Newsfeeds

Benefits of playing online adventure games for kids - by tushar grover

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 19 May 2017 - 6:29am
here we discuss the benefits of playing online adventure games for kids and how these adventure games which children play online make a positive effect on their lives for better future.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

The labors of Theseus: how we designed a 3rd person VR experience - by Marco Mortillaro

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 19 May 2017 - 6:28am
The challenges of developing our first VR game. Theseus is a third person experience, so how did we approach cameras and UI?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Dota2 vs. LOL vs. Clash Royale vs. CATS - by Anh Lee

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 19 May 2017 - 6:08am
What is the main different between Dota 2, LOL, Clash Royale & CATS in the way players get casual fun?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

New Grav Tank And Chariot Available To Order From Forge World

Tabletop Gaming News - 19 May 2017 - 6:00am
Whether you’re on the fields of Middle Earth or on some planet far off from Terra, nobody likes having to walk to battle. Better to get someone or something else to deliver you to the action. I.E. – Drive closer so I can hit them with my sword! Well, that’s what Forge World has for […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

ThinkShout: Skipping a Version - Migrating from Drupal 6 to Drupal 8 with Drupal Migrate

Planet Drupal - 19 May 2017 - 5:30am

I recently had the opportunity to migrate content from a Drupal 6 site to a Drupal 8 site. This was especially interesting for me as I hadn’t used Drupal 6 before. As you’d expect, there are some major infrastructure changes between Drupal 6 and Drupal 8. Those differences introduce some migration challenges that I’d like to share.

The Migrate module is a wonderful thing. The vast majority of node-based content can be migrated into a Drupal 8 site with minimal effort, and for the content that doesn’t quite fit, there are custom migration sources. A custom migration source is a small class that can provide extra data to your migration in the form of source fields. Typically, a migration will map source fields to destination fields, expecting the fields to exist on both the source node type and destination node type. We actually published an in-depth, two-part blog series about how we use Drupal Migrate to populate Drupal sites with content in conjunction with Google Sheets in our own projects.

In the following example, we are migrating the value of content_field_text_author from Drupal 6 to field_author in Drupal 8. These two fields map one-to-one:

id: book label: Book migration_group: d6 deriver: Drupal\node\Plugin\migrate\D6NodeDeriver source: key: migrate target: d6 plugin: d6_node node_type: book process: field_author: content_field_text_author destination: plugin: entity:node

This field mapping works because content_field_text_author is a table in the Drupal 6 database and is recognized by the Migrate module as a field. Everyone is happy.

However, in Drupal 6, it’s possible for a field to exist only in the database table of the node type. These tables look like this:

mysql> DESC content_type_book; +----------------------------+------------------+------+-----+---------+-------+ | Field | Type | Null | Key | Default | Extra | +----------------------------+------------------+------+-----+---------+-------+ | vid | int(10) unsigned | NO | PRI | 0 | | | nid | int(10) unsigned | NO | MUL | 0 | | | field_text_issue_value | longtext | YES | | NULL | | +----------------------------+------------------+------+-----+---------+-------+

If we want to migrate the content of field_text_issue_value to Drupal 8, we need to use a custom migration source.

Custom migration sources are PHP classes that live in the src/Plugin/migrate/source directory of your module. For example, you may have a PHP file located at src/Plugin/migrate/source/BookNode.php that would provide custom source fields for a Book content type.

A simple source looks like this:

namespace Drupal\custom_migrate_d6\Plugin\migrate\source; use Drupal\node\Plugin\migrate\source\d6\Node; /** * @MigrateSource( * id = "d6_book_node", * ) */ class BookNode extends Node { /** * @inheritdoc */ public function query() { $query = parent::query(); $query->join('content_type_book', 'book', 'n.nid = book.nid'); $query->addField('book', 'field_text_issue_value'); return $query; } }

As you can see, we are using our migration source to modify the query the Migrate module uses to retrieve the data to be migrated. Our modification extracts the field_text_issue_value column of the book content type table and provides it to the migration as a source field.

