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Dries Buytaert: European Commission will start offering bug bounties for Open Source software

28 January 2019 - 1:08pm

The European Commission made an exciting announcement; it will be awarding bug bounties to the security teams of Open Source software projects that the European Commission relies on.

If you are not familiar with the term, a bug bounty is a monetary prize awarded to people who discover and correctly report security issues.

Julia Reda — an internet activist, Member of the European Parliament (MEP) and co-founder of the Free and Open Source Software Audit (FOSSA) project — wrote the following on her blog:

Like many other organizations, institutions like the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission build upon Free Software to run their websites and many other things. But the Internet is not only crucial to our economy and our administration, it is the infrastructure that runs our everyday lives.

With over 150 Drupal sites, the European Commission is a big Drupal user, and has a large internal Drupal community. The European Commission set aside 89,000€ (or roughly $100,000 USD) for a Drupal bug bounty. They worked with Drupal's Security Team every step along the way to get this set up. To participate in the Drupal bug bounty, read the guidelines provided by Drupal's security team.

Over the years I've had many meetings with the European Commission, presented keynotes at some of its events, and more. During that time, I've seen the European Commission evolve from being hesitant about Open Source to recognizing the many benefits that Open Source provides for its key ICT services, to truly embracing Open Source.

In many ways, the European Commission followed classic Open Source adoption patterns; adoption went from being technology-led (bottom-up or grassroots) to policy-led (top-down and institutionalized), and now the EU is an active participant and contributor.

Today, the European Commission is a shining example and role model for how governments and other large organizations can contribute to Open Source (just like how the White House used to be).

The European Commission is actually investing in Drupal in a variety of ways — the bug bounty is just one example of that — but more about that in a future blog post.

Categories: Drupal

Jeff Geerling's Blog: Rendering Twig templates programmatically in Drupal 8

28 January 2019 - 12:59pm

From time to time, I have the need to take a Twig template and a set of variables, render the template, replacing all the variables within, and then get the output as a string. For example, if I want to have a really simple email template in a custom module which has a variable for first_name, so I can customize the email before sending it via Drupal or PHP, I could do the following in Drupal 7:

Categories: Drupal

Acquia Developer Center Blog: Building Usable Conversations: Conversational Information Architecture

28 January 2019 - 7:47am

In this second installment in our series on conversational usability, we dive into a relatively overlooked area of conversational interfaces that can have an outsized impact on the eventual user experience that results: information architecture.

Tags: acquia drupal planet
Categories: Drupal

Spinning Code: SC DUG September 2018

28 January 2019 - 5:00am

This fall the South Carolina Drupal User’s Group started using Zoom are part of all our meetings. Sometimes the technology has worked better than others, but when it works in our favor we are recording the presentations and sharing them when we can.

Chris Zietlow presented back in September about using Machine Learning to Improve UX.

We frequently use these presentations to practice new presentations and test out new ideas. If you want to see a polished version hunt group members out at camps and cons. So if some of the content of these videos seems a bit rough please understand we are all learning all the time and we are open to constructive feedback.

If you would like to join us please check out our up coming events on Meetup for meeting times, locations, and connection information.

Categories: Drupal

OpenSense Labs: The greatness of Behat for automated testing in Drupal

28 January 2019 - 1:05am
The greatness of Behat for automated testing in Drupal Shankar Mon, 01/28/2019 - 14:35

Visualise yourself getting involved in a social experiment (and you are oblivious of your involvement). You are walking down the street and find cash on the sidewalk. You get drowned in different thoughts as to whether casually pick it up and slip it inside your pocket or just plod away as if you haven’t seen anything or just take it and give it to someone needy. Supposing you have chosen the second option, you, then, realise that it was a social experiment as some guys come towards you appreciating your character.


Sometimes life gives you such opportunities without even giving you some sort of prompt where you are automatically tested for your behaviour. Speaking of an automatic test, there is a different sort of automated test involved in the digital scene but has a lot of significance. Adding test coverage to your website and application can be very fruitful. For instance, you can ensure that requirements are met and avoid regressions from happening. One of the many approaches for testing is Behaviour Driven Development (BDD). As one of the leading open source content management systems, Drupal enables you to imbibe automated testing through tools like Behat in your website.

Diving into Automated testing

Automated testing is a process that involves pre-scripted tests which are run automatically. Their function is to compare actual results with expected results that help in determining if the application works as expected. It can help in executing iterative tasks and regression tests to verify if an application works correctly after the newly implemented alterations.

Automated testing is a process that involves pre-scripted tests which are run automatically.

On the contrary, manually testing involves quality assurance specialists who need to verify that the applications are working properly by following conditions written in test cases. In spite of its primitive nature, it is still very significant in cases like wearables and mobile devices that may need field testing in a physical environment.

Source: Gear Inc

Automated testing saves a lot of time by reducing the time to run repetitive tests which, in turn, saves money. It vastly enhances your test coverage. Lengthy tests that are, most often than not, avoided in manual testing can be run unattended. It also improves precision by performing the same steps precisely whenever they are executed and never misses from recording detailed results. It can simulate tens and thousands of virtual users interacting with a network, software and web applications. Moreover, shared automated tests can be leveraged by developers to detect problems quickly before sending to QA.

Automated testing in Drupal

Drupal 8 core testing framework comes with numerous automated testing options. To ensure the quality and reaction of code on edge cases, testing can be performed in different layers:

  • To test class methods, you can write Unit tests which constitute the process of testing the discrete parts or units of a software project. PHPUnit can be leveraged in this case.
  • For testing module APIs, you can write Kernel tests which are basically unit tests on steroids.
  • You can also adopt functional testing where software testing is performed for detecting the actual performance of an application’s functional requirements. Functional testing is great for accuracy, interoperability, compliance, security and suitability.
  • There is also the possibility of utilising an external framework like Behat with scenarios in gherkin syntax.
Power of Behat


Behat is an open source Behaviour-driven Development (BDD) framework, as stated in the official site of Behat, and helps in supporting the process of delivering software that matters via perpetual communication, deliberate discovery and test automation. BDD is a way of building software through continuous interaction with stakeholders in the form of examples like what help would a particular software be offering to them and you for attaining your goals.

Behat is an open source Behaviour-driven Development framework.

Behat was created for PHP and is a spectacular PHP library to the core with its codebase leveraging a superabundance of Symfony components, strictly adhering to coding standards, and comes out on top in major static analysis tools. Moreover, Behat has superb extensibility as almost all of its functionality could be enhanced or replaced via a magnificent extension system.  

Behat for Drupal

There is a provision for a Drupal extension that offers an integration layer between Behat, Mink Extension and Drupal. For the starters, this Drupal extension can be enabled using Composer followed by the creation of behat.yml file in the projectdir. You also get to add your features files to the features directory of your repository that contains human-readable steps to test something.

By describing the behaviour of a site in plain but stylised language followed by the process of turning that description into an automated test, Behat and Mink come in very handy. These functional tests enable the site builders to ensure that the added value that is created while building a Drupal website keeps on behaving as per the expectations even after alterations are done to the website like security updates, changes to custom code among others.

This Drupal extension helps in setting up test data using Drush or the Drupal API in addition to defining theme regions and test data that appear within them. It also assists in clearing cache, logging out and other such significant steps. Moreover, it is an astronomical solution for detecting and discovering steps offered by contributed modules and themes.

Case study

Global Canopy Programme wanted to retrieve the news syndicated from a plethora of public sources, govern it through an internal application followed by resyndicating it to numerous public-facing sites. For this, it leveraged the power of Drupal with the help of a digital agency to build this application called Forest Desk. They followed the paradigm of BDD that was beneficial for each piece of functionality and could be embedded in the Scrum process.

Behat was meritorious for testing whether the functionality has been built correctly. It turned out to be an essential tool for testing comprehensible action on a website like clicking links or hitting submit buttons. Behat’s knowledge could further be extended using custom PHP code thereby leveraging it to understand RSS which is the format for syndicating content on the web.

Behat’s knowledge could further be extended using custom PHP code thereby leveraging it to understand RSS which is the format for syndicating content on the web.

The RSS standard was utilised for syndicating data and Drupal’s Feeds module was very beneficial in consuming this standard from remote websites and modules like Views helped in repackaging it for consumption by other sites. Furthermore, the Adminimal theme offered an immaculate administrative design.

For developing each feature, once its scenario was specified in Gherkin syntax, Features module was leveraged. This helped in altering the configuration and save the changes and return to the previous state of configuration in case any BDD test no longer works.

Conclusion

Behat is a great tool for enabling superfast and efficacious automated testing in Drupal development.

Offering stupendous digital experience with our suite of services to our partners has been our supreme goal.

Contact us at hello@opensenselabs.com to get the best out of automated testing through this wonderful tool - Behat.

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Categories: Drupal

OpenSense Labs: Efficacy of Drupal in building SaaS

27 January 2019 - 11:45am
Efficacy of Drupal in building SaaS Shankar Mon, 01/28/2019 - 01:15

Girish Mathrubootham launched his startup Freshdesk, a software-as-a-service (SaaS) venture, with Shan Krishnasamy in a small conference room of his friend’s office. Its staggering growth in a short span of time coerced them to move to a suburb and convert a warehouse into an office. Subsequently, they went on to have a proper office. With a humongous rise in stature, they had to literally break the walls to expand its workplace. ‘Breaking the walls’ represents the swift growth of this SaaS-based firm.


Such is the significance of the SaaS model that it can enable the enterprises to emphasise on business outcomes rather than working around technical limitations. SaaS clients relish the quicker and flexible deployment and frequent automatic updates to increase the pace of innovation. SaaS standardisation simplifies Research and Development and uncloaks new collaboration and sharing potential. SaaS-based business applications promise faster time-to-deploy and an agile, incremental approach for attaining business goals. Drupal, as an open source content management framework, can be very beneficial for building SaaS. Before exploring Drupal’s power in building SaaS, let’s traverse the origins of SaaS briefly.

Origins of SaaS Source: Process Street

An interesting compilation by Process Street delineates the history of SaaS and takes us back to mid-twentieth century. It states that IBM was the 1960s SaaS company and IBM 360 Model 67 provided processing power to many organisations. Computers were not as powerful as we have today but this allowed them to have the data and power hosted in a different physical location to the one they are being used in.

The ‘70s and the ‘80s are touted to be the time period when pre-SaaS architecture grew. This was the time when first ever CRM (Customer Relationship Management) called ACT! was developed. This was also the time when Great Plains Software emerged in the market which was later acquired by Microsoft and turned into Microsoft Dynamics.

