Skip to Content

Planet Drupal

Syndicate content
Drupal.org - aggregated feeds in category Planet Drupal
Updated: 17 hours 53 min ago

Shomeya: Running Your Agency/Tech Company like a Factory is Destroying Humanity: Part 2

11 May 2015 - 12:45pm

In case you missed it Part 1

Very carefully I cut the letters out of the magazines that are strewn across my table. My fingers covered in glue, I lay them out one at a time on a piece of heavy duty paper, a message for the CEO of my friend's company. A message to save humanity:

"Your company is following the startup lemmings off the cliff, do you care?"

-- Anonymous

Every year your agency or startup is throwing away thousands of dollars, because you follow some very bad habits that reward mediocrity and egos. I know because as a CEO of even a tiny company, I've watched you bleed and wanted to hand you the bandage.

At Shomeya I am the CEO and the Project manager, when I fuck up and put my programmer in a bad position I see how it effects his work AND his home life. I feel every late night, and regret every poor choice when I said yes to the client, because I deal with the results.

So I learned to adjust Shomeya to make better choices. And the good news is these choices can scale because they are based on something we all deal with no matter what the size of our payroll; human brains.

Read more
Categories: Drupal

Red Crackle: Adding A Contextual Filter To A View In Drupal 8

11 May 2015 - 11:00am
In this article, we will focus on contextual filters. Initially, we will explore the difference between contextual and regular filters. After that, we will create a view displaying content created by the logged-in user. We will also explore the “WHEN THE FILTER VALUE IS NOT IN THE URL” dialog box and the different options associated with it.
Categories: Drupal

J-P Stacey: When iterating on features can break a Drupal site in development

11 May 2015 - 10:19am

It's generally safe to use Features to maintain and deploy the configuration of Drupal sites, but I'd heard rumours from other developers that, especially during a rapid development process, some phase of featurization could lead to database errors. I'd not seen that for ages until a few days ago, when re-enabling features led to PDO exceptions. Here's what I did, what I didn't do, and how to mitigate this problem in future.

The process I followed: getting a new live database mid-featurizing

I had been working on a feature locally, part of which included adding new fields to a content type. All the additions had been exported into the feature and checked into version control. The features dashboard was showing green "Default" lights all the way.

Read more of "When iterating on features can break a Drupal site in development"

Categories: Drupal

Wim Leers: Making Drupal fly - The fastest Drupal ever is near!

11 May 2015 - 9:45am

Come and join us for a wild ride into the depths of Render Caching and how it enables Drupal to be faster than ever.

The Masterplan of Drupal Performance

Here we will reveal the TRUE MASTERPLAN of Drupal Performance. The plan we have secretly (not really!) been implementing for years and are now “sharing” finally with all of you! (Well you could look at the issue queue too or this public google doc, but this session will be more fun!)

Learn what we have in store for the future and what has changed since we last talked about this topic in Amsterdam and why Drupal 8 will even be more awesome and why you don’t have to wait and can do it all in Drupal 7 right now with the help of the render_cache module (with some extra work).

Get the edge advantage of knowing more

Learn how to utilize cache contexts to vary the content of your site, cache tags to know perfectly when items are expired and cache keys to identify the objects - and what is the difference between them.

Learn how powerful ‘placeholders’ will allow the perfect ESI caching you always wanted and how it will all be very transparent and how you can make your modules ready for the placeholder future.

See with your own eyes how you can utilize all of that functionality now on your Drupal 7 and 8 sites.

Get ready for a new area of performance

We will show you:

  • The biggest Do’s and Don’ts when creating render-cache enabled modules and sites
  • Frontend performance pitfalls and why front-end performance is tied to backend performance more than you thought
  • Why libraries[] are so great and why single CSS/JS files make trouble.
  • Common scenarios and how to solve them (mobile sites variation, cookie variation, etc.)
  • Drupal using an intelligent BigPipe approach

Get to know the presenters

This session will be presented by Wim Leers and Fabian Franz. Wim implemented a lot of what we show here in Drupal 8 and made the APIs easy and simple to use and made cache tags and #post_render_cache a very powerful concept. Fabian has prototyped a lot of this concepts in his render_cache module, introduced powerful Drupal 8 concepts into Drupal 7 and is always one step ahead in making the next big thing. Together they have set out on a crusade to rule the Drupal Performance world to bring you the faster Drupal ever!

