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The Pros and Cons of CCG-based Game Design - by Josh Bycer

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 21 April 2016 - 10:54pm
Today's post looks at the concept of adding in CCG-based design into other games, and what works and doesn't work with it.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Taric’s League of Legends update: making protective classes fun in a combat game. - by Bryant Francis

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 21 April 2016 - 10:53pm
The support champion Taric got a big update in League of Legends, so I took him for a test drive to see how his updates reflect design trends with characters who don't go in for the kill.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Better Search Block

New Drupal Modules - 21 April 2016 - 8:19pm

With just a couple clicks you can change your boring Drupal search box into a nice looking search box with icon animations.

Additional features:

  • Configurable search box size
  • Configurable placeholder text

The module currently has four search box theme to select from:

  1. Background Fade
  2. Expand Search Box on Hover
  3. Expand Icon on Hover
  4. Slide Icon into View on Hover


The configuration is located at: admin/config/search/better-search

Categories: Drupal

ActiveLAMP: Creating Layouts with the Layout Plugin Module in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 21 April 2016 - 8:01pm

Writing custom layouts using the Layout Plugin module for D8 is really easy. This video will outline how to create a new layout in your theme using Foundation 6 as the base theme and how to extend the layout to add custom classes and id.

Read more...
Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: “One Weird Trick” for Drupal Security... or Something

Planet Drupal - 21 April 2016 - 1:00pm
Matt & Mike talk with Drupal Security Team Lead Michael Hess, along with the former lead Greg Knaddison. We talk about the current state of Drupal security, along with their Drupalcon session, "Watch the Hacker Hack".
Categories: Drupal

Palantir: What DrupalCon Means to Us

Planet Drupal - 21 April 2016 - 11:48am

Each and every year we pack up our booth, swag, and people, and make the pilgrimage to a location somewhere in the US for DrupalCon North America. It's always an amazing week, filled with knowledge, sharing, fun, and, of course, business. This year it's in New Orleans the week of May 9th, and, per usual, we have a lot going on so we'd like to share a few highlights.

Sessions

We have a few sessions lead by our team this year, and we'd love to see you there! Better still, stop by our booth (no. 222) before or after each to talk more. We're an open book, and want to share.

D8 Module Acceleration Program (Workbench)

Ken Rickard
Ken is part of a D8 Module Acceleration Program panel for Workbench on Tuesday, May 10th at 2:15 pm in room no. 279.

Finding Your Purpose as a Drupal Agency

George DeMet
Founder and CEO George DeMet will be giving a talk on Finding Your Purpose as a Drupal Agency on Wednesday, May 11th at 4:45pm in room no. 262.

Booth

We'll be at booth no. 222 all week, and we'd like you to think of it as your basecamp. As you walk around the conference and attend sessions, if a question comes to mind or you need some clarification on some aspect of Drupal, web strategy, design, or development, please do come by and let's talk. And we mean it; we have couches...

Sponsorship

We always gladly sponsor both the Drupal Association and DrupalCon. It's good for the community, and it's good for our clients. Why? Because of the nature of the open source community, and the sheer amount of knowledge share to solve common problems as it relates to the web. We utilize and pass on this knowledge to keep the cycle going.

Trivia Night

Speaking of sponsorship, we've sponsored Trivia Night at DrupalCon for the last few years, and it's always a fantastic night of fun and Drupal nerdiness! We're proud sponsors again this year, so we hope you can join us for a night filled with trivia, hilarity, and plenty of prizes.

Thursday, May 12
9:00pm - 12:00am (doors at 8:00pm)
U.S. Freedom Pavilion at National World War II Museum
1043 Magazine Street, New Orleans, LA
Free to attend

Related content Everything you Wanted to Know About DrupalCon

DrupalCon is just a few weeks away in New Orleans, so our Account Manager Allison Manley is joined by our CEO and Founder George DeMet, Drupal veteran and PHP guru Larry "Crell" Garfield, and Senior Front-End Developer Lauren Byrwa on our podcast this time around. They share thoughts about the conference generally, what they're excited about specifically, and what they're expected from the Driesnote, among other topics.

Planning for Long Term Success on the Web

Designing, architecting, and building enterprise-level Web projects can feel like a Moonshot. They're often expensive, complex, and time-consuming undertakings that require the long-term commitment and dedication of the entire company or organization. In this way, many of the lessons of the Apollo program are directly applicable to the work that we undertake with our customers every day at Palantir.

