Newsfeeds

Building a Pirate's Paradise: The AI of Sea of Thieves (Part 1) - by Tommy Thompson

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 4 June 2019 - 7:23am
In this first of a four-part series, I explore the numerous AI systems running under the hood of Rare's online pirate adventure game and the work required to maintain the experience for players across the Sea of Thieves.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Admin Toolbar Language Switcher

New Drupal Modules - 4 June 2019 - 7:08am

Add the Toolbar Language Switcher to administration toolbar of the project.
This is helpful to easily visualize the current page language context and the handy navigation to change it.

Categories: Drupal

From the Mouth of Babes

New RPG Product Reviews - 4 June 2019 - 6:31am
Publisher: Aegis Studios
Rating: 5
There's the standard thumbnail background of the *Odysseys and Overlords* setting and notes about suitable rules (handy if you've just picked this up without reading anything else in this game line), then we're off with the background to the adventure itself. It seems a bunch of goblins has been hanging out on the edge of an area of wilderness hoping to pick off adventurers going there to explore (or even better, coming back with their loot!) but a leadership dispute led to the loss of a magic dagger... which fell into their watersource, with dire results.

The party first find out about all this when they, like any adventurers worthy of the name, head into the wilderness - or snap up one of the plot hooks provided - and are accosted by a couple of hungry, grubby goblin youngsters who ask for help. This encounter should prove entertaining. Provision is made for it taking place either in the day or during the night, and there's plenty of detail to help you role-play it to the hilt.

Hopefully, with an optional encounter on the way, the party with the youngsters guiding them should arrive at the goblin lair. It's even smellier than the words 'goblin lair' suggest, for reasons that should become apparent as the delve into its depths proceeds. Everything is laid out clearly, with ample description, stat blocks/hit point check boxes for all encounters and other game mechanical information as necessary.

As with the young goblins in the opening encounter, it pays to try talking with at least some of the inhabitants of the lair, for if the party does so, they will be able to piece together what has been going on, as well as undertake the expected exploration, killing and looting. Whatever the party decides to do about the goblins, there are other monsters to slay and loot to be had.

Everything is left quite open ended. The party might help the goblins and continue exploring the wilderness, or they might - especially if you used one of the plot hooks provided - want to go back to town. There are suggestions for some further adventures and a welcome selection of 'story-based' XP awards that you can make based on the party's actions. There are a couple of new items and a new monster, and maps for both players and the GM.

Whilst OSR in essence, this has a welcome range of options for interaction and role-play, and is well-resourced to enable you to cope with just about anything your players might decide to do.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Overview Builder

New Drupal Modules - 4 June 2019 - 4:04am

The overview builder is a developer module that adds a new plugin type
"overview_builder" that allows to create custom overviews with pagination
and filters. This module can be used when you prefer to build your overviews
in code instead of configuring like the "Views" module. Also when you need more
flexibility than Views this module might suit your needs.

Categories: Drupal

Freelock : Is your host a single point of failure?

Planet Drupal - 3 June 2019 - 3:45pm
Is your host a single point of failure? John Locke Mon, 06/03/2019 - 15:45

Just ran across a sad story where Digital Ocean is accused of killing a startup:

Disaster Recovery Drupal Planet Risk
Categories: Drupal

Promet Source: Web Accessibility Solutions or Whack-a-Mole

Planet Drupal - 3 June 2019 - 1:44pm
Smart business decisions tend to be equated with cutting costs and saving money.   Over the past decade or so, “Better! Faster! Cheaper!” has become the rallying cry for business process reengineering and new initiatives within every sector. As a developer and former business owner, I get this. Efficiency is essential.  
Categories: Drupal

Video: Building interactive worlds the Walt Disney Imagineering way

Social/Online Games - Gamasutra - 3 June 2019 - 12:40pm

In this 2019 GDC talk, Walt Disney Imagineering's Brent D. Strong and Sara Thacher talk about the opportunities and challenges of building physical, interactive worlds! ...

