Newsfeeds

Renegade Game Studio Announces Clank! In! Space! Card Game

Tabletop Gaming News - 22 August 2017 - 3:00pm
Many big announcements were made over the past week at Gen Con. One of them was Renegade Game Studios announcing that they’re coming out with a new card game called Clank! In! Space! Yes, exclamation points entirely necessary. Much like the fantasy version of the game, Clank! In! Space! sees the players as thieves, looking […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

CosyKiller Subscription Box Murder Mystery Up On Kickstarter

Tabletop Gaming News - 22 August 2017 - 2:00pm
Most subscription boxes give you something like some tchotchkes or a couple snacks or ingredients for a recipe or a couple miniatures. CosyKiller gives you something a bit different. It’s a new subscription box coming from Red Herring Games that is a murder mystery, packed with clues that let you hopefully solve the case. It’s […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Reservoir, a simple way to decouple Drupal

Dries Buytaert - 22 August 2017 - 1:52pm

Headless Drupal seems to be taking the world by storm. I'm currently in Sydney, and everyone I talked to so far, including the attendees at the Sydney Drupal User Group, is looking into headless Drupal. Digital agencies are experimenting with it on more projects, and there is even a new Decoupled Dev Days conference dedicated to the topic.

Roughly eight months ago, we asked ourselves in Acquia's Office of the CTO whether we could create a "headless" version of Drupal, optimized for integration with a variety of applications, channels and touchpoints. Such a version could help us build bridges with other developer communities working with different frameworks and programming languages, and the JavaScript community in particular.

I've been too busy with the transition at Acquia to blog about it in real time, but a few months ago, we released Reservoir. It's a Drupal-based content repository with all the necessary web service APIs needed to build decoupled front-end applications, be it a React application, an Ember front end, a native application, an augmented reality application, a Java or .NET application, or something completely different. You can even front-end it with a PHP application, something I hope to experiment with on my blog.

API-first distributions for Drupal like Reservoir and Contenta are a relatively new phenomenon but seem to be taking off rapidly. It's no surprise because an API-first approach is critical in a world where you have to operate agnostically across any channel and any form factor. I'm convinced that an API-first approach will be a critical addition to Drupal's future and could see a distribution like Reservoir or Contenta evolve to become a third installation profile for Drupal core (not formally decided).

Headless Drupal for both editors and developers The welcome screen after installing Reservoir.

The reason headless Drupal is taking off is that organizations are now grappling with a multitude of channels, including mobile applications, single-page JavaScript applications, IoT applications, digital signage, and content driven by augmented and virtual reality. Increasingly, organizations need a single place to house content.

What you want is an easy but powerful way for your editorial team to create and manage content, including administering advanced content models, content versioning, integrating media assets, translations, and more. All of that should be made easy through a great UI without having to involve a developer. This, incidentally, is aligned with Drupal 8's roadmap, in which we are focused on media management, workflows, layouts, and usability improvements through our outside-in work.

At the same time, you want to enable your developers to easily deliver that content to different devices, channels, and platforms. This means that the content needs to be available through APIs. This, too, is aligned with Drupal 8's roadmap, where we are focused on web services capabilities. Through Drupal's web service APIs, developers can build freely in different front-end technologies, such as Angular, React, Ember, and Swift, as well as Java and .NET. For developers, accomplishing this without the maintenance burden of a full Drupal site or the complexity of configuring standard Drupal to be decoupled is key.

API-first distributions like Reservoir keep Drupal's workflows and editorial UI intact but emphasize Drupal's web service APIs to return control to your developers. But with flexible content modeling and custom fields added to the equation, they also give more control over how editors can curate, combine, and remix content for different channels.

Success is getting to developer productivity faster Reservoir includes side-by-side previews of content in HTML and JSON API output.

The goal of a content repository should be to make it simple for developers to consume your content, including digital assets and translations, through a set of web service APIs. Success means that a developer can programmatically access your content within minutes.

