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Code Karate: An Intro to Lando with Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 27 October 2018 - 9:21pm
Episode Number: 211

Lando is what the cool kids are using for their local development environments these days. In this episode, I give you a quick introduction to Lando and show you how it can be used to create a Drupal 8 site in less than a minute. I also show you how you can integrate Lando into your workflow if you are hosting your websites on Pantheon.

Are you using or have you tried using Lando yet? What are your thoughts?

Check out the Code Karate Patreon page

Tags: DevOpsDrupalDrupal 8Drupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

Bay Area Drupal Camp: BADCamp: Did You Lose Anything?

Planet Drupal - 27 October 2018 - 5:17pm
BADCamp: Did You Lose Anything? Drupal Planet rob.thorne Sun, 10/28/2018 - 00:17

BADCamp is officially over, and we're striking the circus tent as I write this.  A quick last minute note if you forgot or lost anything. By all means, let us know.  Some things sitting in our lost and found at 5:30 PM:

  • A black Office Depot notebook with someone's excellent notes of BADCamp-ish topics.
  • Someone's white and black prescription eye glasses.
  • Two painted sticks that looks like they are used to juggle.
  • A white USB thumb drive (about 4" in length).
  • A Contigo water bottle.

These items, except for the thumb drive, have been left at the 2nd floor reception desk at the MLK Student Union building.  These generally are kept for about a week, so if you want these items back, please contact the front desk at 510.664.7976.

Since data can be very valuable, the MLK ASUC people recommended that we handle the drive differently. If you lost your drive and want to back, please send us a personal message on Twitter, @BADCamp, and we'll get it back to you.

 

 

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Atlanta Medium Publication: DrupalCamp Organizers Unite: Is it Time for Camp Organizers to Become an Official Working Group?

Planet Drupal - 27 October 2018 - 12:24pm
If the community is a top priority then resources for organizing DrupalCamps must also be a top priority.“Together We Create graffiti wall decor” by "My Life Through A Lens" on Unsplash

Community, community and more community. One of the common themes we hear when it comes to evaluating Drupal against other content management systems (CMS), is that the community is made up of over 100,000 highly skilled and passionate developers who contribute code. And in many of these application evaluations, it’s the community, not the software that leads to Drupal winning the bid. We have also heard Dries Buytaert speak about the importance of the community at various DrupalCons and he is quoted on Drupal.org’s getting involved page:

“It’s really the Drupal community and not so much the software that makes the Drupal project what it is. So fostering the Drupal community is actually more important than just managing the code base.” — Dries BuytaertMy First Encounter with the Drupal Community

With this emphasis on community, I tried to think back to how and when I first interacted with the community. Like so many others, my first introduction to Drupal was at a local Meetup. I remember going to this office building in Atlanta and the room was packed with people, plenty of pizza, soda and, of course, laptops. It was a nice relaxed atmosphere where we introduced ourselves and got a chance to know each other a little bit. Then the lights dimmed, the projector turned on and the presentations kicked off, highlighting some new content strategy or a new module that can help layout your content. After that first meetup, I felt energized because until that point, I had never spoken with someone in person about Drupal and it was the first time that I was introduced to Drupal professionals and companies.

Are you interested in attending the first online DrupalCamp Organizers Meeting, on Friday, November 9th at 4:00pm (EST)? RSVP Here.

DrupalCamps Play An Integral Role in Fostering Community

After attending a few meetups, I joined the email list and I received an email announcing DrupalCamp Atlanta was going to be held at Georgia Tech and the call for proposals was now open for session submissions.

2013 DrupalCamp Atlanta photo by Mediacurrent

I purchased a ticket for a mere $30 and added it to my google calendar. On the day of the event, I remember walking in the front door and being blown away by the professionalism of the conference as there were sponsor booths, giveaways, and four concurrent sessions throughout the day. But it wasn’t until I was inside the auditorium during the opening session and saw the 200 or so people pile in that made me realize this Drupal community thing I heard about was for real. Over the next couple of years, I decided that I would attend other camps instead of DrupalCon because the camps were more affordable and less intimidating. My first camp outside of Atlanta was Design4Drupal in Boston, DrupalCamp Charlotte, DrupalCamp Florida and BADCamp were all camps I went to before attending a DrupalCon. All of these camps were top notch but what I really loved is that each camp had their own identity and culture. It’s exactly what I think a community should be and for the very first time, I felt that I was a part of the Drupal community.