Slides: http://wimleers.com/talk-making-drupal-fly-fastest-drupal-ever-nearConference: DrupalCon Los AngelesLocation: Los AngelesDate: May 13 2015 - 02:00Duration: 60 minutes
Categories: Drupal

Drupal Watchdog: VIDEO: DrupalCon Amsterdam Interview: Kieran Lal

11 May 2015 - 9:36am

KIERAN LAL (Technical Director, Corporate Development, Acquia), nabbed outside the Acquia room, talks about the Drupal Organization, movie sound-tracks, and learning Italian – then indulges in a “Hi, Mom!” moment.

Tags:  DrupalCon Amsterdam DrupalCon Video Video: 
Categories: Drupal

Drupal Watchdog: VIDEO: DrupalCon Amsterdam Interview: Robert Vandenburg

11 May 2015 - 9:32am

Lingotek does translation management (whatever that is). As President and CEO, ROBERT VANDENBURG gets to travel to exotic locations like Austin and Amsterdam, and hobnob with the locals.

How many languages does Bob speak? We’ll ask him at DrupalCon LA. Stay tuned.

Tags:  DrupalCon Amsterdam DrupalCon Video Video: 
Categories: Drupal

nielsdefeyter.nl: Create a View with Organic Group content

11 May 2015 - 7:08am
If you want to list Organic Group content in a View you must do a little more that just add one reference. The default example is available if you enable Organic Groups. The name of that View is "OG content" (machine-name: og_nodes ). I put it here on the blog because our usecase didn't use Organic...
Categories: Drupal

iterate.: Drupal Open Days 2015

11 May 2015 - 7:03am

Drupal Open Days is the annual Irish Drupal conference. This year we are presenting three talks at the event covering business strategy, UX and development.

Categories: Drupal

Amazee Labs: Kickstart your Career with Amazee Talents

11 May 2015 - 5:04am
Kickstart your Career with Amazee Talents

Today our Group is launching Amazee Talents, a program to win bright minds like you for a 3 month internship at Amazee Labs or Amazee Metrics.

If you have completed, or are about to complete your apprenticeship, higher education or university degree and happen to live in Switzerland, the European Union, the United States or South Africa, then read on.

We are looking for above-average talents in web development, web analytics or online marketing who love to tackle tech problems and want to join our hard working team.

Depending on the available positions and your domicile you will be assigned to an internship in Zurich (Switzerland) or Austin (Texas, USA). The Amazee Group covers all travel and accommodation cost to and at your place of work. 

So, if you want to learn from the best in the field of Drupal development or web analytics & online marketing and be part of an open and creative corporate culture, visit the Amazee Talent program on our Group website.

We are looking forward to your application (scroll down for the talent program)!

Categories: Drupal

Microserve: The importance of being Open

11 May 2015 - 1:11am

Many years ago I started my working life as a trainee tech journalist. Every month the magazine that I worked on was accompanied by a CD-ROM containing dozens of (mostly useless) applications for readers to install on their PCs. As the new boy on the team I remember asking what it meant that some of the products were listed as ‘open source’. “It just means that we can put them on the disc without paying anyone” came the explanation.

I didn’t think about it much at the time, but years later I’ve come to realise that for many people ‘open source’ still just means ‘free’. No doubt that’s one of the most attractive things about open source software, but it’s only half the story. As well as the software being ‘free of charge’ the source code is freely available too, allowing anyone with the right skills to use it, customise it and improve it. Any useful developments can then be donated back to the source code for everyone to benefit from, making it a virtuous circle for those involved.

One of the best ways to illustrate the importance of open source software development is to consider the history of the internet itself. From the TCP/IP protocols, to the concept of hypertext, to the LAMP stack and (some) modern browsers, the internet as we know it relies on royalty-free technologies that have been made openly available over the years for everyone’s benefit. My guess is that the early pioneers of the web weren’t aiming to become millionaires (although some consequently did), rather they wanted to use their new discoveries to make people’s lives better. In the era of internet billionaires and an obsession with intellectual property, it’s important for everyone involved in web-related industries to occasionally remind ourselves that we’re all standing on the shoulders of these altruistic giants.