Project Management: The Musical!

Description

Attending the conference? We'd love to say hello. Let's schedule a time to meet at DrupalCon.

Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: What it really means to run a project the “Agile Scrum” way

Planet Drupal - 21 April 2016 - 11:36am

 If you were to search “What is the Agile Scrum Methodology of project management?” you’d find this:

“…an alternative to traditional project management, typically used in software development. It helps teams respond to unpredictability through incremental, iterative work cadences, known as sprints. Scrum is one framework used to run a project using the Agile Methodology.”

Categories: Drupal

Don't Miss: Unorthodox tips for improving your programming skills

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 21 April 2016 - 11:33am

Sure, there are "plenty of good resources out there that teach the technical skills"; but this classic post concentrates on "the more personal lessons that you often only learn through experience." ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Chapter Three: More Drupal 8 Sites in the Wild

Planet Drupal - 21 April 2016 - 11:11am

Its been a big week for Drupal 8 here at Chapter Three.

As mentioned previously, at the beginning of the year Chapter Three made the decision to build all new projects with Drupal 8. Knowing we had the help and Drupal 8 expertise of Alex and Daniel to back us up if we encountered any errors or incomplete contrib ports gave us the confidence to leave Drupal 7 in the dust. Having already had a few successful client projects on 8 last year let me know I wouldn't have a developer revolt on my hands as a result of that decision.

The fruits of that decision are starting to ripen.

Categories: Drupal

Metal Toad: What I Learned Today: Check Your Default Google Analytics Settings

Planet Drupal - 21 April 2016 - 10:48am
What I Learned Today: Check Your Default Google Analytics Settings April 21st, 2016 Jonathan Jordan Google Analytics Module Settings

Drupal's Google Analytics Module is great. There are a few settings though that I recently found out you'll want to pay closer attention to. First is the "Pages" section of the configuration form, which allows you to only include/exclude Google Analytics tracking code on certain pages. The default settings are to exclude the code on the following pages.

admin admin/* batch node/add* node/*/* user/*/*

The other setting to keep in mind is in the "Privacy" section of the configuration form. In particular the "Universal web tracking opt-out" setting which is enabled by default. Those are pretty good defaults for most sites, but if you aren't aware of them, they can also cause you to lose some valuable analytics data.

The "Universal web tracking opt-out" setting allows users to setup their browsers to send a Do Not Track header. The Google Analytics module respects this header if the "Universal web tracking opt-out" setting is enabled. That is unless page caching is enabled. If the page is cached, then Google Analytics is always included in the cached page. So on production sites, this usually means that tracking is enabled except if a user is logged in and they setup their browser to send the Do Not Track header. Again, this seems like the reasonable and respectful default.

Introduce Custom Panel Pages Into the Mix

Now consider you have a Custom Panel page with the url: "node/%/my-sub-page", which is a special sub page for a particular content type on your site. The contents of the panel page doesn't matter much, what matters is that if you are using the default Google Analytics settings for googleanalytics_pages, this page will not have Google Analytics tracking on it. The fix is fairly simple, update your Google Analytics settings and replace "node/*/*" with node/*/edit, and maybe a few others that you might not care about (ie: node/*/devel, node/*/nodequeue if you use those modules).

This post is part of my challenge to never stop learning.
Categories: Drupal

Phponwebsites: Redirect users after login in Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - 21 April 2016 - 9:42am
    This blog describes about how to redirect users after logged into a site in Drupal 7. By default, Drupal redirects users to user page after logged into a site.  Suppose you want to redirect users into any other pages as you want. Then you can done that in Drupal 7.
  You can redirect users after login in Drupal using the following two ways:
1. Redirect users after logged into a site using hook_user_login()
2. Redirect users after logged into a site using custom form submit



Redirect users after logged into a site using hook_user_login:
     Drupal provides hook called hook_user_login to make changes while user login successfully. Let see the below code.

/**
 * Implement hook_user_login()
 */
function phponwebsites_user_login(&$form, &$form_state) {
 //add page here to where you want redirect users after login
  $form['redirect'] = '<front>';
}
    Now you can check whether you redirect to front page or not after login. Now  Drupal will be redirect you to front page.

Redirect users after logged into a site using custom form submit:
   Drupal have alternate method to redirect users after login. Ie, You need to add custom form submit handler to a form using hook_form_alter(). Then add a page to redirect users in that custom form submit handler in Drupal 7. Let see the below code.


