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Kayak

New Drupal Modules - 11 April 2016 - 1:58pm

Drupal 8 provides a complex framework of classes and interfaces that can easily overwhelm new developers. While tutorials cover some of these for certain scenarios, a lot of the low-level tools provided by Drupal Core can remain hidden because no straight-forward examples of their use exist.

Kayak will provide a web frontend to quickly navigate through the Drupal code base and gain a bird's-eye perspective. It will visualize hierarchies and dependencies and explain when and where to use each class or interface.

Categories: Drupal

Doug Vann: Drupal Promotes An Ownership Society, but does Drupal 8 threaten that?

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2016 - 12:30pm

Those who know me at all likely know that I have a few catch-phrases I use when trying to explain the impact that Drupal has had on the market for organizations and individuals needing quality web sites.

DRUPAL PROMOTES AN OWNERSHIP SOCIETY

is a phrase that I have used for years and years. When I say that I seek to convey the fact that many organizations and individuals are choosing to rely less on outside vendors and more on internal talent to get things done. I have come to this conclusion simply by observation. As I became more and more in demand I found that many organizations wanted me to come in and empower THEIR STAFF to do the work that needed done. In some cases they already had a site that a vendor built but they wanted to improve it. Others had no site and wanted to build the thing form scratch and learn how to use Drupal along the way. Either way, these clients were going ALL IN for Drupal and decided that Drupal was a tool to have IN THEIR OWN tool belt to use whenever they need it.

Who are these organizations choosing to OWN the Drupal process and rely less on vendors? They are Universities, Governments [Fed, State, Local, etc,] Tech companies, Media companies,  Marketing companies, Agencies, etc. They see others, sometimes competitors, leveraging Drupal and they want the same power, but without the price tag. They know that Drupal is Open Source, meaning free, so they check it out and get so far until they decide they need a push. The come to the point where they need a formal engagement by a knowledgable trainer who can walk with them through a tailored learning experience that addresses the kinds of projects that they will be building. They don't want package {A} or {B} or {C} to choose from. They want to own a personal Drupal training experience to equip them to build their personal web experience.

And that is exactly what I give them!

So.... How's that going for you? 

I've kept in touch with these clients & I see many of them attending and participating in Drupal events. I watch them launch site after site. Some of them wind up hiring in some Drupal talent to augment the staff. When that Drupal talent arrives, the other staff are already well oriented to the ways of the Drupal! [Hmm. perhaps a new catch phrase!?] 

Let’s not forget too that many of these organizations have cancelled their expensive licenses for proprietary CMSs and are now enjoying a more agile and productive process of increasing their web-appeal.

AND ALONG CAME DRUPAL 8

I've criss-crossed the country teaching Site Building, Theming, Module Development. People have been amazed at what you can do with Drupal core, some Contribute modules and NO CODE! But the fact is that you are highly likely to need code eventually. If you truly want to create the website EXACTLY to specs, then a little hook here and a little hook there and a theme-variable or 3 or 4 will get you considerably closer to those specs. One custom module with 1 to 4 hooks along with a dozen lines in your template.php and a few extra print commands in a few TPL files will make significant changes to your site. I have taught people how to do this for years and they LOVE THE POWER.

Now I look out at the landscape of Drupal 8 and I am trying to imagine going back to those same clients and telling them to forget it ALL and learn OOP, Symfony2, PSR, and Twig. Is it possible? sure it is! Can I do it all in one week? Not at all likely. Drupal 8 is a game-changer primarily because it threw out most of the rules and started over. So what is an accomplished Drupal trainer and consultant to do? Well. I have discussed this with some of my clients. Some are choosing to ignore Drupal 8 until more contrib modules come of-age. Some are thinking they will ride out their volume of D7 sites until D9 is a topic and the idea of D7 end-of-life is a concern. NONE are overly anxious to start over and jump into a world where most of what they learned before no longer applies.

And yes.... I do tell them that BACKDROP CMS is a viable solution to get tomorrow's features built on a platform that they already know and enjoy and are skilled at.

So you tell me. Have you observed organizations and individuals taking an ownership position of Drupal and relying less on vendors? Do you agree that that approach is more difficult for “many” organizations due to the degree of code rewrite that D8 experienced?