SaaS-based firms like Salesforce, NetSuite, and Intacct established themselves in the 1990s. Moreover, inefficacies in Application Service Providers (ASP) gave further push to the growth of SaaS. As a matter of fact, Salesforce was the gamechanger in the SaaS business. Eventually, SaaS has gone on to become a proven business model and it is one of the most sought after solutions among the enterprises today.

A quick look at SaaS Source: Microsoft

Gartner defines software as a service (SaaS) as software that is owned, delivered and managed remotely by one or more providers. The provider delivers software based on one set of common code and data definitions that are consumed in a one-to-many model by all contracted customers any time on a pay-for-use basis or as a subscription based on use metrics. Biggest SaaS organisations today include the likes of Salesforce, Microsoft, Google, Adobe, Amazon, etc.

Software as a service is a software that is owned, delivered and managed remotely by one or more providers.

SaaS helps you in gaining access to intricate applications. You do not have to buy, install, update or govern any hardware, middleware or software for offering SaaS apps to the users. Complex enterprise applications like ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) and CRM are made cost-effective by SaaS. This is advantageous for the organisations that have the dearth of resources to purchase, deploy and handle the required infrastructure and software themselves.

By paying for only what you use, you wind up saving superabundance of money. Furthermore, you can run most SaaS apps directly from the web browser without having to download and install any software albeit few apps that require plugins. It streamlines the process mobilising your workforce and with the data stored in the cloud, you can access the information from any internet-connected computer or handheld device.

Drupal for SaaS

Suppose you already have a SaaS product, you can use Drupal to build the website and market your product. Drupal’s tremendous features for content governance and e-commerce can be an astounding solution to take your product to an unprecedented reach. 

Can I use Drupal to build a SaaS? Yes, you can also build a SaaS solution utilising the powerful capabilities of Drupal. Governments are required to confront a plethora of social determinants that affect healthcare outcomes and overall spending. An agency talked about building a Drupal SaaS solution in a session hosted by Drupal 4 Gov for connecting citizens with services.


The State of Idaho innovatively compiled both government and community services through a single platform and simplified the process of assisting citizens to avail the right sort of services through its ‘Live Better Idaho’ program. Drupal turned out to be an astounding choice for building this platform because of its immaculate content workflow, extensibility and interoperability. Amazon Web Services was also leveraged for its great scalability.

Drupal turned out to be an astounding choice because of its immaculate content workflow, extensibility and interoperability. 

Civiserv, a Drupal-based citizen portal which is focussed specifically on powering the delivery of social and health services by state and local agencies, came in very handy for building ‘Live Better Idaho’ program. Offered as a SaaS product, it comes as a configurable virtual assistant that helps to bridge the gap between target audiences and the services that they need the most.

A lot of developmental effort was put into creating means testing. To improve personalisation factor, user accounts were integrated that allowed users to set up accounts and preserve their searches and favourites within the site. In addition to this, email signups and text alert functionalities were added so that notification was sent to the user whenever new content is published or any new event is added. For efficacious tracking, reports could be seen to find out the number of referrals that were being generated or the most popular service among users.

The session also presented a demonstration which showed the platform having simple navigation of services under different categories like financial, healthcare, food and nutrition among others. In addition to this, a conventional search box could also be utilised for finding the relevant services. The means testing was demonstrated through the ‘Tell us about yourself’ option where you need to enter particulars like your age and monthly income and the results pop up showing relevant services. The results could be further narrowed down by choosing particulars like ‘within 5 miles’ or ‘Teen: 13-17 yrs’. 

What lies ahead for SaaS? Source: FinancesOnline

SaaS will be powering almost 80 percent of the business workflows by 2022 as can be seen in the graphical representation below.

Moreover, Wikibon’s 2018 Cloud Markets and Trends report states that the largest segment of the cloud industry is SaaS and will grow to $346 billion at a CAGR (Compound Annual Growth Rate) of 25.9%.

A report on Transparency Market Research states that CRM is registering the highest demand for SaaS solutions. ERP and the collaborative solutions segments will pick up the pace by 2022. The increasing trend of e-commerce, infrastructural growth and increasing customer support services will accelerate the use of SaaS solutions. HCM (Human Capital Management) is slated to be registering quickest growth in the demand for SaaS solutions at 32.90% CAGR in the forecast period of 2015 to 2022. The rise in the need for smart and talented workforce in organisations across the world is the reason behind this growth.

Conclusion

SaaS is great for digital businesses as it fosters a quicker, more agile approach to application deployment and is an integral component of any digital transformation project that is prevalent in a plethora of application portfolios.

Drupal can be a quintessential solution for delivering a SaaS offering with its fantastic content workflow capabilities.

We are perpetually committed to delivering an amazing digital experience to our partners through our suite of services.

Ping us at hello@opensenselabs.com and let us know how can we help you achieve your digital transformation goals.

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Categories: Drupal

Joachim's blog: Unnatural file changes with git

26 January 2019 - 11:19pm

When you check out a branch or commit with git, two things happen: git changes the files in the repository folder, and changes the file that tells it what is currently checked out. In git terms, it changes what HEAD points to. In practical terms, it updates the .git/HEAD text file to contain a different reference.

But these two operations can be done separate from one another, so that while the files correspond to one commit, git thinks that the HEAD commit is another one.

This of course puts your git repository in an unstable, even unnatural state. But there are useful reasons for doing this, and one of these comes up in the operation of dorgflow, my tool for working with git and drupal.org patches.

Dorgflow creates a local branch for a drupal.org issue, and creates a commit for each patch, so you end up with a nice sequential representation of the work that's been done so far.

But every patch that's uploaded to an issue is a patch against the master branch, so we can't just apply the patches one by one and make commits: the first patch will apply, and all the subsequent ones will fail.

What we need is for the files be in the same state as the master branch, so that the patch applies, but when we make a commit, it needs to be a new commit on the feature branch:

* [Feature branch] Patch 1 <- Make patch 2 commit on top of this commit. / * [master branch] Latest master commit. <- Apply patch 2 to these files.

In git terms, we want the current files (the working tree, as git calls it) to be on the master branch, while git's HEAD is on the feature branch.

For my first attempt at getting this to work, I did the following:

  1. Put git on the feature branch.
  2. Check out the master branch's files, with git checkout master -- .

When you use git checkout command with a file or files specified, it doesn't move HEAD, but instead changes just those files to the given commit or branch. If you give '.' as the file to check out, then it does that for all of the repository's files. In effect, you get the files to look like the given commit, in our case the master branch.

This is what we want, but it has one crucial flaw. Suppose patch 1 added a new file, foo.php. When we check out master's files, foo.php is not changed, because it's not on master. There's nothing on master to overwrite it. The 'git checkout master -- .' doesn't actually say 'make all the files look like master', it says 'check out all the files from master'. foo.php isn't on master, and so it's simply left alone.

Suppose now that patch 2 also adds the foo.php file, which it most likely will, since in most cases, a newer patch incorporates all the work of the previous one.

Applying patch 2 to the files in their current state will fail, because patch 2 tries to create the file foo.php, but it's already there.

So this approach is no good. I was stuck with this problem with dorgflow for months, until I had a brainwave: instead of staying on the feature branch and changing the files to look like master, why not check out the master branch, but tell git that the HEAD is the feature branch?

That solves the problem of the foo.php file: when you check out master, the foo.php that's at the patch 1 commit vanishes, because it doesn't exist on master. So applying patch 2 will be fine.

The only remaining question was how to you tell git it's on a different branch without doing a checkout of files? Turns out this is a simple plumbing command: git symbolic-ref HEAD refs/heads/BRANCH. This is just telling git to change the reference that HEAD points to, and that's how git stores the fact that a particular branch is the current one.

This was a simple change to make in dorgflow (it was actually more work to update the tests so the mocks had the correct method call expectations!).

This means that dorgflow accordingly now handles applying a sequence of issue patches that add files now works in the latest release.

Categories: Drupal

OpenSense Labs: Traveling Towards Future With Open Source and Open Web

26 January 2019 - 9:26pm
Traveling Towards Future With Open Source and Open Web Vasundhra Sun, 01/27/2019 - 10:56

As children, we have all come across chapters which were all about Human Rights. Right to express your own opinions, right to educate, right to equality and right on not to be mistreated. 

To deny people their human rights is to challenge their very humanity. 
-Nelson Mandela

The way these rights have been allowing everyone to live in dignity, freedom, equality, justice, and peace can easily be correlated to the four rights of open source and web that is following the similar responsibility. 

When I talk about open source or open web I am precisely talking about freedom to use, study, share and improve. In short the ability to use the internet to build and make something. 


Open Source and Open web might have the same rights, but these terms as a whole have a very different meaning. 

Past of the Open Source and Open web

Open source and Open web have played a vital job in the IT business. From frameworks to the biggest supercomputer, and from the handset in your pocket to the product working the sites, both these things have made a mark in the lives of its users.
 
The saga started during the 1950s when an eager figuring master and corporate research fabricated and imparted the product to its source code which was simply tuned in to the general thought of information trade.
 
Though the web was initially figured and delivered to draw in the interest for computerized data sharing between the researchers in colleges and foundations around the globe. There are fields in which it has made its stamp. New methodologies in fields as various as data (Open Data), legislative issues (Open Government), logical research (Open Access), training, and culture (Free Culture). 
 
In the late 1970s – mid-1980s, the main programming licenses showed up. That is when programming items ended up secured by copyrights and trademarks.
 
In 1983, Richard Stallman started the GNU project to make a working framework with its source code which was accessible and open. The free software foundation was built up. 
 
In the late 1990s, Linux started the enthusiasm of various organizations and government associations. A great deal of site-based new businesses was built up in those days which drove up interest with the expectation of complimentary web servers, in the primary line the Apache HTTP Server.
 
As the product business has developed, working frameworks developed into increasingly unpredictable and present-day applications. 

Open source and Open web Presently and Ways in Which they are different   Open Source Open Web  Definition  The original source code is made freely available. Parts of the web that are public and viewable by everyone  Constitutes of Source Code, Derived Works, Integrity of the source code etc
Ability to publish, code, access 
  Why is it important? It promotes the development of powerful software tools. Presents with a more informed public, civic participation, opportunities to learn Definition 

Open Source 

The term "open source" refers to something that people can modify and share because of the fact that its design is publicly accessible. It allows its users to copy, modify, or delete parts of the code under their own choice. The user is able to work functions of the open source on their own program where there is no consequence. "Source code" is the part of the software that most of the computer users don't ever see; it's the code computer programmers can manipulate to change how a piece of software—a "program" or "application"—works. 

