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Drupal blog: State of Drupal presentation (September 2017)

Planet Drupal - 27 September 2017 - 7:33am

This blog has been re-posted with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

Yesterday, I shared my State of Drupal presentation at DrupalCon Vienna. In addition to sharing my slides, I wanted to provide some more detail on how Drupal is evolving, who Drupal is for, and what I believe we should focus on.

Drupal is growing and changing

I started my keynote by explaining that Drupal is growing. Over the past year, we've witnessed a rise in community engagement, which has strengthened Drupal 8 adoption.

This is supported by the 2017 Drupal Business Survey; after surveying 239 executives from Drupal agencies, we can see that Drupal 8 has become the defacto release for them and that most of the Drupal businesses report to be growing.

While the transition from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 is not complete, Drupal 8's innovation continues to accelerate. We've seen the contributed modules ecosystem mature; in the past year, the number of stable modules has more than doubled. Additionally, there are over 4,000 modules in development.

In addition to growth, both the vendor and technology landscapes around Drupal are changing. In my keynote, I noted three primary shifts in the vendor landscape. Single blogs, portfolio sites and brochure sites, which represent the low end of the market, are best served by SaaS tools. On the other side of the spectrum, a majority of enterprise vendors are moving beyond content management into larger marketing suites. Finally, the headless CMS market segment is growing rapidly, with some vendors growing at a rate of 500% year over year.

There are also significant changes in the technology landscape surrounding Drupal, as a rising number of Drupal agencies have also started using modern JavaScript technologies. For example, more than 50% of Drupal agencies are also using Node.js to support the needs of their customers.

While evolving vendor and technology landscapes present many opportunities for Drupal, it can also introduce uncertainty. After listening to many people in the Drupal community, it's clear that all these market and technology trends, combined with the long development and adoption cycle of Drupal 8, has left some wondering what this all means for Drupal, and by extension also for them.

Drupal is no longer for simple sites

Over the past year, I've explained why I believe Drupal is for ambitious digital experiences, in both my DrupalCon Baltimore keynote and on my blog. However, I think it would be valuable to provide more detail on what I mean by "ambitious digital experiences". It's important that we all understand who Drupal is for, because it drives our strategy, which in turn allows us to focus our efforts.

Today, I believe that Drupal is no longer for simple sites. Instead, Drupal's sweetspot is sites or digital experiences that require a certain level of customization or flexibility — something I refer to as "richness".

Ambitious is much more than just enterprise

This distinction is important because I often find that the term "ambitious" becomes conflated with "enterprise". While I agree that Drupal is a great fit for the enterprise, I personally never loved that categorization. It's not just large organizations that use Drupal. Individuals, small startups, universities, museums and nonprofits can be equally ambitious in what they'd like to accomplish and Drupal can be an incredible solution for them.

An example of this could be a small business that manages 50 rental properties. While they don't have a lot of traffic (reach), they require integrations with an e-commerce system, a booking system, and a customer support tool to support their business. Their allotted budget is $50,000 or less. This company would not be considered an enterprise business; however, Drupal would be a great fit for this use case. In many ways, the "non-enterprise ambitious digital experiences" represent the majority of the Drupal ecosystem. As I made clear in my presentation, we don't want to leave those behind.

Addressing the needs of smaller organizations

The Drupal ecosystem majority are organizations with sites that require medium-to-high richness, which SaaS builders cannot support. However, they also don't need to scale at the level of enterprise companies. As the Drupal community continues to consider how we can best support this majority, a lot of smaller Drupal agencies and end-users have pointed out that they would benefit from the following two things:

  1. Powerful site building tools. They want easy-to-use site building tools that are simple to learn, and don't require dozens of contributed modules to be installed and configured. They would also prefer to avoid writing a lot of custom code because their clients have smaller budgets. Great examples of tools that would improve site building are Drupal's upcoming layout builder, workspaces and media library. To make some of Drupal's own administrative UIs more powerful and easier to use, I proposed that we add a modern JavaScript to core.
  2. Easier updates and maintenance. While each Drupal 8 site benefits from continuous innovation, it also needs to be updated more often. The new Drupal 8 release cycle has monthly patch releases and 6-month minor releases. In addition, organizations have to juggle ad-hoc updates from contributed modules. In addition, site updates has often become more complex because our dependency on third-party libraries and because not everyone can use Composer. Many smaller users and agencies would benefit tremendously from auto-updates because maintaining and updating their Drupal 8 sites can be too manual, too complex and too expensive.

