Newsfeeds

Drupal Association News: The future of Community Summit. Help drive us forward.

Planet Drupal - 8 November 2016 - 7:58am

Come for the code, stay for the community. That’s the mantra of the Drupal community. It’s the reason many of us are here. It’s why we contribute in our spare time, spend our weekends organizing Drupal events, attend week-long DrupalCons. As a community we are continuing to grow and change, just like the project. DrupalCon programming should be changing too.

In particular, we at the Drupal Association want to make sure that the community programming at DrupalCons best serves the community it is made for. And that means that we need fresh voices, more support, and new ideas. We are asking for a new crop of community leaders and leading companies to step in and help us move community programming at DrupalCons forward.

How community programming got here:
Originally, community conversations at DrupalCon took place in sessions for the community track, running alongside all the other content at DrupalCons. The community track allowed for presentations on topics related to our community and although it was valuable to raise the topics, there were concerns that the session format made it difficult to continue the momentum after the Con. Further, the community track was not well attended.

At DrupalCon Prague in 2013, we launched the first Community Summit, a day-long event, on the Monday of DrupalCon week. Morten DK, Addison Berry, and others (thank you all - you have been great collaborators) ran the program and led a number of very useful conversations.

At the past few DrupalCons, Donna Benjamin has stepped up to lead unconference-style Community Summits open to anyone who wants to join, contribute to, or lead a local community. Through the unconference format, the Summit has been able to foster conversations about nonviolent communication, camp budgeting, public speaking, local community activities and more. Unfortunately, unconferences seem to stop once the Summit is over, and continuing conversations and action plans prove difficult with a community spread across the world.

Where is community programming headed?
As we continue to grow as a project and community, we recognize that we need to make sure we have the right format and space for our community to continue to grow and learn from each other.
Community programming needs some new faces to help move us forward into a world of Drupal 8, new camps, project-wide discussions, etc. We are a community full of incredible leaders and we are putting out a call for some of you to stand up and help us design the future for our community.

Community programming also needs a fiscal champion - a sponsor who fully recognizes the importance of investing in our community. Our community leaders are volunteers and e want to minimise barriers for participation. To date, the Community Summit has been free to attend. We’d like to keep it that way. But we’d like to provide attendees with lunch, and workshop tools like post-it notes, markers and flipcharts. Because we offer the Summit at no cost, we have needed to limit the space available which has meant it has booked up early, and many who would have liked to attend, have missed out.

We need you to contribute to community programming
We need you. And we are asking - can you contribute? We would love a team of community organizers to work with the Drupal Association on community programming at DrupalCon Baltimore and beyond. We need a sponsor or two to financially support the Community Summit and allow us to continue to grow it.

We are close to finalizing our space at the Baltimore Convention Center and are also nearing our online registration launch. We need to determine what the Community Summit will be so we can allocate the appropriate space and include tickets on our website. If you can help, take action now by contacting us at the Drupal Association before November 21, 2016. There are a few ways to get involved:

Are we supporting new initiatives like Drupal Diversity in the best way that we can? Are we providing our Camp Organizers with the opportunity to convene and share tips and tricks to running amazing camps around the globe? What other programming can we be providing?  Comment below to let us know what you’d like to see from community programming at DrupalCons.

Thank you for your endless support of this amazing community.

Categories: Drupal

groups.drupal.org frontpage posts: [DCMuc16] Can you smell the gingerbread and hot spiced wine? DrupalCamp Munich 2016 is coming

Planet Drupal - 8 November 2016 - 7:41am

Hey Drupalistas!
We are just a few blinks away from the DrupalCamp Munich 2016 (31.11.-02.12.2016 CodeSprints @ Burda Media // 03.12.-04.12.2016 DrupalCamp @LMU Munich). As you know, this is our 2nd Camp after the great (and 1st) DrupalDevDays in 2010, and we think we will be great hosts again.