Reservoir tries to achieve this in four ways:

  1. Easy on-boarding. Reservoir provides a welcome tour with helpful guidance to create and edit content, map out new content models, manage access control, and most importantly, introspect the web service APIs you'll need to consume to serve your applications.
  2. JSON API standard. Reservoir makes use of JSON API, which is the specification used for many APIs in JSON and adopted by the Ember and Ruby on Rails communities. Using a common standard means you can on-board your developers faster.
  3. Great API documentation. Reservoir ships with great API documentation thanks to OpenAPI, formerly known as Swagger, which is a specification for describing an API. If you're not happy with the default documentation, you can bring your own approach by using Reservoir's OpenAPI export.
  4. Libraries, references, and SDKs. With the Waterwheel ecosystem, a series of libraries, references, and SDKs for popular languages like JavaScript and Swift, developers can skip learning the APIs and go straight to integrating Drupal content in their applications.
Next steps for Reservoir API documentation auto-generated based on the content model built in Reservoir.

We have a lot of great plans for Reservoir moving forward. Reservoir has several items on its short-term roadmap, including GraphQL support. As an emerging industry standard for data queries, GraphQL is a query language I first highlighted in my 2015 Barcelona keynote; see my blog post on the future of decoupled Drupal for a quick demo video.

We also plan to expand API coverage by adding the ability to programmatically manipulate users, tags, and other crucial content elements. This means that developers will be able to build richer integrations.

While content such as articles, pages, and other custom content types can be consumed and manipulated via web services today, upstream in Drupal core, API support for things like Drupal's blocks, menus, and layouts is in the works. The ability to influence more of Drupal's internals from external applications will open the door to better custom editorial interfaces.

Conclusion

I'm excited about Reservoir, not just because of the promise API-first distributions hold for the Drupal community, but because it helps us reach developers of different stripes who just need a simple content back end, all the while keeping all of the content editing functionality that editorial teams take for granted.

We've put the Reservoir codebase on GitHub, where you can open an issue, create a pull request, or contribute to documentation. Reservoir only advances when you give us feedback, so please let us know what you think!

Special thanks to Preston So for contributions to this blog post and to Ted Bowman, Wim Leers, and Matt Grill for feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

Reservoir, a simple way to decouple Drupal

Dries Buytaert - 22 August 2017 - 1:52pm

Decoupled Drupal seems to be taking the world by storm. I'm currently in Sydney, and everyone I talked to so far, including the attendees at the Sydney Drupal User Group, is looking into decoupled Drupal. Digital agencies are experimenting with it on more projects, and there is even a new Decoupled Dev Days conference dedicated to the topic.

Roughly eight months ago, we asked ourselves in Acquia's Office of the CTO whether we could create a "headless" version of Drupal, optimized for integration with a variety of applications, channels and touchpoints. Such a version could help us build bridges with other developer communities working with different frameworks and programming languages, and the JavaScript community in particular.

I've been too busy with the transition at Acquia to blog about it in real time, but a few months ago, we released Reservoir. It's a Drupal-based content repository with all the necessary web service APIs needed to build decoupled front-end applications, be it a React application, an Ember front end, a native application, an augmented reality application, a Java or .NET application, or something completely different. You can even front-end it with a PHP application, something I hope to experiment with on my blog.

API-first distributions for Drupal like Reservoir and Contenta are a relatively new phenomenon but seem to be taking off rapidly. It's no surprise because an API-first approach is critical in a world where you have to operate agnostically across any channel and any form factor. I'm convinced that an API-first approach will be a critical addition to Drupal's future and could see a distribution like Reservoir or Contenta evolve to become a third installation profile for Drupal core (not formally decided).

Decoupled Drupal for both editors and developers The welcome screen after installing Reservoir.

The reason decoupled Drupal is taking off is that organizations are now grappling with a multitude of channels, including mobile applications, single-page JavaScript applications, IoT applications, digital signage, and content driven by augmented and virtual reality. Increasingly, organizations need a single place to house content.

What you want is an easy but powerful way for your editorial team to create and manage content, including administering advanced content models, content versioning, integrating media assets, translations, and more. All of that should be made easy through a great UI without having to involve a developer. This, incidentally, is aligned with Drupal 8's roadmap, in which we are focused on media management, workflows, layouts, and usability improvements through our outside-in work.