To use this migration source, we need to make one minor change to change to our migration. We replace this:

plugin: d6_node

With this:

plugin: d6_book_node

We do this because our migration source extends the standard Drupal 6 node migration source in order to add our custom source field.

The migration now contains two source fields and looks like this:

id: book label: Book migration_group: d6 deriver: Drupal\node\Plugin\migrate\D6NodeDeriver source: key: migrate target: d6 plugin: d6_book_node node_type: book process: field_author: content_field_text_author field_issue: field_text_issue_value destination: plugin: entity:node

You’ll find you can do a lot with custom migration sources, and this is especially useful with legacy versions of Drupal where you’ll have to fudge data at least a little bit. So if the Migrate module isn’t doing it for you, you’ll always have the option to step in and give it a little push.

Categories: Drupal

Paragraphs accordion

New Drupal Modules - 19 May 2017 - 3:11am

A pre-configured paragraph type that generates an accordion on display.

This module allows the user to enter multiple text/title pairs via the text_with_title compound field type.

Categories: Drupal

The Power of No

Gnome Stew - 19 May 2017 - 1:00am

One of the worst pieces of GMing advice I ever gave myself was to always make sure the players were happy, even over my own happiness; to avoid saying No. This ridiculous piece of advice has lead to more campaign deaths in my career as a GM than I should admit. The thing is that saying yes to every idea or whim a player has isn’t a good idea. Sometimes we have to say No. No, so that we keep the stability of the campaign intact. No, so that the game remains fun for the majority of the group. No, so that we maintain safety.  We often discount the power of No, but let’s take a look at why it may just be the thing you need to make your game better.

What about say “yes, and…”?

Ok. Let’s get this out of the way right now.  There is this belief of many people who give GMing advice, myself included, that says that you should always listen to what a player does/says, say “yes, and…” and keep going. The idea is that “yes, and…” prevents shutting down players, and keeps everyone engaged and happy. That is true up to a point.

“Yes, and…” is an amazing improv tool, to be used during actual play. In play, it is a way to move a story forward and foster creativity for everyone at the table. I love “yes, and…”. Here is the thing that is missing—when it’s used in improvisational play, there is an assumption that all actors [players] are going to follow the theme of the story and are going to play well with others. This is why in improv theater, it looks magical. Those actors know the boundaries and know their fellow actors.  Under those constraints, “yes, and…” is an amazing tool, and I do highly encourage its use.

But there are a lot more parts of a game than just play. And in those cases “yes, and…” does not apply. But I am getting ahead of myself.

The Power of No

I am a parent, like many of you may be. If you are not, let me tell you that there is real power in No. No stops kids from doing things that could get them hurt, and it stops them from doing things that will damage property—yours or someone else’s.

 No is used to protect things as well. It can and should be used to protect safety, to ensure fun for the majority of the table and the integrity of the campaign, for long-term stability. 

In RPGs, No is used to protect things as well. It can and should be used to protect safety, to ensure fun for the majority of the table and the integrity of the campaign, for long-term stability. That is not to say players are children, but rather that sometimes what is fun or a good idea for one player is not true for the group. And sometimes, you just have to remember what Spock says,

The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few or the one.

So Where is No Ok?

So going on the understanding that “yes, and…” is something you do during the playing of scenes, there are plenty of places where this does not apply, and you should not feel obligated to use it. So let’s talk about a few of those places:

Campaign Creation

When we are setting up our campaign collaboratively, we need to consider using a No from time to time. You don’t want to be heavy handed with this, but there are definitely times when you, as the GM, need to say no to a suggestion. The reason you want to do this is to keep the integrity and long-term stability of the campaign intact.

Most often this is going to be preventing the addition of some element in the game that is going to either mechanically destabilize the game, or some element that goes against the established tone and tropes of the game so much that it is jarring for others to engage the setting.