I gotta be honest... When someone asks me D7 or D8? I ask them, do you or your organization plan on OWNING the site or do you want to rely on vendors? Along with that I will ask, do you have some young Comp-Sci cats in your org who can be delighted by the near-MVC-like rewrite of Drupal?

Insert the usual caveat here...
I believe in D8 and its power to bring Drupal to whole new levels of appeal to bigger markets. I also believe that smaller markets have already been and will continue to be "put-off" by the volume of changes that do not necessarily add value to the ways in which these smaller markets utilize this powerful tool.

Alrighty... SHIELDS UP! Sock it to me, PLEASE, in the comments below! :-) 

Drupal Planet

View the discussion thread.

Categories: Drupal

Blizzard shutters popular private WoW server with threat of legal action

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 11 April 2016 - 11:44am

Over the weekend one of the largest private "vanilla" World of Warcraft servers, Nostalrius, was shut down after Blizzard threatened to take its operators to court over copyright infringement. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Red Crackle: Configuring Drupal With Elasticsearch For Facet Search Functionality

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2016 - 11:00am
This article integrates Drupal with Elasticsearch to introduce Facet search functionality. You will be taken through the step-by-step procedure through a series of screenshots. By the end of this article, you will be able to select and display items on a page based on specific search criteria.
Categories: Drupal

Pantheon Blog: Modern Command Line Tools for Drupal Modules with Drush and Drupal Console

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2016 - 9:55am
Having a command line interface to the functionality provided by Drupal modules has been a highly valuable and widely-used feature that has been used for many years. Today, there are over 500 Drupal modules that provide Drush commands, and the number keeps growing.  On top of this, some modules have started to use Drupal Console to implement their command line tools. Drupal Console provides an object-oriented interface and a host of utility functions provided by the Symfony Console libraries.
Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association News: Honoring DrupalCon Volunteers

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2016 - 9:22am

Hello, Drupal world! We are thrilled to be able to give you an inside peek at what goes into planning DrupalCons. Throughout 2016, we’ll share a series of posts, and a few webcasts, to show some behind-the-scenes aspects of DrupalCon. In honor of National Volunteer Week, this month's DrupalCon post highlights how an army of amazing, dedicated volunteers is behind every DrupalCon.

If you’ve ever attended a DrupalCon, you probably remember the Drupal Association standing onstage and saying that this event ‘couldn’t happen without our amazing volunteers.’ We normally have a round of applause for the volunteers at each particular Con, but that still doesn't fully convey how much of the Con is lead by some fantastic community members. In this blog we want to help quantify how much time and energy these volunteers give to help create a memorable and enriching Con for you.

Before you even know there is a Con happening in any city, volunteers are already on board helping to make it happen. Once the city has been decided and finalized by the Drupal Association, we loop in a small group of community leaders in the secret city to come together and help us make a splash when we announce the next year’s Con location.

Besfore the Con has even been announced, these 4-6 volunteers work to put together a document that guides our designer in the logo creation and branding of the still-secret event. The community gives input during the design process of the logo, sticker and splash page that goes live after the announcement. The announcement is another way that the volunteers make an impact by dreaming up an awesome way to tell you about how awesome their city is and why you should come to DrupalCon the next year.

Once we have publically announced a location, the Drupal Association reaches out to more volunteers to build the Program Team. This team includes various groups of volunteers who make a huge impact on your DrupalCon experience. Here is a quick rundown of how committed these volunteers are and how their contribution shapes the Con.