Open Web 

Open web refers to the public side of the web. That can be easily accessible to people.
The public side of the Web. There are parts of the Web that are public and viewable by everyone and others that are private. The countries that do not restrict their citizens from viewing content on the Web. For me the Open Web is about the ability to openly do three kinds of things:

Constitutes of

Open Source 

Open source doesn't just involve the accessing of the source code. The distribution terms of open-source include the following criteria:

  • Source Code: The program must include the source code, and must allow distribution in the source code in a compiled form. Where some form of a product is not shared with source code, there must be well-publicized source code for no more than a reasonable reproduction cost, preferably downloading via the Internet without charge
     
  • Distributed Works: Different licenses enable ps the programmers to change the software with several conditions attached. When you modify the source code, open source needs the inclusion of what you should alter.
     
  • Distributed revision control systems: When many developers in different geographical locations change the data and files, these systems let the different versions and updates.
     
  • Bug trackers and task lists: Open source allows large-scale projects to control the issues and keep a track of their fixes.
     
  • Testing and debugging tools: Open source automates testing during system integration and debugs other programs.

Open Web 

Open Web is all about the experience and the ability to do three types of things:
Publish: The content and the applications on the web in open standards allow the users to declare and publish the data online. 

  • Code and Implement: The web standards depends totally on the content and the applications which depend on it.
     
  • Access and Use: The content, code, web applications, and the implementations can be accessed and used easily.
Why is it important?

Open Source 

Open source is great because it promotes the development of powerful software which is increasingly reliant on. It has encourages things around. Things like: 

  • GitHub and Open Source 

Adding to the open source can be a rewarding way to learn, teach, and build experience in just about any skill you can imagine. GitHub has been providing open source software to its users to use and explore. This helps in successful delivering of the projects. Developers have the power to create and control open source software with the help of Github. They can create a project that interests them to see its progress as it happens. They don’t have to build everything from scratch or make copies of their favorite projects, an experiment in private repositories, and tailor tools and features to meet the needs.


Drupal is an open source content management system (CMS) that powers an estimated 2% of all websites. One of the greatest benefits of using Drupal CMS is the fact that it is open source. That means according to the Drupal websites anyone can download, use, work on, and share it with others. Drupal allows continuous digital innovation at leading organizations like weather.com and NBCUniversal. With Drupal, marketers, and web developers can build and maintain great web, mobile and social experiences. 

Drupal as an open source software has long-term viability. Selecting technologies means committing to solutions that will support an active, growing business over the long term, so it demands careful consideration and foresight.


Open Web 

An open web is a movement which goes up against some of the largest platform companies of the world that have control over our data, in short, it means positive progress of things like:

  • A more informed public 
  • More civic Participation 
  • More opportunities to learn and connect with each other 

The open web is decentralized 

The decentralized web or Dweb could be an opening to take charge of our data back from the big tech firms that have been spying and beholding on it from quite some time now. A big example of it is Facebook which recently got under the radar of security issues.

Determining the best type of software depends on the business needs and objectives. The best way to compare is to look at some of the biggest differences between the two types.

Are open source and open web at risk?

Open source and open web are losing in its genre. Open source does have restrictions and risks that comes under the drama. Social issues such as data protection and privacy, political issues such as net neutrality and copyrights have been compromised through things like automation of fake news, the use of CMS to take out a step in future and the idea where there is no information of the people who are being interacted. 

  • Open Source Software Security Risks

Open source security vulnerabilities are really lucrative opportunity for the hackers. Once discovered by the security research community, open source vulnerabilities and the details on how to carry out the exploit are made public to everyone. This provides hackers with all the information that they need in order to carry out an attack. 

  • Open Source Software Licensing Compliance Risks

Every open source software component, along with its dependencies, comes with a license. When we use an open source component in our project, we are agreeing to a set of terms and conditions that we must comply with. This can become murky territory for anyone who is not well versed in the ins and outs of open source licensing.  

  • Open Source Software Quality Risks

While an organization invests many resources in the quality assurance of its proprietary code, it appears many development teams marginalize or overlook checking an open source component’s quality. Obviously, we all want our final product to be stable and consistent under pressure.

So now the question is- how to solve it?

Google is presenting all of the company's open source projects under one roof. Any company considering releasing some of its code under open source licenses might want to take a gander at Google's new website, Google Open Source. It's not a repository, for source code you'll still have to go to GitHub or the company's own Git service, but more of a catalog of Google's open source projects, with each listing including information such as how the company uses the software, its license and so on.

Google is no newcomer to open source. In its early days, it built its infrastructure on the back of freely available software, like Linux, and has been a major contributor to the open source canon ever since. Kubernetes would be an example of a project it 

Future of Open Source: How can it win?

Today, open source is the default. Every major technology starts there, whether that’s a cloud, AI, mobile or containers. To win the Open source you can follow three methods:

  • Start blogging 
  • Increase in the User experience 
  • Define 

As the Internet continues to expand in new ways, so do innovations and revolutions. Anyone can contribute to open source projects. And, today we're seeing open hardware, the Internet of Things, and the Maker movement takes hold and changes the way we are solving problems and shaping the world.

Google Amp Project and Open Web

The AMP Project is an open-source initiative that is aiming to make the web a better place for all. The project enables the creation of websites and the ads that are consistently fast, beautiful and high-performing across devices and distribution platforms. Moreover, the sites that have adopted AMP have seen encouraging gains in site performance and conversions (which presumes a correlating better site user experience). These and other noted benefits have led Google to begin with the working toward the technologies utilized by AMP and folding them into open web standards.


Business Eco-System and Open Source 

We have seen open source growth and changes in different approach on how to build a business model. Technology has changed a lot, thus the innovation has been taking place in open source projects to an extent. Overall, the world of software would be much different without open source software. 

Wrapping Up 

Open Source has become dominant on the web over time. Today over 90% of the CMS market is open source. In fact, it’s nearly the de-facto license model for the all-things web. To say that the internet is an open source would not be an exaggeration, it’s that dominant. 

At Opensense Labs, building a successful service model is no task and we are always ready for the challenge. We bring features and capabilities into a new direction with all the abilities of open source. Ping us on hello@opensenselabs.com to build an open source project that would form a building block for your futuristic applications. 

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Categories: Drupal

OPTASY: The Drupal Quality Initiative: How Do You Know When Your Contributed Project Is Ready to Be Released? How Do You Assess Its Quality?

25 January 2019 - 10:42am
The Drupal Quality Initiative: How Do You Know When Your Contributed Project Is Ready to Be Released? How Do You Assess Its Quality? adriana.cacoveanu Fri, 01/25/2019 - 18:42

Let's say you've been working on this contributed project for a few months now. It has gone from Beta 1 to Beta 2 to Beta... Now, how long till its final release? How do you know when it's ready for the Drupal community to see and use? And this is precisely why the Drupal quality initiative was launched in the first place.

So that can we finally have some sort of a checklist at hand to use whenever we need to assess our code's level of quality:
 

  • the standards that we should evaluate our contributed projects by 
  • the specific elements that go into the quality of our projects, such as contributed Drupal modules
  • a certain hierarchy of quality that we could rate our own projects by
     

And so on...

For, let's admit it now:

Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: How to decouple Drupal in 2019

25 January 2019 - 9:31am

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog.

Do I build my website with Drupal's built-in templating layer or do I use Drupal's decoupled or headless capabilities in combination with a JavaScript framework?

The pace of innovation in content management has been accelerating — driven by both the number of channels that content management systems need to support (web, mobile, social, chat) as well as the need to support JavaScript frameworks in the traditional web channel. As a result, we've seen headless or decoupled architectures emerge.

Decoupled Drupal has seen adoption from all corners of the Drupal community. In response to the trend towards decoupled architectures, I wrote blog posts in 2016 and 2018 for architects and developers about how and when to decouple Drupal. In the time since my last post, the surrounding landscape has evolved, Drupal's web services have only gotten better, and new paradigms such as static site generators and the JAMstack are emerging.

Time to update my recommendations for 2019! As we did a year ago, let's start with the 2019 version of the flowchart in full. (At the end of this post, there is also an accessible version of this flowchart described in words.)

Different ways to decouple Drupal

I want to revisit some of the established ways to decouple Drupal as well as discuss new paradigms that are seeing growing adoption. As I've written previously, the three most common approaches to Drupal architecture from a decoupled standpoint are traditional (or coupled), progressively decoupled, and fully decoupled. The different flavors of decoupling Drupal exist due to varying preferences and requirements.

In traditional Drupal, all of Drupal's usual responsibilities stay intact, as Drupal is a monolithic system and therefore maintains complete control over the presentation and data layers. Traditional Drupal remains an excellent choice for editors who need full control over the visual elements on the page, with access to features such as in-place editing and layout management. This is Drupal as we have known it all along. Because the benefits are real, this is still how most new content management projects are built.

Sometimes, JavaScript is required to deliver a highly interactive end-user experience. In this case, a decoupled approach becomes required. In progressively decoupled Drupal, a JavaScript framework is layered on top of the existing Drupal front end. This JavaScript might be responsible for nothing more than rendering a single block or component on a page, or it may render everything within the page body. The progressive decoupling paradigm lies on a spectrum; the less of the page dedicated to JavaScript, the more editors can control the page through Drupal's administrative capabilities.

Up until this year, fully decoupled Drupal was a single category of decoupled Drupal architecture that reflects a full separation of concerns between the presentation layer and all other aspects of the CMS. In this scenario, the CMS becomes a data provider, and a JavaScript application with server-side rendering becomes responsible for all rendering and markup, communicating with Drupal via web service APIs. Though key functionality like in-place editing and layout management are unavailable, fully decoupled Drupal is appealing for developers who want greater control over the front end and who are already experienced with building applications in frameworks like Angular, React, Vue.js, etc.

Over the last year, fully decoupled Drupal has branched into two separate paradigms due to the increasing complexity of JavaScript development. The so-called JAMstack (JavaScript, APIs, Markup) introduces a new approach: fully decoupled static sites. The primary reason for static sites is improved performance, security, and reduced complexity for developers. A static site generator like Gatsby will retrieve content from Drupal, generate a static website, and deploy that static site to a CDN, usually through a specialized cloud provider such as Netlify.

What do you intend to build?

