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Dries Buytaert: Why Drupal's Layout Builder is so powerful and unique

12 November 2018 - 4:02am

Content authors want an easy-to-use page building experience; they want to create and design pages using drag-and-drop and WYSIWYG tools. For over a year the Drupal community has been working on a new Layout Builder, which is designed to bring this page building capability into Drupal core.

Drupal's upcoming Layout Builder is unique in offering a single, powerful visual design tool for the following three use cases:

  1. Layouts for templated content. The creation of "layout templates" that will be used to layout all instances of a specific content type (e.g. blog posts, product pages).
  2. Customizations to templated layouts. The ability to override these layout templates on a case-by-case basis (e.g. the ability to override the layout of a standardized product page)
  3. Custom pages. The creation of custom, one-off landing pages not tied to a content type or structured content (e.g. a single "About us" page).

Let's look at all three use cases in more detail to explain why we think this is extremely useful!

Use case 1: Layouts for templated content

For large sites with significant amounts of content it is important that the same types of content have a similar appearance.

A commerce site selling hundreds of different gift baskets with flower arrangements should have a similar layout for all gift baskets. For customers, this provides a consistent experience when browsing the gift baskets, making them easier to compare. For content authors, the templated approach means they don't have to worry about the appearance and layout of each new gift basket they enter on the site. They can be sure that once they have entered the price, description, and uploaded an image of the item, it will look good to the end user and similar to all other gift baskets on the site.

Drupal 8's new Layout Builder allows a site creator to visually create a layout template that will be used for each item of the same content type (e.g. a "gift basket layout" for the "gift basket" content type). This is possible because the Layout Builder benefits from Drupal's powerful "structured content" capabilities.

Many of Drupal's competitors don't allow such a templated approach to be designed in the browser. Their browser-based page builders only allow you to create a design for an individual page. When you want to create a layout that applies to all pages of a specific content type, it is usually not possible without a developer.

Use case 2: Customizations to templated layouts

While having a uniform look for all products of a particular type has many advantages, sometimes you may want to display one or more products in a slightly (or dramatically) different way.

Perhaps a customer recorded a video of giving their loved one one of the gift baskets, and that video has recently gone viral (because somehow it involved a puppy). If you only want to update one of the gift baskets with a video, it may not make sense to add an optional "highlighted video" field to all gift baskets.

Drupal 8's Layout Builder offers the ability to customize templated layouts on a case per case basis. In the "viral, puppy, gift basket" video example, this would allow a content creator to rearrange the layout for just that one gift basket, and put the viral video directly below the product image. In addition, the Layout Builder would allow the site to revert the layout to match all other gift baskets once the world has moved on to the next puppy video.

Since most content management systems don't allow you to visually design a layout pattern for certain types of structured content, they of course can't allow for this type of customization.

Use case 3: Custom pages (with unstructured content)

Of course, not everything is templated, and content authors often need to create one-off pages like an "About us" page or the website's homepage.

In addition to visually designing layout templates for different types of content, Drupal 8's Layout Builder can also be used to create these dynamic one-off custom pages. A content author can start with a blank page, design a layout, and start adding blocks. These blocks can contain videos, maps, text, a hero image, or custom-built widgets (e.g. a Drupal View showing a list of the ten most popular gift baskets). Blocks can expose configuration options to the content author. For instance, a hero block with an image and text may offer a setting to align the text left, right, or center. These settings can be configured directly from a sidebar.

In many other systems content authors are able to use drag-and-drop WYSIWYG tools to design these one-off pages. This type of tool is used in many projects and services such as Squarespace and the new Gutenberg Editor for WordPress (now available for Drupal, too!).

On large sites, the free-form page creation is almost certainly going to be a scalability, maintenance and governance challenge.

For smaller sites where there may not be many pages or content authors, these dynamic free-form page builders may work well, and the unrestricted creative freedom they provide might be very compelling. However, on larger sites, when you have hundreds of pages or dozens of content creators, a templated approach is going to be preferred.

When will Drupal's new Layout Builder be ready?

