Newsfeeds

Fantasy character sound design - Video Tutorial - by Alex Mars

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 20 September 2017 - 8:16am
Today I'm gonna show you how to make a fantasy character sound.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Top 5 Common Mistakes of Playable Ads - by Ben Chong

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 20 September 2017 - 8:15am
A list of 5 common mistakes that we observed on playable ads.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Level Design Lobby - Podcast - by Max Pears

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 20 September 2017 - 8:13am
I have launched my new podcast about video games. Level Design Lobby FInd out more info
Categories: Game Theory & Design

How much does it cost to develop a videogame? - by Michael Hoss

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 20 September 2017 - 8:13am
In a recent Kotaku article a discusion spread: How much does it cost to create games? In this post I'd like to clarify a few things, let the readers do the math and think about costs in general.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Push your game into the spotlight... on the cheap - by Elvis Alistar

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 20 September 2017 - 8:12am
Making games is challenging, hard work, most connected with the game design and development, later on when the game is ready, marketing, updates, support, etc. We show you how you can build a community/fan base around your game way before it's released.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Marketing your game on Youtube. - by Megh Jagad

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 20 September 2017 - 8:12am
Marketing your game on Youtube.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

The Team Yankee Firestorm: Red Thunder Campaign Ending Soon

Tabletop Gaming News - 20 September 2017 - 8:00am
Battlefront is awesome at having big, worldwide campaigns for their games. Firestorm: Red Thunder is their latest, and it’s been extended for another weekend to let you get involved. It’s more than just bragging rights for having your side win, participants will possibly win cool prizes for joining in. So grab your Team Yankee minis, […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Announcing Node.js on Acquia Cloud

Dries Buytaert - 20 September 2017 - 7:48am

Today, Acquia announced that it expanded Acquia Cloud to support Node.js, the popular open-source JavaScript runtime. This is a big milestone for Acquia as it is the first time we have extended our cloud beyond Drupal. I wanted to take some time to explain the evolution of Acquia's open-source stack and why this shift is important for our customers' success.

From client-side JavaScript to server-side JavaScript

JavaScript was created at Netscape in 1995, when Brendan Eich wrote the first version of JavaScript in just 10 days. It took around 10 years for JavaScript to reach enterprise maturity, however. Adoption accelerated in 2004 when Google used JavaScript to build the first release of Gmail. In comparison to e-mail competitors like Yahoo! Mail and Hotmail, Gmail showed what was possible with client-side JavaScript, which enables developers to update pages dynamically and reduces full-page refreshes and round trips to the server. The benefit is an improved user experience that is usually faster, more dynamic in its behavior, and generally more application-like.

In 2009, Google invented the V8 JavaScript engine, which was embedded into its Chrome browser to make both Gmail and Google Maps faster. Ryan Dahl used the V8 run-time as the foundation of Node.js, which enabled server-side JavaScript, breaking the language out of the boundaries of the browser. Node.js is event-driven and provides asynchronous, non-blocking I/O — things that help developers build modern web applications, especially those with real-time capabilities and streamed data. It ushered in the era of isomorphic applications, which means that JavaScript applications can now share code between the client side and server side. The introduction of Node.js has spurred a JavaScript renaissance and contributed to the popularity of JavaScript frameworks such as AngularJS, Ember and React.

Acquia's investment in Headless Drupal

In the web development world, few trends are spreading more rapidly than decoupled architectures using JavaScript frameworks and headless CMS. Decoupled architectures are gaining prominence because architects are looking to take advantage of other front-end technologies, most commonly JavaScript based front ends, in addition to those native to Drupal.

Acquia has been investing in the development of headless Drupal for nearly five years, when we began contributing to the addition of web service APIs to Drupal core. A year ago, we released Waterwheel, an ecosystem of software development kits (SDKs) that enables developers to build Drupal-backed applications in JavaScript and Swift, without needing extensive Drupal expertise. This summer, we released Reservoir, a Drupal distribution for decoupled Drupal. Over the past year, Acquia has helped to support a variety of headless architectures, with and without Node.js. While not always required, Node.js is often used alongside of a headless Drupal application to provide server-side rendering of JavaScript applications or real-time capabilities.