The essential question, as always, is what you're trying to build. Here is updated advice for architects exploring decoupled Drupal in 2019:

  1. If your intention is to build a single standalone website or web application, choosing decoupled Drupal may or may not be the right choice, depending on the features your developers and editors see as must-haves.
  2. If your intention is to build multiple web experiences (websites or web applications), you can use a decoupled Drupal instance either as a) a content repository without its own public-facing front end or b) a traditional website that acts simultaneously as a content repository. Depending on how dynamic your application needs to be, you can choose a JavaScript framework for highly interactive applications or a static site generator for mostly static websites.
  3. If your intention is to build multiple non-web experiences (native mobile or IoT applications), you can leverage decoupled Drupal to expose web service APIs and consume that Drupal site as a content repository without its own public-facing front end.

What makes Drupal so powerful is that it supports all of these use cases. Drupal makes it simple to build decoupled Drupal thanks to widely recognized standards such as JSON:APIGraphQLOpenAPI, and CouchDB. In the end, it is your technical requirements that will decide whether decoupled Drupal should be your next architecture.

In addition to technical requirements, organizational factors often come into play as well. For instance, if it is proving difficult to find talented front-end Drupal developers with Twig knowledge, it may make more sense to hire more affordable JavaScript developers instead and build a fully decoupled implementation.

Are there things you can't live without?

As I wrote last year, the most important aspect of any decision when it comes to decoupling Drupal is the list of features your project requires; the needs of editors and developers have to be carefully considered. It is a critical step in your evaluation process to weigh the different advantages and disadvantages. Every project should embark on a clear-eyed assessment of its organization-wide needs.

Many editorial and marketing teams select a particular CMS because of its layout capabilities and rich editing functionality. Drupal, for example, gives editors the ability to build layouts in the browser and drop-and-drag components into it, all without needing a developer to do it for them. Although it is possible to rebuild many of the features available in a CMS on a consumer application, this can be a time-consuming and expensive process.

In recent years, the developer experience has also become an important consideration, but not in the ways that we might expect. While the many changes in the JavaScript landscape are one of the motivations for developers to prefer decoupled Drupal, the fact that there are now multiple ways to write front ends for Drupal makes it easier to find people to work on decoupled Drupal projects. As an example, many organizations are finding it difficult to find affordable front-end Drupal developers experienced in Twig. Moving to a JavaScript-driven front end can resolve some of these resourcing challenges.

This balancing act between the requirements that developers prioritize and those that editors prioritize will guide you to the correct approach for your needs. If you are part of an organization that is mostly editorial, decoupled Drupal could be problematic, because it reduces the amount of control editors have over the presentation of their content. By the same token, if you are part of an organization with more developer resources, fully decoupled Drupal could potentially accelerate progress, with the warning that many mission-critical editorial features disappear.

Current and future trends to consider

Over the past year, JavaScript frameworks have become more complex, while static site generators have become less complex.

One of the common complaints I have heard about the JavaScript landscape is that it shows fragmentation and a lack of cohesion due to increasing complexity. This has been a driving force for static site generators. Whereas two years ago, most JavaScript developers would have chosen a fully functional framework like Angular or Ember to create even simple websites, today they might choose a static site generator instead. A static site generator still allows them to use JavaScript, but it is simpler because performance considerations and build processes are offloaded to hosted services rather than the responsibility of developers.

I predict that static site generators will gain momentum in the coming year due to the positive developer experience they provide. Static site generators are also attracting a middle ground of both more experienced and less experienced developers.

Conclusion

Drupal continues to be an ideal choice for decoupled CMS architectures, and it is only getting better. The API-first initiative is making good progress on preparing the JSON:API module for inclusion in Drupal core, and the Admin UI and JavaScript Modernization initiative is working to dogfood Drupal's web services with a reinvented administrative interface. Drupal's support for GraphQL continues to improve, and now there is even a book on the subject of decoupled Drupal. It's clear that developers today have a wide range of ways to work with the rich features Drupal has to offer for decoupled architectures.

With the introduction of fully decoupled static sites as an another architectural paradigm that developers can select, there is an even wider variety of architectural possibilities than before. It means that the spectrum of decoupled Drupal approaches I defined last year has become even more extensive. This flexibility continues to define Drupal as an excellent CMS for both traditional and decoupled approaches, with features that go well beyond Drupal's competitors, including WordPress, Sitecore and Adobe. Regardless of the makeup of your team or the needs of your organization, Drupal has a solution for you.

Special thanks to Preston So for co-authoring this blog post and to Angie ByronChris HamperGabe SulliceLauri EskolaTed Bowman, and Wim Leers for their feedback during the writing process.

Accessible version of flowchart

This is an accessible and described version of the flowchart images earlier in this blog post. First, let us list the available architectural choices:

  • Coupled. Use Drupal as is without additional JavaScript (and as a content repository for other consumers).
  • Progressively decoupled. Use Drupal for initial rendering with JavaScript on top (and as a content repository for other consumers).
  • Fully decoupled static site. Use Drupal as a data source for a static site generator and, if needed, deploy to a JAMstack hosting platform.
  • Fully decoupled app. Use Drupal as a content repository accessed by other consumers (if JavaScript, use Node.js for server-side rendering).

Second, ask the question "What do you intend to build?" and choose among the answers "One experience" or "Multiple experiences".

If you are building one experience, ask the question "Is it a website or web application?" and choose among the answers "Yes, a single website or web application" or "No, Drupal as a repository for non-web applications only".

If you are building multiple experiences instead, ask the question "Is it a website or web application?" with the answers "Yes, Drupal as website and repository" or "No, Drupal as a repository for non-web applications only".

If your answer to the previous question was "No", then you should build a fully decoupled application, and your decision is complete. If your answer to the previous question was "Yes", then ask the question "Are there things the project cannot live without?"

Both editorial and developer needs are things that projects cannot live without, and here are the questions you need to ask about your project:

Editorial needs
  • Do editors need to manipulate page content and layout without a developer?
  • Do editors need in-context tools like in-place editing, contextual links, and toolbar?
  • Do editors need to preview unpublished content without custom development?
  • Do editors need content to be accessible by default like in Drupal's HTML?
Developer needs
  • Do developers need to have control over visual presentation instead of editors?
  • Do developers need server-side rendering or Node.js build features?
  • Do developers need JSON from APIs and to write JavaScript for the front end?
  • Do developers need data security driven by a publicly inaccessible CMS?

If, after asking all of these questions about things your project cannot live without, your answers show that your requirements reflect a mix of both editorial and developer needs, you should consider a progressively decoupled implementation, and your decision is complete.

If your answers to the questions about things your project cannot live without show that your requirements reflect purely developer needs, then ask the question "Is it a static website or a dynamic web application?" and choose among the answers "Static" or "Dynamic." If your answer to the previous question was "Static", you should build a fully decoupled static site, and your decision is complete. If your answer to the previous question was "Dynamic", you should build a fully decoupled app, and your decision is complete.

If your answers to the questions about things your project cannot live without show that your requirements reflect purely editorial needs, then ask two questions. Ask the first question, "Are there parts of the page that need JavaScript-driven interactions?" and choose among the answers "Yes" or "No." If your answer to the first question was "Yes", then you should consider a progressively decoupled implementation, and your decision is complete. If your answer to the first question was "No", then you should build a coupledDrupal site, and your decision is complete.

Then, ask the second question, "Do you need to access multiple data sources via API?" and choose among the answers "Yes" or "No." If your answer to the second question was "Yes", then you should consider a progressively decoupled implementation, and your decision is complete. If your answer to the second question was "No", then you should build a coupled Drupal site, and your decision is complete.

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Categories: Drupal

OpenSense Labs: The Guide for Maintaining & Building your Drupal Website

25 January 2019 - 3:11am
The Guide for Maintaining & Building your Drupal Website Vasundhra Fri, 01/25/2019 - 16:41

When I say that a mere thank you to the development of site building tools won’t be enough, would you agree with me?

You might, you might not. 

But imagine a building that is under construction. Without the use of the right raw materials and tools (like cement, bricks, metal rods, labor etc) the task of constructing and maintaining it would be difficult to achieve. 

Right?


In the case of Drupal website, modules play a similar role, like that of the site building tools. 

We can witness a myriad of modules to build and maintain a Drupal website. These modules build a foundation to the website structure that continually adds the "bricks" to make a sound and holistic site.

But, the main question is - Which modules are the right one to build and maintain a website? 

Site Building vs Frontend vs Backend   Site Building Frontend Backend Refers to the Supporting of all the digital marketing efforts.   The client side of the application   The server side of the application  Constitutes of Web design and development for the site building process. The part which the user can see and interact with Everything that happens behind the scene  It covers Site hosting, Themes, multi-domain, HTML, CSS etc  The visual aspect of the website. The server requests. The web server communicates with the database. Serves in Helping an effective communication with the audience.  Creating user-friendly pages. Maintaining application and database. Things you would need to build a website 

When you are constructing a Drupal website, there are a lot of things which are needed. As important as it is to write your HTML and CSS codes, several other factors contribute highly to the whole process. Factors like:


Web hosting service 

When you upload your files on the cloud, only those people are able to access them whom you have granted the authority to. 

Well, think of web hosting as the same. Your website is the file and is essentially being put on the internet for the people to be viewed. Instead of sending complex website files to every person you can simply provide with your website URL and they can easily view it all. 
Web Hosting allows you to put all your website content for people to view them. Instead of sending those files to people, it allows you to host them online. Having web hosting means that all your potential readers will be able to view your content at anywhere at any time.

While choosing a hosting service, you must consider 4 big factors:

  • Uptime: Uptime percentage shows how much time your site will be up and running. Note that weak server and unstable network connections can often push your site offline. Banking on a hosting company with reputable uptime score, preferably above 99.5% is the key to your site success. 
     
  • Page load speed: You should choose a host that loads faster than 850 ms, which is the current average. Factors like a fast hard drive, locating essential resources easily, dedicated and enhanced resources contribute highly to the page load speed. 
     
  • Customer support: This is an important aspect for your web hosting. Your provider should have a good, responsive, solid reputation in their support department. Most of the providers offer multiple levels of support like emails, toll-free phone, live chat and much more. 
     
  • Price: Everyone wants a web host that is affordable and reliable.  In short, choose the one that you can manage. Make sure that the web hosting organization which you chose has an in-house support department. Compare all the features with each provider in your list and then make a decision. 

Modules 

Drupal is like a blessing to its users. It has a loyal, supportive community that contribute highly to the whole section of modules. It provides its users with excellent modules to the system. All these modules are the set of PHP, CSS and javascript files that present with unique features and functionalities. 

Different Drupal modules would add different functionalities to the website

Drupal 8 core provides modules for functionalities such as.