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Mediacurrent: Can I See the Menu Please? Building and Integrating a Menu in Drupal

Planet Drupal - 3 June 2019 - 10:27am

By nature, menus are complicated. They’re not easy to work with, build or style, and yet they are probably the single most important navigation element of any website. Despite their complication, they need to be perfect to serve their purpose. A menu can make or break a website. They can make your browsing experience a pleasant one, or can drive you to leave a website frustrated and likely never to return.

When it comes to menus and forms, it is best to let Drupal dictate the direction rather than build them independently of Drupal. By adhering to Drupal’s best practices we can save a lot of time, effort and frustration. For example, rather than writing your menu’s markup before you see it being printed by Drupal, it is best to build your menu in Drupal and see what the markup looks like. Then you can use Drupal’s markup as a starting point for writing your menu’s markup. 

This is going to be a lengthy post (mostly because it includes a lot of code snippets), but this article will cover all you need to accomplish the following:

Build a multi-level menu component in Pattern Lab

Let’s start by building a pretty straight forward multi-level menu component in Pattern Lab. If you’ve used Pattern Lab or KSS Node you know most components require at least three files: 

  • .twig for the component markup and logic,
  • .yml or json for the component data or dummy content
  • .css or scss for the component styles
  • In some cases you may also need a Javascript file
     

For more in-depth explanation on building and integrating components read our blog series.  
Note: This series is over two years old and many things have changed since then, but the basics of building a component still apply.

Building the component

If the code above does not look familiar to you it’s probably because you’ve never used a Twig Macro. I will explain the macro in detail shortly, but for now let’s move on to completing the component.

  1. In your theme’s components location create a new directory called main-menu
  2. In the main-menu directory, create the following three files:
    • main-menu.twig
    • main-menu.yml
    • main-menu.scss
  3. Inside main-menu.yml add the code below:
  4. The data above represents an array of items. Each item has 3 key/value pairs: Title, URL and menu_level.  Each item represents a link in the menu.  You may notice some of the links have nested arrays (i.e. below). These represent submenus in the menu tree. The items array above is only intended to simulate the menu’s data for our component. In Drupal the array will be provided when we add menu links to Drupal’s Main Menu.
  5. Inside main-menu.twig add the code below:
  6. Finally add the following styles in main-menu.scss

These styles are as bare as possible. They are simply to make the menu look presentable and could use a lot of improvements. This is what the multi-level menu looks like:

It’s important to note that the component will simply be used for styleguide purposes. We will create a similar component for Drupal, but we will use the original component above as a base for markup styles and behavior.

Why do we need to create a duplicate component for Drupal?

Drupal provides attributes Pattern Lab does not understand. Rather than over complicating the component, we are going to keep it simple for styleguide purposes while the Drupal version is more elaborate with all the things Drupal needs. This is not required but provides more clarity to the process.

Create a Twig template suggestion for the main menu

Our ultimate goal is to update Drupal’s menu system to render with similar markup as the main-menu component. This will require several steps which we will cover next.

Follow these steps to enable Twig Debugging in your theme. Then, you can inspect your site, which will allow you to see the various template suggestions that Drupal uses to render the page; including your navigation menu. The debug information looks like this:

Under File Name Suggestions notice two template names: menu.html.twig & main-menu.html.twig. The X next to menu.html.twig indicates Drupal is using this file to render the Main Menu. The second file, main-menu.html.twig, is what Drupal is suggesting we create if we only want to alter the Main Menu and not other menus.

Under Begin Output notice the path where menu.html.twig can be found, the example above is pointing to Drupal’s stable theme.

To ensure we only affect the main menu and not other menus on our site, we are going to make a copy of Drupal’s menu.html.twig in our theme and then override it. This is recommended rather than modifying Drupal core’s template. Let’s start:

  1. Copy the menu.html.twig template from core/themes/stable/templates/navigation/ into [site_root]/themes/custom/<your-theme>/templates/navigation/menu.html.twig (if these folders do not exist yet in your theme go ahead and create them).
    Following the golden rule “Never hack core”, we want to make a copy of Drupal’s menu template in our own theme. Replace the core theme’s name with your core base theme if you are not using stable.

  2. Next, In your theme rename the newly copied template to main-menu.html.twig.
    Copying menu.html.twig into our theme will affect other menus. This is why we are renaming the template so it only affects the main menu (main-menu.html.twig). Replace ‘main’ with whatever your menu’s machine name is if you are not using Drupal’s Main Menu. This can be found in Drupal’s Menus page (admin/structure/menus).