  • Track Team - with two to three volunteers per track, this is the team that sets the tone of what content you will be hearing in sessions. They begin thinking about this at least 5 months before the Con and meet weekly to move the session content forward. Between writing track descriptions, reaching out to speakers to curate sessions, reading every single session submission, helping build the schedule and later acting as coaches for their speakers, this team signs up for a long and heavy time commitment and the fruits of their labor results in amazing sessions. In New Orleans we have 130 hand-selected sessions thanks to this dedicated team. Additional Selection Committees - we also call on the help and expertise of various other community volunteers in selecting more things related to DrupalCon. For the incredible training course proposals that we get, we have a team dedicated to selecting the 15 that should be offered. We also have a team tasked with the duty of reading each grant and scholarship application and making the difficult decisions about who is given an award to come to the DrupalCon.
  • Summit Leads - each Summit is led by a small team who works to develop a full day of engaging and educational content that will allow attendees to get the most out of the Con by adding this Monday ticket event to their trip. Our Summit Leads begin working 4 months before the Con to line-up panel guest speakers, organize multiple round table topic leaders, create the flow of the day as well as emcee their event. If you’ve ever attended a Summit, we hope that you appreciate the time and energy that these Leads have committed to making your day great.
  • Sprint Leads - this team of leads works year-round to help create sprints that are welcoming and engaging and DrupalCons are no different. Beginning planning a few months in advance of the Con, this team takes on 9 days of sprint coordination (all those extended sprints on the weekends before and after the Con, Monday Contribution Sprints, Sprint Lounge during the week and Friday Sprint Day). They also have a booth in the Exhibit Hall where you can learn about sprinting, contributing and how you can get involved. They also work to lead an amazing group of additional volunteer Sprint Mentors who help make these sprints a learning experience for many newer contributors.
  • Sprint Mentors - this group of sometimes up to 75 is mainly recognizable in their bright colored Con shirts on Fridays - helping to make sure new contributors are set-up to learn how to give back to Drupal. These mentors come from around the world and attend a training on being mentors to hundreds of DrupalCon attendees and truly dedicate their time and energy to the community with this role.
  • Community Leaders - after helping plan the big reveal of their city, the community leaders stay throughout the months before the Con to make sure that the Con gets an injection of the host city into the fun-filled week. If you’ve ever found a blog about local restaurants or learned about a popular app in a new country, the local community leads are more than likely to thank as the work to provide helpful content that makes your time in their city the best ever.
  • Prenote Performers - now an institution at DrupalCon, the Prenote has become a staple of Con content. The known suspects as well as local participants put in countless hours of time to craft a script, original songs and multiple antics that share the story of Drupal while making us laugh -- kicking the Con off right.

Apart from the Program Team, there are still many more volunteers who give time and knowledge to making DrupalCon special. Below are some of the many ways that volunteers are involved with shaping the Con:

  • Speakers - although the speakers get a free ticket to the Con, we consider them volunteers because in choosing to speak at DrupalCon they are providing us with an incredible session that takes a lot of time and energy to create. Many hours go into a single presentation before you hear it at the Con, and with over 150 speakers at DrupalCon New Orleans, we are thankful to have so many talented volunteers sharing their experience with our Drupalistas.
  • On-site Volunteers - the days before the Con involve over 50 volunteers who help us prepare for the barrage of Drupalers who arrive to enjoy a week of all things Drupal. From organizing over 3,000 t-shirts to stuffing that tote bag you get with multiple sponsor goodies, this power-team of volunteers are like a machine and deserve a huge round of applause for hard work. Once those tasks are complete, we have many volunteers who also help at the registration desk, counting session room attendance, and checking in with sponsors. There is literally of sea of volunteers at all times making sure DrupalCon is going smoothly.
  • Recurring Con Volunteers - some volunteers take on an element of the Con and just own it. Group photos and photography shots come from an amazing photography team composed of new volunteer photographers and some that have been taking photos at Drupal events for years. Our social media team is on point year-round to make sure that you’re always getting the most up-to-date info about the next Con. These volunteers have become almost permanent extensions of our Drupal Association team. We're grateful to work with our recurring volunteers because not only do they rock at what they do, but gosh, they're fun!
  • The Community Working Group - with the Code of Conduct in effect at every Con, this group might go unnoticed but plays a huge role in making DrupalCon welcoming and inclusive for all attendees. Available to mediate and work through incidents, this group is an important part of making a Con a Con.

As you can see, when we say this couldn’t happen without the volunteers, we MEAN IT.

I consider myself very lucky to primarily work with volunteers around the world who are so passionate and invested in creating a DrupalCon for you. I spend a lot of time on Zoom calls and in Slack channels with many of these volunteers. During working hours, on weekends, and at the event itself, these volunteers put a lot of themselves into these Cons and I sometimes step back and appreciate how incredible the Drupal community is.