Examples:

  • Adding Ninjas into a Dragonlance game.
  • Including the Ultimate Book of Firearms into your Forgotten Realms game.
  • The inclusion of divine powers into your hard sci-fi setting

You can totally say yes to these things if everyone at the table thinks it’s amazing and wants to play in that world. Say no when someone brings it up and everyone else either says “meh” or is uncomfortable with it.

Character Generation/Advancement

In my history of GMing, this is where I fail the most to say no, and where most of my campaigns break. These are the cases where the player wants something for their character. This is a hard one to often say no to because the character is the primary vehicle that the player has for enjoying the game, and as GM’s we try to allow as much autonomy in this area as possible. We then feel this obligation to say yes to their requests.

Examples:

  • Wanting to play a Class out of a third party supplement (like a ninja in your Dragonlance game).
  • A player taking the perfect storm of feats to show you how broken the game can become.
  • The player asking if they can start the game with this one magic item.

I will be bold. In most cases just say no. I know it trumps player choice, but once one broken character gets into the game it will destabilize everything. It will have one of two effects: either everyone will be annoyed at the broken character and they will disengage from the game, or it will start an arms race—and every player will try to emulate the broken character so that the entire group breaks.

Group Formation

A cohesive party is a productive party. If you are into intra-party conflict and player squabbles, skip this one. For the rest of us get ready to brandish a few no’s. When the group is working out how they are a group and their group dynamics, don’t hesitate to drop a no if you think that something in the dynamic is going to cause the group to collapse.

Examples:

  • One player asks if they can be a traitor and be allied with the bad guys, unbeknownst to the rest of players.
  • One player wants to have a secret from the other PLAYERS (key word being players).
  • Two players have diametrically opposed alignments/beliefs, that can’t be reconciled.

These issues fall into two categories that both need a no: they involve keeping secrets from players (keeping secrets from characters is a different thing..and can be just fine), and they involve creating atmospheres that make cooperation impossible. Neither of these will make for a productive group. So ready up a no-bomb, and preserve the peace.

Chaotic Stupid Actions

There are times when players are either being funny or ridiculous and do something that will trigger an immediate or intermediate reaction that will stymie the game and possibly end the campaign. Often this is done under the shield of a certain alignment or belief system, and covered with “I was just playing in character”. No and no.

Examples:

  • A player just stabs the friendly King in the face because they are bored, to which the GM has no choice but to throw the castle full of guards at them.
  • Shooting a fellow character over an in-game argument.
  • The thief stealing from the party because “that’s what thieves do”.

Perhaps you don’t like stopping and rewinding things in your game to edit these things out. I didn’t either, like 50 dead campaigns ago. Today, I will just stop the game and talk it out to see if there is something else going on, and find a way to address it. But I have seen plenty of games descend into chaos due to one of these moves.

Safety Issues

Up to this point, I have been a bit cheeky and ranty in my advice. Let me change my tone for this section.

Safety is nothing to joke about. We are all here to have a good time, to feel included, and to be comfortable physically and emotionally. If we are failing on any of those, something is seriously wrong. Our jobs as players, and a bit more GM’s as the de facto head of the game, is to insure safety for everyone in the game. When safety is broken, saying no is the best thing to do:

Examples:

  • One player is getting physically too close to another, who has not consented.
  • A GM deciding that the guards sexually abuse one of the captured characters.
  • Someone wants to play out a torture scene during an interrogation.

No. Stop the game, and address the problem. In this case, Spock is dead wrong. Safety is not a majority rule. If everyone but one person is fine with the torture scene, you don’t have it. GM’s, if you are in the wrong for an action and get called out, take it and apologize. It is not your game, it’s everyone’s game.

Your best bet is to deploy a safety tool like the X-card to facilitate addressing these proactively, and always make your decision based on what is safe for everyone.  