The good news is that we have made progress in both improving site builder tools and simplifying updates and maintenance. Keep an eye on future blog posts about these topics. In the meantime, you can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 22:10), or you can download a copy of my slides (56 MB).

State of Drupal keynote, DrupalCon Vienna from Dries Buytaert State of Drupal keynote, DrupalCon Vienna from Dries Buytaert
Categories: Drupal

Moving away from GitFlow - by Niklas Gray

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 September 2017 - 7:28am
Discusses the different source control practices I've used in the past and why I've decided to move from GitFlow to trunk-based development.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Launching Hive Jump on Wii U - Why Didn't We "Switch"? - by Matt Raithel

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 September 2017 - 7:24am
Why would Graphite Lab still launch Hive Jump on the Wii U with the Switch already making headlines?
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Postmortem of my first Indie Game - by Attilio Carotenuto

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 September 2017 - 7:23am
2 years ago, after many years working in the industry as a game developer, I decided to quit my job, setup my business and become an indie developer. Here's my thoughts on it, and on my first indie game.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Steamworld Dig 2 trailer-first commentary - by M. Joshua Cauller

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 September 2017 - 7:19am
The Steamworld games have some of my all-time favorite trailers. So I recorded my immediate reactions to the launch trailer, provide some trailer takeaways, and then show how much I love the game's core loop.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Avoiding the avoidable: Why 'optional' queer content isn't solving the diversity problem (and how to fix this) - by Alayna Cole

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 September 2017 - 7:12am
If a developer wants to incorporate diverse perspectives in their game, sometimes they don't know where to start. This post gives actionable tips for including characters with diverse sexualities in your game, and explains why this is important.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

New Huge Minis Available To Pre-Order for Kings of War

Tabletop Gaming News - 27 September 2017 - 7:00am
I’ve always loved oversized miniatures. You know, the ones that their base is the size of a CD or a notepad. For you Kings of War players, Mantic has a couple new huge minis that they’re taking orders for. You’ve got the Revenant King on Undead Wyrm and the Steel Behemoth. They’re certain to make […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

100 Days of VR: Day 14 Finish Attacking the Enemy and Walking Sounds In Unity Following 1 - by Josh Chang

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 September 2017 - 7:00am
We’re back in Day 14. I finally solved the pesky problem from Day 13 where the Knight refuses to get pushed back when we shoot at him. We're also going to go and add walking sound effects into the game!
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Task List, Upcoming Milestone, New Music and a Temporary Setback - by Jake Jollimore

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 September 2017 - 6:59am
From Me: Explaining my workflow and looking at my task list From Mika (Our composer): New music and computer problems
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Steam: Bye bye Indie developer, welcome copycat games - by Jose Antonio Andujar

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 September 2017 - 6:58am
Why Steam Direct was the last hope for indies and became their last tear. Now, Steam is full of cloned games, terrible titles and good ones become hidden gems for not having enough visibility.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

[System/Game Design] How I handle items and spells in Ebony Spire: Heresy - by Constantin Bacioiu

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 September 2017 - 6:58am
A quick look at how I handle the creation of items, spells and effects for my dungeon crawling RPG. This method helps me create virtually any number of item types and combination for my game with little effort. Great for my item-focused little game.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Apple's ARKit game development: a whole new world - by Jose Joao Oliveira Junior

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 27 September 2017 - 6:46am
At Skullfish Studios, we had the difficult task to make an AR game with the new Apple's ARkit within one month. Here we will explain our obstacles and solutions during the development.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Fantasy Flight Games Announces New Legend of the Five Rings RPG Open Beta