Functionalities  Modules  Managing User Accounts  Core User Module Managing Basic Content Core Node Module Managing Fields  Core Fields, Field UI modules, Core Modules providing Field Types  Managing Navigation Menus  Core Menu UI  Making Lists, grids, and blocks from the existing content  Core Views, Views UI Module 

Time Savers 

Timesaver is a turnkey timesheet management application designed for businesses of all sizes. The simple and intuitive design lets your administrator set up the system quickly and lets employees use the system with minimal training. The configurable timesheet entry periods would allow you to tie in the pay hours to the timesheet system. It not only provides an easy to use manager workflow that accesses, approves, edits and lock the employee's time but also allows the administrator to configure the task of customers, projects, activities with ease. Some of the amazing features that are granted by time savers are:

  • It provides the users with easy to use interface. A robust, yet easy interface allows the users to easily began the timesaver system.
  • Starting from the entries to the approvals and ending from rejections to locks, the timesheet system is configurable to suit your needs and requirements.
  • Keeps the sensitive information private and secure. It only allows employees and their delegates or supervisors to view entries. 
  • There are pre-built excel reports that allow customization easily.
  • It easily creates new customers, projects, activities, and tasks.
  • Granting the users with AJAX enabled output that helps in streamlined timesheet entry, reporting, and approvals. 

Environment 

As you read it, from functionality to appearance to navigation and code integrity, a lot goes into creating a good website. In other words, the environment that is around the project plays an essential role in the construction of a website. A good environment would not only result in excellent conversions, but it would also bring out the best end result. It totally depends on the factors which involve:

  • Size of the project: It is an important factor in terms of planning and devising. This is particularly important in a multi-project environment where simultaneous project competes for funds and human resources. Small project methodologies would never fit in the one which has a larger preceptive. Thus, making the size an important factor. 
     
  • Size of the company: Building an adequate empire of your organization plays a vital role when it comes to the environment. The size of the company not only contributes to the growth of a company but also helps to gauge the health of the culture around. Size of the company is underpinned with many other characteristics like discipline, development, management, experience etc.
     
  • Level of skills and knowledge of the team: The importance of quality team members and skilled colleagues matter a lot when it comes to the environment. High-grade and skilled team members mean efficiency and management. This not only boosts the other people around but also helps in completing the goal on time.
Things you would need to maintain a website 

Now that you have created a Drupal website and owned it, there are responsibilities which would rise with it. Maintaining on regular basis is one of them. 

Everyone wants that their website should run smoothly with heavy traffic and incredible conversion rates. 

Using a proper website maintenance program can help you achieve it all. Here are some of the things which you can use to maintain it.

Status report screen 

Drupal provides a feature called Status Report which checks a variety of important issues regarding your site's health, including permissions of the folders that Drupal needs to access. Modules that aren’t working because of other modules or libraries that are not installed will also be printed here. This type of report is even important when debugging issues or technical support issue arises. The report is provided in simple plain text format to minimize problems which arise in cutting and pasting up of files.

Cron 

The term Cron refers to the automated task that a website runs on every “N” hour. Cron should definitely be run on your Drupal site in order to keep it healthy. It helps with scheduled tasks like clearing the cache, running jobs like e-mails, reminders etc that can be configured automatically to execute tasks without any manual involvement. 

A properly configured Cron job manages a variety of task.

  • It helps in updating the index of the site content which is used by the search module.
  • Queues feeds are updated with the help of the Aggregator Module.
  • It checks the available updates for the Update Manager module 

It performs routine maintenance task for the System Module.  

Caching 

Caching is the strategy that improves the efficiency of accessing existing information types. Any information which is in the raw state can be cached into its non-raw state. During the processing of HTTP requests, the information from a different source can be stored in different bins. These cache bins then each is stored in different configurable backends. 

By default Drupal enables two modules for caching:

  • The Internal Page Cache Module: This module caches pages for anonymous users in the database. Pages that are requested by anonymous users are stored the first time they are requested and then they are reused for future visitors. 
     
  • The Internal Dynamic Page Cache Module: This module aims to speed up the site for both anonymous and logged in users. 

Deployment 

Drupal deployment is designed to allow the users to easily stage content from one Drupal site to another. In other words, when you are working on a Drupal site it is a good practice to use one or more different environments to develop or test your website without affecting the live site’s availability to the world. The changes which are made in the code or the configuration which of the developed website are then deployed with the help of the automated process. This helps you to create various content types or modify the configuration of the front page. You can then deploy those changes without resorting the replicated changes on the live website. 

How can Drupal help in Building your Websites? 

Drupal 8 is a great system to use, instead of trying to code or pay the third party to build the website, Drupal tends to deliver all the elements for an online presence. 

Like good buildings, Drupal website can be very solid, beautifully designed and convenient in every way. After you have installed Drupal and selected a suitable web host, it’s time to start building the website. 

Drupal 8 comes with the most popular text editor module as well as image uploaders which provides you with basic HTML control and tools when writing content. Text editor modules like paragraphs give you cleaner data structures so you can give more editing power to your end-users, and if you are worried about your mistakes - Environmental Indicator would help you with the correction of all your errors. It would create multiple environments which would make navigation easy. 

The CMS also provides site builders and administrators with a powerful user interface to create custom automated workflows on a website, without any coding, using "reactive" rules. Site builders can use the rules module to react when something happens on a site and conditionally manipulate data or execute any logic necessary. 

Once you have created the data on your website would need elements to arrange it. Panelizer module would allow you to arrange the fields in your content such that no fields are stacked on top of each other. In short, it would allow you to attach panels to any type of node in the system and customize your content.

Copying files folder to the development and downloads the files from a specified server have been easy with the help of stage file proxy. It is a general solution for getting production files on a development server on demand. With the help of backup and migrate module you can dump some or all of your database tables to a file download or save to a file on the server or offsite. Therefore, all your current data in your database related to the users can be masked with the help of Mask User Data (GDPR)
 
There is a devel module in Drupal 8 that is a valuable tool for constructing and coding websites. Devel is usually used for low-level development of a site. This module also features Drush integration and provides with several custom Drush demands. ( Drush is a shell interface with is helpful in managing Drupal right from the cloud server command line)

Once you are done with the production of your website profiling your site is extremely useful not only for debugging and performance testing but also for learning that how a site handles a request. WebProfiler helps in doing such a task. Its bundle is a comes with Drupal module that for Symfony which helps in collecting the information about each request that is made to your application and allows you to visualize it on the browser. 

How can Drupal help in Maintaining your Websites? 

Now that your website is up and running, you would need to maintain it now and keep an eye on every aspect. This includes appearance, performance and other aspects as well. Fortunately drupal comes with a set of contributed themes. These themes help in the appearance of the site. It allows you to change your look and feel of the website. The PHP template engine has been replaced with the all-new twig template. All themes files are the HTML.twig. It also had made modification in the syntax, .info files become .info.yml files that use the YAML syntax.
 
Drupal is also known for offering excellent multilingual capabilities, ensuring that your website is accessible to the widest possible audience. Modules like local (integrated with the core), content translation (integrated with the core), internationalization, variable contributes to the multilingual aspect of the website.

And if you are thinking that Drupal can't get better than this then think again.  It also comes with multi-domain capabilities. Multi-domain allows you to span one site across multiple domains. You can configure which domains to use for different parts of your site including which protocol that section uses.

Drupal is for everyone. From developers to marketers, it has extended its horizons. The instantly installable and no programming requiring modules come with customizable shopping carts and products which are showcased pertaining to a theme. With it, one can create taxes, discounts and charges heads and even give opportunities for subscriptions and recurring payments. Make the top e-commerce modules to receive donations too.

Wrapping up

Depending upon the requirements and keeping in mind both the security and scalability of the website, Drupal is and has always been a very powerful and flexible platform. True, that it presents us with secure and reliable modules and keeping in mind certain features and factors - Drupal has won many hearts. 

Hence, to have the best website experience you need the best organization. Opensense Labs has been harboring strong relations with its partners and providing them with ample solutions and digital services

Contact us at hello@opensenselabs.com to get the best digital experience.

blog banner blog image Drupal Drupal 8 CMS Website Maintenance Website Building Drupal Modules Support and maintenance Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On
Categories: Drupal

OpenSense Labs: Can I Boost the Performance of My Team Members?

25 January 2019 - 3:04am
Can I Boost the Performance of My Team Members? Vasundhra Wed, 12/25/2019 - 15:56

Suppose you wish to create a thriving vegetable patch. 

What would be your starting steps?

You would read the instructions, plant seeds and provide them with a proper environment (sunlight, water, time).

Correct?

You wouldn’t just throw seeds around and order them to grow - “Hey you, become a cabbage right now”


Same is the case with a team. Nurturing a healthy team culture is really important for the growth and development of an organization. When your team is “in the zone”, being productive and on time, you acknowledge that phenomenal feeling. 

It’s like a sweet cocktail of emotions -  excited, challenging, safe and successful. Pumped up for the entire day and energized to do the work. Happy team members tend to achieve the desired goals at a faster pace than the ones which are not looked upon. 

And this is how you can achieve it.

Personal Development Plan

The first step to help the team members achieve their personal goals while contributing to the company’s goals is implementing the Personal Development Plan.

Personal Development Plan shows the team members all the opportunities in the company and helps them to set a clear but ambitious goal for the future. The process of achieving this goal in a transparent corporate culture is motivational.

A Personal Development Plan helps you to think about your future in detail and helps you in getting there with the specifics. 

The process of building your plan can take a considerable amount of time but it is an excellent idea to increase the efficiency and performance of the company. The process includes some important factors which are: 

Clearing your vision

To start with the Personal Development Plan you have to study beyond the end. Think about your future life and how it can be in the time span you choose for yourself, and now take a step back and review yourself. 

What are the areas that would make you feel successful? Or how can you determine your efficiency and values?

Now map them by putting everything you would want. After you have the primary key fields for your development, you would have a clear vision of the areas you have to focus on. 

Areas of improvements

Now that you know what you want, you next have to figure out that what are the means of going towards your goals. Prepare a list of skills you need to develop and the projects which you can start working on. Write down your areas of weakness and strength. This would help you to think about the regions which need improvements and the areas which should be lightly focused on.

Establishing goals 

Now that you have a crystal clear direction let’s get down to the details. The primary agenda is to get down to specific actions for the future. Start by setting up particular projects and the resources which would be needed to complete those projects. 

This would give you an idea about the things that are needed to be done and the ways in which it is supposed to be completed. You can even tie up your personal development plans to the annual goals. 

Reviewing and Adapting  

To make sure that your goals are being achieved, it's important to review them. Reread your vision, check out the values mind map and then focus on what needs to be done. If you feel that some projects no longer make sense to you, don’t hesitate to remove them from your plan. Also, don’t hesitate to adapt to the plan which has been added with new interests and outcomes. Your personal strategy would grow the way you do.