So, it's your part to submit your session prosposals until 14th of november and to be part of the special spirit of a camp with friends, Drupal, PHP, Symfony, beer, a lot of socializing, food, another beer, coffee, code sprints, very special welcome-bags, ...
We are thankful of our sponsors so we have a special prizing for students and WWCode. Please contact us for further information.
We look forward to seeing you at DrupalCamp Munich 2016 and to drinking a mug or two of "Gluhwein" or bavarian beer together.

Greetings from our Team

AttachmentSize ankuendigung_v02.jpg359.83 KB
Categories: Drupal

DOES Something Have to Give? - by Keith Fuller

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 November 2016 - 7:32am
Amy Hennig, former creative director for Naughty Dog, says something has to give when it comes to industry work practices. She's right, and it starts with studio leaders.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Balancing the sh#& out of our shmup - by Krister Karlsson

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 November 2016 - 7:32am
Getting the correct balance of any game is critical and extremely challenging. Here's how we went about doing it for 1993 Space Machine, while also touching on design.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Is imagination important to make new videogames? - by Lee Witney

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 November 2016 - 7:32am
If developers took new ideas to the grave with them, would they be missed?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

What Happened to Power Politics? - by Sande Chen

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 November 2016 - 7:31am
In this article, game designer Sande Chen discusses the legacy of the election simulation game, Power Politics.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

How Modern MMOs are Changing the Game - by Josh Bycer

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 November 2016 - 7:31am
Today's post looks at how modern MMOs have adjusted their progression model, and the pros and cons of the new system.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Crafting the looks of a unique city - by Luis Diaz

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 November 2016 - 7:31am
Open-world games have players wandering around a big map which needs to feel organic, while featuring a diverse set of places to keep the player engaged. It's a tough challenge, but here's how we are dealing with it in "A Place for the Unwilling".
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Postmortem: IRF Media's Ginger Roll - by Adnan Ramzan

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 8 November 2016 - 7:29am
A look at the different challenges faced, successes and future plans of Ginger Roll; a 3D arcade platformer game by games studio IRF Media. Learn about the development, design and marketing that was involved in the making of Ginger Roll.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

InternetDevels: Bootstrap for Drupal: how to create a subtheme in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 8 November 2016 - 7:15am

Here goes another Drupal 8 post by one of our Drupal developers!

Read more
Categories: Drupal

µSync

New Drupal Modules - 8 November 2016 - 7:11am

What if you wanted to write you features using Yaml files?

Categories: Drupal

Asmodee Previews Gameplay from Aye, Dark Overlord

Tabletop Gaming News - 8 November 2016 - 7:00am
Well, you dun fudged up. You were supposed to kill off the heroes, grab the magical widget, and allow the Dark Overlord to control the world’s supply of whelks. This, of course, would have led to the eventual domination of all the Earth. But, well, you see, wuh ha happen wuz… it didn’t work out. […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Bloodborne: The Card Game Available November 11th

Tabletop Gaming News - 8 November 2016 - 6:00am
Bloodborne is one of the more-popular video games of the last few years. The challenge comes from basically making it as far as you can before you’re brutally killed in-game. It’s not so much a question of if you’ll die, but just how far you get before you die. Well, that dark dungeon crawl experience […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Drupalize.Me: Our Development Workflow and Pantheon Multidev

Planet Drupal - 8 November 2016 - 5:29am

When we were considering switching to the Pantheon hosting platform, one of the features that made us confident in our decision is what they call Multidev.

At its core, Multidev is just a method of spinning up complete environments for code that hasn't yet been merged into the main development branch. The main benefit to this is that it makes it incredibly easy to build a complete website environment that parallels your live site where any team member can functionally and visually test changes before they're fully merged.

This blog post covers the Drupalize.Me team's development workflow, and how we're using Pantheon's Multidev to be more efficient.

Categories: Drupal

Google Login

New Drupal Modules - 8 November 2016 - 3:23am

This module let you to login with your google account and/or create a user with your google account. This is a really small module, if you want something biggest you should check Social API module.