I do my best to thank these volunteers often, reminding myself that each and everyone of them has a life and other priorities and that they are choosing to make DrupalCon important, but as it is National Volunteer Week, I would like to take a moment to list the DrupalCon New Orleans volunteers below and specifically say THANK YOU for all of your hard work - it is valued and appreciated not only by the team at the Drupal Association but by the community as well.

Program Volunteers

Pamela Barone, Donna Benjamin, Pedro Cambra, Michael Cannon, Ian Carrico, Karyn Cassio, Stuart Clark, Matt Davis, Jess Dearie, Shawn DeArmond, Jeff Diecks, Mauricio Dinarte, Robert Douglass, Larry Garfield, Rob Gill, Becca Goodman, Paul Grotevant, Adam Hill, Lucas Hedding, David Hwang, Paul Johnson, Sherri Johnson, Adam Juran, Alex Laughnan, Dan Linn, Greg Lund-Chaix, Alina Mackenzie, Kathryn McClintock, Jeffrey McGuire, Ashok Modi, Diana Montalion, Mike Nielson, Steve Parks, Jon Peck, Joel Pittet, Koen Platteeuw, Tim Plunkett, Ryan Price, Justin Rhodes, Jason Savino, Michael Schmid, Sabrina Schmidt, Eric Schmidt, Eric Sembrat, Seth Silesky, Lauren Smith, Nikki Stevens, Joe Stewart, Ashleigh Thevenet, Cathy Theys, Campbell Vertesi, Shannon Vettes, Jason Want, Heather White, Jason Yee

Sprint Mentors

Alina Mackenzie (alimac), Adam Smeets (asmeets), Ravindra Singh (RavindraSingh), Cathy Theys (YesCT), Gobinath Mallaiyan (gobinathm), David Valdez (gnuget), Aman Kanoria (amankanoria), Joël Pittet (joelpittet), John Cook (John Cook), Chris McCafferty (cilefen), David Hernandez (davidhernandez), manmohan bisht (manmohandream), Mike Keran (mikeker), Ashwini Kumar (ashwinikumar), Eleanor Wai (eleanor_wai), Mauricio Dinarte (dinarcon), Prabhu Narayanpethkar (prabhurajn654), Maninder Singh (Maninders), Maninder Singh (Maninders), Lucas Hedding (heddn), Hitesh Jain (hitesh-jain), Steve Purkiss (stevepurkiss), Anto Jose (antojose), Piyuesh Kumar (piyuesh23), Saket Kumar (saki007ster), Manauwar Alam (manauwarsheikh), Les Lim (Les Lim), Ajit Shinde (AjitS), Marc Drummond (mdrummond), Nikki Stevens (drnikki), Neetu Morwani (neetu morwani), Prashant Goel (prashantgoel), Tim Erickson (stpaultim), Daniel Carvalhinho (dscl), Lalit Nirban (lalit3007), Joaz Rivera (m3chas), Junaid Masoodi (junaidmasoodi), Christian Manalansan (cmanalansan), Blake Hall (blakehall), Abhishek Anand (abhishek-anand), Amber Matz (Amber Himes Matz), Darryl Norris (darol100) David Needham (davidneedham), Kristin Bradham (kristink2), Diana VanRooy (thenyouDi), Marc Isaacson (vegantriathlete), Carlos Ospina (camoa), Patrick Storey (Patrick Storey), William Hetherington (willwh), Ravish Gupta (ravyg), Valery Lourie (valthebald) Seth Silesky (sethsilesky), Stuart Clark (Deciphered), Barbara Errickson (barbarae), Cristina Chumillas (ckrina)