  3. After clearing Drupal’s cache, inspect the menu again and you should see the X next to main-menu.html.twig which means Drupal is now using our custom twig template suggestion to render the menu.

Create a multi-level menu in Drupal
  • Let’s make sure we have a menu we can see in Drupal. Let’s create a multi-level menu using the Main Navigation menu (Structure | Menus | Main Navigation).

  • Add as many links as you wish. Be sure to add nested items so we end up with a multi-level menu.

  • In addition, ensure each of the submenu’s parent links are set to “show expanded. You will see the option on the Add/Edit Link page.

  • Finally, go to Structure | Block Layout and click Configure next to Main Navigation

    • Change Number of levels to display to Unlimited. This will ensure dropdowns are rendered and display in your navigation.

Customize the template suggestion

Before we look at the code inside menu.html.twig as it may look confusing or not familiar, we are going to move it into the same directory as the main-menu component. We are doing this to make some improvements to the macro.

  1. In the same directory where you created the main-menu component, create a new file called _main-menu-macro.twig (notice the underscore as first character of file name). This file is only for Drupal purposes and we don’t need it to be shown in Pattern Lab. The underscore allows Pattern Lab to ignore it.

  2. Copy all the code from main-menu.html.twig into _main-menu-macro.twig.

The above code is a Twig Macro. Macros are the Twig version of functions. Just like you would write a function in PHP to do something and return something, you can use a Twig macro to generate some output.

Rendering menu with default macro

If we were to use the macro provided by Drupal as is our menu would render at its simplest form with minimum markup and almost no semantic css classes. See example:

The markup above may look different depending on your base menu. The classy base menu may show more markup but it does not make our job easier to style the menu.

Update Drupal’s menu macro to match our component’s markup

Not having the right markup for the menu, or any other element for that matter, can really complicate things for us when it’s time to style. We are going to modify the macro so it matches the markup of the main-menu component, and as a result the styles we wrote for the component will apply to the Drupal menu.

Menu Macro explained

Let’s step through this macro line by line to understand what it does. To keep things simple we are going to ignore all the custom classes we added above and focus on the macro itself.

  • Twig macros can be called from other twig templates; and it's also possible to place the macro within the same twig template from which you call it. The context is used in this case (line 21). So, with this import statement, we imported the macro and set it as a variable called menus.
  • Using the menus variable we then assign a name to it (main_menu), (line 23), which will take the following parameters: items, attributes, and 0). This name can be anything you wish.
  • Now we declare the macro again but this time with its new name, main_menu,( line 25), and pass the slightly modified parameters items, attributes, menu_level. We've changed the menu_level to a variable. If you are wondering where these parameters come from, the comments above the macro code in menu.html.twig provide all these variables.
  • Now that we’ve updated the arguments, we self import the macro again to make use of it (line 26).
  • Before writing any markup, we first check whether there are menu items to render (line 27).
    • If there are items in our main menu we start writing the markup. However, since we may have a multi-level menu, we want to make sure we identify the top level menu from nested (submenus), menus in the tree.  
    • This is where we first check if the menu_level is 0 (zero).
    • If it is the top level menu, we print a <ul> and we pass Drupal’s attributes in addition to our custom class.
    • If menu is not top level (submenus), then we simply print a <ul> with its corresponding class.

Learn more about Macros in Twig Templates.

Looping through the menu tree

Looping through the items array allows us to intersect each item and apply classes or attributes.

  • First we loop through the items array (line 33), and for each item, we print a <li> some classes which can be helpful if we need to style the different states of the menu.
  • For each link in a list item, we pass two things:
    • The node title
    • The node url
  • Inside the list item, we check to see if that particular item has other items or submenus.
  • When submenus exist, we make use of the macro again to repeat the process of printing the menu. This is where the macro saves us from writing duplicate code.
  • For each level of submenus we are increasing the menu_level by 1 and printing it as part of the submenu class. This is handy if we want to target a specific submenu in the tree.
  • Finally, we close all previously open actions/tags (i.e. for loops, if statements, lists, and macro).

