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AddWeb Solution: Creating Customized Cloning Module for Drupal 8 Website

Planet Drupal - 26 October 2018 - 9:04am

Cloning is a concept that runs in almost every industry that exists, for ages. And the world of website development is no different from others. Multiple tools are available to clone a website, be it a command line or GUI. Being in the business of coding for years now, we at AddWeb have cloned a number of websites/website pages to fulfill the requirement of our client.

 

Over a span of 6+ years of our existence in the industry as a leading IT company, we have worked with a host of international clients. Similarly, this time too a client, whose name we can not disclose due to legal & ethical reasons, came up with a requirement of cloning multiple pages for their Drupal-based website. And we, buckled-up to deliver our expertise and stand true to the client’s requirement.

 

The Client’s Requirement:
Simple cloning is not an extraordinary task since the modules for the same are easily available from the community. But this one required us to clone multiple pages at a time, where the original page is not affected. Also, the pages had to be cloned in such a manner that the components of the same are thoroughly included. Scrutinizing the nature of the requirement, we realized that this type of cloning required us to either custom-create a module or make alterations to the existing module available for cloning. The website was in Drupal 8 and we knew, it’s about time to show some more love for our most loved tech-stack.
 

The Process of Cloning:
Drupal 8 has always been our favorite sphere to work on. So, all excited and geared up with the tool of our experience over the same we searched out the available module for cloning from the community site of Drupal - Drupal.org. The name of this module is ‘Entity Clone Module’. 

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The Emergence of Challenge:
But as they say, “Calm waters does not make a good sailor”. The water was not calm for us either. Because as we said the cloning module that we found from the community came with a limitation, which was that only one page can be cloned at a time. So, now was the time to bring our expert knowledge of Drupal to use and create a custom module that fulfills the requirement of the client.
 

Overcoming the Challenge:
We have had made a couple of modules in Drupal earlier and hence, we knew we would be able to create a fine custom module for cloning. And we did it! Yes, we created a custom module which came with multiple page templates, group-wise. One just needs to select the required page-template, submit the form to clone it and it’s done. Every single selected page gets cloned along with the components. This process turned out to be immensely useful for the editor. Because it saved both the admin’s time as well as energy to clone the pages. This process was otherwise quite tedious and time-taking since the admin had to clone one page at a time; whereas here just one single click and multiple pages are cloned together. And we’ll definitely share the credit of creating this custom module for cloning with the ‘Entity Clone Module’; since we used their script and made some alterations and addition to it in order to make the multiple-page cloning feature possible.

 

The Final Word:
We, at AddWeb Solution Pvt. Ltd., believe the ultimate achievement of any work that we do lies in the satisfaction that the client feels on delivering the final product. And we don’t whether we’re just lucky or too good with our work that like others, this client too responded to us with the appreciation - not just for the quality of the work that we deliver but also for the ‘Artful Agile’ process that we choose to follow for our work!

 

Categories: Drupal

Disable user view page

New Drupal Modules - 26 October 2018 - 8:51am

Disable user view page is a small module with a single goal of disabling the user view page.
Meant for Drupal projects where users can register and sign in but there is no need for viewing users.

  • Disable user view page
  • Redirect /user page to user edit form
  • Remove access to user view page
Categories: Drupal

Aten Design Group: Decoupled Drupal + Gatsby: Automating Deployment

Planet Drupal - 26 October 2018 - 8:15am

To get started with decoupling Drupal with Gatsby, check out our previous screencasts here.

In this screencast, I'll be showing you how to automate content deployment. So when you update the content on your Drupal site, it will automatically rebuild/update your Gatsby site on Netlify.

Download a Transcription of this Screencast

Download Transcription

Categories: Drupal

Lessons learned in game art production - Part I - by Ricardo Bess

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 26 October 2018 - 7:22am
This article sums my experience in the production of two tiles: Conflict0:Shattered and Dead Body Falls. The article is divided in two parts and this is part I.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Kliuless? #9: China's Gaming Cold War Continues - by Kenneth Liu

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 26 October 2018 - 7:21am
Each week I compile a gaming industry insights newsletter that I share with other Rioters, including Riot’s senior leadership. This edition is the public version that I publish broadly every week as well. Opinions are mine.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