Speakers

Hussain Abbas, Mary Albert, John Albin Wilkins, Kelly Albrecht, Greg Anderson, Geoff Appleby, Ronald Ashri, Ryan Aslett, Morten Birch, Kristina Bjoran, Abe Brewster, Jesse Browne, Amitai Burstein, Angie Byron, Ian Carrico, Leigh Carver, Karyn Cassio, Marji Cermak, Matt Cheney, Gus Childs, Chaz Chumley, Courtney Clark, Casey Cobb, Ashish Dalvi, Matt Davis, Aimee Degnan, George Demet, Alex Dergachev, Suzanne Dergacheva, Nikhil Deshpande, Frederic Dewinne, Jeff Diecks, Daniel Dreier, Marc Drummond, Jeff Eaton, Stephanie El-Hajj, Adam Englander, Brad Erickson, Lauri Eskola, Edward Faulkner, Mark Ferree, John Ferris, Jessi Fischer, Fabian Franz, Pieter Frenssen, Larry Garfield, Yuriy Gerasimov, Aditya Ghan, Mike Gifford, Matt Glaman, Micah Godbolt, Drew Gorton, Nicolas Grekas, Rudy Grigar, Jody Hamilton, Mike Herchel, David Hernandez, Michael Hess, Jason Hibbets, Amber Himes Matz, Mikkel Høgh, Gábor Hojtsy, Chris Hoult, David Hwang, Marcus Iannozzi, Allie Jones, Adam Juran, Adam Kapp, John Kary, John Kennedy, Greg Knaddison, Randall Knutson, Josh Koenig, Charles Kreitzberg, Michelle Krejci, Kat Kuhl, Ashwini Kumar, Saket Kumar, Piyuesh Kumar, Wim Leers, Brian Lewis, Les Lim, Dan Linn, Clay Marshall, Tom Martin, Sophie Matson, Jeffrey McGuire, Catharine McNally, Oscar Merida, Steven Merrill, Brett Meyer, Michael Miles, Josh Miller, Tim Millwood, Igor Minar, Gaurav Mishra, Jesus Molivas, John Money, Jess Mybro, David Needham, Narayan Newton, Dani Nordin, Darryl Norris, Ron Northcutt, Dick Olsson, John Ouellet, Jason Pamentalm, Jon Peck, Steve Persch, Piyush Poddar, Kristen Pol, Fabien Potencier, Alex Pott, Taco Potze, Ellie Power, Luke Probasco, Ilan Rabinovitch, Scott Reeves, Dave Reid, Adrian Rollett, Chris Rooney, Chris Russo, Susan Rust, Terrence Ryan, Peter Sawczynec, Dave Sawyer, Michael Schmid, Roy Scholton, Michael Sherron, Joe Shindelar, Sebastian Siemssen, Michael Silverman, Preston So, David Spira, Anne Stefanyk, Nikki Stevens, Karen Stevenson, Nick Stielau, Matt Stratton, David Strauss, Ryan Szrama, Patrick Teglia, Chris Teitzel, Dave Terry, Kyle Theobald, Ashleigh Thevenet, Bjorn Thomson, Travis Tidwell, Matthew Tift, Howard Tizzo, Vanessa Turke, Tatiana Ugrimova, Chris Urban, Kristof Van Tomme, Jeff Walpole, Ryan Weaver, Daniel Wehner, Moshe Weitzman, Lynn Winter, Peter Wolanin, Chris Wright, Bojan Živanović, Helena Zubkow

Image credit goes to the following photographers:
DrupalCon Asia Volunteer Selfie : Michael Cannon
Education Summit Meeting : Paul Johnson
Zoom Screenshot Photo : David Hwang
DrupalCon Los Angeles Sprint Mentors: Jared Smith

Categories: Drupal

Drupal @ Penn State: Lower the Drupal 8 development barrier to entry by using the Drupal Console to generate boiler plate code.

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2016 - 9:06am

I admit that I haven't really looked at Drupal 8 too much yet. There is a variety of reasons why I haven't and I surely don't want this to turn into a forum listing the pros and cons of D8. We can leave that for another post. 

Categories: Drupal

Comments Entity

New Drupal Modules - 11 April 2016 - 7:05am

Drupal core comment module is great for commenting on nodes.

This module provides fieldable comments for any entity even comments itself. Entity Comments integrates with views and rules.

Installation

Simply enable the module and go to "admin/structure/comments_entity" and enable Entity Comments on any entity.

Categories: Drupal

The Sego Blog: Drupal 8 Module Development Resources

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2016 - 6:54am
04/11/2016Drupal 8 Module Development Resources

This past weekend we were honored to co-host the Drupal Global Training day at DoSomething.org in NYC. This training was focused on Drupal 8 module development. We have been training on the ins and out of Drupal 8 module development for over a year now but this time we changed the format, considerably. I think for the better! 

Using the Role Notices module, developed by Ted Bowman, we put together an exercise that walks you through building the functionality it exposes step by step. We also built a list of resources chock full of links pertaining to various tools and docs for getting your chops up with D8 development. 