Why Establish the DrupalCamp Organizers Council?

As provided in my previous examples, one of the advantages of Drupal comes from the great community and DrupalCamps are an important aspect in fostering this community. Running any event can be challenging, but to pull off a respectable DrupalCamp you have consider so many things such as the website, credit card processing, food, accepting and rejecting sessions, finding a keynote speaker, the afterparty, pre-conference trainings, oh and did I mention the website? You get my drift, it's a lot of work. Many of these tasks just roll off my tongue from past experience so ask yourself;

  • Where can I share my knowledge with other people who organize camps?
  • What if there was some way that all of us DrupalCamp organizers could come together and implement services that make organizing camps easier?
  • How could we provide camp organizers with resources to produce great camps?

During the #AskDries session at DrupalCon Nashville (listen for yourself), Midwest DrupalCamp Organizer Avi Schwab asked Dries the following question;

“... giving the limited funding the Drupal Association has, where should we go in trying to support our smaller local community events?” — Avi Schwab

Dries then responded with:

“That’s a great question. I actually think its a great idea what they (WordCamp) do. Because these camps are a lot of work. ...I think having some sort of central service or lack of a better term, that helps local camp organizers, I think is a fantastic idea, because we could do a lot of things, like have a camp website out of the box, ... we could have all sorts of best practices out of the box .” — Dries Buytaert

DrupalCamp Slack Community was the first time that I was provided a link to a spreadsheet that had the camp history dating back to 2006 and people were adding their target camp dates even if they were just in the planning stages. As a camp organizer I felt connected, I felt empowered to make better decisions and most of all I could just ask everyone, hey, how are you doing this?

Are you interested in attending the first online DrupalCamp Organizers meeting, on Friday, November 9th at 4:00pm (EST)? RSVP Here.

Earlier this year I volunteered for the Drupal Diversity and Inclusion Initiative (DDI) and was inspired when I heard Tara King on the DrupalEasy podcast, talk about how she just created the ddi-contrib channel on the Drupal slack and started hosting meetings. All jazzed up and motivated by that podcast, I reached out to over 20 different camp organizers from various countries and asked them if they would be interested in being on something like this? And if not, would they feel represented if this council existed?

Here are some quotes from Camp Organizers:

“I think a DrupalCamp Organizers Council is a great idea. I would be interested in being a part of such a working group. Just now I’m restraining myself from pouring ideas forth, so I definitely think I’m interested in being a part.”“I am interested in seeing something that gathers resources from the vast experiences of current/past organizers and provides support to camps.”“I definitely would appreciate having such a council and taking part. I’ve now helped organize DrupalCamp four times, and this was the first year we were looped into the slack channels for the organizers.”“I really like the idea — what do we need to do to get this started?”What are the Next Steps?

Based on the positive feedback and the spike in interest from other camp organizers I have decided to take the plunge and establish our first meeting of DrupalCamp Organizers on Friday, November 9th at 4:00pm (EST). This will be an online Zoom video call to encourage people to use their cameras so we can actually get to know one another.

The agenda is simple:

  • Introductions from all callers, and one thing they would like to see from the council.
  • Brainstorm the list of items the council should be advocating for.
  • Identify procedures for electing people to the Council: ways to nominate, eligibility criteria, Drupal event organizer experience required etc.
  • Outline of a quick strategic plan.

If you are interested in attending the zoom online call on Friday, November 9th at 4:00pm (EST), please fill out the RSVP Here. If you are interested in participating in the Council but are Unable to Attend, please fill out this survey here

If you are attending DrupalCamp Atlanta I will be hosting the Zoom call during one of the concurrent sessions so feel free find me.