The Universal Inaccessibility in Board Games - by Michael Heron

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 26 October 2018 - 7:21am
Are there common accessibility issues across board games despite the fact that every board game is different? The answer initially seems like it should be no, but actually there is a common problem. Board games have manuals, and manuals are awful.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Remembering the Excellence of Ghostbusters 2009 - by Josh Bycer

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 26 October 2018 - 7:21am
Many games sadly slip under the cracks despite good reviews, and in honor of Halloween, I wanted to pay homage to one of the best licensed games that most of you never played.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Sequelitis: Continuing Endings - by Gregory Pellechi

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 26 October 2018 - 7:20am
Games that never end aren’t immune from sequelitis. So let's look at what's expected of a sequel and the pitfalls in creating one that you'll have to contend with, especially as a writer or game designer.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

First Week Revenue Data from an Endless Puzzle Game on iOS - by Luke Schneider

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 26 October 2018 - 7:00am
In-depth data and analysis of my first free-with-ads puzzle game on iOS, and how free games are more about multiplier stacking than I first realized.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

OpenSense Labs: How to implement Continuous Deployment with Drupal

Planet Drupal - 26 October 2018 - 6:16am
How to implement Continuous Deployment with Drupal Shankar Fri, 10/26/2018 - 18:46

The Guardian, one of the most trusted news media, took a different approach for their membership and subscriptions apps. Rather than emphasising on lengthy validation in staging environments, The Guardian’s Continuous Deployment pipeline places greater focus on ensuring that the new builds are really working in production. Their objective was to let the developers know that their code has run successfully in the real world instead of just observing green test cases in a sanitised and potentially unrepresentative environment.


Thus, The Guardian reduced the amount of testing run pre-deployment and extended the deployment pipeline constituting feedback on tests run against the production site. Such is the significance of utilising a lightweight Continuous Deployment pipeline which has helped a large organisation like The Guardian to focus on production validation instead of a large suite of acceptance tests. Such benefits can be witnessed in the Drupal-based projects as well where Continuous Deployment can allow us to iterate on Drupal web applications at speed.

Read more on the implementation of Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery with Drupal

A Brief Timeline of Continuous Deployment

Agile Aliiance has stated that the origins of Continuous Deployment can be traced in the early 2000s. In 2002, Kent Beck, creator of Extreme Programming, has mentioned Continuous Deployment in the early discussions (unpublished) of applying Lean ideas to software where undeployed features are seen as inventory. However, it took multiple years for it to be refined and codified.

Later, in the proceedings of Agile 2006 Conference, the first article describing the core of Continuous Deployment - The Deployment Production Line - came into the limelight. Published by Jez Humble, Chris Read and Dan North, it was a codification of the practices of numerous ThoughtWorks UK teams.

By 2009, the practice of Continuous Deployment became well established as can be seen through the article called Continuous Deployment at IMVU by Timothy Fitz. Not only it is beneficial in Agile processes, but its great features can be extracted for methodologies such as a Lean startup or DevOps.

Continuous Deployment in focus Source: Atlassian

While Continuous Integration refers to the process of automatically building and testing your software on a regular basis, Continuous Delivery is the logical next step which ensures that your code is always in a release-ready state. The ultimate culmination of this process is the Continuous Deployment.

In Continuous Deployment, every alteration that passes all stages of your production pipeline is released to the customers

In Continuous Deployment, every alteration that passes all stages of your production pipeline is released to the customers with no human intervention and only a failed test will deter a new alteration to be deployed to production. It is a spectacular way to aggrandise the feedback loop with your customers and take pressure off the team as is takes away the so-called ‘release day’ from the equation. It allows the developers to emphasise on creating software and they can see their work going live minutes after they have put in all their efforts on it.

Why Should you Consider Continuous Deployment?

Continuous Deployment benefits both the internal team who are implementing it and the stakeholders in your company.