Tabletop Gaming News - 27 September 2017 - 6:00am
The launch of the Legend of the Five Rings card game seems to be doing rather well. We’ve got like 5-6 people here at the office that play. This has brought a lot of attention back to the property, and Fantasy Flight is looking to get you, the players, involved. They are going to start […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Lullabot: Small Ways to Conduct User Research That Can Make A Big Impact

Planet Drupal - 27 September 2017 - 5:30am

We’ve worked with many amazing clients who had to be careful about their budget or needed a project completed rather quickly. You may be one of those clients. If you’re in the process of hiring a design firm to help improve your product or website but are concerned about investing in user research and testing because of budget or timeline constraints, you’re in good company. What follows are some practical ideas your designers can use to increase your chances of success without breaking the bank. 

Research to conduct during the project kickoff “People ignore design that ignores people.” - Frank Chimero, Author of The Shape of Design Conducting User and Stakeholder Interviews

A clear understanding of the problems you’re solving and who you’re solving them for is critical to the success of any design project. A site’s “users” are made up of not just the end users or target audience of the site, but also the business users: the product stakeholders, content editors, designers, and the team that will use the site over time to reach that audience. Those business users are an ideal starting point for research. The people who create and manage the content, run sales for the organization or handle customer service are often a wealth of information about the target audience they’re serving and their common needs and challenges. These same stakeholders also help clarify the true purpose and goals of the project and any potential pitfalls.

Before any collaborative workshopping, we always try to conduct individual interviews with at least a representative of each of these kinds of stakeholders (e.g., content and editorial, marketing, sales, customer service, leadership, etc.). We’ve found this process to be hugely beneficial for things like:

  • Clarifying project goals
  • Clarifying the audience and its various segments
  • Clarifying the known problem space
  • Clarifying the existing, driving assumptions about the site’s users that perhaps need more research
  • Surfacing internal conflicts that need resolution
  • Surfacing potential pitfalls for the project
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This early information you easily get from these interviews can be invaluable as you begin crafting interview protocols, surveys, and other research methods to learn from the site’s audience. Conducting research with a site’s audience (the external user base) is often where the bulk of the cost lies, so getting as much clarity up front to help refine that work can save a lot of time and cost.

Sharing Relevant Documentation

Another highly effective way to reduce research costs in your project is to make sure that your design team can leverage all of the past research your team or others have already done. Designers can learn a great deal very quickly by reviewing the results of past annual surveys or support requests. Below is a list of the kinds of things you should look for and be sure to share with your design team to save time and ensure a better end product.

  • Existing internal persona documents that define your audience
  • Access to site analytics
  • Past surveys of your audience
  • Notes, audio or video of any past user tests or interviews
  • Existing user flows
  • Existing documentation or reports from customer service teams on common problems or guides for those customer service reps

Collecting your team’s knowledge about your audience and summarizing it in an audience inventory worksheet can also help save your designer time when reading through the research.

undefined Competitive Analysis

Conducting a competitive analysis of your competition can also be used to evaluate your audience and make a comparison of how your product or site stacks up against the competition. Designers can usually complete these within a day or two, if not within a few hours. They’ll use a set of heuristics such as design consistency, the grouping of common tasks, functionality, mobile friendliness, and placement of links or calls to action, to help evaluate your site against the competition. This evaluation will help set up a strong design strategy that distinguishes your site.  

Research to conduct during the design process In Process Usability Testing “To design an easy-to-use interface, pay attention to what users do, not what they say. Self-reported claims are unreliable, as are user speculations about future behavior.” - Jakob Nielsen, User Advocate and principal of the Nielsen Norman Group

Even when you think you understand the problems users have, there are times when your designers will need to ensure that the ideas they’re proposing resonate with your audience. Will they understand how to use a certain component? Does the marketing copy answer their questions? Does the visual design accurately reflect the core values and mission of the company? These are all questions your designers should be asking themselves throughout the design process. Conducting usability tests early and throughout the design process with actual users can help them answer these questions and validate that the design is on the right track.