DrupalCamp Organizers Unite: Is it Time for Camp Organizers to Become an Official Working Group? was originally published in Drupal Atlanta on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Categories: Drupal

An object at rest

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 17 May 2008 - 2:03pm

So obviously, the pendulum of progress stopped swinging on my game.  As much as I tried to prevent it, pressing obligations just wouldn’t take a back seat (nor would the burglars who, a few weeks ago, stole 90% of my wardrobe and who last week stole my monitor).  So after a string of hectic weekends and even crazier weeks, this weekend has been pretty wide open for doing whatever I want to do.  And not a moment too soon!

So after doing all the other things I try to do with my weekends, I finally loaded up the ol’ Inform 7 IDE and started working on my game.  To get me back in the swing of things, so to speak, I started reading through what I’d already written.  It was an interesting experience.

Strangely, what impressed me most was stuff I had done that I have since forgotten I learned how to do.  Silly little things, like actions I defined that actually worked, that had I tried to write them today, probably would have had me stumped for a while.  Go me!  Except, erm, I seem to have forgotten more than I’ve retained.

I also realized the importance of commenting my own code.  For instance, there’s this snippet:

A thing can be attached or unattached. A thing is usually unattached. A thing that is a part of something is attached.

The problem is, I have no idea why I put it in there – it doesn’t seem relevant to anything already in the game, so I can only imagine that I had some stroke of genius that told me I was going to need it “shortly” (I probably figured I’d be writing the code the next night).  So now, there’s that lonely little line, just waiting for its purpose.  I’m sure I’ll come across it some day; for now, I’ve stuck in a comment to remind myself to stick in a comment when I do remember.

It reminds me of all the writing I did when I was younger.  I was just bursting with creativity when I was a kid, constantly writing the first few pages of what I was sure was going to be a killer story.  And then I’d misplace the notebook or get sidetracked by something else, or do any of the million other things that my easily distracted self tends to do.  Some time later, I’d come across the notebook, read the stuff I’d written and think, “Wow, this is great stuff!  Now… where was I going with it?”  And I’d never remember, or I’d remember and re-forget.  Either way, in my mother’s attic there are piles and piles of notebooks with half-formed thoughts that teem with potential never to be fulfilled.

This situation – that of wanting to resume progress but fumbling to pick up the threads of where I left off –  has me scouring my memory for a term I read in Jack London’s Call of the Wild.  There was a part in the book where Buck’s owner (it’s late, his name has escaped me) has been challenged to some sort of competition to see if Buck can get the sled moving from a dead stop.  I seem to remember that the runners were frozen to the ground.  I thought the term was “fast break” or “break fast” or something to that effect, but diligent (does 45 seconds count as diligent?) searching has not confirmed this or provided me with the right term.  Anyway, that’s how it feels tonight – I feel as if I’m trying to heave a frozen sled free from its moorings.

The upside is, I am still pleased with what I have so far.  That’s good because it means I’m very likely to continue, rather than scrap it altogether and pretend that I’ll come up with a new idea tomorrow.  In the meantime, I’ll be looking for some SnoMelt and a trusty St. Bernard to get things moving again.

Categories:

Time enough (to write) at last…

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 14 April 2008 - 3:24pm

So I didn’t get as much coding done over the weekend as I had hoped, mainly because the telephone company *finally* installed my DSL line, which meant I was up til 5:30 Saturday am catching up on the new episodes of Lost.  That, in turn, meant that most of the weekend was spent wishing I hadn’t stayed up until such an ungodly hour, and concentration just wasn’t in the cards.

However, I did get some stuff done, which is good.  Even the tiniest bit of progress counts as momentum, which is crucial for me.  If the pendulum stops swinging, it will be very hard for me to get it moving again.

So the other day, as I was going over the blog (which really is as much a tool for me as it is a way for me to share my thoughts with others), I realized I had overlooked a very basic thing when coding the whole “automatically return the frog to the fuschia” bit…

As the code stood, if the player managed to carry the frog to another room before searching it, the frog would get magically returned to the fuschia.  This was fairly simple to resolve, in the end – I just coded it so that the game moves (and reports) the frog back to fuschia before leaving the room.  I also decided to add in a different way of getting the key out of the frog – in essence, rewarding different approaches to the same problem with success.