All this work is open source and available at this link. I am really hoping that this content can serve as a valuable resource for folks looking to learn the proper flow of developing a Drupal 8 module.

There are so many exciting concepts and programming patterns to explore in D8, we hope you continue to join us during this jounrney. 

Mega thanks to everyone that helped make this happen! 

Categories: Drupal

Acquia Developer Center Blog: The Faichi Story: From Unknown Drupal Shop to Top 10 in 6 months

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2016 - 6:21am

It all started at DrupalCon Barcelona, when Shailesh Gogate, VP at Faichi Solutions, met Johanna Boel Bergmann, the Account Manager, Drupal Businesses at the Drupal Association.

Johanna had never heard of Faichi; she had never seen it in the Drupal.org Marketplace. This even though our company has been working with big enterprise clients for the past five years, as well as contributing to Drupal.org.

That was an eye­-opener for Shailesh. When he returned to India, he shared his findings with Faichi’s engineers and senior management. They took the feedback very seriously. They decided to create a plan to show their presence: not only in the Drupal Marketplace, but to the whole Drupal community.

Tags: acquia drupal planet
Categories: Drupal

Chapter Three: Javascript testing comes to Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2016 - 4:47am

With the arrival of Drupal 8.1.0 finally you can test javascript interactions on Drupal.org. This is culmination of years of work by many developers to improve the testing API and infrastructure. Without the improvements delivered by Drupal 8 it'd be hard to leverage Mink, PhantomJS and PHPUnit to run our tests, and without the new DrupalCI infrastructure we'd have nowhere to run the tests.



Categories: Drupal

Drop Guard: Big update: the new onboarding process, improved patching workflow and more

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2016 - 3:14am
Big update: the new onboarding process, improved patching workflow and more Igor Kandyba Mon, 11.04.2016 - 12:14

Today, we’re excited to introduce you to a number of new features, improvements and fixes for Drop Guard - the first update in the series of releases planned for 2016.  It includes many enhancements designed to improve user experience when creating projects in Drop Guard, support for the "Unsupported updates", and even smarter automated patching workflow. Read below to learn about the major improvements and don't forget to check your Drop Guard account to check it by yourself. Let's dive right in!

Drop Guard features Drupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

Kristof De Jaeger: Taking a (Drupal 8) website offline using AppCache

Planet Drupal - 11 April 2016 - 2:41am
Written on April 11, 2016 - 11:41

A native mobile application which can cache the data locally is a way to make content available offline. However, not everyone has the time and/or money to create a dedicated app, and frankly, it's not always an additional asset. What if browsers could work without network connection but still serve content: Application Cache and/or Service Workers to the rescue!

For Frontend United 2016, Mathieu and I experimented to see how far we could take AppCache and make the sessions, speakers and some additional content available offline using data from within the Drupal site. There are a couple of pitfalls when implementing this, of which some are nasty (see the list apart link at the bottom for more information). Comes in Drupal which adds another layer of complexity, with its dynamic nature of content and themes. Javascript and css aggregation is also extremely tricky to get right. So after trial and error and a lot of reading, we came up with the following concept:

  1. Only add the manifest attribute to all "offline" pages which are completely separate from "online pages", even though they might serve the same content. In other words, you create a sandboxed version of some content of your site which can live on its own. Another technique is a hidden iframe which loads a page which contains the html tag with the manifest attribute. You can embed this iframe on any page you like. This gives you the option to create a page where you link to as an opt-in to get a site offline. Both techniques give us full control and no side affects so that when network is available the site works normally.
  2. You define the pages which you want to store in the cache. They are served by Drupal, but on a different route than the original (e.g. node/1 becomes offline/node/1) and use different templates. These are twig templates so you can override the defaults to your own needs. Other information like stylesheet and javascript files can be configured too to be included.
  3. The manifest thus contains everything that we need to create the offline version when your device has no network connection. In our case, it contains the list of speakers and sessions, content pages and some assets like javascript, stylesheet, logo and images.
Offline in the browser or on the homescreen