/**
 * Implement hook_form_alter().
 */
function phponwebsites_form_alter(&$form, &$form_state, $form_id) {
  if ($form_id == "user_login" || $form_id == "user_login_block") {
    $form['#submit'][] = 'phponwebsites_custom_login_submit';
  }
}  
function phponwebsites_custom_login_submit(&$form, &$form_state) {
  //page to be redirect
  $form['redirect'] = '<front>';
}

Now you will be redirect to front page after logged into a drupal site. Now I’ve hope you should know how to redirect users after logged into a site in Drupal 7.

Related articles:
Add new menu item into already created menu in Drupal 7
Add class into menu item in Drupal 7
Create menu tab programmatically in Drupal 7
Add custom fields to search api index in Drupal 7
Clear views cache when insert, update and delete a node in Drupal 7
Create a page without header and footer in Drupal 7
Login using both email and username in Drupal 7
Categories: Drupal

Pronovix: Documenting APIs mini-conference: Video recordings available!

Planet Drupal - 21 April 2016 - 8:41am

The video recordings of the lectures held on the Documenting APIs mini-conference are now available on our dedicated event page.

On March 4, 2016 we helped organise a special whole-day meetup in London on the Write The Docs conference, in which the community discussed the tools and processes used to document APIs.

Categories: Drupal

Drop Guard: Speaking Words of Wisdom, Let it Key - a guest post by Luke Probasco

Planet Drupal - 21 April 2016 - 5:00am
Speaking Words of Wisdom, Let it Key - a guest post by Luke Probasco Gast (not verified) Thu, 21.04.2016 - 14:00

Encryption has gone mainstream. Thanks to the numerous data breaches (781 during 2015 in the U.S. alone) data security is a top priority for businesses of all sizes. Semi-vague language like “we ensure our data is protected” from IT teams is no longer good enough to satisfy the concerns of business executives and their customers. CEOs are losing their jobs and companies are suffering financial losses/fines that reach into the millions of dollars when poorly encrypted or un-encrypted data is lost.

Drupal Encryption Security Drupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

Multivalue Extras

New Drupal Modules - 21 April 2016 - 4:39am
Overview

Module enhances settings for muliple value fields.

Categories: Drupal

Liip: State of Drupal Commerce for Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 21 April 2016 - 4:12am

The two biggest players in the Drupal 7 webshop field are Drupal Commerce (also known as DC1) and Übercart. DC1 actually started as an Übercart rewrite to make use of Drupal 7 APIs. After the split Übercart was ported to Drupal 7 too but it was still using Drupal 6 technologies.

Although still very much in development, it seems something similar will be true for Drupal 8 as well. The developers of DC2 (the Drupal 8 version of Drupal Commerce), lead by Bojan Živanović rewrote the whole system from scratch to make use of the huge changes in Drupal 8. They are active members of the Drupal developer community so they not only know but also form the actual best practices. While working on DC2 they have fixed many dozens of Drupal 8 core issues and much more in other contributed modules (such as Entity, Inline Entity Form, Profile).

A great realisation when rewriting Commerce was that several components of a webshop could be reused by other (not even necessarily webshop or Drupal) systems. Some typical examples are address formats, currencies and taxes. These components are usually a huge pain to maintain because of the small differences from country to country. So they have created standalone PHP libraries usually using authorative third party datasets such as CLDR for currency or Google’s dataset for address formats. Some of them are already used by other webshop solutions like Foxycart and developers even outside the Drupal community are giving feedback which makes maintaining them easier.

In the DC2 development process UI and UX has got a big emphasis already from the beginning. Based on research of existing webshop solutions the shop administration and checkout process has been redesigned by UX specialists. For example, the product creation process is quite confusing in DC1 and there’s not even a recommended way to do it. In DC2 this happens now in one single form which makes it super easy.

A new concept in DC2 is Stores. Stores represent billing locations and products can belong to one ore more stores. One use case is the need for different billing for customers from different countries. Another one is having a shop where sellers can open an account and sell their own products. In this case each seller has their own store.

There are many other new features and improvements like a new and flexible tax system (you can say things like: “from Jan 1st 2014 the VAT changes from 21% to 19%”), a redesigned checkout flow, different workflows for different order types etc.

DC2 is still in alpha phase and is not recommended for production use yet. Beta releases will already have upgrade paths between them and so can be considered for starting real sites with. Beta1 is expected for May.