Drupal 8's Layout Builder is still a beta level experimental module, with 25 known open issues to be addressed prior to becoming stable. We're on track to complete this in time for Drupal 8.7's release in May 2019. If you are interested in increasing the likelihood of that, you can find out how to help on the Layout Initiative homepage.

An important note on accessibility

Accessibility is one of Drupal's core tenets, and building software that everyone can use is part of our core values and principles. A key part of bringing Layout Builder functionality to a "stable" state for production use will be ensuring that it passes our accessibility gate (Level AA conformance with WCAG and ATAG). This holds for both the authoring tool itself, as well as the markup that it generates. We take our commitment to accessibility seriously.

Impact on contributed modules and existing sites

Currently there a few methods in the Drupal module ecosystem for creating templated layouts and landing pages, including the Panels and Panelizer combination. We are currently working on a migration path for Panels/Panelizer to the Layout Builder.

The Paragraphs module currently can be used to solve several kinds of content authoring use-cases, including the creation of custom landing pages. It is still being determined how Paragraphs will work with the Layout Builder and/or if the Layout Builder will be used to control the layout of Paragraphs.

Conclusion

Drupal's upcoming Layout Builder is unique in that it supports multiple different use cases; from templated layouts that can be applied to dozens or hundreds of pieces of structured content, to designing custom one-off pages with unstructured content. The Layout Builder is even more powerful when used in conjunction with Drupal's other out-of-the-box features such as revisioning, content moderation, and translations, but that is a topic for a future blog post.

Special thanks to Ted Bowman (Acquia) for co-authoring this post. Also thanks to Wim Leers (Acquia), Angie Byron (Acquia), Alex Bronstein (Acquia), Jeff Beeman (Acquia) and Tim Plunkett (Acquia) for their feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

DrupalBASE: Creating visualization styles

12 November 2018 - 2:55am

Visualization styles are configuration entities that store a reference to a drawer plugin (its Id) and a set of configuration defaults. These styles are used to create drawings. As VisualN defines it, a drawing is a ready, self-contained piece of markup (or render array) with possibly styles and scripts attached. Almost anything can be a drawing: a chart, an image gallery or even a web app.

In a sense, they are similar to image styles which are applied to an original image in order to get a styled one. In the case of visualization styles, they are applied to sets of data to get a drawing as a result. Though some drawers don't even need data to create a drawing.

Visualization styles can be created either using Available drawers preview UI or directly using VisualN > Visualization Styles administration page. Once created, they can be used anywhere on the site to create drawings: views, fields, blocks, embedded into content via ckeditor, tokens etc. Multiple styles can be created for the same drawer.

On the screenshot below a style is created for the Linechart Basic drawer provided with VisualN module.

To create a visualization style, its label must be set and drawer plugin selected. If selected drawer plugin configuration form provides required fields, those must be set up too.

Categories: Drupal

Code Karate: Drupal 8 Image Widget Crop Module

10 November 2018 - 7:46am
Episode Number: 216

The Drupal 8 Image Widget Crop Module is a handy module for allowing your content editors on your website to crop images after they upload them. Have you ever uploaded an image on a website and had it automatically crop the image for you in a way that just looks wrong? This module solves that problem!

Tags: DrupalContribDrupal 8Image HandlingSite BuildingDrupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

Code Karate: Drupal 8 Contact Storage Export Module

9 November 2018 - 1:49pm
Episode Number: 215

In this episode, we cover the Drupal 8 Contact Storage Export Module. This episode covers a module that adds additional functionality to the Contact Storage Module (which we covered in episode 213). This module allows you to export your contact form submissions to a CSV file. It's a simple module that serves a very specific purpose. If you need to export your contact form submissions, this is how you do it!

Tags: DrupalContribDrupal 8Site BuildingDrupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: The end of PHP 5

9 November 2018 - 9:28am

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

If you are still using PHP 5, now is the time to upgrade to a newer version of PHP.

PHP, the Open Source scripting language, is used by nearly 80 percent of the world's websites.

According to W3Techs, around 61 percent of all websites on the internet still use PHP 5, a version of PHP that was first released fourteen years ago.