The Power Of No

For all the advice I have given above (except for the Safety advice) you may say, that is fine in your game. That is totally cool. My point wasn’t to tell you what to say no to, but rather to give you an idea of areas in the game where actions can occur that destabilize games, and make good candidates for saying no. Hell, if you want Ninjas in your Dragonlance campaign, wielding firearms and mixed in with the Ultimate Handbook of Ninja Badness—and your group is into that—then assault Raistlin’s tower with your AK-47 toting Ninjas.

Rather my point in this article has been that sometimes we have to say no to things in the game for its long-term stability. After all, the goal of campaign play is to play session after session, developing a tale. But that won’t happen if the game destabilizes because you tried to make a player or players happy with a decision that you or the rest of the group were not comfortable with.

So what were some of the No’s you have said to preserve your games? What were some of the Yeses in your games that should have been No’s?

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Mediator

New Drupal Modules - 18 May 2017 - 7:29pm
Categories: Drupal

Jeff Geerling's Blog: Call for Sessions is open for DrupalCamp St. Louis 2017 - come and speak!

Planet Drupal - 18 May 2017 - 7:13pm

DrupalCamp St. Louis 2017 will be held September 22-23, 2017, in St. Louis, Missouri. This will be our fourth year hosting a DrupalCamp, and we're one of the best camps for new presenters!

If you did something amazing with Drupal, if you're an aspiring themer, site builder, or developer, or if you are working on making the web a better place, we'd love for you to submit a session. Session submissions are due by August 1.

Categories: Drupal

Brian Osborne: Keeping a view of upcoming events fresh in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 18 May 2017 - 4:34pm

Imagine you have a view that lists upcoming events on your Drupal 8 site. There's a date filter that filters out any event who's start date is less than the current date. This works great until you realize that the output of the view will be cached in one or many places (dynamic page cache, internal page cache, varnish, etc). Once it's cached, views doesn't execute the query and can't compare the date to the current time, so you may get older events sticking around.

Categories: Drupal

Friduction: the internet's unstoppable drive to eliminate friction

Dries Buytaert - 18 May 2017 - 4:02pm

There is one significant trend that I have noticed over and over again: the internet's continuous drive to mitigate friction in user experiences and business models.

Since the internet's commercial debut in the early 90s, it has captured success and upset the established order by eliminating unnecessary middlemen. Book stores, photo shops, travel agents, stock brokers, bank tellers and music stores are just a few examples of the kinds of middlemen who have been eliminated by their online counterparts. The act of buying books, printing photos or booking flights online alleviates the friction felt by consumers who must stand in line or wait on hold to speak to a customer service representative.

Rather than negatively describing this evolution as disintermediation or taking something away, I believe there is value in recognizing that the internet is constantly improving customer experiences by reducing friction from systems — a process I like to call "friduction".

Open Source and cloud

Over the past 15 years, I have observed Open Source and cloud-computing solutions remove friction from legacy approaches to technology. Open Source takes the friction out of the technology evaluation and adoption process; you are not forced to get a demo or go through a sales and procurement process, or deal with the limitations of a proprietary license. Cloud computing also took off because it also offers friduction; with cloud, companies pay for what they use, avoid large up-front capital expenditures, and gain speed-to-market.

Cross-channel experiences

There is a reason why Drupal's API-first initiative is one of the topics I've talked and written the most about in 2016; it enables Drupal to "move beyond the page" and integrate with different user engagement systems that can eliminate inefficiencies and improve the user experience of traditional websites.

We're quickly headed to a world where websites are evolving into cross­channel experiences, which includes push notifications, conversational UIs, and more. Conversational UIs, such as chatbots and voice assistants, will prevail because they improve and redefine the customer experience.