So yes, open source always means ‘free’, but it means so much more besides. It means thinking about the bigger picture rather than the quick buck. It means having the courage to let other people make your ideas better. It means developing re-usable solutions and not reinventing the wheel. All of this can only lead to better software for everyone.

But why should the principles of open source only apply to software development? If the principles work, then why couldn’t they be applied to other disciplines? When I look at the briefs that land on my desk, I see clients asking for solutions to the same types of problems again and again, which makes me think: “wouldn’t it be great if ‘open UX design’ was a thing, or ‘open business analysis’?” Organisations always think they are unique, but their requirements are often almost identical to others in the same sector.

I recently pitched to rebuild the website of a major county council, which had already done a superb job on the UX and design phase of the project, producing some very focused wireframes and prototypes. Since this great work was funded by public money, it feels right that the documentation could be made publicly available, and potentially save other local councils from spending tens of thousands of pounds to reach similar (probably worse) solutions.

I’m not suggesting one-size-fits-all solutions, rather solutions that can be adapted for each instance and which evolve as we collectively learn more about what works and what doesn’t. By sharing and collaborating more openly the evolution of ‘best practice’ will accelerate, which will benefit everyone as ever-more smart and effective solutions emerge.

And after open UX design, why not open hardware design? Or open pharmaceutical development? Or open product design? I’m pretty sure that ‘open’ movements are happening in all these industries to some extent, but it would great to see them reaching a critical mass and getting a higher profile. Maybe there will come a time when the the Dragons on 'Dragons’ Den' don’t ask “do you own the patent?” but “will you open-source it?”. The benefits for society would be huge.

At Microserve we use Drupal CMS and are very proud to be heavily involved in the Drupal community. Our developers make frequent contributions to the open source project, and we also contribute financially, attend events and are co-organising DrupalCamp Bristol 2015 (buy your tickets now). It’s our way of giving something back to the open-source movement, which has gifted us and millions of others a great way of earning a living. We hope, in our own small way, that we’re making the web, and the world, a better place.

Dan McNamara
Categories: Drupal

Microserve: The importance of being Open

11 May 2015 - 1:11am
The importance of being OpenMonday, May 11, 2015 - 09:11

Many years ago I started my working life as a trainee tech journalist. Every month the magazine that I worked on was accompanied by a CD-ROM containing dozens of (mostly useless) applications for readers to install on their PCs. As the new boy on the team I remember asking what it meant that some of the products were listed as ‘open source’. “It just means that we can put them on the disc without paying anyone” came the explanation.

I didn’t think about it much at the time, but years later I’ve come to realise that for many people ‘open source’ still just means ‘free’. No doubt that’s one of the most attractive things about open source software, but it’s only half the story. As well as the software being ‘free of charge’ the source code is freely available too, allowing anyone with the right skills to use it, customise it and improve it. Any useful developments can then be donated back to the source code for everyone to benefit from, making it a virtuous circle for those involved.

One of the best ways to illustrate the importance of open source software development is to consider the history of the internet itself. From the TCP/IP protocols, to the concept of hypertext, to the LAMP stack and (some) modern browsers, the internet as we know it relies on royalty-free technologies that have been made openly available over the years for everyone’s benefit. My guess is that the early pioneers of the web weren’t aiming to become millionaires (although some consequently did), rather they wanted to use their new discoveries to make people’s lives better. In the era of internet billionaires and an obsession with intellectual property, it’s important for everyone involved in web-related industries to occasionally remind ourselves that we’re all standing on the shoulders of these altruistic giants.

So yes, open source always means ‘free’, but it means so much more besides. It means thinking about the bigger picture rather than the quick buck. It means having the courage to let other people make your ideas better. It means developing re-usable solutions and not reinventing the wheel. All of this can only lead to better software for everyone.

But why should the principles of open source only apply to software development? If the principles work, then why couldn’t they be applied to other disciplines? When I look at the briefs that land on my desk, I see clients asking for solutions to the same types of problems again and again, which makes me think: “wouldn’t it be great if ‘open UX design’ was a thing, or ‘open business analysis’?” Organisations always think they are unique, but their requirements are often almost identical to others in the same sector.

