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Progressive Web App - Notifications

New Drupal Modules - 7 February 2019 - 6:24am

Integration with Firebase Cloud Messaging (FCM).

Installation

1. Enable module.
2. Create your project (https://console.firebase.google.com/).
3. Get your access crentials from Settings => Cloud Messaging tab (https://console.firebase.google.com/u/0/project/YOUR-PROJECT-ID/settings...) to Firebase Settings(/admin/config/system/firebase)

Categories: Drupal

Gnomecast #59 – Roll for Initiative

Gnome Stew - 7 February 2019 - 5:23am

Join Ang, Camdon, and Jared for a discussion on different initiative systems and different ways to manage initiative in your games. Will these gnomes act soon enough to keep them out of the stew?

Download: Gnomecast #59 – Roll for Initiative

The product Jared mentions is the Axe n Shield Initiative Tracker.

Keep up with all the gnomes by visiting gnomestew.com, following @gnomestew on Twitter, or visiting the Gnome Stew Facebook Page. Check out Gnome Stew Merch, and support Gnome Stew on Patreon!

Follow Camdon at @camdon on Twitter and check out his website camdon.com.

Follow Jared at @KnightErrant_JR on Twitter and check out his blog What Do I Know?. On the Internet.

Follow Ang at @orikes13 on Twitter, or find her in the Misdirected Mark Google+ Community.

Categories: Game Theory & Design

HadePay

New Drupal Modules - 7 February 2019 - 3:56am

HadePay is an offsite Payment Gateway. And HadePay is a financial technology startup that develops infrastructure for online fiat and blockchain payments. We are the only service that lets businesses accept digital currency payments without disrupting their existing payments infrastructure.

Hade Pay will open new revenue streams and expedite international growth for merchants around the world with a payment and business management solution that gives businesses greater insights into their customers, payments, employees, regional, and product performance.

Categories: Drupal

Specbee: Drupal 8 websites in a Flash - 5 reasons to choose Acquia Lightning

Planet Drupal - 7 February 2019 - 1:53am

Drupal 8 gives developers and content authors full flexibility to shape their websites and applications that meets their vision. It is packed with thousands of powerful features that requires to be able to support a wide variety of content-rich applications. Acquia Lightning is a lean, ready-to-use starter-kit that encompasses just the tools needed to develop and manage your enterprise-grade digital experiences. Lightning is built specifically to empower your marketing and editorial teams to build better, easier and faster. Here are 5 reasons why choosing Acquia Lightning could be a great decision for your organization’s editorial and content teams.

Categories: Drupal

How to grow your game with referrals - by Ben Meakin

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 7 February 2019 - 1:39am
Referrals are one of the most cost-effective ways to grow your game, and should play a major role in your marketing strategy. This post breaks down the best practices and examples of referral marketing.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Ckeditor Copyformatter

New Drupal Modules - 7 February 2019 - 1:03am

This module requires the core CKEditor module and also the Color Button plugin
from CKEditor.com.

1. Download the plugin from https://ckeditor.com/cke4/addon/copyformatting at least
version 4.5.6.
2. Place the plugin in the root libraries folder (/libraries).
3. Enable Copy Formatting module in the Drupal admin.
4. Configure your CKEditor toolbar to include the button as a paint brush.

Follow these steps to make sure the plugin works for Full HTML text format:

Categories: Drupal

Character Class: Playing in Character

RPGNet - 7 February 2019 - 12:00am
No funny accents needed!
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Agiledrop.com Blog: Druplicon.org: In Search of the Lost Druplicon

Planet Drupal - 6 February 2019 - 11:24pm

In this post, we present the story behind druplicon.org, a site for exploring the various different versions of the well-known Drupal logo.

READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

Drush CMI Tools

New Drupal Modules - 6 February 2019 - 7:25pm

Provides advanced CMI import and export functionality for CMI workflows.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: Drupal helps rescue ultra marathon runner

Planet Drupal - 6 February 2019 - 5:34pm

I'm frequently sent examples of how Drupal has changed the lives of developers, business owners and end users. Recently, I received a very different story of how Drupal had helped in a rescue operation that saved a man's life.

The Snowdonia Ultra Marathon website

In early 2018, Race Director Mike Jones was looking to build a new website for the Ultra-Trail Snowdonia ultra marathon. He reached out to a good friend and developer, Rob Edwards, to lead the development of the website.

© Ultra-trail Snowdonia and No Limits Photography

Rob chose Drupal for its flexibility and extensibility. As an organization supported heavily by volunteers, open source also fit the Snowdonia team's belief in community.