Drupal Commerce is the most popular e-commerce solution for Drupal 7. Given the high quality code and responsiveness to developer, shop maintainer and customer needs I do not expect this to change in Drupal 8 either.

Sources:
Drupal Commerce 2 blog
Modules Unraveled podcast on Commerce

Categories: Drupal

Valuebound: How to create Custom Rest Resources for POST methods in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 21 April 2016 - 2:07am

One of the biggest changes in Drupal 8 is the integration of Rest services in the core. With use of Views it become very easy to create RESTful Services.

But there are certain situations when you need to create your own custom REST Resources. There are documentations available for creating a GET request using Views and using custom module. However there isn’t much documentation available for creating Rest Resources for POST methods.

In this article I will be sharing, how to create a REST Resource for POST methods. This Rest API will create an article in Drupal 8 site from an external…

Categories: Drupal

Sven Decabooter: Using Drupal 8 contact forms via REST

Planet Drupal - 21 April 2016 - 1:34am
Using Drupal 8 contact forms via REST

While working on Narwal CMS, our hosted decoupled / headless CMS service built on Drupal 8, a feature request that has popped up multiple times is the ability to have (contact) forms in the frontend application or website be processed by the Drupal backend through REST.

Drupal 8 provides you with REST services and fieldable contact forms out of the box, but doesn't provide all the pieces to get this specific use case working. In the tutorial below I will show you how to implement this on your Drupal 8 website.

Tutorial:
  1. Prerequisites
    • Install your Drupal 8 website and make sure to enable the "Contact" and "Restful web services" modules, as we'll obviously need those.
    • Install and enable the REST UI module to easily manage which REST resources are activated on your site.
    • Install and enable the "Contact message REST" module.
    • You should also activate an authentication module such as "HTTP Basic Authentication" (in Drupal 8 core) or IP Consumer Auth to be able to restrict form submission access to your frontend application(s) only, and not leave your REST endpoints open to everyone.
  2. Set up REST resource
    • Go to /admin/config/services/rest and enable the "Contact message" resource, with path /contact_message/{entity}:
    • Configure the supported formats and authentication providers to your preferences. E.g.:
  3. Configure permissions
    • Go to /admin/people/permissions and grant selected roles access to the permission "Access POST on Contact message resource". This should be set up correctly so your frontend application can authenticate with the correct role and perform the POST method. Only grant anonymous users permissions if you have some method to restrict access to your frontend application, such as IP whitelisting or API keys.
  4. Create contact form
    • Go to /admin/structure/contact and create a contact form, or use the default "Website feedback" form. Take note of the machine name of the contact form, as we'll need it when performing the REST call.
  5. Submit contact form via REST
    • In your frontend application, you should do a POST method call to the /contact_message REST endpoint: e.g. POST http://mydomain.com/contact_message?_format=json. Make sure you have set up your headers correctly for authentication and the X-CSRF-Token.
    • The body of your method call should provide values for the contact form entity fields. When using the default contact form fields, your request would look like this (in JSON format): { "contact_form":[{"target_id":"YOUR_FORM_MACHINE_NAME"}], "name":[{"value":"SENDER_NAME_VALUE"}], "mail":[{"value":"SENDER_MAIL_VALUE"}], "subject":[{"value":"FORM_SUBJECT"}], "message":[{"value":"FORM_MESSAGE"}] }
    • For example:
Extra's:

You could also install the Contact Storage module if you wish to store the submitted form entries, rather then just sending them via mail. In my experience, the module currently still has some bugs that prevent it from being completely usable, but those might get ironed out soon.

Background about "Contact message REST" module

While trying to get the functionality above working with Drupal core, 2 issues came up that prevented it from working:

  • When trying to create a Contact message through the default /entity/contact_message/{contact_message} resource, errors are thrown, because a contact Message entity doesn't get an ID assigned to it (because it uses the ContentEntityNullStorage storage handler). Since this REST resource tries to load the created entity and return it, this fails.
  • The actual sending of the contact form mails happens in the \Drupal\contact\MessageForm submit handler, which doesn't get called when a Message entity gets created through a REST resource.

Hence I created the Contact message REST module to solve these issues. Hopefully they will be resolved in later versions of Drupal 8.x, so the module won't be needed anymore.

 

Sven Decabooter Thu, 04/21/2016 - 10:34
Categories: Drupal

Better Module Dependencies

New Drupal Modules - 21 April 2016 - 1:21am

This module enhances modules list page and comes in handy if you have a large amount of modules installed on your Drupal website. In cases like that each module's requirements list becomes larger and larger, therefore it becomes very hard to read and work with module dependencies. So what this module actually does is making any module dependency clickable.