Go to the Offline homepage of Frontend United and wait until the 'The content is now available offline!' message appears, which means you just downloaded 672 kb of data - it is really really small, surprising no? Now switch off your network connection and reload the browser: still there! Click around and you'll be able to check the offline version at any time. If you're on a mobile device, the experience can be even sweeter: you can add this page to your homescreen, making it available as an 'app'. On iOS, you need to open the app once while still being connected to the network. We really do hope safari/iOS fixes this behavior since this is not necessary on Android. After that, turn off your network and launch the app again. Oh, and it works on a watch too if you have a browser on it. If that isn't cool, we don't know what else is! We have a little video to show you how it looks like. Watch (pun intended) and enjoy! Oh, in case we make changes to the pages, you will see a different notification telling you that the content has been updated - if your device has network of course.

Drupal integration

We've created a new project on Drupal.org, called Offline App, available for Drupal 8. The project contains the necessary code and routes for generating the appcache, iframe, pages (nodes and views) and settings to manipulate the manifest content. 3 new regions are exposed in which you can place the content for offline use. Those regions are used in offline-app-page.html.twig - but any region is available if you want to customize. Two additional view modes are created for content types and the read more link can be made available in the 'Offline teaser' mode. Formatters are available for long texts to strip internal links and certain tags (e.g. embed and iframe) and for images that will make sure that 'Link to content' is pointing to the 'Offline path'. Last, but not least, an 'Offline' Views display is available for creating lists. We're still in the process in making everything even more flexible and less error-prone when configuring the application. However, the code that is currently available, is used as is on the Fronted United website right now.

This module does not pretend to be the ultimate solution for offline content, see it as an example to quickly expose a manifest containing URL's from an existing Drupal installation for an offline version of your website. Other Drupal projects are available trying to integrate with AppCache or Service workers, however, some are unsupported or in a very premature state, apart from https://www.drupal.org/project/pwa. Note that I've been in contact with Théodore already and we'll see how we combine our efforts for coming up with one single solution instead of having multiple ones.

What about service workers ?

Not all browsers support the API yet. Even though AppCache is marked deprecated, we wanted to make sure everyone could have the same offline experience. However, we'll start adding support for service workers soon using the same concept.

We're also planning to start experimenting with delivering personal content as well, since that's also possible, yet a little trickier.

Links
Categories: Drupal

Offline Application

New Drupal Modules - 11 April 2016 - 2:15am

Offline application is a module that allows you to make content from your website available offline. You can configure nodes, views and the menu that will be used as the 'offline app' version of your website. Further configuration includes manifest for adding the content as an app on your homescreen.

Supports Application Cache API, even though it has been deprecated, but has the best support on all major browsers. Service Workers integration is following soon though.

Categories: Drupal

To the (Gaming) Muses

Gnome Stew - 11 April 2016 - 1:00am

Art by Avery Liell-Kok

I’m in fifth grade. It’s after school and I’m stuck waiting for my mom to pick me up. The middle school kids have their classrooms at the other end of the building, and I can hear shouting, so of course that’s where I go. They’re in our dingy little library gathered round a battered table. They have paper, dice, and books– and they’re playing Dungeons and Dragons. Advanced Dungeons and Dragons, to be specific (they are very specific). They offer to teach me, but for now I just want to sit and listen, maybe look at the books. While they argue about THACO, I open the Monstrous Manual, and my world changes.

I am in 7th grade. I am taking orders. “Okay . . . so, here’s the list of races I can draw. Yeah, I can totally do a Swan May. What color hair should she have? Eyes? Skin?” I have a tiny cohort, and they all want characters to “adopt”. A battered copy of the Monstrous Manual is passed around, in case anyone doesn’t know what a Swan May is, or a Drow, or a Rakshasa. I also offer custom races– mermaids, cat people, vampires, anthropomorphic ducks (don’t ask). My notebooks have their own entries, copied off D&D’s model, detailing the biology, habitats and stats of all these creations. I slavishly create my own pictures. My goal is to make something look as cool as the Tarrasque, but I’m leagues away.