Personalization and contextualization

In the 90s, personalization meant that websites could address authenticated users by name. I remember the first time I saw my name appear on a website; I was excited! Obviously personalization strategies have come a long way since the 90s. Today, websites present recommendations based on a user's most recent activity, and consumers expect to be provided with highly tailored experiences. The drive for greater personalization and contextualization will never stop; there is too much value in removing friction from the user experience. When a commerce website can predict what you like based on past behavior, it eliminates friction from the shopping process. When a customer support website can predict what question you are going to ask next, it is able to provide a better customer experience. This is not only useful for the user, but also for the business. A more efficient user experience will translate into higher sales, improved customer retention and better brand exposure.

To keep pace with evolving user expectations, tomorrow's digital experiences will need to deliver more tailored, and even predictive customer experiences. This will require organizations to consume multiple sources of data, such as location data, historic clickstream data, or information from wearables to create a fine-grained user context. Data will be the foundation for predictive analytics and personalization services. Advancing user privacy in conjunction with data-driven strategies will be an important component of enhancing personalized experiences. Eventually, I believe that data-driven experiences will be the norm.

At Acquia, we started investing in contextualization and personalization in 2014, through the release of a product called Acquia Lift. Adoption of Acquia Lift has grown year over year, and we expect it to increase for years to come. Contextualization and personalization will become more pervasive, especially as different systems of engagements, big data, the internet of things (IoT) and machine learning mature, combine, and begin to have profound impacts on what the definition of a great user experience should be. It might take a few more years before trends like personalization and contextualization are fully adopted by the early majority, but we are patient investors and product builders. Systems like Acquia Lift will be of critical importance and premiums will be placed on orchestrating the optimal customer journey.

Conclusion

The history of the web dictates that lower-friction solutions will surpass what came before them because they eliminate inefficiencies from the customer experience. Friduction is a long-term trend. Websites, the internet of things, augmented and virtual reality, conversational UIs — all of these technologies will continue to grow because they will enable us to build lower-friction digital experiences.

Categories: Drupal

Friduction: the internet's unstoppable drive to eliminate friction

Dries Buytaert - 18 May 2017 - 4:02pm

There is one significant trend that I have noticed over and over again: the internet's continuous drive to mitigate friction in user experiences and business models.

Since the internet's commercial debut in the early 90s, it has captured success and upset the established order by eliminating unnecessary middlemen. Book stores, photo shops, travel agents, stock brokers, bank tellers and music stores are just a few examples of the kinds of middlemen who have been eliminated by their online counterparts. The act of buying books, printing photos or booking flights online alleviates the friction felt by consumers who must stand in line or wait on hold to speak to a customer service representative.

Rather than negatively describing this evolution as disintermediation or taking something away, I believe there is value in recognizing that the internet is constantly improving customer experiences by reducing friction from systems — a process I like to call "friduction".

Open Source and cloud

Over the past 15 years, I have observed Open Source and cloud-computing solutions remove friction from legacy approaches to technology. Open Source takes the friction out of the technology evaluation and adoption process; you are not forced to get a demo or go through a sales and procurement process, or deal with the limitations of a proprietary license. Cloud computing also took off because it also offers friduction; with cloud, companies pay for what they use, avoid large up-front capital expenditures, and gain speed-to-market.

Cross-channel experiences

There is a reason why Drupal's API-first initiative is one of the topics I've talked and written the most about in 2016; it enables Drupal to "move beyond the page" and integrate with different user engagement systems that can eliminate inefficiencies and improve the user experience of traditional websites.

We're quickly headed to a world where websites are evolving into cross­channel experiences, which includes push notifications, conversational UIs, and more. Conversational UIs, such as chatbots and voice assistants, will prevail because they improve and redefine the customer experience.

Personalization and contextualization

In the 90s, personalization meant that websites could address authenticated users by name. I remember the first time I saw my name appear on a website; I was excited! Obviously personalization strategies have come a long way since the 90s. Today, websites present recommendations based on a user's most recent activity, and consumers expect to be provided with highly tailored experiences. The drive for greater personalization and contextualization will never stop; there is too much value in removing friction from the user experience. When a commerce website can predict what you like based on past behavior, it eliminates friction from the shopping process. When a customer support website can predict what question you are going to ask next, it is able to provide a better customer experience. This is not only useful for the user, but also for the business. A more efficient user experience will translate into higher sales, improved customer retention and better brand exposure.