RESOURCE: I recently ran into a blog post by Tamas Hajas where he has a great way to address classes and states on a menu. Check it out Drupal 8 Twig: add custom CSS classes to menus

Looking at the rendered menu after Macro improvements

Now that we have a better understanding on how the macro works, and after making the improvements discussed above, the markup for the menu would look something like this:

Integrate the Main Menu component with Drupal’s Menu

The last part of the process is to integrate all the work we’ve done with Drupal, so our Main Menu is rendered with the markup, styles and behavior we implemented when we built the component.  

  1. >In your editor, open [site_root]/themes/custom/<your-theme>/templates/navigation/main-menu.html.twig
  2. Delete all the content in the twig template except for the comments, and then paste the code below into it
{{ attach_library('your_theme/main-menu') }} {% import '@patterns/main-menu/_main-menu-macro.twig' as menus %} {{ menus.main_menu(items, attributes, 0) }}
  1. Clear Drupal’s cache
  2. Reload Drupal’s page

Since we moved the macro to the component’s location, all we need to do in the main-menu.html.twig template is to import the macro and provide the parameters the macro expects. These parameters can be found in the twig template’s comments.

If we did our job right, Drupal’s menu should now look and behave the same way as our component. In addition, if you inspect the Drupal page, the menu should reflect the same markup as the main-menu component.

IMPORTANT: If you are using the Main Navigation blog to position the navigation where you want it in the page, you may need to make a copy of the twig template for that block in order to assign the main-menu class the menu needs.  

  • Copy block--system-menu-block.html from your base theme into your own theme’s /templates directory
  • Modify the template so it includes the main-menu class, as shown below:
    <nav class="main-menu" role="navigation" aria-labelledby="{{ heading_id }}"{{ attributes|without('role', 'aria-labelledby') }}>
Drupal Libraries

As a best practice, we should create a drupal library to attach any styles and javascript to our component. See this article for adding CSS and JS to a page or component.

In our case our library would look like this:

  • Inside /themes/custom/<your-theme>/your-theme.libraries.yml add the following code

main-menu: css: component: dist/css/main-menu.css: {}

This library has already been attached above inside menu--main.html.twig

By doing this any styles we wrote for the component will apply to the main navigation when it’s rendered in Drupal. Drupal libraries have no effect in Pattern Lab.

After completing the steps above, clear your Drupal’s cache and reload your Drupal site. You should see your Drupal menu being rendered with all the styles and markup we wrote throughout this post.

In closing

I’d like to admit that I went about the long way to get the main menu working on both, Pattern Lab and Drupal. There are other ways to accomplish this by using contrib modules such as Simplify Menu (full disclosure, I helped create the module), and perhaps Twig Tweak among several others, however, the approach I took here gives you the most control and that can make all the difference if you are dealing with a pretty advanced or complicated menu.

Categories: Drupal

ACME Challenge

New Drupal Modules - 3 June 2019 - 7:53am
Categories: Drupal

Part 3, Putting into play - On narrative from a cognitive perspective II - by Katarina Gyllenback

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 3 June 2019 - 7:32am
"Putting into play" is part of more than a one-year-long project which goal is to explain from a cognitive and narrative perspective the mind and hands-on approach to the design of an engaging and dynamic game system.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Diary of a game 1 - Capturing architectural decisions - by Mark Easton

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 3 June 2019 - 7:28am
Starting game development, and deciding an approach to recording architectural decisions
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Extended Fiction in Game Design: Metal Gear Solid and Emily Is Away - by Austin Anderson

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 3 June 2019 - 7:26am
Part of my honors thesis on extended fiction in game design, this section focuses on Metal Gear Solid and Emily Is Away, two very different games that execute a relatively similar technique to extend their fiction and evoke parallel emotion in players.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Kliuless #37: Anti-Loot Box Bill - by Kenneth Liu

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 3 June 2019 - 7:25am
Each week I compile a gaming industry insights newsletter that I share broadly within Riot. This edition is the public version that I publish broadly every week as well. Opinions are mine.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Looking Back on a Decade of Coaching and Training Agile Game Development - by Clinton Keith