The resulting website, https://apexrunning.co/, included a custom-built timing module. This module allowed volunteers to register each runner and their time at every aid stop.

A runner goes missing

Rob attended the first day of Ultra-Trail Snowdonia to ensure the website ran smoothly. He also monitored the runners at the end of the race to certify they were all accounted for.

Monitoring the system into the early hours of the morning, Rob noticed one runner, after successfully completing checkpoints one and two, hadn't passed through the third checkpoint.

© Ultra-trail Snowdonia and No Limits Photography

Each runner carried a mobile phone with them for emergencies. Mike attempted to make contact with the runner via phone to ensure he was safe. However, this specific area was known for its poor signal and the connection was too weak to get through.

After some more time eagerly watching the live updates, it was clear the runner hadn't reached checkpoint four and more likely hadn't ever made it past checkpoint three. The Ogwen Mountain Rescue were called to action.

Due to the terrain and temperature, searching for the lost runner on foot would be too slow. Instead, the mountain rescue volunteers used a helicopter to scan the area and locate the runner.

How Drupal came to rescue

The area covered by runners in an ultra marathon like this one is vast. The custom-built timing module helped rescuers narrow down the search area; they knew the runner passed the second checkpoint but never made it to the third.

After following the fluorescent orange markers in the area pinpointed by the Drupal website, the team quickly found the individual. He had fallen and become too injured to carry on. A mild case of hypothermia had set in. The runner was airlifted to the hospital for appropriate care. The good news: the runner survived.

Without Drupal, it might have taken much longer to notify anyone that a runner had gone missing, and there would have been no way to tell when he had dropped off.

NFC and GPS devices are now being explored for these ultra marathon runners to carry with them to provide location data as an extra safety precaution. The Drupal system will be used alongside these devices for more accurate time readings, and Rob is looking into an API to pull this additional data into the Drupal website.

Stories about Drupal having an impact on organizations and individuals, or even helping out in emergencies, drive my sense of purpose. Feel free to keep sending them my way!

Special thanks to Rob Edwards, Poppy Heap (CTI Digital) and Paul Johnson (CTI Digital) for their help with this blog post.

Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: Why Programmers Should Read Good Fiction

Planet Drupal - 6 February 2019 - 1:17pm

If you are a programmer looking to improve your professional craft, there are many resources toward which you will be tempted to turn. Books and classes on programming languages, design patterns, performance, testing, and algorithms are some obvious places to look. Many are worth your time and investment.

Categories: Drupal

AI are learning common sense through Pictionary

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 6 February 2019 - 1:00pm

Researchers over at Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence have developed an AI program that can play both sides of Pictionary. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Webform Product

New Drupal Modules - 6 February 2019 - 12:03pm

Webform Product can create a Commerce order from any Webform submission.

This module can be used for websites that have commerce for payment of predefined product types, but in need of a more flexible product for temporary product types or highly customisable product types, like a quick donation form or a promotional product.

With Webform you can create simple or very complex forms, combine this with the easy to setup handler and you got a new product, ready to be paid with any payment provider defined in Drupal Commerce.

Categories: Drupal

EA has a subscription service for 'another major platform' in the works

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 6 February 2019 - 11:25am

Electronic Arts already runs subscribe-for-access game libraries through the PC†™s Origin Access and the Xbox One†™s EA Access, and the company has another due out this year. ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Fair Play Alliance expands Fair Play Summit for GDC 2019

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 6 February 2019 - 10:43am

The Fair Play Alliance, a cross-industry initiative focused on fostering fair play in online games, has announced it will return for Game Developers Conference 2019 with an all-day Fair Play Summit! ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

'Virtual pharmacology' advance tackles universe of unknown drugs

Virtual Reality - Science Daily - 6 February 2019 - 10:19am
Scientists have developed the world's largest virtual pharmacology platform and shown it is capable of identifying extremely powerful new drugs. The platform, soon to contain over a billion virtual molecules never before synthesized and not found in nature, is poised to dramatically change early drug discovery and send waves through the pharmaceutical industry, the authors say.
Categories: Virtual Reality

Gnome Stew Notables – Jabari Weathers

Gnome Stew - 6 February 2019 - 9:50am

About Jabari in their own words: Jabari Weathers is an illustrator and game designer who currently resides in Baltimore, Maryland. They also are (apparently) under suspicion of being a goblin princet from beyond the veil. In order to keep up their glamor, they make art and narrative games for themselves.

You can help them maintain their human facade by checking out their artwork at jmwillustration.com and their game design work at lunarveil.press. If you wish to follow along with their more anecdotal adventures, they can be found on instagram (jmwillustration) and twitter (JabariWeathers).