I am in 8th grade. My dad comes home from the recycling center with a box of abandoned books. The all have similar titles– Vampire: the Masquerade, Werewolf: the Apocalypse, Mage: The Ascension, Wraith:the Oblivion, and Changeling: The Dreaming. My heart skips a beat when I see Changeling’s beautiful stained glass cover. I think of my favorite author, Charles de Lint, and the world he described in my personal holy book, Memory and Dream– a world of faeries and stranger things, of a painter who could bring the numinous into reality by the power of her brush alone. When I open that book and see Rebecca Guay’s unbelievable watercolors and Tony DiTerlizzi’s iconic splash pages, I think this is what Mr. de Lint was describing. This is real magic. I use up reams of printer paper creating a whole cast of characters for my own personal World of Darkness, and never show anything but a sliver to the outside.

I am a freshman in college. I am ostensibly here to study art, mostly I am here to escape my disintegrating home life. I am depressed, and for the first time I understand what artist’s block is. The best I can manage is some half-assed Jackie Chan Adventures fan art. I take comfort in the mechanical exercises of my entry level classes, but my worlds are closed to me, until my old high school friend tells me I need to come with him to this LARP. It’s Changeling based, he says, and so much fun, and all I can think about is how embarrassed I would be to play in a game with people I don’t know– but in the grayest part of February, when I can’t walk down the street without wanting to chuck myself in front of a bus, I say yes. He helps me with the basics. I go home, and start thinking about my character. The first thing I need to do to get to know her is draw her face.

I am a Junior in college. I am doing a project for the Changeling game, drawing as many of the characters as I can. There’s a lot– we’re talking a game that regularly pulls in around sixty people at it’s height. I’ve decided to focus on illustration when I get out of school. Just last year was my first GenCon, and this year I’m putting together a portfolio to take to the people at Wizards of the Coast. I work at my local games store and when I’m not slinging magic cards, I’m coming up with picture ideas. I never do finish the project, and the Wizards people very kindly tell me they hate my work, but I am invigorated. I can do this.

I am a couple of months out of school after taking an extra year to travel to Italy. When I’m not wandering Florence, I’m either working on several illustrations related to the Exalted game I’m utterly obsessed with; or, I’m reading the new Changeling: the Lost, and once again coming up with a cast of people to inhabit this gorgeous, insane city I will come to call home even ten years later. When I return and graduate, it is these illustrations I include in my portfolio when I get my first real gig doing some interiors for a little company called Silvervine Games. It’s a start, and I can’t be happier.

It is 2016, and I have been working full time as a professional illustrator for five years, employed at a company that gives me a salary to draw all day. I have never broken through to Wizards, in large part because I stopped thinking of painting a Magic card as the pinnacle of my potential career. I have other ambitions, now. Those old notebooks? I still have them. I’m starting to think maybe other people would be interested in those places and characters I have imagined so thoroughly, have drawn constantly. In partnership with my writer friend, I’m working on my first original gaming supplement. It’s great– I draw, he writes; he writes, I draw.

Roleplaying games were the fertile ground in which the seeds of my creativity were planted. Whatever fantastic fruits spring from that garden, I’m always going to tithe a portion of the harvest to the industry that nurtured me and gave me the confidence to tell whatever story I wanted, that taught me about world building and the joys of character design and made it imperative that I learn to tell a story in my paintings.

Thanks, you guys. I’ve got my pencil — Let’s play.

What was your gaming journey? How did you get inspired and pulled into the world of gaming?

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Sponsored: 22 Do's and don'ts when fighting cheating in online games

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 11 April 2016 - 12:59am

Want to sharpen your anti-cheat skills? This sponsored article is a brief summary on the topic, based on materials from an upcoming book on "Development and Deployment of Multiplayer Online Games." ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Search API Cross-language information retrieval

New Drupal Modules - 11 April 2016 - 12:35am

Cross-language information retrieval (CLIR) is a subfield of information retrieval dealing with retrieving information written in a language different from the language of the user's query. For example, a user may pose their query in English but retrieve relevant documents written in French.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross-language_information_retrieval

Categories: Drupal

The Game Developer's Toolbox (for Students) - by Anna Jenelius

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 11 April 2016 - 12:33am
This post offers a list of tips and tricks for budding game developer - a toolbox, if you will. It touches on many things, such as marketing, your elevator pitch, and how to sync your idea within the team.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Fuzzy Thinking: Where There's a Whip ...

RPGNet - 11 April 2016 - 12:00am
Fuzzy songs!
Categories: Game Theory & Design

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