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 3 June 2019 - 7:21am
As I've passed a decade as an independent agile coach and trainer, I reflect on what got me here, where we're at and what the future holds.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Chinese Game Localization 2019: Translate Games With The 4R Technique In Mind - by Dolly Dai

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 3 June 2019 - 7:18am
The Chinese games market sales revenue represents nearly ¼ of the global game market. Learn what to pay attention to during the Chinese localization process and how to boost your downloads in China with the 4R technique.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

History of Game Design: The Suprisingly Ancient Origins of Pinball - by Caleb Compton

Gamasutra.com Blogs - 3 June 2019 - 7:16am
Pinball may seem like it has always been around, but where did it come from? This article looks at the ancient historical beginnings of this game, and how it evolved into what we know today.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Specbee: How Easy Is Drupal To Use? Leveraging Drupal CMS To Create Digital Experiences

Planet Drupal - 3 June 2019 - 6:57am
The term Drupal invokes different feelings among different people, based on their professional background or on what they have heard or learned about the CMS . Over the years, Drupal CMS has evolved from a simple tool for hobbyists, to a powerful digital experience platform for Global enterprises. 
Categories: Drupal

Spire of the Kobolds

New RPG Product Reviews - 3 June 2019 - 6:18am
Publisher: Aegis Studios
Rating: 4
This adventure for 1st-2nd level characters opens with the standard overview of the history of the land (in case you've picked up the adventure without looking at any other *Odysseys and Overlords* material) and then gives a brief note about the background to the adventure. It's designed to toss the party straight into the action when they are in some wild country called the Untamed Gauntlet.

Interestingly, the party has not been sent to the Spire, a known but mysterious landmark in the Untamed Gauntlet - the intention is that they are going elsewhere when they notice activity there and presumably decide to investigate. In case they don't, there's a kobold hunting party wandering around that might decide to have a go at them. From there it's into the Spire proper and a room-to-room description follows.

Two maps are provided, one for the GM and one for the players. They are nice and clear, but the only difference between them appears to be the room numbers (which the players don't get). The room descriptions are good, providing details of what's there along with stat blocks for who/whatever is in there - complete with checkboxes to mark off their hit points as they die, a neat addition - and relevant mechanics for any traps.

There's enough going on in this small space, with several of the kobolds potentially willing to interact rather than just fight to the death (although they mostly will, if not running away, should the party not be inclined to conversation. Overall, it's a nice introductory adventure that brings out the essence of the 'OSR' style of play.
Categories: Game Theory & Design

Mediacurrent: The Drupal 7 Versus 8 Debate: An Insurer’s Guide to Upgrading

Planet Drupal - 3 June 2019 - 5:56am

In the battle for insurance customer loyalty, the best customer experience wins. Equipped with a powerful content management system (CMS) like Drupal, insurance web teams are prepared for a competitive landscape crowded with fast-on-their-feet insurtech startups and looming giants of tech, Amazon and Google

The Drupal 7 Versus 8 Debate: A Team Approach 

Drupal 9 is coming. With the release just under a year away, the time is now for insurers’ teams to resolve their internal CMS debate — remain on Drupal 7 or upgrade to Drupal 8?

Bridging the customer experience gap is no small feat. However, insurance business leaders, marketers and developers are tackling the challenge head on. They comprise the team of experience builders with seats at the table for decisions like a CMS upgrade. To forward growth, their technology decisions are prioritized by data security and cost control. Also topping the list of evaluation criteria is a capacity for continuous improvement and swift speed to market of applications and functionality. Business leaders, marketers and developers bring unique approaches to achieve these common goals. In this article, we’ll evaluate Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 through the lens of these three stakeholders.

Current Drupal 7 sites have captured a glimpse of why Drupal is a fit for insurance, but the real power lies within Drupal 8. Of course, the decision to upgrade requires thoughtful consideration and planning. It’s a significant undertaking, particularly for large sites. However, factoring in the robust features of Drupal 8 with the appealing innovation forecast for Drupal 9—and the simple upgrade path connecting the two—insurers are likely to find that the advantages of upgrading far exceed the disadvantages. 

Drupal 7 Versus Drupal 8 for Business Leaders

Business leaders’ roles and responsibilities revolve around improving operating efficiency and cutting expenses. A flexible technology stack is crucial to stay competitive, perhaps even opening doors to collaborate with emerging insurtech startups. 