At the same time, you want to enable your developers to easily deliver that content to different devices, channels, and platforms. This means that the content needs to be available through APIs. This, too, is aligned with Drupal 8's roadmap, where we are focused on web services capabilities. Through Drupal's web service APIs, developers can build freely in different front-end technologies, such as Angular, React, Ember, and Swift, as well as Java and .NET. For developers, accomplishing this without the maintenance burden of a full Drupal site or the complexity of configuring standard Drupal to be decoupled is key.

API-first distributions like Reservoir keep Drupal's workflows and editorial UI intact but emphasize Drupal's web service APIs to return control to your developers. But with flexible content modeling and custom fields added to the equation, they also give more control over how editors can curate, combine, and remix content for different channels.

Success is getting to developer productivity faster Reservoir includes side-by-side previews of content in HTML and JSON API output.

The goal of a content repository should be to make it simple for developers to consume your content, including digital assets and translations, through a set of web service APIs. Success means that a developer can programmatically access your content within minutes.

Reservoir tries to achieve this in four ways:

  1. Easy on-boarding. Reservoir provides a welcome tour with helpful guidance to create and edit content, map out new content models, manage access control, and most importantly, introspect the web service APIs you'll need to consume to serve your applications.
  2. JSON API standard. Reservoir makes use of JSON API, which is the specification used for many APIs in JSON and adopted by the Ember and Ruby on Rails communities. Using a common standard means you can on-board your developers faster.
  3. Great API documentation. Reservoir ships with great API documentation thanks to OpenAPI, formerly known as Swagger, which is a specification for describing an API. If you're not happy with the default documentation, you can bring your own approach by using Reservoir's OpenAPI export.
  4. Libraries, references, and SDKs. With the Waterwheel ecosystem, a series of libraries, references, and SDKs for popular languages like JavaScript and Swift, developers can skip learning the APIs and go straight to integrating Drupal content in their applications.
Next steps for Reservoir API documentation auto-generated based on the content model built in Reservoir.

We have a lot of great plans for Reservoir moving forward. Reservoir has several items on its short-term roadmap, including GraphQL support. As an emerging industry standard for data queries, GraphQL is a query language I first highlighted in my 2015 Barcelona keynote; see my blog post on the future of decoupled Drupal for a quick demo video.

We also plan to expand API coverage by adding the ability to programmatically manipulate users, tags, and other crucial content elements. This means that developers will be able to build richer integrations.

While content such as articles, pages, and other custom content types can be consumed and manipulated via web services today, upstream in Drupal core, API support for things like Drupal's blocks, menus, and layouts is in the works. The ability to influence more of Drupal's internals from external applications will open the door to better custom editorial interfaces.

Conclusion

I'm excited about Reservoir, not just because of the promise API-first distributions hold for the Drupal community, but because it helps us reach developers of different stripes who just need a simple content back end, all the while keeping all of the content editing functionality that editorial teams take for granted.

We've put the Reservoir codebase on GitHub, where you can open an issue, create a pull request, or contribute to documentation. Reservoir only advances when you give us feedback, so please let us know what you think!

Special thanks to Preston So for contributions to this blog post and to Ted Bowman, Wim Leers, and Matt Grill for feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

Reservoir, a simple way to decouple Drupal

Dries Buytaert - 22 August 2017 - 1:52pm

Decoupled Drupal seems to be taking the world by storm. I'm currently in Sydney, and everyone I talked to so far, including the attendees at the Sydney Drupal User Group, is looking into decoupled Drupal. Digital agencies are experimenting with it on more projects, and there is even a new Decoupled Dev Days conference dedicated to the topic.

Roughly eight months ago, we asked ourselves in Acquia's Office of the CTO whether we could create a "headless" version of Drupal, optimized for integration with a variety of applications, channels and touchpoints. Such a version could help us build bridges with other developer communities working with different frameworks and programming languages, and the JavaScript community in particular.