Feedback Survey 

Happy employees are more productive than the ones who are just sloping around at the workplace. And how can you make an employee happy? 
Definitely, by asking them about their needs, because let’s face it, it is difficult to predict the wants and requirements of your employees as you aren't a psychic.

So how would you do it?

By conducting feedback surveys. 

Feedback Survey helps the employers to receive meaningful and constructive feedbacks which are crucial for the growth of an organization. It creates a positive working environment which not only delivers happiness to the team but grants them with an added level of satisfaction.  

Feedback encompasses many aspects like work and team performance, Skills, and competencies, an employee’s well being, strategies etc 

It is all about helping employees and organization with personal effectiveness and excellence by creating opportunities for the employees and boosting the company with satisfactory culture environment. 
 

Questionnaires 

So now that you know how much feedbacks are important for the growth, it is important to know that what all questions should be put in front of the employees to get the best result. 

Employees don’t like the proverbial my-way-or-the-highway boss, control freak, or the micromanager. So how do you avoid being a bad leader to your team? 

It’s all about the right questions.

The real questions can dramatically improve an employee’s morale, output, and quality of work. Asking the questions is perhaps the only way to be a truly effective work manager. The following list of questions can effectively build and boost team performance. 

Personal and Company related Questionnaires 

There is no doubt to the fact that each one of us has a value system, which holds our everyday decisions. Also, the organizations that we work in, base their daily activities on a certain value system that they use. However, questions of how much do our personal values coincide with the prevailing/existing values of that of an organization can provide you with adequate research. Questions like:

  • What’s your biggest accomplishment this month?
  • What should we do differently?
  • Is there anything that the company can help you with?
  • What process can be fixed or improved?
  • What inspires you to succeed every day?

Self-assessment

A focused employee is a reliable employee and what can be the best way to review your work than self-evaluation. Self-assessment allows for management and their workforce to engage in a helpful dialogue about career development and goals. Some of the questions which can be put for self-assessment are:

  • What’s your biggest challenge right now?
  • What resources would be helpful to you right now?
  • Anything in your work world that’s less than stellar/causing frustration or delays?
  • Looking back to the week is there anything that could have been done better?

Future Goals

Growth creates opportunities for your people to develop their skill, attract the best talent for your company, and create wealth for you and your investors. Therefore, to achieve that growth it is important to have new ideas and notions for the future. To know that you can put up questions which include:

  • What are the things that your work environment should have to improve the performance of the organization?
  • What additional training or education can the organization provide to bring out better results?
  • Where do you see the company in 10 years?
Presenting results and structuring the follow-up talks 

There are good meetings and then there are bad meetings. Bad meetings drone on forever, you seem to never get an idea about the accomplishments and the goals. Whereas good meeting leaves you with solid plans and structure on how to achieve them. Thus, if you structure your meeting plans, preparation, execution, and follow-ups around these following factors then an effective result can be witnessed for your organization.

Achieving the meeting’s objective 

An effective meeting serves a useful purpose. This indicates that in after conquering those objectives you would tend to get the desired results. With the end result clearly defined you can plan the content of the meetings, and determine the people who should be present.

Minimum time and more productivity 

Time is a precious resource and no one wants that their time should be wasted. With the amount of time that we spend in a meeting, you tend to owe it to yourself and the members which are there in the meeting to have a clearer vision on what has to be achieved and that what all is possible. The time that is wasted in a meeting is time wasted for everyone which means less efficiency and less productivity. Assigning particular topic of discussion to various people is a great way to have qualitative progress. 

Structured Process 

Now that you have the agenda prepared, you need it to circulate among the participant and get their feedback and inputs. If there is something that a team member needs to add then a lot them with the task. After the meeting is over take some time to debrief and determine that what went well and the areas which need improvement. Evaluate the meeting effectiveness based on how well you met the objectives. 

Conducting Basic Coaching Conversations 

You can help your reporting employees improve their current performance, or in case of already effective ones, you can boost them to another level of effectiveness by having basic coaching conversations. Performance is a powerful tool when it comes to coaching team members. 

Note that the goal of performance coaching is not to make the employee’s disheartened, nor it is to help to provide a show on how much the HR professionals or manager know. The main goal of coaching is to work with employee’s to solve performance problems and is done to improve the work of the employee’s. 

Thus by using these following steps, you can provide effective support to your reporting employees. 

  • Show confidence in the willingness and ability of employees.
  • Describe and explain the performance problem and behavior of the employee.
  • Determine how to remove the four common barriers: time, training, tools and temperament.
  • Discuss the potential solutions.
  • Agree on a written action plan that includes the employee, the manager, and the HR. 
  • Set a date and time for the follow-up.
Possible challenges that can be faced 

Advancing and using effective employees performance is quite difficult and challenging. This is especially true if your company uses a workgroup or team structure and you want to assess the quality of the team's performance. The challenges can vary from employee’s belief to trivial coordinating issues. There can be a number of challenges that can be encountered among which some are:

Low interest in filling out surveys 

Everyone wants a 100 percent response rate for the betterment of their organization. The level of participation in filling out survey forms can be either extraordinary or not at all. Two main reasons where an employee might not participate could be because:

  • Many employees through several surveys and no change seems to come to the results.
  • Fear of being judged or misinterpreted. 

Poor feedback or no feedback

National Business Research Institute shows the importance of the annual employee survey. It explains that employee engagement increases the overall profit margin up to 6% and results in five times more shareholder return. 

Clearly, most businesses and professionals appreciate the importance of surveys. Poor feedbacks results in misguidance and lowers the growth of an organization. 

Postponed results

Delay in the results exchanges a negative impact on a company. You should not forget that in a project everything and everyone is related to each one that is present under one roof. It is like a chain which is iterative and should be agile. One step missed, the whole goal suffers. Postponed results may occur because of reasons like

  • Inadequate estimations (budgets, timeframes, human resources)
  • Task complexity
  • Unexpected events
  • Organizational strategy prioritizing some projects over other due to strategic objectives.
  • Bad coordination among team members 
Wrapping up 

When you involve appropriate team members in the resource allocation process, you create a spirit of collaboration on important decisions. Plus, you tend to get more accurate results and outcomes. 

If you are looking for a better way to improve performance across your organization, Opensense Labs services are there for you.  Contact us on hello@opensenselabs.com and help your business grow and flourish more. 

blog banner blog image Drupal Drupal 8 CMS Performance Personal Development Plan Feedback Survey Questionnaires Coaching Team Members Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On
Categories: Drupal

Tandem's Drupal Blog: Lando + Contenta CMS + Nuxt Pt. 1

24 January 2019 - 4:00pm
January 25, 2019 Set up a headless Drupal architecture in Lando Why? Headless architectures offer many advantages to app construction. From the COPE (create once publish everywhere) strategy, to parallell development of the frontend and the backend of the app, but getting the infrastructure right can be a bit tricky. Let's take a look at ho...
Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association blog: A Step in a New Direction. Farewell from Amanda Gonser.

24 January 2019 - 10:49am

When I joined the Drupal Association over 4 years ago, I didn’t ‘do Drupal’ and I didn’t have the faintest idea of what ‘the community’ was. These were things I read about in the job description for DrupalCon Coordinator, but didn’t mean anything to me yet. Now, as I prepare to leave Drupal - the Association, the community, the Con, the project - I can actually ‘do Drupal’ (albeit it on a Drupal 7 site, tsk tsk I know) and have such respect and care for the people that I have been lucky to work with from the community.

The journey from Point A to Point B, has been just that - a journey, with many steps in between.

My first DrupalCon was DrupalCon Los Angeles 2015 and it was full of firsts: the first time I met the Track Team who I had seen on the planning calls for months and who were surprised how short I was ‘in real life’; the first time I walked farther than a marathon in one single building; the first time I waltzed to the front of a session room to introduce myself to one of the many volunteer speakers to thank them for contributing; the first time I gained the understanding of how big, how passionate, how special this community was and how important DrupalCon was to all of them.

Since that Con, I have done my best to serve the community that makes Drupal so successful and special. There have been many volunteers, multiple Cons, too many emails to count, and a lot of smiles. As I prepare to step down from my role at the Drupal Association, there are many moments/projects that I am proud that we achieved together:

  • We’ve gone from not tracking diversity of our speakers at all to having our DrupalCon Seattle 2019 lineup be comprised of 50% speakers from underrepresented groups.
  • We held our first DrupalCon in India to serve an incredibly enthusiastic and growing community in what was one of my most memorable Cons ever.
  • We’ve taken the challenge of creating a sustainable and productive DrupalCon Europe and approached it with new eyes and ideas, to craft a new model that is community-driven and on course to be a great event to serve our European contributors.
  • We’ve continued to open our community to new and different audiences, working to create a welcoming environment along with relevant and compelling content for anyone who Drupal impacts- from the CTO to the content editor and marketer.

There are countless other moments that I also consider special - the hugs, the thank you notes that I’ve received, the inside jokes, the staff retreats, the volunteer dinners - thank you for those. In addition to the magic I have felt within our larger community, I also am grateful to the truly fantastic team at the Drupal Association who works to serve the community every single day; I am grateful to have worked with such talented, driven, and fun teammates.

My last day will be February 1, and between now and then I'll be reaching out to all the volunteers involved in the upcoming event to put you in touch with the great team that will succeed me. I am more than confident that the Association, the community, and the project will continue to grow, change, and prosper. Thank you for letting me be part of that, it has been a true privilege to serve you.

In my time here, I learned that to do well in my job, I needed to do my best for all of you. So even though I won’t see you at DrupalCon Seattle 2019, imagine me whizzing by you at speed-walk pace with a smile, shouting lovingly at you to squeeze in the group picture, or receiving a handwritten card from me thanking you for contributing to the Con.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: How to decouple Drupal in 2019

24 January 2019 - 8:18am

The pace of innovation in content management has been accelerating — driven by both the number of channels that content management systems need to support (web, mobile, social, chat) as well as the need to support JavaScript frameworks in the traditional web channel. As a result, we've seen headless or decoupled architectures emerge.

Decoupled Drupal has seen adoption from all corners of the Drupal community. In response to the trend towards decoupled architectures, I wrote blog posts in 2016 and 2018 for architects and developers about how and when to decouple Drupal. In the time since my last post, the surrounding landscape has evolved, Drupal's web services have only gotten better, and new paradigms such as static site generators and the JAMstack are emerging.

Time to update my recommendations for 2019! As we did a year ago, let's start with the 2019 version of the flowchart in full. (At the end of this post, there is also an accessible version of this flowchart described in words.)