Focusing on the bottom line, insurance business leaders are understandably concerned with forecasting migration costs. 

Gaining a Competitive Edge 

With Drupal 8, insurers can gain a foothold to gain, and keep, a competitive edge in the market. 

  • Drupal 8 core offers many advantages, including improved performance and a better editorial and developer experience, to close the innovation loop.
  • To support the leap from Drupal 7, Drupal 8 now includes a built-in user interface to streamline migrations and offers more support for multilingual migrations.
  • More accessible web forms and other accessibility improvements in Drupal 8 serve to support legal compliance efforts and extend insurance offerings to the widest possible audience.
Benefits of Drupal 8 

Source: Mediacurrent

The many advancements in Drupal 8 core are reason enough to consider an upgrade, but contributed modules represent the best innovation in the Drupal ecosystem. The brilliant and globally spread Drupal community has shone a spotlight on Drupal 8. Drupal 7 simply hasn’t received the same level of enhancements and attention. Furthermore, passing on Drupal 8 now can also mean missing competitive advantages during the waiting time before Drupal 9. 

Looking ahead, moving to Drupal 8 now will make for an easier transition to Drupal 9. In the words of Frank Sinatra, “The best is yet to come...and won’t it be fine” (or should we say, nine?).   

Estimating Effort and Cost

Insurance business leaders are naturally concerned with total cost of ownership for their Drupal CMS. The migration roadmap is an important factor in that equation. 

Can you take your time to upgrade for Drupal 9? The answer is, technically, yes — but consider both migration and opportunity costs.  After clearing the jump from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8, expect future upgrades to Drupal 9 and onward will be significantly easier. 

Drupal 8 marked the beginning of a new continuous innovation model where advances in functionality are released rapidly on a six-month release cycle. Also, the Drupal 8 architecture is tuned so that a simplified upgrade path awaits to Drupal 9. This approach allows you to benefit from the innovation of Drupal 8 as Drupal 9 brews in the same codebase. 

Mediacurrent’s Drupal 9 Upgrade Guide can help prep your site for the move to Drupal 9. 

Drupal 7 Versus Drupal 8 for Marketers

Insurance marketers of all types, e.g., home, auto and life, view the customer experience as synonymous with digital experience. They have watched customer loyalty dwindle as the market has shifted online, where it’s never been easier to switch providers and shop online for quotes.

Earning Loyalty, Improving Customer Experience

Drupal 8’s appeal to marketers has grown significantly with major releases emphasizing ease of use and customer experience. Insurance organizations like MagMutual have embarked on the transition from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 to better serve marketing teams:

Our Drupal platform allows our team to adapt to that very quickly to change marketing strategies as we continue to grow and evolve with our customer base.

Sallie Graves, CIO, MagMutual

Catch up on our CIO Interview with MagMutual to see how the organization is bringing new engagement strategies to life on an adaptable platform.

The key to forging deep customer loyalty lies in improving the customer experience from start to finish. In evaluating a CMS platform, marketers need a solution to tighten the reins on data so that it can be applied to the customer experience. 

For Guardian Insurance, Drupal 8 was a savvy place to land. Read Guardian’s Drupal 8 case study to see how they built a data-informed customer experience to win millennial insurance shoppers. 

Our Drupal 8 platform will serve as a foundation as we scale and enhance our web and mobile experiences for customers.

Peggy Maher, SVP, direct to consumer at Guardian Life Insurance 

Drupal 8 and Modern MarTech Stack 

Insurance marketers on Drupal 7 have most likely been with the same platform for a few years. If that rings true for you, consider the strategic doors that an upgrade can open. Think big about your website as a business tool. 

Consider questions like:

  • Does your conversion rate, bounce rate, site traffic and page load time indicate it’s time for a redesign?
  • Do you have a solution for customer journey mapping? Can you see what works, what doesn’t and, most importantly, why to engage prospective and current customers?
  • What usability improvements can help shape the customer experience?
  • Are there any areas of your digital presence lacking in personalization?