Now is the time to give PHP 5 some attention. In less than two months, on December 31st, security support for PHP 5 will officially cease. (Note: Some Linux distributions, such as Debian Long Term Support distributions, will still try to backport security fixes.)

If you haven't already, now is the time to make sure your site is running an updated and supported version of PHP.

Beyond security considerations, sites that are running on older versions of PHP are missing out on the significant performance improvements that come with the newer versions.

Drupal and PHP 5 Drupal 8

Drupal 8 will drop support for PHP 5 on March 6, 2019. We recommend updating to at least PHP 7.1 if possible, and ideally PHP 7.2, which is supported as of Drupal 8.5 (which was released March, 2018). Drupal 8.7 (to be released in May, 2019) will support PHP 7.3, and we may backport PHP 7.3 support to Drupal 8.6 in the coming months as well.

Drupal 7

Drupal 7 will drop support for older versions of PHP 5 on December 31st, but will continue to support PHP 5.6 as long there are one or more third-party organizations providing reliable, extended security support for PHP 5.

Earlier today, we released Drupal 7.61 which now supports PHP 7.2. This should make upgrades from PHP 5 easier. Drupal 7's support for PHP 7.3 is being worked on but we don't know yet when it will be available.

Thank you!

It's a credit to the PHP community that they have maintained PHP 5 for fourteen years. But that can't go on forever. It's time to move on from PHP 5 and upgrade to a newer version so that we can all innovate faster.

I'd also like to thank the Drupal community — both those contributing to Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 — for keeping Drupal compatible with the newest versions of PHP. That certainly helps make PHP upgrades easier.

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: Top Drupal blog post from October 2018

9 November 2018 - 7:12am

We’ve prepared for you an overview of the best Drupal blog post written in the previous month - October 2018. Enjoy.

READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

ComputerMinds.co.uk: Beware File::getFileUri()!

9 November 2018 - 6:06am

I'll keep this short and sweet, but we thought this would be a useful tip to share with the world as a potential security issue with the combined use of File::getFileUri() and FileSystem::realpath().

Consider the following code excerpt :

$file = File::load($some_file_uri); if ($file) { $uri = $file->getFileUri(); $file_realpath = \Drupal::service('file_system')->realpath($uri); }

Seems pretty harmless right? Load up the file from $some_file_uri , If we have a valid file then get the URI and then grab the real path.

Wrong (potentially, depending on what you do with $file_realpath).

If $file is a valid file, but for whatever reason the file is no longer physically located on disk, then $file->getFileUri() will return a blank string.

It turns out that passing this blank string $uri into \Drupal::service('file_system')->realpath($uri) will return the full webroot of your site!

Depending on what you were doing with said $file_realpath, it could then be a security issue.

We were handling a user webform submission and then sending the submission over to a CRM system... because $file_realpath was now the webroot of the site, then code that followed to archive the user submitted file ended up archiving the entire webroot and sending this over to the client's CRM system. 

Luckily in this instance, the archive was only ever available temporarily server side and then went directly to the clients own CRM system, but in another circumstance this could have easily been a very serious security issue.

Fortunately the fix is quite simple, ensure the the $uri returned from ->getFileUri() is valid by some method, before passing through realpath(). Here, I now validate the uri matches what I know it should be for the current webform submission.

if ($file) { $uri = $file->getFileUri(); $webform_id = $webform->get('id'); $submission_id = $webform_submission->get('sid')->getValue()[0]['value']; $valid_file_scheme = strpos($uri, 'private://webform/' . $webform_id . '/' . $submission_id . '/') !== FALSE; if ($valid_file_scheme) { // Proceed with the rest of the code.. } }

 

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: The end of PHP 5

8 November 2018 - 3:19pm

It's easy to take PHP for granted. The Open Source scripting language is used by nearly 80% of the world's websites.

According to W3Techs, around 61 percent of websites on the internet still use PHP 5. PHP 5 was first released fourteen years ago. Fourteen years is a long time, and makes it easy to take it for granted.

Now is the time to give PHP 5 some attention. In less than two months, on December 31st, security support for PHP 5 will officially cease. (Note: Some Linux distributions, such as Debian Long Term Support distributions, will still try to backport security fixes.)