Managed Node.js on Acquia Cloud

Previously, if an organization wanted to build a decoupled architecture with Node.js, it was not able to host the Node.js application on Acquia Cloud. This means that the organization would have to run Node.js with a separate vendor. In many instances, this requires organizations to monitor, troubleshoot and patch the infrastructure supporting the Node.js application of their own accord. Separating the management of the Node.js application and Drupal back end not only introduces a variety of complexities, including security risk and governance challenges, but it also creates operational strain. Organizations must rely on two vendors, two support teams, and multiple contacts to build decoupled applications using Drupal and Node.js.

To eliminate this inefficiency, Acquia Cloud can now support both Drupal and Node.js. Our goal is to offer the best platform for developing and running Drupal and Node.js applications. This means that organizations only need to rely on one vendor and one cloud infrastructure when using Drupal and Node.js. Customers can access Drupal and Node.js environments from a single user interface, in addition to tools that enable continuous delivery, continuous integration, monitoring, alerting and support across both Drupal and Node.js.

On Acquia Cloud, customers can access Drupal and Node.js environments from a single user interface. Delivering on Acquia's mission

When reflecting on Acquia's first decade this past summer, I shared that one of the original corporate values our small team dreamed up was to "empower everyone to rapidly assemble killer websites". After ten years, we've evolved our mission to "build the universal platform for the world's greatest digital experiences". While our focus has expanded as we've grown, Acquia's enduring aim is to provide our customers with the best tools available. Adding Node.js to Acquia Cloud is a natural evolution of our mission.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: Announcing Node.js on Acquia Cloud

Planet Drupal - 20 September 2017 - 7:48am

Today, Acquia announced that it expanded Acquia Cloud to support Node.js, the popular open-source JavaScript runtime. This is a big milestone for Acquia as it is the first time we have extended our cloud beyond Drupal. I wanted to take some time to explain the evolution of Acquia's open-source stack and why this shift is important for our customers' success.

From client-side JavaScript to server-side JavaScript

JavaScript was created at Netscape in 1995, when Brendan Eich wrote the first version of JavaScript in just 10 days. It took around 10 years for JavaScript to reach enterprise maturity, however. Adoption accelerated in 2004 when Google used JavaScript to build the first release of Gmail. In comparison to e-mail competitors like Yahoo! Mail and Hotmail, Gmail showed what was possible with client-side JavaScript, which enables developers to update pages dynamically and reduces full-page refreshes and round trips to the server. The benefit is an improved user experience that is usually faster, more dynamic in its behavior, and generally more application-like.

In 2009, Google invented the V8 JavaScript engine, which was embedded into its Chrome browser to make both Gmail and Google Maps faster. Ryan Dahl used the V8 run-time as the foundation of Node.js, which enabled server-side JavaScript, breaking the language out of the boundaries of the browser. Node.js is event-driven and provides asynchronous, non-blocking I/O — things that help developers build modern web applications, especially those with real-time capabilities and streamed data. It ushered in the era of isomorphic applications, which means that JavaScript applications can now share code between the client side and server side. The introduction of Node.js has spurred a JavaScript renaissance and contributed to the popularity of JavaScript frameworks such as AngularJS, Ember and React.

Acquia's investment in Headless Drupal

In the web development world, few trends are spreading more rapidly than decoupled architectures using JavaScript frameworks and headless CMS. Decoupled architectures are gaining prominence because architects are looking to take advantage of other front-end technologies, most commonly JavaScript based front ends, in addition to those native to Drupal.

Acquia has been investing in the development of headless Drupal for nearly five years, when we began contributing to the addition of web service APIs to Drupal core. A year ago, we released Waterwheel, an ecosystem of software development kits (SDKs) that enables developers to build Drupal-backed applications in JavaScript and Swift, without needing extensive Drupal expertise. This summer, we released Reservoir, a Drupal distribution for decoupled Drupal. Over the past year, Acquia has helped to support a variety of headless architectures, with and without Node.js. While not always required, Node.js is often used alongside of a headless Drupal application to provide server-side rendering of JavaScript applications or real-time capabilities.