Drupal 8 is built for easy integration with your current and future marketing toolkit. Connect marketing automation, email service providers, CRM and more with Drupal 8 as the foundation for your digital experience ecosystem.

Drupal 7 Versus Drupal 8 for DevelopersSecurity 

Developers in the insurance space are tasked with managing the security implications for mountains of personal data and sensitive information. 

We mentioned previously that the developer community has been laser focused on innovation in Drupal 8 —this also applies to security. Major security flaws are first found—and first fixed—in Drupal 8. If that’s not reason enough to contemplate a move to Drupal 8, consider also the security implications of Drupal 7’s impending end of life where core maintainers check out of security duty.  Beware— your site’s data could become vulnerable to hacking and other exploits. 

A study from 2018 found 63% of hacked sites running Drupal had outdated versions when breached.  

Ahead of the Curve 

The Internet of Things (IoT), which includes smart home devices and new telematics solutions, gives insurers a new opportunity to learn from customers to serve them better. Beyond just a website, insurers need to meet customers on their screen of choice. Whether it’s mobile, wearables or smart home devices, screen time is all the time. Drupal 8 core is built with the elasticity to accommodate customers’ devices of today and tomorrow. 

For more considerations from a site builder’s perspective, read 10 Reasons Why You Should Start Your New Project in Drupal 8 on the Acquia Developers blog. 

Conclusion

For insurance providers, digital transformation is where customer experience meets Drupal 8 technology. With a highly proactive community behind the screens, the Drupal project is paving the runway for next-generation customer experiences. 

Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 converts like the State of Georgia and Pegasystems are but two examples of large, complex sites that saw significant gains from their migration. Acquia and Mediacurrent have proudly supported these organizations on their Drupal journey. Watch their migration stories here

Master Your Drupal 8 Upgrade With a Trusted Partner

The final crucial consideration on the road to adopting Drupal 8 is choosing a migration partner. As a leader in Drupal development, strategy and design, Mediacurrent has partnered with high-profile clients ranging from large enterprise businesses to education. Together with Acquia, our talent, tools and processes ensure a smooth and successful migration. Partnering with us will help you establish the personalized digital experiences that capture customer loyalty — leveraging flexible open source technology and with the lock-tight security the industry requires.

Categories: Drupal

Drawing Initiative -The Best Initiative Trick You Probably Never Thought Of

Gnome Stew - 3 June 2019 - 5:18am

 

I was at a meetup game the other week and was watching a new GM struggle to remember the initiative order of the players and the NPCs. After the game ended, I asked if they wanted to hear a cool trick I came up with to remember initiative and track HP at the table with little prep. They said sure, and I outlined the trick that has saved my life in running D&D or action / initiative heavy games over the last few years. I call it DRAWING YOUR INITIATIVE and I can’t believe I haven’t yet written an article on it.

Drawing Your Initiative

This system is super simple, and requires a small paradigm shift in thinking, but helps out incredibly if you are the type of game master who forgets the order or names of characters / npcs often. Here’s the process.

  1. Take your sheet of scrap paper (any size will do, but a bigger one leaves room for more info) and draw the shape of the table somewhere near the top.
  2. Point from left to right and ask for players initiatives, then mark them down based on their approximate positions at the table. Bonus: Write their character names next to the initiative number.
  3. Draw a small table (or just mark it in a space at the bottom) and put in the enemies initiative and any reminders (A, B, Fighter 1, Mage Red Cloak, etc.) to denote the NPC.
  4. Draw a line under the NPC initiative and then write the current HP, marking it off and scratching it off as the NPC gets hit.

This simple visual trick merges the physical space of the table and gives you an easy reminder for the quick information you need. You can expand it by making notes next to the players and NPC names (a C for charmed, a D for disadvantage, etc.) and scratching it off is easy. If you keep the concept to a Top for PCS, Bottom for NPCS and use an 8.5 by 11 piece of paper, you’ll have plenty of expansion or note space.

 

Hopefully this helps some of the GMs out there who struggle with keeping track of initiative order and HP for the crunchier games. If you’ve got a clever initiative trick, I’d love to hear  about it. I’m always up for new ideas to incorporate into my games.

 

Categories: Game Theory & Design

Pages

Subscribe to As If Productions aggregator