Tell us a little bit about yourself and your work? What project are you most proud of?

Hi Tracy, thanks for inviting me to do this with you! I’m a black, nonbinary scifi fantasy illustrator by day, and tabletop rpg/narrative game designer by night. I live in Baltimore and attended art school here (at MICA). Soon after I found myself making so many tarot cards for roleplaying game publishers. The work I’m most proud of in that regard is, in fact, split between making the 7th Sea Sortè deck art, and the Bluebeard’s Bride Tarot of Servants art. Both projects put together took 8 months for me to make the art for, which kind of scares me. As far as my game design work, I’m working on an epistolary game called A Dire Situation, which is essentially a really perverse game of telephone inspired by Dangerous Liaisons and other acidic period piece dramas. It’s a good time. You can follow my artwork at jmwillustration.com, my (announced) game design work at lunarveil.press, and me at twitter.com/JabariWeathers and instagram.com/jmwillustration~

What themes do you like to emphasize in game work?

Existential tension, often the questions of identity and knowing who you are. I’m in a few different professional and creative circles that I simultaneously feel indebted to as far as my taste in media and interests, and feel not immediately welcome in, having to have carved a niche for myself within scifi/fantasy illustration and game design. I often try to find ways to take the kind of performative tension I feel as a POC in both circles and fold that into game design terms. It’s sort of like journaling. There’s a mechanic in A Dire Situation where everyone chooses a secret for another person’s character, but you don’t know what secret has been chosen for you specifically, even though your *character* is understood to be aware of the secret and you as a player get to see all of the available secrets that are in play at the table. The result is nobody is quite who they themselves think they are, and you end up having to question a lot about the entity you’re stepping into for the evening. I like trying to get people to question their fictional personas, anyway!

How did you get into games? Who did you try to emulate in your career?

Actually I got into games through my mom, who played DnD when she was younger and never stopped consuming speculative fiction. She kinda just passed the genre interest on to me. I also grew up with cousins who played a LOT of video games with me, and eventually made my way toward titles that valued a kind of emergent design that tabletop RPGs are especially well suited for (for example, Thief, Deus Ex [I grew up with Invisible War and Deadly Shadows and played the earlier games in late high school and early college], Morrowind). In high school, my religion teacher (I went to an all boys Catholic high school), was really my first longstanding GM with 3.5, but I had been reading the books for a solid amount of time before that point. I don’t know if I tried to emulate any one person in my game design upon starting, but I did try to chase the same kind of player choice that Looking Glass Studios baked into their digital work (which they pulled from tabletop games in a lot of ways), as well as their interdisciplinary approach to game design. Look at Thief: The Dark Project against it’s contemporaries and you can tell that it was made by people interested in things outside of the industry that it was making an impact on. I love how Looking glass trusts it’s players and doesn’t hold their hand, instead giving them tools to let the experience emerge. I also love how their games had such odd and idiosyncratic approaches that really challenged the player. I still chase both things in the social landscape that tabletop RPGs create, and I really hope I make something that’s half as inspiring as that Looking Glass ethos was for me!

More recently, I’ve been owing a lot of the recent game design lessons learned to Marissa Kelly, Sarah Richardson and Whitney Beltran from Bluebeard’s Bride, and John Harper’s work on Blades in the Dark. The former is such an amazing study in how to get horror and tension to emerge, and how to bake unusual ceremony into a game. A lot of people are intimidated by it when they are used to simulationist style games, and many admirers of Bluebeard’s Bride also label it as “simple” mechanically, but there is *so* much happening in the social and emotional landscape of that game, so much that gets mechanized so eloquently. Every piece of vocabulary that the players (including the Groundskeeper) use is calibrated perfectly to the theme and discussions Bluebeard’s is meant to provoke. Blades does a wondrous amount of things with a swashbuckling setup by letting players pick the details of their abilities and tools on the fly, but making *everything* a resource management game. When some of those resources aren’t just ‘coin’ or ‘inventory’ but are ‘stress’, it becomes evocative in a game that I wish a lot of other action/adventure RPGs would be. Both also have a remarkable relationship to violence that ends up more nuanced than what I think the common examples of games present show to those not entrenched in the game community. I’ve been studying these both *very* closely, and trying to digest the things they’ve brought to my game brain rather deeply.

Do you have any advice for others getting into the industry?