I recently pitched to rebuild the website of a major county council, which had already done a superb job on the UX and design phase of the project, producing some very focused wireframes and prototypes. Since this great work was funded by public money, it feels right that the documentation could be made publicly available, and potentially save other local councils from spending tens of thousands of pounds to reach similar (probably worse) solutions.

I’m not suggesting one-size-fits-all solutions, rather solutions that can be adapted for each instance and which evolve as we collectively learn more about what works and what doesn’t. By sharing and collaborating more openly the evolution of ‘best practice’ will accelerate, which will benefit everyone as ever-more smart and effective solutions emerge.

And after open UX design, why not open hardware design? Or open pharmaceutical development? Or open product design? I’m pretty sure that ‘open’ movements are happening in all these industries to some extent, but it would great to see them reaching a critical mass and getting a higher profile. Maybe there will come a time when the the Dragons on 'Dragons’ Den' don’t ask “do you own the patent?” but “will you open-source it?”. The benefits for society would be huge.

At Microserve we use Drupal CMS and are very proud to be heavily involved in the Drupal community. Our developers make frequent contributions to the open source project, and we also contribute financially, attend events and are co-organising DrupalCamp Bristol 2015 (buy your tickets now). It’s our way of giving something back to the open-source movement, which has gifted us and millions of others a great way of earning a living. We hope, in our own small way, that we’re making the web, and the world, a better place.

Dan McNamara Main Image: 
Categories: Drupal

Propeople Blog: FFW: Our New Digital Agency

10 May 2015 - 11:18pm

Today, I am excited to introduce you to our new digital agency: FFW. Over the past several months, we have been working at Blink Reaction and Propeople to bring the two agencies together under a single unified brand. Through the process, we have reflected on the great successes achieved by the individual agencies throughout our histories. But more importantly, we have come together to define the core vision that will drive our new joint agency into the future.

FFW is a global digital agency built on technology, driven by data, and focused on user experience. We bring together 420 people working across 19 offices in 11 countries, to form a new agency that is a part of the Intellecta Group (listed on the NASDAQ OMX).

We find ourselves in a unique position in the digital agency marketplace as recognized technology experts that also excel in data-driven digital strategy and creative work.

No other agency understands the intersection of technology, strategy and creativity as well as we do.

We are excited to begin a whole new chapter together as FFW. It is a bittersweet moment, as the individual stories of Blink Reaction and Propeople come to an end, but I absolutely can’t wait to see what the future holds for our new agency.

Tags: FFWdigital agencyCheck this option to include this post in Planet Drupal aggregator: planetTopics: Business & Strategy
Categories: Drupal

DrupalCon News: Registration is Open! Come on By!

10 May 2015 - 3:13pm

Registration is officially open!  We will be at the Los Angeles Convention Center until 6:00pm today and will open tomorrow 7:00am!

When you walk down South Figueroa street, you will turn right on 12th Avenue to the entrance of the West Hall Lobby.  It should look like this:

As you get closer you will see the blue carpet, your official cue that you have arrived at DrupalCon Los Angeles!  Welcome!  Enter the doors and we will see you at registration.

Categories: Drupal

Harry Slaughter: Dang, it happened to me!

10 May 2015 - 12:40pm

After using the new gmail 'tabs' for a while, I began just ignoring anything not in the primary tab. It turns out, this included notifications from Godaddy regarding domain renewals. I neglected to renew devbee.com, and as sure as the sun rises, it got scooped up immediately by a ... person.

read more

Categories: Drupal

ThinkDrop Consulting: DevShop Workshop & Sprints at DrupalCon Los Angeles

10 May 2015 - 10:51am

I'm headed to DrupalCon on Monday morning, and hope to spend most of my time recruiting users and sprinters to DevShop development.

The DrupalCon sprints are an amazing opportunity to work together with people in person. Despite being very remote-oriented, there really is no replacement for face to face work, especially when it comes to complex projects like DevShop.

There are a number of opportunities this week to come learn about devshop.

Sprints

 

I'll be sprinting on DevShop on Monday afternoon, all day Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday! There are a few sessions and other BoF's I plan on attending, but my main focus will be to help the devshop community meet, recruit developers, give demos, and assisting setup with anyone who is interested.