Usability testing doesn’t have to be a long, expensive process. There are ways your designers can test their ideas with users rather quickly. Tree testing can be a quick way to test your site's IA hierarchy and navigation nomenclature without producing a bunch of artifacts such as wireframes or prototypes that are often needed for usability testing. Your designers can also use wireframes or paper prototypes to conduct efficient usability tests during the exploration phase. At Lullabot, we’ve used a combination of the above to help conduct usability tests in an efficient manner. Conducting usability tests throughout the process with help ensure that the design and strategy are on the right track, and also sets the site up for success.

undefined Research to Conduct After Launch

Your project has launched! Hopefully, everything went smoothly, and now there’s a sigh of relief. But there's still work to be done. The ultimate form of user testing is launching a site! The best designers want to keep on learning and iterating. What follows are a few affordable ways to do this. 

Conducting Surveys Placing an optional survey on the site is an inexpensive way to collect user feedback that doesn’t require a lot of time to set up. Surveying can identify if something is not working correctly on the site and can help quickly collect user feedback to address in possible future iterations.  Surveying establishes a user pool for future usability testing. Keeping surveys short (5 brief questions or less) increases the number of users who are likely to complete the survey. Tools like SurveyMonkey, Ethnio, and Typeform can easily integrate into your site. 

Another option is to place a link somewhere on the site where users can give feedback. An example of this might be if you're rolling out a restructured navigation. Placing a link titled “can’t find what you’re looking for?” in the navigation that links to a form can help users quickly give feedback on how the new structure is working for them and help to identify any changes that may need to be addressed in the new navigational structure.

Usability Testing

Conducting usability tests on a recently launched site is another way to quickly gather user feedback on how well the site is working for the audience. Since conducting usability sites on the actual launched site requires no prototyping, it can be fairly quick to set up and conduct these tests. You can also save time with recruitment by reusing the same user pool that you had gathered during the in-process usability tests.  

Post Launch Meetings

Finally, another inexpensive practice we highly recommend is scheduling regular design check-ins post-launch. Set an interval of either quarterly or biannually to ensure that there's time for real data to come in from real users, but also regular enough to perhaps take action and roll out small improvements based on the data. In these regular meetings, we recommend you do at least the following:

  • Review anything that’s gone well, and has been surprising or concerning when it comes to users interacting with the site.
  • Review any feedback that your team may collect from actual users
  • Review and discuss any changes to the goals business or the goals of the site 
  • Discuss the progress of the site in relation to the goals that were set. Are they on target?

Adding user research to your project process can be beneficial to everyone involved to help understand your audience’s behavior, their goals, and can help inform how to improve your site after it’s launched. Not every project will have an ample budget or timeline for an in-depth research process, but there are small ways to validate ideas to create a site that’s successful and communicates to your audience. If you’re concerned about how user research can affect the budget, I hope you’ll take some of the above into consideration when discussing user research with your designers and collaborate with them to find small ways to work user research into your process. If you’re interested in learning more, I’d recommend reading Just Enough Research by Erika Hall and The User Experience Team of One: A Research and Design Survival Guide by Leah Buley.

Categories: Drupal

Amazee Labs: Drupalcon Europe gets going

Planet Drupal - 27 September 2017 - 5:00am
Drupalcon Europe gets going

The people have arrived from all around the world. The booths have been set up. #DrupalConEUR 2017 - It has begun!

Bryan Gruneberg Wed, 09/27/2017 - 14:00

The obvious highlights of the day were the Prenote and the Keynote address.

What is the Prenote you ask? You can check it out for yourself! You may even recognise some of the people who took part!

Where are we from?

Our friends over at Pantheon ran a “from the stage” survey of the community in the room (and I guess a few people who were watching the live stream). Inky, Dania, Lees and I are from Cape Town and Mostfa is from Tunisia. I’m fairly sure that Amazee Labs people account for a large portion of the 1% from Africa.

 

What do we like?

It starts with the community of course. There is meeting people, sharing food, learning, sprinting on the project. And friends!

 

… and of course, there is beer. And people, and travel, and connections, and OIDA.

 

… and there are stickers and hugs… AND beer sessions, and networking beer, and community beer. And if you keep an eye out and stay vigilant you might just spot a beer.

 

OIDA!