Categories: Drupal

Media entity document

New Drupal Modules - 21 April 2016 - 12:56am

Local document integration for Media entity module.

Categories: Drupal

Vardot: Project Manager’s Guide to Breaking Down a Drupal Site for Incremental Delivery

Planet Drupal - 21 April 2016 - 12:39am
How to, Resources Read time: 8 minutes

TL;DR. Jump to the free template: Standard Drupal Work Breakdown Structure Template.

Building a new site on a content management system has always been a tricky project to manage for a project manager, when compared to building a site on a framework or from scratch. That is because you are dealing with building blocks that are provided as a standard from the CMS. A project manager should have the necessary knowledge of the CMS’s building blocks to be able to manage a successful project.

Put this in context of today’s Scrum management approach (an agile way to manage a project, usually software development) and you’ll end up with a puzzled project manager with several questions such as:

  1. What can my team deliver in the first sprint?

  2. How can I breakdown the project’s deliveries into sprints?

  3. What expectations of deliverables should I set with my project’s stakeholders (product owner, business owner, client)

  4. When do I deliver the homepage for my stakeholder to look at?

  5. Are we supposed to deliver on page by page basis?

 

Drupal disrupts the “page” methodology that we are used to thinking of. One naturally tends to think of a website as a folder, with sub-folders, and pages (.html) inside those folders. That’s the 90s. We’re in 2016. Drupal is a database-driven CMS that takes a content-first (or content-out) approach of building rich web experiences, instead of a page-first approach. See “Drupal is content first, and that's good” and “A Richer Canvas”.

   

Due to this approach of how Drupal works, we at Vardot have came up with a framework of planning the phases of building a Drupal site, to lead to an incremental development that can be broken down and fit into Scrum sprints. This will apply to almost all Drupal projects.

This standard way we'll call: The Standard Drupal Work Breakdown Structure

 

Why Do I Need a Breakdown of Work for Planning My Drupal Site?

Because this what project managers do. I have seen in the many Drupal projects that I was part of, that project managers (and/or coordinators) must understand how Drupal works, how the development process goes, and how do we get 80% of the site done in 20% of the time.

A work breakdown structure will help you (as a project manager) to understand how a Drupal site is built. It will also ease the process for getting high quality incremental deliveries to fit in your sprints. In this post, I will walk you through the high-level breakdown for any Drupal site.

 

Most importantly, the goals and outcomes of a breakdown are for you to understand and communicate to your project’s stakeholders your timeline of deliveries, and to be able to fit these deliveries into sprints.

To summarize, these goals are:

  1. Breakdown of deliverables. Define needed outcomes of initial sprints

  2. Provide a holistic view and analysis of the site’s functionality and its building blocks

  3. Remember, we are building a CMS, not a website. Therefore you need to architect your “CMS solution”, and not your “website solution”

 

Let’s Start With The How

Now we enforce these goals by implementing the The Standard Drupal Work Breakdown Structure, that will fit for almost all of the Drupal projects you will work with.

These phases will be divided into:

  1. Initialization Work Breakdown Structure: This phase is the cornerstone phase for starting right, it’s most probably a typical standard way that you should do in every project.

  2. Project’s Epics Work Breakdown Structure: Careful analysis of the site’s components and how it will be developed in the CMS will be implemented here.

  3. Finalization Work Breakdown Structure: This is the ending phase, where you make sure your site is ready for launch. Final preparations, tuning, and tweaks are carried out in this phase to prepare for your big day.

Note that you will be able to deliver something for your stakeholders to look at, in the “Initialization” phase.

This breakdown must happen after high-fidelity wireframes are done, or if you have the full visual mockups of a Drupal site done for your key pages.

It’s important to note that the visual mockups should use and adhere to Drupal’s design language and patterns. But what is Drupal’s design language and patterns? That’s for another article to discuss.

Now that we have designs handed to us with a clear communication of how the new website will look like. We are ready to breakdown our Drupal site for a successful delivery.

 

The Work Breakdown

Disclaimer: the terminology that I’m using below to name some components that make up your site is not an “official Drupal language”. No worries if you stick with the same terminology or use your own names, what really matters is just the breakdown structure.