If you haven't already, now is the time to make sure your site is running an updated and supported version of PHP.

Beyond security considerations, sites that are running on older versions of PHP are missing out on the significant performance improvements that come with the newer versions.

Drupal and PHP 5 Drupal 8

Drupal 8 will drop support for PHP 5 on March 6, 2019. We recommend updating to at least PHP 7.1 if possible, and ideally PHP 7.2, which is supported as of Drupal 8.5 (which was released March, 2018). Drupal 8.7 (to be released in May, 2019) will support PHP 7.3, and we may backport PHP 7.3 support to Drupal 8.6 in the coming months as well.

Drupal 7

Drupal 7 will drop support for older versions of PHP 5 on December 31st, but will continue to support PHP 5.6 as long there are one or more third-party organizations providing reliable, extended security support for PHP 5.

Earlier today, we released Drupal 7.61 which now supports PHP 7.2. This should make upgrades from PHP 5 easier. Drupal 7's support for PHP 7.3 is being worked on but we don't know yet when it will be available.

Thank you!

It's a credit to the PHP community that they've made it easy for all of us to take this programming language for granted. But that can't go on forever. It's time to move on from PHP 5 and upgrade to a newer version so that we can all innovate faster.

I'd also like to thank the Drupal community — both those contributing to Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 — for keeping Drupal compatible with the newest versions of PHP. That certainly helps make PHP upgrades easier.

Categories: Drupal

Hook 42: BADCamp 2018 Retrospective: A GatsbyJS Primer

8 November 2018 - 1:27pm

Now that I’ve settled back down in Alaska after a fun trip to Berkeley for BADCamp, I’m finally digesting all of the info I gathered throughout the week. As always, it was cool to look over the schedule and see what topics were getting a lot of attention; and, without a doubt, it seemed like GatsbyJS was the hot-ticket item this year. So here’s a primer on what GatsbyJS is and why the Drupal community seems so head-over-heels for this up and coming site generator.

Categories: Drupal

Kanopi Studios: BADCamp + Accessibility = Education, Inspiration and Opportunity

8 November 2018 - 7:51am

Now that the excitement of BADCamp has worn off, I have a moment to reflect on my experience as a first-time attendee of this amazing, free event. Knowing full well how deeply involved Kanopi Studios is in both the organization and thought leadership at BADCamp, I crafted my schedule for an opportunity to hear my colleagues while also attending as many sessions on Accessibility and User Experience (UX) as possible.

Kanopi’s sessions included the following:

The rest of my schedule revolved around a series of sessions and trainings tailored toward contributing to the Drupal community, Accessibility and User Experience.

For the sake of this post, I want to cover a topic that everyone who builds websites can learn from. Without further ado, let’s dive a bit deeper into the accessibility portion of the camp.  

Who is affected by web accessibility?

According to the CDC, 53 million adults in the US live with some kind of disability; which adds up to 26% of adults in the US. Issues range from temporary difficulties (like a broken wrist) to permanent aspects of daily life that affect our vision, hearing, mental processing and mobility. Creating an accessible website allows you to communicate with 1 in 4 adults you might otherwise have excluded.

What is web accessibility?

Accessibility is a detailed set of requirements for content writers, web designers and web developers. By ensuring that a website is accessible, we are taking an inclusive attitude towards our products and businesses. The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) are a globally acknowledged set of standards that help us publish content that fits within the established success criteria. These guidelines are organized into the following four categories.

WCAG Categories:

  • Is your website perceivable? This applies to non-text content, time-based media (audio and video), color contrast, text size, etc.
  • Is your website operable? This ensures that content is easy to navigate using a keyboard, that animations and interactions meet real-user requirements, buttons are large enough to click, etc.
  • Is your website understandable? This means that text content is easy to read for someone at a ninth grade reading level, that interactions follow design patterns in a predictable manner, that form errors are easy to recover from, etc.
  • Is your website robust? This means that content should be easy to interpret for assistive technologies, such as screen readers.