Dries took to the stage to the expected applause from the room. He spent quite some time going through the product stats and if you weren’t at the Driesnote it's worth checking out the full presentation below.

At Amazee Labs, we use Drupal all the time. It supports most of what we produce, and it underpins 100% of what we do. In my team, we support, extend, and maintain a myriad Drupal 7 and 8 sites. Soon we will be onboarding some of the more ambitious Fully Decoupled Drupal-React sites that the sprint teams have been hard at work on this year into the maintenance and extension project phase. It is really helpful to have someone like Dries stand up and force us to take stock of where Drupal is a product and to highlight some of the things that the people using the product should be thinking about.

 

“The CMS Vendor Landscape is changing”

The CMS vendor landscape is undergoing a transformation. With the rapid rise and adoption of various Javascript frameworks, and patterns, CMSs are increasingly becoming (or in the case of Drupal, being used as) headless providers of data and content. This will over time inevitably change things for the Drupal project.

 

“Drupal is for Ambitious Digital Experiences”

So what is the graph telling us? It maps different potential Drupal users in two dimensions along Reach (how many people will the system touch?), and Richness (how many features will the system have?). Perhaps the most striking piece is the explicit acknowledgment that the SaaS competitive platforms are now mature and feature-rich enough to make them more appropriate for blogs, portfolio, and brochure sites.

But we can also see that Drupal isn’t only for enterprise clients. To quote Dries: “Ambitious is much more than just enterprise”. In fact, enterprise clients are only a portion of the potential Drupal market. There is plenty of space (perhaps even the majority of the market?) for feature-rich sites to be built and deployed for customers who we would not consider Enterprise. And Dries’ talk suggests that we should think about this, and start to include this in our strategies, and to help our customers to include this in their strategies.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: State of Drupal presentation (September 2017)

Planet Drupal - 27 September 2017 - 4:55am

Yesterday, I shared my State of Drupal presentation at DrupalCon Vienna. In addition to sharing my slides, I wanted to provide some more detail on how Drupal is evolving, who Drupal is for, and what I believe we should focus on.

Drupal is growing and changing

I started my keynote by explaining that Drupal is growing. Over the past year, we've witnessed a rise in community engagement, which has strengthened Drupal 8 adoption.

This is supported by the 2017 Drupal Business Survey; after surveying 239 executives from Drupal agencies, we can see that Drupal 8 has become the defacto release for them and that most of the Drupal businesses report to be growing.

While the transition from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 is not complete, Drupal 8's innovation continues to accelerate. We've seen the contributed modules ecosystem mature; in the past year, the number of stable modules has more than doubled. Additionally, there are over 4,000 modules in development.

In addition to growth, both the vendor and technology landscapes around Drupal are changing. In my keynote, I noted three primary shifts in the vendor landscape. Single blogs, portfolio sites and brochure sites, which represent the low end of the market, are best served by SaaS tools. On the other side of the spectrum, a majority of enterprise vendors are moving beyond content management into larger marketing suites. Finally, the headless CMS market segment is growing rapidly, with some vendors growing at a rate of 500% year over year.

There are also significant changes in the technology landscape surrounding Drupal, as a rising number of Drupal agencies have also started using modern JavaScript technologies. For example, more than 50% of Drupal agencies are also using Node.js to support the needs of their customers.

While evolving vendor and technology landscapes present many opportunities for Drupal, it can also introduce uncertainty. After listening to many people in the Drupal community, it's clear that all these market and technology trends, combined with the long development and adoption cycle of Drupal 8, has left some wondering what this all means for Drupal, and by extension also for them.

Drupal is no longer for simple sites

Over the past year, I've explained why I believe Drupal is for ambitious digital experiences, in both my DrupalCon Baltimore keynote and on my blog. However, I think it would be valuable to provide more detail on what I mean by "ambitious digital experiences". It's important that we all understand who Drupal is for, because it drives our strategy, which in turn allows us to focus our efforts.

Today, I believe that Drupal is no longer for simple sites. Instead, Drupal's sweetspot is sites or digital experiences that require a certain level of customization or flexibility — something I refer to as "richness".