Managed Node.js on Acquia Cloud

Previously, if an organization wanted to build a decoupled architecture with Node.js, it was not able to host the Node.js application on Acquia Cloud. This means that the organization would have to run Node.js with a separate vendor. In many instances, this requires organizations to monitor, troubleshoot and patch the infrastructure supporting the Node.js application of their own accord. Separating the management of the Node.js application and Drupal back end not only introduces a variety of complexities, including security risk and governance challenges, but it also creates operational strain. Organizations must rely on two vendors, two support teams, and multiple contacts to build decoupled applications using Drupal and Node.js.

To eliminate this inefficiency, Acquia Cloud can now support both Drupal and Node.js. Our goal is to offer the best platform for developing and running Drupal and Node.js applications. This means that organizations only need to rely on one vendor and one cloud infrastructure when using Drupal and Node.js. Customers can access Drupal and Node.js environments from a single user interface, in addition to tools that enable continuous delivery, continuous integration, monitoring, alerting and support across both Drupal and Node.js.

On Acquia Cloud, customers can access Drupal and Node.js environments from a single user interface. Delivering on Acquia's mission

When reflecting on Acquia's first decade this past summer, I shared that one of the original corporate values our small team dreamed up was to "empower everyone to rapidly assemble killer websites". After ten years, we've evolved our mission to "build the universal platform for the world's greatest digital experiences". While our focus has expanded as we've grown, Acquia's enduring aim is to provide our customers with the best tools available. Adding Node.js to Acquia Cloud is a natural evolution of our mission.

Categories: Drupal

Tablets can teach kids to solve physical puzzles

Virtual Reality - Science Daily - 20 September 2017 - 7:00am
Researchers replicated a previous study to confirm that 4- to 6-year-old children can transfer learning of a puzzle from a touchscreen device to the physical version. This contradicts most previous research and suggests that different types of screen learning media could have different effects on whether children can transfer learned skills to the physical world.
Categories: Virtual Reality

Munchkin Holiday Grab Box Up On Kickstarter

Tabletop Gaming News - 20 September 2017 - 7:00am
Steve Jackson Games’ Munchkin has been around for quite some time. In all those years, it’s gotten quite a lot of expansions, alternate sets, special add-ons, and all those great custom dice. Well, for this holiday season, Steve Jackson has put together Holiday Grab Boxes just filled with all manner of things. They’ve got a […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Drupal core announcements: Core topic discussions at DrupalCon Vienna

Planet Drupal - 20 September 2017 - 6:19am

DrupalCon Vienna includes a full track of core conversations where you can learn about current topics in Drupal core development, and a week of sprints where you can participate in shaping Drupal's future.

In addition to the core conversations, we have a few meetings on specific topics for future core development. These meetings will be very focused, so contact the listed organizer for each if you are interested in participating. There are also birds-of-a-feather (BoF) sessions, which are open to all attendees without notice.

Time Topic Organizer Monday, 25 Sep, 13:00 Coding standards fails and automated interdiffs on Drupal.org xjm Tuesday, 26 Sep, 12:00 Media initiative (BoF) chr.fritsch Tuesday, 26 Sep, 15:45 Out of the Box initiative (BoF) kjay Tuesday, 26 Sep, 17:00 Composer bojanz Wednesday, 27 Sep, 11:30 Workflows initiative dixon_ Wednesday, 27 Sep, 14:30 JavaScript drpal, nod_ Friday, 29 Sep, 11:30 API-first initiative Wim Leers Friday, 29 Sep, 13:00 Migrate initiative Gábor Hojtsy

Also be sure to watch Dries' keynote for ideas about Drupal's future!

Categories: Drupal

Fantasy Flight Games Posts New For Cyphers and Masks Sourcebook for Star Wars RPG

Tabletop Gaming News - 20 September 2017 - 6:00am
Information is everything. Being informed of the situation at hand, especially in something as chaotic as a warzone can mean the difference between victory and defeat. And when an enemy is captured, getting accurate information from them is a good skill to have. Such is what you’ll be doing as an Interrogator in the Star […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Content Expire

New Drupal Modules - 20 September 2017 - 5:07am
Categories: Drupal

MD Systems blog: The evolution of Paragraphs

Planet Drupal - 20 September 2017 - 5:02am
Categories: Drupal

The Buzz About The Giant Bee

Gnome Stew - 20 September 2017 - 5:00am

Bees. Bees have an interesting place in our world today. Not exactly domesticated, they are still an incredibly important resource for agriculture, pollinating billions of dollars of crops annually, and the source of an amazing food product.