I've been too busy with the transition at Acquia to blog about it in real time, but a few months ago, we released Reservoir. It's a Drupal-based content repository with all the necessary web service APIs needed to build decoupled front-end applications, be it a React application, an Ember front end, a native application, an augmented reality application, a Java or .NET application, or something completely different. You can even front-end it with a PHP application, something I hope to experiment with on my blog.

API-first distributions for Drupal like Reservoir and Contenta are a relatively new phenomenon but seem to be taking off rapidly. It's no surprise because an API-first approach is critical in a world where you have to operate agnostically across any channel and any form factor. I'm convinced that an API-first approach will be a critical addition to Drupal's future and could see a distribution like Reservoir or Contenta evolve to become a third installation profile for Drupal core (not formally decided).

Decoupled Drupal for both editors and developers The welcome screen after installing Reservoir.

The reason decoupled Drupal is taking off is that organizations are now grappling with a multitude of channels, including mobile applications, single-page JavaScript applications, IoT applications, digital signage, and content driven by augmented and virtual reality. Increasingly, organizations need a single place to house content.

What you want is an easy but powerful way for your editorial team to create and manage content, including administering advanced content models, content versioning, integrating media assets, translations, and more. All of that should be made easy through a great UI without having to involve a developer. This, incidentally, is aligned with Drupal 8's roadmap, in which we are focused on media management, workflows, layouts, and usability improvements through our outside-in work.

At the same time, you want to enable your developers to easily deliver that content to different devices, channels, and platforms. This means that the content needs to be available through APIs. This, too, is aligned with Drupal 8's roadmap, where we are focused on web services capabilities. Through Drupal's web service APIs, developers can build freely in different front-end technologies, such as Angular, React, Ember, and Swift, as well as Java and .NET. For developers, accomplishing this without the maintenance burden of a full Drupal site or the complexity of configuring standard Drupal to be decoupled is key.

API-first distributions like Reservoir keep Drupal's workflows and editorial UI intact but emphasize Drupal's web service APIs to return control to your developers. But with flexible content modeling and custom fields added to the equation, they also give more control over how editors can curate, combine, and remix content for different channels.

Success is getting to developer productivity faster Reservoir includes side-by-side previews of content in HTML and JSON API output.

The goal of a content repository should be to make it simple for developers to consume your content, including digital assets and translations, through a set of web service APIs. Success means that a developer can programmatically access your content within minutes.

Reservoir tries to achieve this in four ways:

  1. Easy on-boarding. Reservoir provides a welcome tour with helpful guidance to create and edit content, map out new content models, manage access control, and most importantly, introspect the web service APIs you'll need to consume to serve your applications.
  2. JSON API standard. Reservoir makes use of JSON API, which is the specification used for many APIs in JSON and adopted by the Ember and Ruby on Rails communities. Using a common standard means you can on-board your developers faster.
  3. Great API documentation. Reservoir ships with great API documentation thanks to OpenAPI, formerly known as Swagger, which is a specification for describing an API. If you're not happy with the default documentation, you can bring your own approach by using Reservoir's OpenAPI export.
  4. Libraries, references, and SDKs. With the Waterwheel ecosystem, a series of libraries, references, and SDKs for popular languages like JavaScript and Swift, developers can skip learning the APIs and go straight to integrating Drupal content in their applications.
Next steps for Reservoir API documentation auto-generated based on the content model built in Reservoir.

We have a lot of great plans for Reservoir moving forward. Reservoir has several items on its short-term roadmap, including GraphQL support. As an emerging industry standard for data queries, GraphQL is a query language I first highlighted in my 2015 Barcelona keynote; see my blog post on the future of decoupled Drupal for a quick demo video.

We also plan to expand API coverage by adding the ability to programmatically manipulate users, tags, and other crucial content elements. This means that developers will be able to build richer integrations.

While content such as articles, pages, and other custom content types can be consumed and manipulated via web services today, upstream in Drupal core, API support for things like Drupal's blocks, menus, and layouts is in the works. The ability to influence more of Drupal's internals from external applications will open the door to better custom editorial interfaces.

Conclusion

I'm excited about Reservoir, not just because of the promise API-first distributions hold for the Drupal community, but because it helps us reach developers of different stripes who just need a simple content back end, all the while keeping all of the content editing functionality that editorial teams take for granted.