Sponsored by : The Cocktail

Categories: Drupal

A plan for media management in Drupal 8

Dries Buytaert - 8 November 2016 - 1:23am

Today, when you install Drupal 8.2, the out-of-the-box media handling is very basic. For example, you can upload and insert images in posts using a WYSIWYG editor, but there is no way to reuse files across posts, there is no built-in media manager, no support for "remote media" such as YouTube videos or tweets, etc. While all of these media features can be added using contributed modules, it is not ideal.

This was validated by my "State of Drupal 2016 survey" which 2,900 people participated in; the top two requested features for the content creator persona are richer image and media integration and digital asset management (see slide 44 of my DrupalCon New Orleans presentation).

This led me to propose a "media initiative" for Drupal 8 at DrupalCon New Orleans. Since then a dedicated group of people worked on a plan for the Drupal 8 media initiative. I'm happy to share that we now have good alignment for that initiative. We want to provide extensible base functionality for media handling in core that supports the reuse of media assets, media browsing, and remote media, and that can be cleanly extended by contributed modules for various additional functionality and integrations. That is a mouthful so in this blog post, I'll discuss the problem we're trying to solve and how we hope to address that in Drupal 8.

Problem statement

While Drupal core provides basic media capabilities, contributed modules have to be used to meet the media management requirements of most websites. These contributed modules are powerful — look at Drupal's massive adoption in the media and entertainment market — but they are also not without some challenges.

First, it is hard for end-users to figure out what combination of modules to use. Even after the right modules are selected, the installation and configuration of various modules can be daunting. Fortunately, there are a number of Drupal distributions that select and configure various contributed modules to offer better out-of-the-box experience for media handling. Acquia maintains the Lightning distribution as a general purpose set of components including media best practices. Hubert Burda Media built the Thunder distribution and offers publishers strong media management capabilities. MD Systems created the NP8 distribution for news publishers which also bundles strong media features. While I'm a big believer in Drupal distributions, the vast majority of Drupal sites are not built with one of these distributions. Incorporating some of these media best practices in core would make them available to all end-users.

Second, the current situation is not ideal for module developers either. Competing solutions and architectures exist for how to store media data and how to display a library of the available media assets. The lack of standardization means that developers who build and maintain media-related modules must decide which of the competing approaches to integrate with, or spend time and effort integrating with all of them.

The current plan

In a way, Drupal's media management today is comparable to the state of multilingual in Drupal 7; it took 22 or more contributed modules to make Drupal 7 truly multilingual and some of those provided conflicting solutions. Multilingual in Drupal 7 was challenging for both end-users and developers. We fixed that in Drupal 8 by adding a base layer of services in Drupal 8 core, while contributed modules still cover the more complex scenarios. That is exactly what we hope to do with media in a future version of Drupal 8.

The plan for the Drupal 8 media initiative is to provide extensible base functionality for media handling in core that supports the reuse of media assets, media browsing, and remote media, and that can be cleanly extended by contributed modules for various additional functionality and integrations.

In order to do so, we're introducing a media entity type which supports plugins for various media types. We're currently aiming to support images and YouTube videos in core, while contributed modules will continue to provide more, like audio, Facebook, Twitter, etc. To facilitate media reuse, WYSIWYG image embedding will be rebuilt using media entities and a media library will be included to allow selecting from pre-existing media.

We consider this functionality to be the minimum viable product for media in Drupal 8 core. The objective is to provide a simple media solution to make Drupal 8 easy to use out of the box for basic use cases. This would help users of sites large and small.

A work-in-progress prototype of the proposed media library.Expected timeline and call for help

We believe this could be achieved in a relatively short time — to be included in Drupal 8.3 or Drupal 8.4 as experimental modules. To help make this happen, we are looking for organizations to help fund two dedicated code sprints. The existing contributors are doing an amazing job but dedicated in-person sprints would go a long way to make the plans actually happen. If you are willing to help fund this project, let me know! Looking to help with the implementation itself? The media team meets at 2pm UTC every Wednesday. I also recommend you follow @drupalmedia for updates.

