 2015.

Categories: Drupal

Drupalize.Me: Changes in the Form API in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 13 January 2015 - 6:13am

In my previous post, I documented the first of my Adventures in Porting a D7 Form Module to Drupal 8. In that article, I documented how I used the Drupal Module Upgrader to convert my Drupal 7 module, Form Fun, to Drupal 8 and what I learned along the way about how Routes and Controllers replaced hook_menu, and what I gleaned from change records about other API changes. This article is a continuation of that post, so you might want to pop over and give it a read so that you're up to speed with what we're doing here.

Categories: Drupal

On-site visualization of planned buildings

Virtual Reality - Science Daily - 13 January 2015 - 6:04am
Using a new system, architects, developers or their clients can view a 3D model of a building in its intended shape, precisely where the building is to be constructed. This will give them a much clearer, realistic impression of the design.
Categories: Virtual Reality

7 things I’ve learnt from designing This War of Mine - by Kacper Kwiatkowski

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 13 January 2015 - 4:48am
This War of Mine seen from the perspective of one of the designers. What design features make it stand out how they contributed to the game's success? What can a game designer learn from it?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Postmortem: Launching The War Z - by Sergey Titov

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 13 January 2015 - 4:48am
The War Z was one of the most controversial game launches of 2012. Now, more than two years later, I'd like to dive into what went so, so wrong, as well as what actually went right. This is a cautionary yet hopeful tale that any indie dev can learn from!
Categories: Game Theory & Design
Syndicate content


Google+
about seo