For internal team
  • Instead of performing a weekly or a monthly release, moving to feature-driven releases enables faster and finer-grained upgrades and helps in debugging and regression detection by only altering one thing at a time.
  • By automating every step of the process, you make it self-documenting and repeatable.
  • By making the deployment to the server fully automated, a repeatable deployment process can be created.
  • By automating the release and deployment process, you can constantly release the ongoing work to the staging and QA servers thereby giving visibility fo the state of development.
Moving to feature-driven releases enables faster and finer-grained upgrades For stakeholders in the company
  • Instead of waiting for a fixed upgrade window, you can release features when they are ready thereby getting them to the customer faster. As you are constantly releasing to a staging server while developing them, internal customers can see the alterations and take part in the development process.
  • Managers will see the result of work faster and progress will be visible when you release more often
  • If a developer needs a few more hours to make sure that the feature is in perfect working condition, then the feature will go out a few hours later and not when the next release window opens.
  • Sysadmins will not have to perform the releases themselves. Small, discrete feature releases will enable easier detection of the alterations that have affected the system adversely. 
Continuous Deployment Tools


Unit tests and functional tests put the code into as many execution scenarios as possible for predicting its behaviour in production. Unit testing frameworks consist of NUnit, TestNG and RSpec among others.
 
IT automation and configuration management tools like Poppet and Ansible manage code deployment and hosting resource configuration. Tools like Cucumber and Calabash can help in setting up integration and acceptance tools.
 
Monitoring tools like AppDynamics and Splunk can help in tracking and reporting any alterations in application or infrastructure. Performance due to the new code. Management tools like PagerDuty can trigger IT incident response. Monitoring and incident response for Continuous Deployment setups should be to real-time for shortening time to recovery when there are hassles with the code.
 
Rollback capabilities are essential in the deployment toolset to detect any unexpected or undesired effects of new code in production and mitigate them faster. Moreover, canary deployment and sharding, blue/green deployment, feature flags or toggles and other deployment controls can be useful for organisations looking to safeguard against user disruption from Continuous Deployment.
 
Some applications can deploy in containers such as Docker and Kubernetes for isolating updates from the underlying infrastructure.

Continuous Deployment with Drupal


A digital agency worked with Drupal 8, Composer, Github, Pantheon and CircleCI around Continuous Integration and Deployment. The project involved moving from internal hosting to the cloud (in this case, Pantheon), moving the main sites from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 and implementing a new design.

To the cloud

Pantheon was chosen as the cloud host for new Drupal sites. Initially, it was chosen for features like ‘Cutom Upstreams’, one-click core updates, simple deployments between development, Test, and Live environments, Multidevs, and the fact that each is a Git repo a heart. Terminus (Pantheon CLI tool) was heavily used and appreciated.

Migration to Drupal 8

It focussed on two main umbrella sites and one news site to serve both umbrella sites. It did a content refresh which showed that only content that needs to be migrated are the news articles. The configuration management of Drupal 8 was found to be nicer than the Drupal 7.

Custom Design

As the Drupal is not the only web platform they were using, instead of building a Drupal theme, they built a platform-agnostic project with a new look and feel. It was based on the Zurb foundation and was just HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.
 
Grunt was used as the build tool. So when they have a new release, they would just commit and push to Github. That triggers a CircleCI workflow which tags a new release and publishes the release artefact as an npm package to Artifactory. From there, npm package can be pulled into any project including Drupal.
 
It should be noted that the published package includes only the CSS, JS, libraries and other assets. After the publishing, a static site is created with the package and corresponding HTML templates on a cloud host as a reference implementation.

Deployment Process

They had an ‘upstream’ repo on Github named umbrella-upstream which is a composer-based Drupal 8 project with a custom install profile comprising of custom modules, package.json, and deploy scripts. Each of the sites (umbrella-site X, umbrella-site Y, etc.) was also in a Github repo as composer-based Drupal 8 project and had umbrella-upstream configured as a remote.
 
When they push an alteration to the upstream repo, a set of CircleCI workflows gets started that runs some Codeception acceptance tests and the alterations get merged from umbrella-upstream down to each umbrella-site X/Y repo.
 
Then, another CircleCI workflow builds, tests and pushes a full Drupal umbrella-site X/Y install to the corresponding Pantheon site X/Y all the way up right to the test environment. Quicksilver hooks were used to send any alterations Pantheon back to the site repos.

Entire Workflow involved:

  • Code alterations and Git commit in custom design repo
  • Npm update custom-design -save-dev, grunt and Git commit in umbrella-upstream repo

Finally, the alterations show up in the Test environment of each site on Pantheon.

Conclusion

It is of paramount importance that you keep iterating and deploy software at speed and with efficacy. Continuous Deployment is a great strategy for software releases wherein code commit that passes automated testing phase is automatically released into the production environment.
 