I tried to make a list of all people and organizations to thank for their work on the media initiative but couldn't. The Drupal 8 initiative borrows heavily from years of hard work and learnings on media related modules from many people and organizations. In addition, there are many people actively working on various aspects of the Drupal 8 media initiative. Special thanks to everyone who has contributed now and in the past. Also thank you to Gábor Hojtsy, Alex Bronstein and Janez Urevc for their contributions to this blog post.

Categories: Drupal

A plan for media management in Drupal 8

Dries Buytaert - 8 November 2016 - 1:23am

Today, when you install Drupal 8.2, the out-of-the-box media handling is very basic. For example, you can upload and insert images in posts using a WYSIWYG editor, but there is no way to reuse files across posts, there is no built-in media manager, no support for "remote media" such as YouTube videos or tweets, etc. While all of these media features can be added using contributed modules, it is not ideal.

This was validated by my "State of Drupal 2016 survey" which 2,900 people participated in; the top two requested features for the content creator persona are richer image and media integration and digital asset management (see slide 44 of my DrupalCon New Orleans presentation).

This led me to propose a "media initiative" for Drupal 8 at DrupalCon New Orleans. Since then a dedicated group of people worked on a plan for the Drupal 8 media initiative. I'm happy to share that we now have good alignment for that initiative. We want to provide extensible base functionality for media handling in core that supports the reuse of media assets, media browsing, and remote media, and that can be cleanly extended by contributed modules for various additional functionality and integrations. That is a mouthful so in this blog post, I'll discuss the problem we're trying to solve and how we hope to address that in Drupal 8.

Problem statement

While Drupal core provides basic media capabilities, contributed modules have to be used to meet the media management requirements of most websites. These contributed modules are powerful — look at Drupal's massive adoption in the media and entertainment market — but they are also not without some challenges.

First, it is hard for end-users to figure out what combination of modules to use. Even after the right modules are selected, the installation and configuration of various modules can be daunting. Fortunately, there are a number of Drupal distributions that select and configure various contributed modules to offer better out-of-the-box experience for media handling. Acquia maintains the Lightning distribution as a general purpose set of components including media best practices. Hubert Burda Media built the Thunder distribution and offers publishers strong media management capabilities. MD Systems created the NP8 distribution for news publishers which also bundles strong media features. While I'm a big believer in Drupal distributions, the vast majority of Drupal sites are not built with one of these distributions. Incorporating some of these media best practices in core would make them available to all end-users.

Second, the current situation is not ideal for module developers either. Competing solutions and architectures exist for how to store media data and how to display a library of the available media assets. The lack of standardization means that developers who build and maintain media-related modules must decide which of the competing approaches to integrate with, or spend time and effort integrating with all of them.

The current plan

In a way, Drupal's media management today is comparable to the state of multilingual in Drupal 7; it took 22 or more contributed modules to make Drupal 7 truly multilingual and some of those provided conflicting solutions. Multilingual in Drupal 7 was challenging for both end-users and developers. We fixed that in Drupal 8 by adding a base layer of services in Drupal 8 core, while contributed modules still cover the more complex scenarios. That is exactly what we hope to do with media in a future version of Drupal 8.

The plan for the Drupal 8 media initiative is to provide extensible base functionality for media handling in core that supports the reuse of media assets, media browsing, and remote media, and that can be cleanly extended by contributed modules for various additional functionality and integrations.

In order to do so, we're introducing a media entity type which supports plugins for various media types. We're currently aiming to support images and YouTube videos in core, while contributed modules will continue to provide more, like audio, Facebook, Twitter, etc. To facilitate media reuse, WYSIWYG image embedding will be rebuilt using media entities and a media library will be included to allow selecting from pre-existing media.

We consider this functionality to be the minimum viable product for media in Drupal 8 core. The objective is to provide a simple media solution to make Drupal 8 easy to use out of the box for basic use cases. This would help users of sites large and small.

A work-in-progress prototype of the proposed media library. Expected timeline and call for help

We believe this could be achieved in a relatively short time — to be included in Drupal 8.3 or Drupal 8.4 as experimental modules. To help make this happen, we are looking for organizations to help fund two dedicated code sprints. The existing contributors are doing an amazing job but dedicated in-person sprints would go a long way to make the plans actually happen. If you are willing to help fund this project, let me know! Looking to help with the implementation itself? The media team meets at 2pm UTC every Wednesday. I also recommend you follow @drupalmedia for updates.