We've put the Reservoir codebase on GitHub, where you can open an issue, create a pull request, or contribute to documentation. Reservoir only advances when you give us feedback, so please let us know what you think!

Special thanks to Preston So for contributions to this blog post and to Ted Bowman, Wim Leers, and Matt Grill for feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: Reservoir, a simple way to decouple Drupal

Planet Drupal - 22 August 2017 - 1:52pm

Decoupled Drupal seems to be taking the world by storm. I'm currently in Sydney, and everyone I talked to so far, including the attendees at the Sydney Drupal User Group, is looking into decoupled Drupal. Digital agencies are experimenting with it on more projects, and there is even a new Decoupled Dev Days conference dedicated to the topic.

Roughly eight months ago, we asked ourselves in Acquia's Office of the CTO whether we could create a "headless" version of Drupal, optimized for integration with a variety of applications, channels and touchpoints. Such a version could help us build bridges with other developer communities working with different frameworks and programming languages, and the JavaScript community in particular.

I've been too busy with the transition at Acquia to blog about it in real time, but a few months ago, we released Reservoir. It's a Drupal-based content repository with all the necessary web service APIs needed to build decoupled front-end applications, be it a React application, an Ember front end, a native application, an augmented reality application, a Java or .NET application, or something completely different. You can even front-end it with a PHP application, something I hope to experiment with on my blog.

API-first distributions for Drupal like Reservoir and Contenta are a relatively new phenomenon but seem to be taking off rapidly. It's no surprise because an API-first approach is critical in a world where you have to operate agnostically across any channel and any form factor. I'm convinced that an API-first approach will be a critical addition to Drupal's future and could see a distribution like Reservoir or Contenta evolve to become a third installation profile for Drupal core (not formally decided).

Decoupled Drupal for both editors and developers The welcome screen after installing Reservoir.

The reason decoupled Drupal is taking off is that organizations are now grappling with a multitude of channels, including mobile applications, single-page JavaScript applications, IoT applications, digital signage, and content driven by augmented and virtual reality. Increasingly, organizations need a single place to house content.

What you want is an easy but powerful way for your editorial team to create and manage content, including administering advanced content models, content versioning, integrating media assets, translations, and more. All of that should be made easy through a great UI without having to involve a developer. This, incidentally, is aligned with Drupal 8's roadmap, in which we are focused on media management, workflows, layouts, and usability improvements through our outside-in work.

At the same time, you want to enable your developers to easily deliver that content to different devices, channels, and platforms. This means that the content needs to be available through APIs. This, too, is aligned with Drupal 8's roadmap, where we are focused on web services capabilities. Through Drupal's web service APIs, developers can build freely in different front-end technologies, such as Angular, React, Ember, and Swift, as well as Java and .NET. For developers, accomplishing this without the maintenance burden of a full Drupal site or the complexity of configuring standard Drupal to be decoupled is key.

API-first distributions like Reservoir keep Drupal's workflows and editorial UI intact but emphasize Drupal's web service APIs to return control to your developers. But with flexible content modeling and custom fields added to the equation, they also give more control over how editors can curate, combine, and remix content for different channels.

Success is getting to developer productivity faster Reservoir includes side-by-side previews of content in HTML and JSON API output.

The goal of a content repository should be to make it simple for developers to consume your content, including digital assets and translations, through a set of web service APIs. Success means that a developer can programmatically access your content within minutes.

Reservoir tries to achieve this in four ways:

  1. Easy on-boarding. Reservoir provides a welcome tour with helpful guidance to create and edit content, map out new content models, manage access control, and most importantly, introspect the web service APIs you'll need to consume to serve your applications.
  2. JSON API standard. Reservoir makes use of JSON API, which is the specification used for many APIs in JSON and adopted by the Ember and Ruby on Rails communities. Using a common standard means you can on-board your developers faster.
  3. Great API documentation. Reservoir ships with great API documentation thanks to OpenAPI, formerly known as Swagger, which is a specification for describing an API. If you're not happy with the default documentation, you can bring your own approach by using Reservoir's OpenAPI export.
  4. Libraries, references, and SDKs. With the Waterwheel ecosystem, a series of libraries, references, and SDKs for popular languages like JavaScript and Swift, developers can skip learning the APIs and go straight to integrating Drupal content in their applications.
Next steps for Reservoir API documentation auto-generated based on the content model built in Reservoir.