Ambitious is much more than just enterprise

This distinction is important because I often find that the term "ambitious" becomes conflated with "enterprise". While I agree that Drupal is a great fit for the enterprise, I personally never loved that categorization. It's not just large organizations that use Drupal. Individuals, small startups, universities, museums and nonprofits can be equally ambitious in what they'd like to accomplish and Drupal can be an incredible solution for them.

An example of this could be a small business that manages 50 rental properties. While they don't have a lot of traffic (reach), they require integrations with an e-commerce system, a booking system, and a customer support tool to support their business. Their allotted budget is $50,000 or less. This company would not be considered an enterprise business; however, Drupal would be a great fit for this use case. In many ways, the "non-enterprise ambitious digital experiences" represent the majority of the Drupal ecosystem. As I made clear in my presentation, we don't want to leave those behind.

Addressing the needs of smaller organizations

The Drupal ecosystem majority are organizations with sites that require medium-to-high richness, which SaaS builders cannot support. However, they also don't need to scale at the level of enterprise companies. As the Drupal community continues to consider how we can best support this majority, a lot of smaller Drupal agencies and end-users have pointed out that they would benefit from the following two things:

  1. Powerful site building tools. They want easy-to-use site building tools that are simple to learn, and don't require dozens of contributed modules to be installed and configured. They would also prefer to avoid writing a lot of custom code because their clients have smaller budgets. Great examples of tools that would improve site building are Drupal's upcoming layout builder, workspaces and media library. To make some of Drupal's own administrative UIs more powerful and easier to use, I proposed that we add a modern JavaScript to core.
  2. Easier updates and maintenance. While each Drupal 8 site benefits from continuous innovation, it also needs to be updated more often. The new Drupal 8 release cycle has monthly patch releases and 6-month minor releases. In addition, organizations have to juggle ad-hoc updates from contributed modules. In addition, site updates has often become more complex because our dependency on third-party libraries and because not everyone can use Composer. Many smaller users and agencies would benefit tremendously from auto-updates because maintaining and updating their Drupal 8 sites can be too manual, too complex and too expensive.

The good news is that we have made progress in both improving site builder tools and simplifying updates and maintenance. Keep an eye on future blog posts about these topics. In the meantime, you can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 22:10), or you can download a copy of my slides (56 MB).

Categories: Drupal

State of Drupal presentation (September 2017)

Dries Buytaert - 27 September 2017 - 4:55am

Yesterday, I shared my State of Drupal presentation at DrupalCon Vienna. In addition to sharing my slides, I wanted to provide some more detail on how Drupal is evolving, who Drupal is for, and what I believe we should focus on.

Drupal is growing and changing

I started my keynote by explaining that Drupal is growing. Over the past year, we've witnessed a rise in community engagement, which has strengthened Drupal 8 adoption.

This is supported by the 2017 Drupal Business Survey; after surveying 239 executives from Drupal agencies, we can see that Drupal 8 has become the defacto release for them and that most of the Drupal businesses report to be growing.

While the transition from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 is not complete, Drupal 8's innovation continues to accelerate. We've seen the contributed modules ecosystem mature; in the past year, the number of stable modules has more than doubled. Additionally, there are over 4,000 modules in development.

In addition to growth, both the vendor and technology landscapes around Drupal are changing. In my keynote, I noted three primary shifts in the vendor landscape. Single blogs, portfolio sites and brochure sites, which represent the low end of the market, are best served by SaaS tools. On the other side of the spectrum, a majority of enterprise vendors are moving beyond content management into larger marketing suites. Finally, the headless CMS market segment is growing rapidly, with some vendors growing at a rate of 500% year over year.

There are also significant changes in the technology landscape surrounding Drupal, as a rising number of Drupal agencies have also started using modern JavaScript technologies. For example, more than 50% of Drupal agencies are also using Node.js to support the needs of their customers.

While evolving vendor and technology landscapes present many opportunities for Drupal, it can also introduce uncertainty. After listening to many people in the Drupal community, it's clear that all these market and technology trends, combined with the long development and adoption cycle of Drupal 8, has left some wondering what this all means for Drupal, and by extension also for them.