I tried to make a list of all people and organizations to thank for their work on the media initiative but couldn't. The Drupal 8 initiative borrows heavily from years of hard work and learnings on media related modules from many people and organizations. In addition, there are many people actively working on various aspects of the Drupal 8 media initiative. Special thanks to everyone who has contributed now and in the past. Also thank you to Gábor Hojtsy, Alex Bronstein and Janez Urevc for their contributions to this blog post.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: A plan for media management in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 8 November 2016 - 1:23am

Today, when you install Drupal 8.2, the out-of-the-box media handling is very basic. For example, you can upload and insert images in posts using a WYSIWYG editor, but there is no way to reuse files across posts, there is no built-in media manager, no support for "remote media" such as YouTube videos or tweets, etc. While all of these media features can be added using contributed modules, it is not ideal.

This was validated by my "State of Drupal 2016 survey" which 2,900 people participated in; the top two requested features for the content creator persona are richer image and media integration and digital asset management (see slide 44 of my DrupalCon New Orleans presentation).

This led me to propose a "media initiative" for Drupal 8 at DrupalCon New Orleans. Since then a dedicated group of people worked on a plan for the Drupal 8 media initiative. I'm happy to share that we now have good alignment for that initiative. We want to provide extensible base functionality for media handling in core that supports the reuse of media assets, media browsing, and remote media, and that can be cleanly extended by contributed modules for various additional functionality and integrations. That is a mouthful so in this blog post, I'll discuss the problem we're trying to solve and how we hope to address that in Drupal 8.

Problem statement

While Drupal core provides basic media capabilities, contributed modules have to be used to meet the media management requirements of most websites. These contributed modules are powerful — look at Drupal's massive adoption in the media and entertainment market — but they are also not without some challenges.

First, it is hard for end-users to figure out what combination of modules to use. Even after the right modules are selected, the installation and configuration of various modules can be daunting. Fortunately, there are a number of Drupal distributions that select and configure various contributed modules to offer better out-of-the-box experience for media handling. Acquia maintains the Lightning distribution as a general purpose set of components including media best practices. Hubert Burda Media built the Thunder distribution and offers publishers strong media management capabilities. MD Systems created the NP8 distribution for news publishers which also bundles strong media features. While I'm a big believer in Drupal distributions, the vast majority of Drupal sites are not built with one of these distributions. Incorporating some of these media best practices in core would make them available to all end-users.

Second, the current situation is not ideal for module developers either. Competing solutions and architectures exist for how to store media data and how to display a library of the available media assets. The lack of standardization means that developers who build and maintain media-related modules must decide which of the competing approaches to integrate with, or spend time and effort integrating with all of them.

The current plan

In a way, Drupal's media management today is comparable to the state of multilingual in Drupal 7; it took 22 or more contributed modules to make Drupal 7 truly multilingual and some of those provided conflicting solutions. Multilingual in Drupal 7 was challenging for both end-users and developers. We fixed that in Drupal 8 by adding a base layer of services in Drupal 8 core, while contributed modules still cover the more complex scenarios. That is exactly what we hope to do with media in a future version of Drupal 8.

The plan for the Drupal 8 media initiative is to provide extensible base functionality for media handling in core that supports the reuse of media assets, media browsing, and remote media, and that can be cleanly extended by contributed modules for various additional functionality and integrations.

In order to do so, we're introducing a media entity type which supports plugins for various media types. We're currently aiming to support images and YouTube videos in core, while contributed modules will continue to provide more, like audio, Facebook, Twitter, etc. To facilitate media reuse, WYSIWYG image embedding will be rebuilt using media entities and a media library will be included to allow selecting from pre-existing media.

We consider this functionality to be the minimum viable product for media in Drupal 8 core. The objective is to provide a simple media solution to make Drupal 8 easy to use out of the box for basic use cases. This would help users of sites large and small.