Keep an eye on #devshop on IRC, @opendevshop on twitter, and follow me @jonpugh for more information throughout the week on where and when sprints will be happening.

There is also a master Sprints spreadsheet available with the schedule for all sprinters on all topics. 

Add your name to the list!

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/109drAI9MUofxh_JP7GSayfYrRZWYuK_pLFLOYswoOew/edit#gid=0 

Birds of a Feather: DevShop Workshop

https://events.drupal.org/losangeles2015/bofs/devshop-workshop

I've got a BoF scheduled on Tuesday at 5pm for a DevShop Workshop. I'll be there ready to help anyone who's interested in installing, using, or developing devshop. See you in room 510!

Birds of a Feather: Aegir!

https://events.drupal.org/losangeles2015/bofs/aegir

Come join us for discussing Aegir at large at the Aegir BoF. We'll probably be mostly talking about the upcoming 3.0 release, and what the plans are for 4.0 after that.

This is an important time for Aegir, as with any new release, we've got the opportunity for improvements and major changes in the next version. Come join us to discuss what the future might look like.

Other Sessions & BoFs

There are a number of sessions and BoFs I am going to keep my eye on to learn about more techniques people are using for dev ops, continuous integration and testing, and more:

BoF: Continous Delivery

https://events.drupal.org/losangeles2015/bofs/drupal-and-delivery-pipeline

Now that DevShop can be used as a continuous integration, testing, and delivery platform, it will be interesting to discuss the overall process in this group.

BoF: Ansible for Drupal Infrastructure and Deployments

https://events.drupal.org/losangeles2015/bofs/ansible-drupal-infrastructure-and-deployments

I am a huge fan of GeerlingGuy, even if he doesn't know it yet. We use Ansible to install devshop, and ansible roles are at the core of the next version of devshop, which will be able to manage and deploy servers for any software in any language. I'm really looking forward to this BoF.

Session: PHP Containers at Scale: 5K Containers per Server

https://events.drupal.org/losangeles2015/sessions/php-containers-scale-5k-containers-server

David Strauss of Pantheon is going to pop the hood to show how they can handle massive amounts of sites per server using containers. DevShop doesn't use containers, yet, so I am very keen to learn as much as I can so we can get started.

BoF: Leveraging Hybrid Cloud Orchestration

https://events.drupal.org/losangeles2015/bofs/how-manage-your-cloud

This BoF is being put on by the author of the Cloud module for Drupal: https://www.drupal.org/project/cloud

This should be very interesting because there is a lot of similarities between this module and the vision for DevShop 2.0.0.

Session: 4x High Performance for Drupal - Step by Step

https://events.drupal.org/losangeles2015/sessions/4x-high-performance-drupal-step-step

I'm looking forward to this session because we want to incorporate high performance tools into devshop out of the box. I hope to learn enough from this walkthrough to start adding performance enhancements to devshop hosting immediately.

Get in Touch

I'm available all week to give demos or chat devshop, so if you are interested or have any questions, please feel free to get in touch via our contact form or on Twitter!

Tags: DrupalConPlanet Drupaldevshop
Categories: Drupal

Code Karate: Using Jquery Isotope to Display Content in Views, It’s Fancy.

10 May 2015 - 7:08am
Episode Number: 207

Taking a content type and displaying it in a Drupal View is core to any Drupal website. As you venture into views you will learn hundreds of ways to manipulate content to change the way the end user is able to interact with the content. To help enhance this, you can use the Views Isotope module. This module uses the jQuery isotope library to dynamically filter views content. As the title states, it’s pretty fancy.

To get an idea of what the library does visit the website for the library at http://isotope.metafizzy.co.

Tags: DrupalContent TypesViewsDrupal 7Site BuildingDrupal PlanetJavascriptJQuery
Categories: Drupal

Deeson: Evolving our culture at Deeson - facilitation over management

10 May 2015 - 1:33am

We see our company's purpose as being to facilitate smart people in getting great things done - not telling them exactly how to do it.

Nothing limits people's motivation and productivity more than jumping through irrelevant hoops.

As we've grown we've realised that it has become more and more important to decentralise decision making and share information effectively.