So I’m categorizing what makes a (Drupal) site into six components:

  1. Wrapping components: Header and Footer.
    These are the components that provide your site with a wrapper for all your next components. Start with these as soon as you install Drupal; it will help you get through the easy stuff that makes up your site.
     
  2. Global components: Page title, Breadcrumbs, Tabs (a.k.a menu local tasks), System messages ...etc.
    These are the components that make up the uniformity of a CMS. These are your next target.
     
  3. Site-unified components: Ad blocks, Newsletter subscribe block, Social media feeds or “follow us” blocks, Static “about us” block ..etc.
    These are the components that most likely appear in the same style across multiple pages in the site.
     
  4. Full nodes and entities: Your “Full content” node/user/entity pages.
    Getting back to “content-out” approach, always start with the full-node or entities completion.
     
  5. Views, view modes, and other content: Views of recent content, Featured content, Node pages, Feeds integration, CRM integration, Single Sign On integration, ...etc.
    This is the major work; components that define your site.
     
  6. The annoying 20% of the site: This is where the built 80% of your site gets the final hidden work, iterative tweaking and enhancements to your site, whether it is requested by your QA team, the client, or the product owner.

In light of this breakdown of CMS’s categories, here’s an animated illustration of how a site can be made possible when following the flow of development based on the components above:

In this order, you can now think of a Drupal site to be developed according the following steps:

Initialization Work Breakdown Structure

  1. Delivering “1. Wrapping components

    1. Install Drupal (or the distribution you want to use), setup the development environment ..etc.

    2. Populate the things that make up the “Wrapping components”: Menus, logo, search ..etc.

    3. Create your theme, and theme the “Wrapping components”

  2. Delivering “2. Global components

    1. Just populate then and theme them.

  3. Delivering “3. Site-unified components

    1. Create and populate the things that make up your “site-unified components”

    2. Theme them

Project’s Epics Work Breakdown Structure

  1. Outline your content types starting from the “Full node” view modes. Identify other view modes for your content types. Start creating those into “Tasks”

  2. Do the same for other Drupal entities: Entities, Files, Comments ..etc.

  3. Deliver “4. Full nodes and entities

  4. Deliver “5. Views, view modes, and other content

  5. Deliver “6. The annoying 20% of the site

Finalization Work Breakdown Structure

  1. Final overall testing

  2. SEO, Printability, Performance, Security, and Accessibility tuning and configuration

  3. Your pre-launch checklists

  4. Go live!

 

FREEBIE: The Standard Drupal Work Breakdown Structure Template

Our Standard Drupal Work Breakdown Structure Template provides an outline of these phases and detailed tasks to be done that we use for every Drupal project. This template is made to be easily imported to JIRA. It contains:

  • a master sheet that aggregates the standard epics, tasks and stories to be easily imported to JIRA.

  • a sheet for defining the project’s own epics and stories

  • the standard Initialization and Finalization work breakdown structure that must not be missed for any project

All of this helps to reduce discrepancies in developing each project, not to miss important tasks and also allows our team to deliver a project fast, and incrementally (delivering in the first week of development).

Using The Template

The template is a Google Spreadsheet that you can easily clone and customize. To do so:

  1. Open the sheet and copy it to make it yours.

  2. Feel free to edit the sheet to make it your own. There are some instructions on how to use the sheet to make it yours.

  3. Follow the instructions on what to edit. We recommend that the “Initialization WBS” and the “Finalization WBS” stay intact (you can edit them once to your standard flow, then replicate for all projects).

  4. For each project, you will want to copy your template to customize the “Project’s Epics WBS” as per the project. The template has some samples for you to consider.

  5. Once done, export the “Master WBS” sheet to CSV. So you can import to your JIRA project.

  6. Map fields to your JIRA. See sample [image to illustrate mapping]

  7. That’s it!

 

Conclusion

Two things have helped us to standardize our work process when developing a Drupal site, and insure consistency and quality:

  1. Starting a project by finishing up components-first approach, not page-first approach.

  2. Documenting our recurring tasks and processes in a Template that uses this approach. This template makes applying this process easier for you.

Next time you start a Drupal project, consider this approach and let us know how this would help you in the comments section below.

Note: This does not depend on a specific Drupal version, this methodology works with Drupal 6, 7 or 8. It depends on Drupal’s conceptual building approach.

Tags:  Drupal Planet drupal 8 Project Management Drupal Templates Title:  Project Manager’s Guide to Breaking Down a Drupal Site for Incremental Delivery
Categories: Drupal
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