A work-in-progress prototype of the proposed media library. Expected timeline and call for help

We believe this could be achieved in a relatively short time — to be included in Drupal 8.3 or Drupal 8.4 as experimental modules. To help make this happen, we are looking for organizations to help fund two dedicated code sprints. The existing contributors are doing an amazing job but dedicated in-person sprints would go a long way to make the plans actually happen. If you are willing to help fund this project, let me know! Looking to help with the implementation itself? The media team meets at 2pm UTC every Wednesday. I also recommend you follow @drupalmedia for updates.

I tried to make a list of all people and organizations to thank for their work on the media initiative but couldn't. The Drupal 8 initiative borrows heavily from years of hard work and learnings on media related modules from many people and organizations. In addition, there are many people actively working on various aspects of the Drupal 8 media initiative. Special thanks to everyone who has contributed now and in the past. Also thank you to Gábor Hojtsy, Alex Bronstein and Janez Urevc for their contributions to this blog post.

Categories: Drupal

Story, Please! – Have Adventure, Will Travel

Gnome Stew - 8 November 2016 - 1:00am

Along the same lines as Evil Hat’s It’s Not My Fault deck, Monte Cook Games’ new Story, Please! deck is a game inspiration deck or randomizer for the ENnie award winning No Thank You, Evil!. If you haven’t encountered No Thank You, Evil!, it’s a kid oriented RPG with multiple levels of play difficulty for accommodating families and growing children. It’s a d6 system with pools of points that you can use to adjust the difficulty of a problem you’re encountering by “trying harder,” and it plays fast and loose and light for short games (and short attention spans).  The game is themed with candy, adventure, intelligent backpacks, and places in a child’s room.

Story, Please! is a deck of adventure pieces to either inspire the Guide (GM) or be used wholesale as is. The deck includes people, places, stuff, one sentence story ideas, map cards, and hand out cards, all with the same engaging style of art we know from No Thank You, Evil!, specifically created to engage the young-uns. Many of the cards have cool stuff on the front and back. Just like the Storia setting of the game itself, these cards ooze friendly storybook charm in the best possible way. The people cards have descriptions and stats on one side and character portraits on the other, for example, but my favorites are actually the map cards, which have small versions of entire locations on one side, and build your own dungeon tiles on the other. The handout cards are also fantastic: an invitation, the last known photo of an astronaut, or a mysterious letter dripped with green goo signed simply “S.”

Personally, I love this kind of story aid. I have been using the It’s Not My Fault deck for a while, and actually use it more for running five minute RPGs on the fly at conventions than for its intended purpose. I can clearly see doing something similar with this deck for turning out stories on the fly, whether they are for No Thank You, Evil! as a system or not. The language is evocative if more appropriate for a younger age, along with twists like candy walls or a remote control dinosaur. While you can absolutely bypass these cards and still have a blast playing No Thank You Evil!, if your kids are on board and you’re running out of inspiration, this deck is the perfect solution. I haven’t had a chance to pull it out and test it on the ultimate subject yet (my son), but I am confident he’ll enjoy it, especially if we have a friend or two over. It seems like it would also be helpful to new GMs, possibly older siblings as the game encourages, who may not have down the art of inspiration and improv. Tools like this encourage GMs new and old to more confidently plan less and improvise more, which I believe gives players more freedom and more possibilities. I hope this deck will help a new generation of GMs learn how to run a story on the fly.  

Story, Please! and Uh-Oh, Monsters! are on kickstarter through November 11. Monte Cook Games provided us with a review copy for this article.

Have you played this game with your munchkins? Do you think these cards look cool?

Categories: Game Theory & Design

MD Systems blog: NP8 and Woodwing Content Station together support content creation process at Netzmedien

Planet Drupal - 8 November 2016 - 12:41am
In the last two months we released four portals for the Swiss tech publisher Netzmedien. All four websites are driven by the NP8 media distribution and their content is created and curated via Woodwing, a centralized multi-channel publishing platform.
Categories: Drupal

Pages

Subscribe to As If Productions aggregator