Don’t be afraid to put yourself out there, and do so in person! I try to go to events because I meet people and make fast friends when in the flesh, and those are friendships I really cherish and feel enriched by. Also, don’t underestimate how much you as (not a designer) are valuable to game design! A lot of my best game design ideas come from me essentially abstracting the anxieties of my day to day life doing freelance and being worried about the world into game mechanics and procedures, or finding the particular joys of the media I consume and turning that into a game. A Dire Situation started as an attempt to capture the unique feeling of watching people read things they shouldn’t have access to, which I always enjoy seeing in films. Get weird with your ideas, someone will cherish it and you’ll get to know yourself better through that, and don’t be afraid to share yourself before you’re ‘polished enough’. This industry is so young, and I think a lot of people curtail the considerable wisdom they can bring to it because they aren’t established, but that’s the way that communities grow best, when people exert the best of themselves in the truest way they know.

What do you think the most important things in gaming are right now?

That’s a huge question, and I’m afraid of my answer being too succinct to pin down a lot of the things that I think are valuable and important that are shifting in this medium and the community that fosters it. Right now, there’s a generation of designers and gamers that are pushing to be *way* more inclusive in this medium, which is amazing because it’s such an empathy builder. With that, we’re seeing a lot of games that are reflecting that wider spectrum of experiences and needs at a higher frequency, and seeing that it’s getting good and wide reception. Games like Bluebeard’s Bride, Star Crossed, Mutants in the Night, and BFF:Best Friends Forever are challenging questions of who’s stories are told, who’s perspectives are shared and what kind of exchange do we expect from such a social medium. As things move forward, I think that kind of willingness and encouragement to lean into new experiences without apologizing to established patterns of play and design is going to only help this community grow faster and stronger, even with the anticipated challenges. This medium is showing very explicitly that Joy isn’t just killing goblins, and Pain isn’t just the threat of being killed by goblins, and that kind of emotional honesty is pulling the industry into it’s teenage years.

This also comes with a greater call for accountability in our community as far as social safety. There’s a lot more discussion of missing stairs, safe tables, and supportive gatherings than I felt just a decade ago as a teenager. A lot of conduct has been pulled rather painfully into the light, a lot of social patterns are under intense scrutiny at our tables and in this industry, and I think that’s rightly so. Being in this world, much as I love it, can be so quietly, exhaustively bracing, and the people that make up this industry should feel able to assert what makes them feel safe and when they are threatened. People are actively doing this in games and in the community, and that’s amazing.

What’s your most meaningful gaming experience?

Generally, one that has enough trust to get uncomfortable. One where I can lean into the vulnerabilities of characters, and embolden fellow players to do the same. I look for kind of emotionally intense, bracing media, and I love feeling that way (or provoking that feeling) in a game. I want my assumptions shaken up a little bit, and, assuming it’s navigated compassionately and safely, I value going to dark places in games. It pulls a lot of the horror and strife of my actual world into perspective. I generally like my fantasy to reflect my reality and give me the vocabulary and process to make it better, or at least see it more clearly. There’s nothing wrong with lighter fare, but this is what will get my attention reliably.

What’s the most important change you could see occurring in the industry?

More than a few, but paying freelancers livable wages (even if it means shrinking the density of content) is the big one. There’s tons of ways to unpack this, and tons of reasons that workloads are overweighed and underpaid, many being unintentional for the majority of the market. In some ways, that’s made it even harder to check. The flipside is that I’ve had ADs in the industry say things along the lines of “artists take (RPG work) on as a hobby, nobody is doing this for full time work” and that sentiment really blew my mind. So many really talented artists spending so much time, money and effort perfecting craft and that’s a sentiment that’s we might be competing against when trying to navigate to a workable and healthy architecture of work. I think there’s a lot of wanting to do better on the business end, especially in indie RPGs, but the whole industry needs to (and is trying to) go through that learning process. The continued challenge to stick with those better principles I think is an instrumental change to the community’s sustainability.

Anything else you want to add?

When practicing magic, make sure to add salt!

And thank you for your time, Tracy!

 

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Entity Registration Form

New Drupal Modules - 6 February 2019 - 9:34am
Categories: Drupal

Agaric Collective: Pass variables without escaping nor sanitizing to t() in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 6 February 2019 - 9:12am

In Drupal 7 it was useful to do things like this: 

function mymodule_content() { $links[] = l('Google', 'http://www.google.com'); $links[] = l('Yahoo', 'http://www.yahoo.com'); return t('Links: !types', array('!types' => implode(', ', $links))); }

In this case, we are using the exclamation mark to pass the $links into our string but unfortunately, Drupal 8 doesn't have this option in the FormattableMarkup::placeholderFormat(), the good news is that even without this there is a way to accomplish the same thing. 

Read more and discuss at agaric.coop.

Categories: Drupal

Paragraphs View Mode Field

New Drupal Modules - 6 February 2019 - 7:33am
Categories: Drupal

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