We have a lot of great plans for Reservoir moving forward. Reservoir has several items on its short-term roadmap, including GraphQL support. As an emerging industry standard for data queries, GraphQL is a query language I first highlighted in my 2015 Barcelona keynote; see my blog post on the future of decoupled Drupal for a quick demo video.

We also plan to expand API coverage by adding the ability to programmatically manipulate users, tags, and other crucial content elements. This means that developers will be able to build richer integrations.

While content such as articles, pages, and other custom content types can be consumed and manipulated via web services today, upstream in Drupal core, API support for things like Drupal's blocks, menus, and layouts is in the works. The ability to influence more of Drupal's internals from external applications will open the door to better custom editorial interfaces.

Conclusion

I'm excited about Reservoir, not just because of the promise API-first distributions hold for the Drupal community, but because it helps us reach developers of different stripes who just need a simple content back end, all the while keeping all of the content editing functionality that editorial teams take for granted.

We've put the Reservoir codebase on GitHub, where you can open an issue, create a pull request, or contribute to documentation. Reservoir only advances when you give us feedback, so please let us know what you think!

Special thanks to Preston So for contributions to this blog post and to Ted Bowman, Wim Leers, and Matt Grill for feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

Type Style

New Drupal Modules - 22 August 2017 - 1:47pm
Summary

Type Style allows users to associate colors and icons with their types. This is an important feature for building rich user interfaces, as content editors can quickly associate iconography and colors with a type. Currently Content types, Custom block types, (core) Media types, Taxonomy vocabularies, and File types are supported, but any custom or contributed type can be supported.

Categories: Drupal

Web3

New Drupal Modules - 22 August 2017 - 1:09pm

This will be the place where we enable Drupal for the next web - web 3.0.

Categories: Drupal

Lewt Ninja Card Game Up On Kickstarter

Tabletop Gaming News - 22 August 2017 - 1:00pm
Dungeons are full of awesome loot. That’s just the nature of dungeons. They’re also full of dangerous monsters protecting said loot. Well, you want that loot, but don’t want to have to deal with the monsters. That makes you a lewt ninja. And that is what you’ll become in Lewt Ninja, a new card game […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

CD Projekt Red whips up its own $850k competitive Gwent series

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 22 August 2017 - 12:27pm

Even ahead of the game's full launch, CD Projekt Red is already hard at work stoking an eSports scene for its upcoming digital card game, Gwent. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Tradewala Card Game Up On Kickstarter

Tabletop Gaming News - 22 August 2017 - 12:00pm
Tradewala is a new card game that’s up on Kickstarter. In it, players are looking to collect a set of a single social issue. Much like trading stocks, it’s about speed and getting what you want. The game is fast-paced and real-time. No turns. Just go-go-go! Get what you want, trade away what you don’t […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Fantasy Flight Games Announces Next Wave of X-Wing Miniatures

Tabletop Gaming News - 22 August 2017 - 11:00am
While Star Wars Legion might be the Star Wars game that everyone’s talking about right now, Fantasy Flight certainly isn’t going to neglect their other Star Wars games. That includes X-Wing. They have announced the next wave of ships that will be available for the game. And one of these takes me down memory lane, […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Corvus Belli Posts September Releases For Infinity

Tabletop Gaming News - 22 August 2017 - 11:00am
With Gen Con over, as far as I’m concerned, it’s fall. September, October, and November are my 3 favorite months. Corvus Belli is ready for September, too. They’ve posted up what will be the Infinity releases for that month. From the announcement: Locust, Clandestine Action Team (Hacker); Umbra Legates (Spitfire); Hellcats (Hacker / Boarding Shotgun) […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Account Activation Reminder

New Drupal Modules - 22 August 2017 - 10:46am

A module allowing site administrators to resend activation emails from a selected user account page.