Which brings me to the main thrust of today’s post.  I have such exacting standards for the games I play.  I love thorough implementation.  My favorite games are those that build me a cool gameworld and let me tinker and explore, poking at the shadows and pulling on the edges to see how well it holds up.  A sign of a good game is one that I will reopen not to actually play through again, but to just wander around the world, taking in my surroundings.  I’ve long lamented the fact that relatively few games make this a rewarding experience – even in the best games, even slight digging tends to turn up empty, unimplemented spots.

What I am coming to appreciate is just how much work is involved in the kind of implementation I look for.  Every time I pass through a room’s description, or add in scenery objects, I realize just how easy it is to find things to drill down into.  Where there’s a hanging plant, there’s a pot, dirt, leaves, stems, wires to hang from, hooks to hang on, etc.  Obviously, unless I had all the time in the world, I couldn’t implement each of these separately, so I take what I believe to be the accepted approach and have all of the refer to the same thing.  Which, in my opinion, is fine.  I don’t mind if a game has the same responses for the stems as it does for the plant as a whole, as long as it has some sort of relevant response.  Even so, this takes a lot of work.  It might be the obsessive part of me, but I can’t help but think “What else would a person think of when looking at a hanging plant?”

Or, as I’ve come to think of it:  WWBTD?

What Would Beta Testers Do?

I’ve taken to looking at a “fully” implemented room and wondering what a player might reasonably (and in some cases unreasonably) be expected to do.  This is a bit of a challenging process for me – I already know how my mind works, so trying to step outside of my viewpoint and see it from a blind eye is hard.   I should stop for a second to note that I fully intend to have my game beta tested once it reaches that point, but the fewer obvious things there are for testers to trip over, the more time and energy they’ll have for really digging in and trying to expose the weaknesses I can’t think of.

I’ve found one resource that is both entertaining and highly informative to me:  ClubFloyd transcripts.  ClubFloyd, for the uninitiated (a group among which I count myself, of course) is a sort of cooperative gaming experience — if anyone who knows better reads this and cares to correct what may well be a horrible description, by all means!– where people get together on the IFMud and play through an IF title.  The transcripts are both amusing and revealing.  I recently read the Lost Pig transcript and it was quite interesting.  The things people will attempt to do are both astonishing and eye-opening.  In the case of Lost Pig (which, fortunately, I had already played before reading the transcript), what was even more amazing was the depth of the game itself.  I mean, people were doing some crazy ass stuff – eating the pole, lighting pants on fire, and so on.  And it *worked*.  Not only did it work, it was reversible.  You obviously need the pole, so there’s a way to get it back if, in a fit of orc-like passion, you decide to shove it in down Grunk’s throat.

Anyway, my point is, the transcripts gave me a unique perspective on the things people will try, whether in an effort to actually play the game, to amuse themselves, or to amuse others.  Definitely good stuff to keep in mind when trying to decide, say, the different ways people will try to interact with my little porcelain frog.

Other Stuff I Accomplished

So I coded in an alternate way to deal with the frog that didn’t conflict with the “standard” approach.  I also implemented a few more scenery objects.  Over the course of the next few days, I’m going to try to at least finish the descriptions of the remaining rooms so that I can wander around a bit and start really getting to the meat of it all.  I also want to work on revising the intro text a bit.  In an effort to avoid the infodumps that I so passionately hate, I think I went a little too far and came away with something a bit too terse and uninformative.  But that’s the really fun part of all of this – writing and re-writing, polishing the prose and making it all come together.

Whattaya know.  Midnight again.  I think I’m picking up on a trend here.

Categories:

Day Nothing – *shakes fist at real life*

Adventures in Interactive FIction - 8 April 2008 - 12:13pm

Grrr… I’ve been so bogged down in work and client emergencies that progress on the game is at a temporary (no, really!  Only temporary) standstill.  I’ve managed to flesh out a few more room and scenery descriptions, but have not accomplished anything noteworthy in a few days.  Hopefully after this week most of the fires on the work front will be extinguished, and I’ll have time to dive into the game this weekend.

(She says to no one, since there’s been one hit on this blog since… it started.)

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