To keep pace with evolving user expectations, tomorrow's digital experiences will need to deliver more tailored, and even predictive customer experiences. This will require organizations to consume multiple sources of data, such as location data, historic clickstream data, or information from wearables to create a fine-grained user context. Data will be the foundation for predictive analytics and personalization services. Advancing user privacy in conjunction with data-driven strategies will be an important component of enhancing personalized experiences. Eventually, I believe that data-driven experiences will be the norm.

At Acquia, we started investing in contextualization and personalization in 2014, through the release of a product called Acquia Lift. Adoption of Acquia Lift has grown year over year, and we expect it to increase for years to come. Contextualization and personalization will become more pervasive, especially as different systems of engagements, big data, the internet of things (IoT) and machine learning mature, combine, and begin to have profound impacts on what the definition of a great user experience should be. It might take a few more years before trends like personalization and contextualization are fully adopted by the early majority, but we are patient investors and product builders. Systems like Acquia Lift will be of critical importance and premiums will be placed on orchestrating the optimal customer journey.

Conclusion

The history of the web dictates that lower-friction solutions will surpass what came before them because they eliminate inefficiencies from the customer experience. Friduction is a long-term trend. Websites, the internet of things, augmented and virtual reality, conversational UIs — all of these technologies will continue to grow because they will enable us to build lower-friction digital experiences.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: Friduction: the internet's unstoppable drive to eliminate friction

Planet Drupal - 18 May 2017 - 4:02pm

There is one significant trend that I have noticed over and over again: the internet's continuous drive to mitigate friction in user experiences and business models.

Since the internet's commercial debut in the early 90s, it has captured success and upset the established order by eliminating unnecessary middlemen. Book stores, photo shops, travel agents, stock brokers, bank tellers and music stores are just a few examples of the kinds of middlemen who have been eliminated by their online counterparts. The act of buying books, printing photos or booking flights online alleviates the friction felt by consumers who must stand in line or wait on hold to speak to a customer service representative.

Rather than interpreting this evolution as disintermediation or taking something away, I believe there is value in recognizing that the internet is constantly improving customer experiences by reducing friction from systems — a process I like to call "friduction".

Open Source and cloud

Over the past 15 years, I've watched open source and cloud computing solutions transform content management into digital experience management. Specifically, I have observed open source and cloud-computing solutions remove friction from legacy approaches to technology. Open source takes the friction out of the technology evaluation and adoption process; you are not forced to get a demo or go through a sales and procurement process, or deal with the limitations of a proprietary license. Cloud computing also took off because it also offers friduction; with cloud, companies pay for what they use, avoid large up-front capital expenditures, and gain speed-to-market.

Cross-channel experiences

Technology will continue to work to eliminate inefficiencies, and today, emerging distribution platforms will continue to improve user experience. There is a reason why Drupal's API-first initiative is one of the topics I've talked and written the most about in 2016; it enables Drupal to "move beyond the page" and integrate with different user engagement systems. We're quickly headed to a world where websites are evolving into cross­channel experiences, which includes push notifications, conversational UIs, and more. Conversational UIs, such as chatbots and voice assistants, will eliminate certain inefficiencies inherent to traditional websites. These technologies will prevail because they improve and redefine the customer experience. In fact, Acquia Labs was founded last year to explore how we can help customer bring these browser-less experiences to market.