Drupal deployment can benefit to a great extent through the incorporation of Continuous Deployment in the project development process. The biggest advantage of doing so is that it makes the alterations visible to the application’s users.
 
Opensense Labs is committed towards the provision of wonderful digital experience to the organisations with its suite of services.
 
To make your next Drupal-based project supremely efficacious through the implementation of Continuous Deployment, ping us at hello@opensenselabs.com

blog banner blog image Continuous deployment Drupal Continuous Deployment Continuous Integration continuous delivery Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On
Categories: Drupal

An object at rest

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 17 May 2008 - 2:03pm

So obviously, the pendulum of progress stopped swinging on my game.  As much as I tried to prevent it, pressing obligations just wouldn’t take a back seat (nor would the burglars who, a few weeks ago, stole 90% of my wardrobe and who last week stole my monitor).  So after a string of hectic weekends and even crazier weeks, this weekend has been pretty wide open for doing whatever I want to do.  And not a moment too soon!

So after doing all the other things I try to do with my weekends, I finally loaded up the ol’ Inform 7 IDE and started working on my game.  To get me back in the swing of things, so to speak, I started reading through what I’d already written.  It was an interesting experience.

Strangely, what impressed me most was stuff I had done that I have since forgotten I learned how to do.  Silly little things, like actions I defined that actually worked, that had I tried to write them today, probably would have had me stumped for a while.  Go me!  Except, erm, I seem to have forgotten more than I’ve retained.

I also realized the importance of commenting my own code.  For instance, there’s this snippet:

A thing can be attached or unattached. A thing is usually unattached. A thing that is a part of something is attached.

The problem is, I have no idea why I put it in there – it doesn’t seem relevant to anything already in the game, so I can only imagine that I had some stroke of genius that told me I was going to need it “shortly” (I probably figured I’d be writing the code the next night).  So now, there’s that lonely little line, just waiting for its purpose.  I’m sure I’ll come across it some day; for now, I’ve stuck in a comment to remind myself to stick in a comment when I do remember.

It reminds me of all the writing I did when I was younger.  I was just bursting with creativity when I was a kid, constantly writing the first few pages of what I was sure was going to be a killer story.  And then I’d misplace the notebook or get sidetracked by something else, or do any of the million other things that my easily distracted self tends to do.  Some time later, I’d come across the notebook, read the stuff I’d written and think, “Wow, this is great stuff!  Now… where was I going with it?”  And I’d never remember, or I’d remember and re-forget.  Either way, in my mother’s attic there are piles and piles of notebooks with half-formed thoughts that teem with potential never to be fulfilled.

This situation – that of wanting to resume progress but fumbling to pick up the threads of where I left off –  has me scouring my memory for a term I read in Jack London’s Call of the Wild.  There was a part in the book where Buck’s owner (it’s late, his name has escaped me) has been challenged to some sort of competition to see if Buck can get the sled moving from a dead stop.  I seem to remember that the runners were frozen to the ground.  I thought the term was “fast break” or “break fast” or something to that effect, but diligent (does 45 seconds count as diligent?) searching has not confirmed this or provided me with the right term.  Anyway, that’s how it feels tonight – I feel as if I’m trying to heave a frozen sled free from its moorings.

The upside is, I am still pleased with what I have so far.  That’s good because it means I’m very likely to continue, rather than scrap it altogether and pretend that I’ll come up with a new idea tomorrow.  In the meantime, I’ll be looking for some SnoMelt and a trusty St. Bernard to get things moving again.

Categories:

Time enough (to write) at last…

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 14 April 2008 - 3:24pm

So I didn’t get as much coding done over the weekend as I had hoped, mainly because the telephone company *finally* installed my DSL line, which meant I was up til 5:30 Saturday am catching up on the new episodes of Lost.  That, in turn, meant that most of the weekend was spent wishing I hadn’t stayed up until such an ungodly hour, and concentration just wasn’t in the cards.

However, I did get some stuff done, which is good.  Even the tiniest bit of progress counts as momentum, which is crucial for me.  If the pendulum stops swinging, it will be very hard for me to get it moving again.

So the other day, as I was going over the blog (which really is as much a tool for me as it is a way for me to share my thoughts with others), I realized I had overlooked a very basic thing when coding the whole “automatically return the frog to the fuschia” bit…

As the code stood, if the player managed to carry the frog to another room before searching it, the frog would get magically returned to the fuschia.  This was fairly simple to resolve, in the end – I just coded it so that the game moves (and reports) the frog back to fuschia before leaving the room.  I also decided to add in a different way of getting the key out of the frog – in essence, rewarding different approaches to the same problem with success.