Different ways to decouple Drupal

I want to revisit some of the established ways to decouple Drupal as well as discuss new paradigms that are seeing growing adoption. As I've written previously, the three most common approaches to Drupal architecture from a decoupled standpoint are traditional (or coupled), progressively decoupled, and fully decoupled. The different flavors of decoupling Drupal exist due to varying preferences and requirements.

In traditional Drupal, all of Drupal's usual responsibilities stay intact, as Drupal is a monolithic system and therefore maintains complete control over the presentation and data layers. Traditional Drupal remains an excellent choice for editors who need full control over the visual elements on the page, with access to features such as in-place editing and layout management. This is Drupal as we have known it all along. Because the benefits are real, this is still how most new content management projects are built.

Sometimes, JavaScript is required to deliver a highly interactive end-user experience. In this case, a decoupled approach becomes required. In progressively decoupled Drupal, a JavaScript framework is layered on top of the existing Drupal front end. This JavaScript might be responsible for nothing more than rendering a single block or component on a page, or it may render everything within the page body. The progressive decoupling paradigm lies on a spectrum; the less of the page dedicated to JavaScript, the more editors can control the page through Drupal's administrative capabilities.

Up until this year, fully decoupled Drupal was a single category of decoupled Drupal architecture that reflects a full separation of concerns between the presentation layer and all other aspects of the CMS. In this scenario, the CMS becomes a data provider, and a JavaScript application with server-side rendering becomes responsible for all rendering and markup, communicating with Drupal via web service APIs. Though key functionality like in-place editing and layout management are unavailable, fully decoupled Drupal is appealing for developers who want greater control over the front end and who are already experienced with building applications in frameworks like Angular, React, Vue.js, etc.

Over the last year, fully decoupled Drupal has branched into two separate paradigms due to the increasing complexity of JavaScript development. The so-called JAMstack (JavaScript, APIs, Markup) introduces a new approach: fully decoupled static sites. The primary reason for static sites is improved performance, security, and reduced complexity for developers. A static site generator like Gatsby will retrieve content from Drupal, generate a static website, and deploy that static site to a CDN, usually through a specialized cloud provider such as Netlify.

What do you intend to build?

The essential question, as always, is what you're trying to build. Here is updated advice for architects exploring decoupled Drupal in 2019:

  1. If your intention is to build a single standalone website or web application, choosing decoupled Drupal may or may not be the right choice, depending on the features your developers and editors see as must-haves.
  2. If your intention is to build multiple web experiences (websites or web applications), you can use a decoupled Drupal instance either as a) a content repository without its own public-facing front end or b) a traditional website that acts simultaneously as a content repository. Depending on how dynamic your application needs to be, you can choose a JavaScript framework for highly interactive applications or a static site generator for mostly static websites.
  3. If your intention is to build multiple non-web experiences (native mobile or IoT applications), you can leverage decoupled Drupal to expose web service APIs and consume that Drupal site as a content repository without its own public-facing front end.

What makes Drupal so powerful is that it supports all of these use cases. Drupal makes it simple to build decoupled Drupal thanks to widely recognized standards such as JSON:API, GraphQL, OpenAPI, and CouchDB. In the end, it is your technical requirements that will decide whether decoupled Drupal should be your next architecture.

In addition to technical requirements, organizational factors often come into play as well. For instance, if it is proving difficult to find talented front-end Drupal developers with Twig knowledge, it may make more sense to hire more affordable JavaScript developers instead and build a fully decoupled implementation.

Are there things you can't live without?

As I wrote last year, the most important aspect of any decision when it comes to decoupling Drupal is the list of features your project requires; the needs of editors and developers have to be carefully considered. It is a critical step in your evaluation process to weigh the different advantages and disadvantages. Every project should embark on a clear-eyed assessment of its organization-wide needs.

Many editorial and marketing teams select a particular CMS because of its layout capabilities and rich editing functionality. Drupal, for example, gives editors the ability to build layouts in the browser and drop-and-drag components into it, all without needing a developer to do it for them. Although it is possible to rebuild many of the features available in a CMS on a consumer application, this can be a time-consuming and expensive process.

In recent years, the developer experience has also become an important consideration, but not in the ways that we might expect. While the many changes in the JavaScript landscape are one of the motivations for developers to prefer decoupled Drupal, the fact that there are now multiple ways to write front ends for Drupal makes it easier to find people to work on decoupled Drupal projects. As an example, many organizations are finding it difficult to find affordable front-end Drupal developers experienced in Twig. Moving to a JavaScript-driven front end can resolve some of these resourcing challenges.

This balancing act between the requirements that developers prioritize and those that editors prioritize will guide you to the correct approach for your needs. If you are part of an organization that is mostly editorial, decoupled Drupal could be problematic, because it reduces the amount of control editors have over the presentation of their content. By the same token, if you are part of an organization with more developer resources, fully decoupled Drupal could potentially accelerate progress, with the warning that many mission-critical editorial features disappear.

Current and future trends to consider Over the past year, JavaScript frameworks have become more complex, while static site generators have become less complex.

One of the common complaints I have heard about the JavaScript landscape is that it shows fragmentation and a lack of cohesion due to increasing complexity. This has been a driving force for static site generators. Whereas two years ago, most JavaScript developers would have chosen a fully functional framework like Angular or Ember to create even simple websites, today they might choose a static site generator instead. A static site generator still allows them to use JavaScript, but it is simpler because performance considerations and build processes are offloaded to hosted services rather than the responsibility of developers.

I predict that static site generators will gain momentum in the coming year due to the positive developer experience they provide. Static site generators are also attracting a middle ground of both more experienced and less experienced developers.

Conclusion

Drupal continues to be an ideal choice for decoupled CMS architectures, and it is only getting better. The API-first initiative is making good progress on preparing the JSON:API module for inclusion in Drupal core, and the Admin UI and JavaScript Modernization initiative is working to dogfood Drupal's web services with a reinvented administrative interface. Drupal's support for GraphQL continues to improve, and now there is even a book on the subject of decoupled Drupal. It's clear that developers today have a wide range of ways to work with the rich features Drupal has to offer for decoupled architectures.

With the introduction of fully decoupled static sites as an another architectural paradigm that developers can select, there is an even wider variety of architectural possibilities than before. It means that the spectrum of decoupled Drupal approaches I defined last year has become even more extensive. This flexibility continues to define Drupal as an excellent CMS for both traditional and decoupled approaches, with features that go well beyond Drupal's competitors, including WordPress, Sitecore and Adobe. Regardless of the makeup of your team or the needs of your organization, Drupal has a solution for you.

Special thanks to Preston So for co-authoring this blog post and to Angie Byron, Chris Hamper, Gabe Sullice, Lauri Eskola, Ted Bowman, and Wim Leers for their feedback during the writing process.

Accessible version of flowchart

This is an accessible and described version of the flowchart images earlier in this blog post. First, let us list the available architectural choices:

  • Coupled. Use Drupal as is without additional JavaScript (and as a content repository for other consumers).
  • Progressively decoupled. Use Drupal for initial rendering with JavaScript on top (and as a content repository for other consumers).
  • Fully decoupled static site. Use Drupal as a data source for a static site generator and, if needed, deploy to a JAMstack hosting platform.
  • Fully decoupled app. Use Drupal as a content repository accessed by other consumers (if JavaScript, use Node.js for server-side rendering).

Second, ask the question "What do you intend to build?" and choose among the answers "One experience" or "Multiple experiences".

If you are building one experience, ask the question "Is it a website or web application?" and choose among the answers "Yes, a single website or web application" or "No, Drupal as a repository for non-web applications only".

If you are building multiple experiences instead, ask the question "Is it a website or web application?" with the answers "Yes, Drupal as website and repository" or "No, Drupal as a repository for non-web applications only".

If your answer to the previous question was "No", then you should build a fully decoupled application, and your decision is complete. If your answer to the previous question was "Yes", then ask the question "Are there things the project cannot live without?"

Both editorial and developer needs are things that projects cannot live without, and here are the questions you need to ask about your project:

Editorial needs
  • Do editors need to manipulate page content and layout without a developer?
  • Do editors need in-context tools like in-place editing, contextual links, and toolbar?
  • Do editors need to preview unpublished content without custom development?
  • Do editors need content to be accessible by default like in Drupal's HTML?
Developer needs
  • Do developers need to have control over visual presentation instead of editors?
  • Do developers need server-side rendering or Node.js build features?
  • Do developers need JSON from APIs and to write JavaScript for the front end?
  • Do developers need data security driven by a publicly inaccessible CMS?

If, after asking all of these questions about things your project cannot live without, your answers show that your requirements reflect a mix of both editorial and developer needs, you should consider a progressively decoupled implementation, and your decision is complete.

If your answers to the questions about things your project cannot live without show that your requirements reflect purely developer needs, then ask the question "Is it a static website or a dynamic web application?" and choose among the answers "Static" or "Dynamic." If your answer to the previous question was "Static", you should build a fully decoupled static site, and your decision is complete. If your answer to the previous question was "Dynamic", you should build a fully decoupled app, and your decision is complete.

If your answers to the questions about things your project cannot live without show that your requirements reflect purely editorial needs, then ask two questions. Ask the first question, "Are there parts of the page that need JavaScript-driven interactions?" and choose among the answers "Yes" or "No." If your answer to the first question was "Yes", then you should consider a progressively decoupled implementation, and your decision is complete. If your answer to the first question was "No", then you should build a coupled Drupal site, and your decision is complete.

Then, ask the second question, "Do you need to access multiple data sources via API?" and choose among the answers "Yes" or "No." If your answer to the second question was "Yes", then you should consider a progressively decoupled implementation, and your decision is complete. If your answer to the second question was "No", then you should build a coupled Drupal site, and your decision is complete.

Categories: Drupal

OpenSense Labs: Blend of VueJS and Drupal

24 January 2019 - 5:55am
Blend of VueJS and Drupal Shankar Thu, 01/24/2019 - 19:25

That’s a beautiful view!”, you exclaim when you witness the sunset while standing on a beach with waves touching your feet. That is when you come out of the rut, leave behind the humdrum life of city and ‘really’ feel a natural beauty. There is another view in the digital landscape that will make you exclaim, “wow!”, and that is Vue.


Vue.js is fantastic for developers to build applications faster and make it more attractive and user-friendly. In combination with Drupal, one of the leading open source content management systems, Vue JS can be a brilliant option for web development needs.

A trip down memory lane: JavaScript frameworks

JavaScript framework is great for creating modern applications. There is an interesting piece from freeCodeCamp on JavaScript’s development and how it came through.