Personalization and contextualization

In the 90s, personalization meant that websites could address authenticated users by name. I remember the first time I saw my name appear on a website; I was excited! Obviously personalization strategies have come a long way since the 90s. Today, websites present recommendations based on a user's most recent activity, and consumers expect to be provided with highly tailored experiences. The drive for greater personalization and contextualization will never stop; there is too much value in removing friction from the user experience. When a commerce website can predict what you like based on past behavior, it eliminates friction from the shopping process. When a customer support website can predict what question you are going to ask next, it is able to provide a better customer experience. This is not only useful for the user, but also for the business. A more efficient user experience will translate into higher sales, improved customer retention and better brand exposure.

To keep pace with evolving user expectations, tomorrow's digital experiences will need to deliver more tailored, and even predictive customer experiences. This will require organizations to consume multiple sources of data, such as location data, historic clickstream data, or information from wearables to create a fine-grained user context. Data will be the foundation for predictive analytics and personalization services. Advancing user privacy in conjunction with data-driven strategies will be an important component of enhancing personalized experiences. Eventually, I believe that data-driven experiences will be the norm.

At Acquia, we started investing in contextualization and personalization in 2014, through the release of a product called Acquia Lift. Adoption of Acquia Lift has grown year over year, and we expect it to increase for years to come. Contextualization and personalization will become more pervasive, especially as different systems of engagements, big data, the internet of things (IoT) and machine learning mature, combine, and begin to have profound impacts on what the definition of a great user experience should be. It might take a few more years before trends like personalization and contextualization are fully adopted by the early majority, but we are patient investors and product builders. Systems like Acquia Lift will be of critical importance and premiums will be placed on orchestrating the optimal customer journey.

Conclusion

The history of the web dictates that lower-friction solutions will surpass what came before them because they eliminate inefficiencies from the customer experience. Friduction is a long-term trend. Websites, the internet of things, augmented and virtual reality, conversational UIs — all of these technologies will continue to grow because they will enable us to build lower-friction digital experiences.

Categories: Drupal

May Releases Available For Dark Age

Tabletop Gaming News - 18 May 2017 - 3:00pm
As you all know, last weekend we had the CMON Expo. While there, players of Dark Age were able to pick up the latest releases, and now they’re available for anyone who wasn’t able to make it to the show. This is one you want to check out if you play, as it includes the […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Lullabot: Modernizing JavaScript in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 18 May 2017 - 3:00pm
Mike and Matt host two of Drupal's JavaScript maintainers, Théodore Biadala and Matthew Grill, as well as Lullabot's resident JavaScript expert Sally Young, and talk about the history of JavaScript in Drupal, and attempts to modernize it.
Categories: Drupal

Views RSS Core Enclosure Force HTTP on image in formater

New Drupal Modules - 18 May 2017 - 2:14pm

Provides views formatter to allow for non https image paths for rss enclosure on https site. To be used with Views Rss Core.

Categories: Drupal

Third & Grove: Using the Batch API and hook_update_N in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 18 May 2017 - 2:07pm
Using the Batch API and hook_update_N in Drupal 8 ed Thu, 05/18/2017 - 17:07
Categories: Drupal

Untold: Adventures Await Storytelling Game on Kickstarter

Tabletop Gaming News - 18 May 2017 - 2:00pm
Rory’s Story Cubes have helped gamers out there tell great stories with their simple-to-use design and seemingly endless combinations (apparently over 10mil in the base set). Well, now they’re a cornerstone of their own game. Untold: Adventures Await is a new storytelling game that’s up on Kickstarter now. From the campaign: Go on outlandish adventures […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

agoradesign: How Drupal Commerce 2.x improved my skills

Planet Drupal - 18 May 2017 - 1:59pm
Being one of the first early adopters of Drupal Commerce 2.x by starting our first project in early 2016 (on alpha2 version) and soon after a second one, I originally planned to write a blog post soon after beta1 gets published. Unfortunately I was too busy at that time....
Categories: Drupal

Field Config Cardinality

New Drupal Modules - 18 May 2017 - 1:28pm

A field instance cardinality for drupal 8

Under active development.

You need patch on core. Read more https://www.drupal.org/node/2822460

Categories: Drupal

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