Which brings me to the main thrust of today’s post.  I have such exacting standards for the games I play.  I love thorough implementation.  My favorite games are those that build me a cool gameworld and let me tinker and explore, poking at the shadows and pulling on the edges to see how well it holds up.  A sign of a good game is one that I will reopen not to actually play through again, but to just wander around the world, taking in my surroundings.  I’ve long lamented the fact that relatively few games make this a rewarding experience – even in the best games, even slight digging tends to turn up empty, unimplemented spots.

What I am coming to appreciate is just how much work is involved in the kind of implementation I look for.  Every time I pass through a room’s description, or add in scenery objects, I realize just how easy it is to find things to drill down into.  Where there’s a hanging plant, there’s a pot, dirt, leaves, stems, wires to hang from, hooks to hang on, etc.  Obviously, unless I had all the time in the world, I couldn’t implement each of these separately, so I take what I believe to be the accepted approach and have all of the refer to the same thing.  Which, in my opinion, is fine.  I don’t mind if a game has the same responses for the stems as it does for the plant as a whole, as long as it has some sort of relevant response.  Even so, this takes a lot of work.  It might be the obsessive part of me, but I can’t help but think “What else would a person think of when looking at a hanging plant?”

Or, as I’ve come to think of it:  WWBTD?

What Would Beta Testers Do?

I’ve taken to looking at a “fully” implemented room and wondering what a player might reasonably (and in some cases unreasonably) be expected to do.  This is a bit of a challenging process for me – I already know how my mind works, so trying to step outside of my viewpoint and see it from a blind eye is hard.   I should stop for a second to note that I fully intend to have my game beta tested once it reaches that point, but the fewer obvious things there are for testers to trip over, the more time and energy they’ll have for really digging in and trying to expose the weaknesses I can’t think of.

I’ve found one resource that is both entertaining and highly informative to me:  ClubFloyd transcripts.  ClubFloyd, for the uninitiated (a group among which I count myself, of course) is a sort of cooperative gaming experience — if anyone who knows better reads this and cares to correct what may well be a horrible description, by all means!– where people get together on the IFMud and play through an IF title.  The transcripts are both amusing and revealing.  I recently read the Lost Pig transcript and it was quite interesting.  The things people will attempt to do are both astonishing and eye-opening.  In the case of Lost Pig (which, fortunately, I had already played before reading the transcript), what was even more amazing was the depth of the game itself.  I mean, people were doing some crazy ass stuff – eating the pole, lighting pants on fire, and so on.  And it *worked*.  Not only did it work, it was reversible.  You obviously need the pole, so there’s a way to get it back if, in a fit of orc-like passion, you decide to shove it in down Grunk’s throat.

Anyway, my point is, the transcripts gave me a unique perspective on the things people will try, whether in an effort to actually play the game, to amuse themselves, or to amuse others.  Definitely good stuff to keep in mind when trying to decide, say, the different ways people will try to interact with my little porcelain frog.

Other Stuff I Accomplished

So I coded in an alternate way to deal with the frog that didn’t conflict with the “standard” approach.  I also implemented a few more scenery objects.  Over the course of the next few days, I’m going to try to at least finish the descriptions of the remaining rooms so that I can wander around a bit and start really getting to the meat of it all.  I also want to work on revising the intro text a bit.  In an effort to avoid the infodumps that I so passionately hate, I think I went a little too far and came away with something a bit too terse and uninformative.  But that’s the really fun part of all of this – writing and re-writing, polishing the prose and making it all come together.

Whattaya know.  Midnight again.  I think I’m picking up on a trend here.

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Day Nothing – *shakes fist at real life*

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 8 April 2008 - 12:13pm

Grrr… I’ve been so bogged down in work and client emergencies that progress on the game is at a temporary (no, really!  Only temporary) standstill.  I’ve managed to flesh out a few more room and scenery descriptions, but have not accomplished anything noteworthy in a few days.  Hopefully after this week most of the fires on the work front will be extinguished, and I’ll have time to dive into the game this weekend.

(She says to no one, since there’s been one hit on this blog since… it started.)

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