It also offers
- a custom email subject line
- a custom email body

This module is safe to use on a production site. Just be sure to only grant 'administer users' permission to developers.

Categories: Drupal

Group Role Delegation

New Drupal Modules - 22 August 2017 - 10:43am

This module allows group owner to grant specific roles to users.
User can set expiry date for selected roles, expiry dates are controlled by cron job, so it automatically removes any expired roles.

Categories: Drupal

Workflows Assignee

New Drupal Modules - 22 August 2017 - 10:38am
Categories: Drupal

Ascension: Valley of the Ancients Available For Pre-Order

Tabletop Gaming News - 22 August 2017 - 10:00am
Honestly, I didn’t have a huge “to buy” list for Gen Con. A couple miniatures from Steamforged. Some cool dice. And the newest Ascension set from Stone Blade Entertainment. I’m happy to say that I was able to get everything I wanted. But for those of you that couldn’t get to the show (or got […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

DrupalEasy: How do I learn Drupal?  Let me count the ways.

Planet Drupal - 22 August 2017 - 9:22am

Resources to learn Drupal are many and certainly vary in delivery, focus and quality. When you are trying to figure out the best way to train up, considerations like schedules, learning styles, and trainer reputations play pretty heavily. You also need to look at the program and compare it to what you already know, what you need to know, and what you should know to get into practice as quickly possible. One of the biggest obstacles is often finding, and then choosing the training program(s) that are right for you, and perhaps your team. But what if you didn’t have to choose?

Drupalize.Me and DrupalEasy are proud to announce that we are making it easier to get trained up in Drupal in a way that helps overcome challenges, meets needs, and addresses the different ways people learn. We are bundling our training programs and resources beginning with DrupalEasy’s Fall 2017 session of Drupal Career Online. The DCO will include access to all of the thousands of Drupalize.me tutorials during the 12-week course, and a deeply discounted subscription after graduation. Current Drupalize.Me subscribers will also receive a special Drupalize.Me tuition rate for this and any future sessions of the DCO.

Drupalize.Me’s Addison Berry came up with the partnership idea as a way to help the community grow by helping along the learning process of people who can more quickly become solid developers.  Addi says, “Any way we can make it easier, and better for people to get quality training to become developers is good for the community, and good for all of us.”  In addition to providing comprehensive Drupal training that focuses on best practices, Drupalize.Me and DrupalEasy share a love of building the Drupal talent base across the world.

Drupalize.Me provides a premium, membership-based training library of thousands of tutorials divided into specific pathways according to your learning goals.  It is trusted by users around the world, and backed by Lullabot, one of the top open source strategy, design, and development companies.

DrupalEasy has been offering instructor-led comprehensive Drupal career technical education (the first of its kind) programs since 2011, launching the 12-week, 132 hour Drupal Career Online program in 2015. The DCO ensures individuals and teams can rely on expert live instruction, office hours and mentorship, expansive learning resources, and a curriculum that thoughtfully stacks skills and emphasizes best practices to ensure graduates have the best possible foundation to become practicing Drupal developers.

The first session of Drupal Career Online that includes unfettered access to the Drupalize.Me’s tutorials in the Site Building, Theming and Development learning pathways begins October 2, with an application deadline of September 26th.  To learn more and get an idea of the DrupalEasy learning platform, sign up for one of two Taste of Drupal free information sessions in August and September or contact DrupalEasy.    



 

 

 

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Modules: The One Percent: Drupal Modules: The One Percent — Views Parity Row (video tutorial)

Planet Drupal - 22 August 2017 - 7:55am
Drupal Modules: The One Percent — Views Parity Row (video tutorial) NonProfit Tue, 08/22/2017 - 09:55 Episode 32

Here is where we bring awareness to Drupal modules running on less than 1% of reporting sites. Today we'll look at Views Parity Row, a module which will allow the rows in your view to be rendered through different view modes.

Categories: Drupal

What the heck is a “soft launch”? - by Antti Kananen

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 22 August 2017 - 7:17am
Thoughts and information about Soft Launching mobile games. Read more what Koukoi Games thinks about the topic here.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

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