Let me tell you a story about one of my characters from years back. The character themselves was rather unremarkable. I don’t remember much about them, but one of our first adventures involved scouting out a system of natural rose quartz canyons. In one of them we discovered a nest of dire bees. We didn’t need to mess with them and they were a difficult encounter for us, so we left them alone. My character scraped together his gold, bought the land rights to the canyons and spent the rest of the campaign hiring glassblowers, alchemists, scribes, builders and soldiers and spending his downtime between adventures setting up trade contracts for his dire bee honey (in attractive rose glass flasks).

So let’s take a closer look at this fantastic relative of the common bee, the dire bee. Dire bees can be about five feet long, and build nests of about one and a half million cubic feet in volume (an orb ~140 feet in diameter or a cube ~110 feet on a side). In temperate climates these nests are usually built in dark enclosed spaces such as caves, huge trees, or abandoned buildings – with a preference for high places if available. In tropical climates, nests are more likely to be built in the open if no enclosed area is available. While these hives are often hidden from sight, the noise they produce – and the comings and goings of worker bees who can forage up to several hundred miles from the hive – makes it almost impossible to stumble upon one unaware.

While the standard drone dire bee isn’t a particularly deadly foe, they are dangerous in swarms – and bulkier soldiers and even larger royal varieties exist. In addition, some species have unique attacks, such as a variety that creates a zone of heat attack if they surround a target (some real life bees use this tactic to kill much larger hornets). Most dire bees won’t attack unless provoked, but aggressive species do exist, and they are attracted to bright colors – often driving them to investigate humans and their habitats.

Dire bees collect no treasure aside from the honey they produce, but incidental spoils can often be found near their hives left over from interlopers who got too close. Careful scavengers can often get a meal or some treasure this way. Adventurers with nerves of steel can sometimes sneak into a nest and gather up some honey. A typical dire bee nest can produce a ton or more of honey over the course of a year, though transporting out large quantities of it is a logistic nightmare. Dire bee chitin is strong and valuable, and of course just like real world bees, dire bees are effective pollinators – so lands close to a hive are often extra productive.

Infiltrating a dire bee nest can be made less dangerous by the application of certain varieties of smoke, application of the correct oils or chemicals to one’s body or even application of illusions or other magic which can either keep dire bees sluggish or fool them into not noticing an intruder.

The honey of a dire bee nest is largely similar to real honey, but access to large amounts of fantastic plants can create honey with weak magical effects. In addition, even more fantastic varieties of dire bee are said to exist with equally amazing properties to their honey.

A clever town may form the same kind of relationship with dire bees that we have today, providing them with cropland from which the bees can harvest pollen, while harvesting and selling honey under the protection of a local alchemist or hedge mage. In addition, the two can engage in a mutually beneficial protection arrangement. In other areas this arrangement might be overseen by the local druid or shaman, or the hive might simply be raided for honey and chitin on occasion.

Adventures around the dire bee:
  • fetch some honey/royal jelly/eggs
  • investigate the nest for signs of disease/predator/other malady
  • recover a macguffin that was lost near the nest or was left in the site in which the nest was built
  • recover some dangerous plants/rare plants/plants from a dangerous location to plant near the hive
  • harvest some chitin from dire bee corpses or kill some bees for their chitin
Variant dire bees:
  • nest with a hive mind or sentient royal caste
  • particularly aggressive species
  • nest with fantastic plants nearby: clouds of pollen near the nest have strange properties, honey shares these properties
  • outsider variety similar to formians
  • elemental bees with special attacks and odd behavior
  • reskinned bees that look more like large hummingbirds

Dire bees are one of many traditional role playing game “monsters” that actually have a lot of applications more interesting than sacks of xp and treasure. What is your favorite monster with overlooked depth?

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Workflows Notifications

New Drupal Modules - 20 September 2017 - 4:47am
Categories: Drupal

Systempay for Payment

New Drupal Modules - 20 September 2017 - 1:36am
Categories: Drupal

Unpublished Node Permissions

New Drupal Modules - 20 September 2017 - 1:25am

Creates permisisons per node content type to control access to unpublished nodes per content type.

Categories: Drupal

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