Browsers that we see today are did not have the sort of functionalities until the early 2000s. They were much less powerful and, performance-wise, there was no feasibility in creating intricate applications inside them.

Introduction of Google Maps and Gmail, that ran inside the browser, started bringing in the much-needed change. Asynchronous network requests were made a reality by Ajax. Eventually, development started happening on top of the web platform while the platform itself - that constitute browsers, the web standards, the browser APIs, and the JavaScript language - was being worked upon by engineers.

First major projects developed upon JavaScript were libraries like jQuery and Mootools that offered a nicer API for interacting with the browser in addition to the provision for solutions to bugs and inconsistencies among numerous browsers. Then, Backbone, Ember, Knockout among others burst onto the scene as modern JavaScript frameworks followed by React, Angular and Vue which have gained popularity in recent times.

The rise of VueJS


VueJS is one of the popular JavaScript frameworks. The official site of VueJS states that it is a progressive JavaScript framework that is used for developing user interfaces. In complete contrast to monolithic frameworks, it is incrementally adoptable and its core library emphasises on the view layer and can be easily incorporated with other libraries or existing projects. It is an astounding solution for intricate single page applications when leveraged alongside modern tooling and supporting libraries.

The usage of VueJS has seen a tremendous rise over the years as represented in the graph below.

Usage statistics of VueJS | Source: BuiltWith

VueJS scores heavily when it comes to high traffic websites. Organisations in need of a web development solution that can scale well during a high spike in traffic are opting for VueJS as can be seen in the graphical representation below.


Meritorious features of VueJS

Following are some of the benefits of VueJS:

Smaller in Size

A JavaScript framework triumph depends upon its size. Size of the JavaScript framework is directly proportional to its usage. With that being said, VueJS is very beneficial with its small size. The size of the VueJS framework is around 18-21KB which means it does not take much of your time while downloading and using it. Small size has no effect on the speed as it is fast and snappy.

Easy development

Adding Vue to an existing web project is quite easy and you can begin coding very swiftly without the need for knowing anything about JSX, ES2015 or build systems to get started. Familiarity with HTML and JavaScript in addition to reading their guide can assist in building something basic within a day that is very advantageous for a fast-paced development team where you are required to pick up something very quickly.

Moreover, it has a simple structure which is great for both small and large scale template development and saves a lot of time as a result. You can even trace the blocks with errors due to its simple structure.

Easy integration

It facilitates developers while integrating with existing applications which makes it a great prospect for developing new web applications and changing the pre-existing applications. The integration is possible because it has components for everything.

Exhaustive Documentation

The documentation of VueJS is very detailed, simple to understand and constitutes several code examples. It has a growing community of developers that can assist when needed.

Immense flexibility

It is simpler to write an app with VueJS swiftly and run it straight from the browser. Or you can even develop an intricate application leveraging ES6, JXX, components, routing, bundling among others. You can even write a template in HTML or in JavaScript or you can use JSX. You get the liberty to structure the application in a way that suits you.

Model-view-viewmodel architecture

Its MVVM architecture (Model-view-viewmodel) helps in facilitating two-way communications for easy management of HTML blocks.

Implementing VueJS with Drupal

Like VueJS, Drupal is very scalable and has been powering high-traffic websites around the world. It also has been outperforming other leading content management frameworks in this criteria.


The blend of Drupal and VueJS, which are both preferred for their scalability, can be a remarkable option. 

One of the ways of utilising VueJS with Drupal is the development of single page application as we have discussed in an earlier blog. It involves the installation of Drupal 8 on the local system followed by the creation of custom content types, adding views, and enabling REST API.

Then, you can start building front end with VueJS and create single page application. This would involve setting up of Vue project with Vue CLI. Once this is done, the addition of Vue router and Vue resource is performed. Vue router, the official router for VueJS, deeply integrates with VueJS core is similar to the angular router (of Angular JS) and react router (of React JS). Vue resource is the plugin for VueJS that offers services for making web requests and govern responses. Then, you can start modifying main.js file to use Vue routers and Vue resources and modify the app.js to work with the router followed by setting up of app components and routers.

Use case

Arbetsförmedlingen, Swedish Public Employment Service, benefitted from the amalgamation of Drupal and VueJS. Drupal Europe 2018 had a session that talked about how a video platform that was built for the Swedish government.


The platform used podcasts, video on demand and live broadcast for the dissemination of their content. They needed a new platform where these different sorts of media could be imported and metadata could be added for easily grouping them and filtering them out.

Drupal was the ultimate choice because of its great content management system, robust multilingual support, user management, and open source platform. Being lightweight with a production-ready build, VueJS was chosen as the desired JavaScript framework. Its compatibility with twig was a bonus. So, development recipe constituted Drupal, the combination of VueJS and twig and an API endpoint.

RESTful Web Services and Serialisation modules were enabled that gave the ability to create normal views as REST export and Axios, a promise-based HTTP client that has an easy-to-use API and can be leveraged in both the browser and NodeJS, was used for the consumption of data. Theme structure comprised of the twig, JS and CSS. Pluggable VueJs components were utilised and event handling configuration was shown through ‘Load More’ button.

Conclusion

The amalgam of Drupal and VueJS can be a rewarding solution that can help fulfil your digital transformation dreams.

We are devoted to providing ambitious digital experience to our partners through a suite of services.

Ping us at hello@opensenselabs.com to get the best out of Drupal and VueJS amalgamation.

blog banner blog image VueJS Drupal 8 Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On
Categories: Drupal

Promet Source: Better Instructions for Your Drupal Content Types

23 January 2019 - 11:40am
Besides Title, the most common field label found on a content type form is Body. Of course, this is where you place the body of your content. It’s your blog post, your how-to instructions, or maybe an event description. You know exactly what needs to be provided in this field because you are the trained author. What happens when the scenario includes many authors with varied skills? Without clearly visible instructions for the form and the form fields, content authors can make mistakes. There are four default features in Drupal 8 that provide instructions for content authors.
Categories: Drupal

OPTASY: Progressively Decoupled Drupal: Moving Towards a Standard Workflow

23 January 2019 - 9:11am
Progressively Decoupled Drupal: Moving Towards a Standard Workflow silviu.serdaru Wed, 01/23/2019 - 17:11

Progressively decoupled Drupal has gone from concept to buzzword. Until recently, when we've started to witness sustained efforts being made to set up a standard workflow for implementing this architecture.

New dedicated modules have been developed to fit those use cases where just a few particular blocks, affecting the website's overall performance, need to be decoupled. All while preserving Drupal's standard robust features.

Features too famous among content editors and site builders to be sacrificed in the name of high speed and rich UX. 

We've gradually shifted focus from “Why would I choose progressive decoupling over a headless CMS?” to:

Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: Contrib Half Hour updates for 2019

23 January 2019 - 8:40am

Just over a year ago I decided to repurpose an internal contrib-focused meeting and make an open meeting to support contributing to Drupal, called the Contrib Half Hour. Along the way we moved its time a little later to avoid conflicting with another important community initiative and then restructured it to add focused meetings for certain topics. To make things even better, almost all meetings have been recorded and uploaded to our Youtube channel. 2019 is going to see some additional changes that I'm excited to start on.

Our Q&A have issues

Throughout the year it became apparent that there was a huge overlap between the Q&A meetings, where we'd focus on general questions and discussions from the community, and the issues lab, where we'd focus on specific drupal.org project issues. While there's definitely a case for both, the overlap became somewhat naturally as the Q&A days had us often look at Drupal issues.

As a result of this we're going to combine the Q&A and Issues Lab days into one that'll be more open ended, letting us focus on general discussions some days and specific issues other days.

The testing shall continue until code improves

We're also continuing our dedication to helping people learn how to write code tests for their modules and themes. While during 2018 we focused on functional testing for Drupal 7 and 8, I'm aiming to expand our coverage (ba-dum-dum) in 2019 to also include unit testing.

I'd also like to open an invitation for folks to join our testing lab who are starting to write tests to join our labs where we'll be able to help.

Upgrade Lab: Time to upgrade

It was announced late last year that Drupal 9 will be released in June 2020 and that Drupal 7 and 8 will reach their end-of-life in November 2021. The main driving factor behind these dates is that the various libraries Drupal 7 and 8 depend upon will all have reached their end-of-life in November 2021 and so will no longer receive security updates from their respective maintainers. To avoid needing to come up with a plan to provide security coverage for a huge number of out-of-date 3rd party libraries, the Drupal core maintainers are dropping support when the other libraries also stop being supported.

It was also revealed that the usual upgrade anxiety for major releases of Drupal (5 to 6, 6 to 7, etc) would not be the case for Drupal 9. The plan is two release Drupal 9.0.0 and the final minor release of Drupal 8 on the same day, with the only difference being that all deprecated D8 APIs are removed from D9. As a result it will be relatively easy to upgrade from Drupal 8 to 9, “just” update all contrib code and custom code to no longer use the deprecated APIs along the way, and in theory everything should just work.

With this in mind we think it's time for people running Drupal 6 and 7 sites to start looking to upgrade to Drupal 8. Towards that goal we're going to have a regular meeting where we look at the steps to upgrade a site to Drupal 8 using the bundled Migrate system. We'll look at what's involved, how it works, how to plan for it, and how to help contributed modules support Drupal 8's upgrade solution. I'm intending that we'll be able to collaborate on improving both core and contrib's upgrade functionality, and in so doing help all sites looking to upgrade. I'm also hoping that we might be able to provide some assistance to folks attempting custom upgrades using Migrate's APIs, but we'll see how it goes.

Schedule

Our schedule for the next few months looks like this:

  • January 3: Q&A
  • January 10: Turning custom code into OSS
  • January 17: Q & A & Issues
  • January 24: Testing Lab
  • January 31: Upgrade Lab
  • February 7: Presentation TBD
  • February 14: Q & A & Issues
  • February 21: Testing Lab
  • February 28: Upgrade Lab
  • March 7: Presentation TBD
  • March 14: Q & A & Issues
  • March 21: Testing Lab
  • March 28: No meeting
  • April 4: Upgrade Lab
  • April 11: Presentation TBD
  • April 18: Q & A & Issues
  • April 25: Testing Lab
  • May 2: Upgrade Lab
  • May 9: Presentation TBD
  • May 16: Q & A & Issues
  • May 23: Testing Lab
  • May 30: Upgrade Lab
Same Bat Time!

We're going to continue meetings at the same time each month, using the same video conferencing provider:

And remember, if you're not able to join us then you can always catch up later as all meetings are recorded, when I don't forget to hit the record button that is.

See you then!

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