Drupal is no longer for simple sites

Over the past year, I've explained why I believe Drupal is for ambitious digital experiences, in both my DrupalCon Baltimore keynote and on my blog. However, I think it would be valuable to provide more detail on what I mean by "ambitious digital experiences". It's important that we all understand who Drupal is for, because it drives our strategy, which in turn allows us to focus our efforts.

Today, I believe that Drupal is no longer for simple sites. Instead, Drupal's sweetspot is sites or digital experiences that require a certain level of customization or flexibility — something I refer to as "richness".

Ambitious is much more than just enterprise

This distinction is important because I often find that the term "ambitious" becomes conflated with "enterprise". While I agree that Drupal is a great fit for the enterprise, I personally never loved that categorization. It's not just large organizations that use Drupal. Individuals, small startups, universities, museums and nonprofits can be equally ambitious in what they'd like to accomplish and Drupal can be an incredible solution for them.

An example of this could be a small business that manages 50 rental properties. While they don't have a lot of traffic (reach), they require integrations with an e-commerce system, a booking system, and a customer support tool to support their business. Their allotted budget is $50,000 or less. This company would not be considered an enterprise business; however, Drupal would be a great fit for this use case. In many ways, the "non-enterprise ambitious digital experiences" represent the majority of the Drupal ecosystem. As I made clear in my presentation, we don't want to leave those behind.

Addressing the needs of smaller organizations

The Drupal ecosystem majority are organizations with sites that require medium-to-high richness, which SaaS builders cannot support. However, they also don't need to scale at the level of enterprise companies. As the Drupal community continues to consider how we can best support this majority, a lot of smaller Drupal agencies and end-users have pointed out that they would benefit from the following two things:

  1. Powerful site building tools. They want easy-to-use site building tools that are simple to learn, and don't require dozens of contributed modules to be installed and configured. They would also prefer to avoid writing a lot of custom code because their clients have smaller budgets. Great examples of tools that would improve site building are Drupal's upcoming layout builder, workspaces and media library. To make some of Drupal's own administrative UIs more powerful and easier to use, I proposed that we add a modern JavaScript to core.
  2. Easier updates and maintenance. While each Drupal 8 site benefits from continuous innovation, it also needs to be updated more often. The new Drupal 8 release cycle has monthly patch releases and 6-month minor releases. In addition, organizations have to juggle ad-hoc updates from contributed modules. In addition, site updates has often become more complex because our dependency on third-party libraries and because not everyone can use Composer. Many smaller users and agencies would benefit tremendously from auto-updates because maintaining and updating their Drupal 8 sites can be too manual, too complex and too expensive.

The good news is that we have made progress in both improving site builder tools and simplifying updates and maintenance. Keep an eye on future blog posts about these topics. In the meantime, you can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 22:10), or you can download a copy of my slides (56 MB).

Categories: Drupal

ToggleMenu

New Drupal Modules - 27 September 2017 - 4:46am

Jquery Toggle Menu integration.
Allow easy switch any menus to mobile menu.

You can alter js options as

Drupal.behaviors.myBehavior.togglemenuOptions = { ... your options }

or

Drupal.behaviors.myBehavior.togglemenuOptions = function(){ return { ... your options } }
Categories: Drupal

Warcradle Studios Taking Over Dystopian and Firestorm Licenses From Spartan Games

Tabletop Gaming News - 27 September 2017 - 3:26am
Well, it looks like Warcradle is on the move again. The new studio making Wild West Exodus has made a deal with Spartan Games that they will continue on the Dystopian and Firestorm universes. They’ve posted up a video discussing the new announcement, and we can look forward to more updates in the coming months. […]
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Entity Class Formatter

New Drupal Modules - 27 September 2017 - 1:25am
Overview

Entity Class Formatter is a very simple module which formats values of fields (of varying types) such that a class is placed on the parent entity of that field. The module can be used to apply classes on entities, allowing the class to act as a modifier which can be used by the theming layer.

Usage

Follow these steps

Categories: Drupal

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