Over the past six months we’ve been experimenting with some big changes to enable a more empowered and self-directed approach.

Underlying principles

We have some beliefs backing the changes:

  • our team members are intrinsically motivated and know how to get their own job done best
  • open access to information is power - use tools to make your company data useful and accessible
  • everyone must have meaningful input for a culture of continous improvement to be effective 
  • we should focus on results not process
  • we do knowledge work and our approach needs to embrace this - measuring who is in the office at 9am is resassuringly tangible but mostly irrelevant to doing great work
  • principles used by people with good judgement are a lot more useful than lots of rules
Business benefits

There are strong commercial drivers:

  • our growth means we need to be able to recruit from a wider talent pool
  • we wanted to reduce the need to introduce middle management in our expanding team
  • our increasingly international client base means that better distributed working practices were part of delivering great client service
  • people told us that flexible working is an important part of our overall recruitment package
Start at the top

We realised that we needed to change the way that the agency was managed.

Simon and I worked to understand which the things we both did were leadership driven and which were management that could be shared.

Through continuing review we enabled team members to take on responsibility and control as much as possible. We were confident this would increase team engagement.

The role of the leadership team rapidly changed, and our focus became to facilitate and coach our teams, rather than to manage and direct.

Our focus has been on getting out of the way of our increasingly self-organised teams delivering digital projects.

The challenge has been as much to change our own individual people management habits as it has been to evolve the company's processes.

Old habits die hard!

We're by no means the only ones thinking this way

We’d seen, heard and read a lot about organisational culture, leadership and change in other companies.

Some examples of thinking that really resonated included Ricardo Semler’s Maverick and 37Signal’s Rework

Aaron Dignan of Undercurrent also has an interesting roundup of different organisational models including Holacracy, Agile Squads and Self Organising.

We invested a lot of time in well configured and well used project and management information systems such as Xero, Harvest and Forecast, which means everyone can now see what’s going live across the agency.

Having better information helps team members make the best decisions on how to deliver their part of a project.

We’ve strengthened our specification, delivery and testing practices so that project delivery is standardised across the agency and easy to monittor.

We’ve also deployed communications tools that work seamlessly, so we don’t think about whether colleagues are on a different floor or on site in a different country. This has included adding softphones on our laptops and embracing collaboration tools such as Slack and Google Hangouts.

Results orientated working patterns
  1. Our team members can work when and where they want - as long as they are effectively collaborating with clients and colleagues
  2. We focus and target on the output- not whether you login at 8:55am or 9:05am.
  3. Top down manager-led appraisals are a thing of the past. Our team members now undertake a personal and peer review every three months to set their own development goals.
  4. Self-led development is backed with an unlimited training budget.
  5. Every team member has their own annual budget to spend on R&D, technology, tools, equipment - anything that helps them do their job better.
How did we work out and describe the detail?

We put together a draft Google Doc 'Deeson Handbook' that everyone could contribute to and had a dedicated Slack channel for discussion.

We spent most of January at a discussion stage. There was very little debate about the principles behind the approach but through collaboration we made some pretty big changes on the details, for example:

  • contactability - making it clear that the principle was that you were easily contactable rather than exactly how
  • holidays and leave - simplifying the holiday policy to just work in days and half days

The handbook is perpetually in beta as we’re always reviewing our approach. It is the single document that explains our new approach, acts as a reference for new joiners and a guide to how things work in practice at Deeson.

How has it gone?

Three months in and we’re really pleased with the results of the changes so far.

We were expecting at least one major problem and we haven't had it (yet!)

Team engagement and satisfaction has improved and we’re seeing increased ownership and autonomy among project teams.

Most importantly we’re confident that this is leading to better digital products and services for our clients - which is something we’re very proud of.

If you’re interested in the details then feel free to ask questions or request a copy of our Handbook document.

Categories: Drupal

DrupalOnWindows: How to choose the best Drupal Cloud Provider

9 May 2015 - 10:00pm
Language English

There are many articles out there talking about the advantages and disadvantages of one or another cloud provider. But most of them are sponsored, biased and really none of them poinpointing what really matters. They are distracting, focusing your attention away of what they don't want you to know.

More articles...
Categories: Drupal


Google+
about seo