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is an international community whose mission is to lead the Web to its full potential. They have also published a checklist to aid our efforts in meeting WCAG success criteria.

How can we be successful in making the web accessible?

Industries have varied requirements when it comes to web accessibility. WCAG has three levels of compliance, ranging from A to AA to AAA. A conformity has the lowest set of requirements and AAA has the strictest set of requirements; so strict, in fact, it may be impossible to achieve across an entire site.

Efforts to meet these standards fall on every individual involved in the process of creating a website. Although there are many tools that aid in our journey, we reach accessibility through a combination of programmatic and manual means.

The most important thing to keep in mind is the fact that achieving success in the world of accessibility is a journey. Any efforts along the way will get you one step closer towards a more inclusive website and a broader audience base.

Please Remember: Once Kanopi helps you launch an accessible site, it’s your job to maintain it. Any content you add moving forward must be properly tagged; images should have proper alt text and videos should have captions. Users come to your site because they love your content, after all! The more you can make your content accessible, the more you will delight your users.

Interested in making your site more accessible? Check out some of the resources I linked to above to join in learning from my peers at BADCamp. If you need more help getting there, let’s chat!

The post BADCamp + Accessibility = Education, Inspiration and Opportunity appeared first on Kanopi Studios.

Categories: Drupal

MidCamp - Midwest Drupal Camp: MidCamp is Coming

8 November 2018 - 7:50am
MidCamp is Coming

MidCamp is returning for its sixth year next March 20-23, 2019. We’ll be back at DePaul University for four days of presentations, professional training, contribution sprints, and socials. Designers, developers, and users will be able to brush shoulders with Drupal service providers, hosting vendors, and other members of the broader web development community.

Agenda Overview

This year we have some changes to our general agenda. We’ll be adding summits for the first time! We’ve also moved our sessions to Thursday and Friday so that attendees get some of their weekends back. A high-level agenda is as follows:

  • Wednesday, Mar 20 - Summits, Training, and Contribution Sprints

  • Thursday and Friday, Mar 21-22 - Sessions

  • Saturday, Mar 23 - Contribution Sprints

Stay Tuned for these Upcoming Dates

Stay tuned into the website and our newsletter for some upcoming dates.

  • NOW! - Ticket sales are open on Eventbrite. Spread the word and get your tickets early: https://midcamp2019.eventbrite.com/

  • Nov 14, 2018 - Our website will be fully up and running. It will be ready to open our call for papers.

  • Dec 12, 2018 - Call for papers will close and travel information will be available on the website.

  • Jan 9, 2019 - We will open the registration for training and summits.

  • Jan 16, 2019 - Announce Featured speakers on the website.

  • Jan 23, 2019 - We will post the Final schedule for the website.

Help us Make MidCamp!

It’s not too late to get involved with MidCamp 2019. We’re on MidCamp Slack. You can also contribute by telling us what topics you’re interested in seeing in the 2019 program.

 

Join the conversation
Categories: Drupal

Community: Introducing the Drupal Governance Task Force 2018 Proposal

8 November 2018 - 6:20am

Drupal is one of the most successful open source projects in the world. Governance is fundamental to the project's success.

The community and the code has been built from the ground up. And as the code has grown, so has the community.

When communities are first emerging it's easy to bring newcomers along, but over time the community begins to mature, change, and then needs to adapt. Challenges and opportunities emerge as evolution occurs, and our community needs to navigate them strategically.

A Governance Task Force has been meeting weekly since May to put together the strategic proposal we now share with you. We've synthesized ideas, discussions, and experiences from people we've interviewed, and we've revisited the themes that emerged from the community listening project run by Whitney Hess and by previous governance discussions.

This Drupal Governance Task Force 2018 Proposal serves two purposes.

Firstly, it's clear that for community evolution to occur there needs to be broad agreement and buy-in. People are comfortable jumping in and building a new module, but community change and action is hard. People talked to us openly about the unclear processes and barriers holding back community progress.

We heard strong perceptions that support from Dries or the Drupal Association is needed before initiatives could be created or scaled; real or otherwise, this is affecting community progress and action. Speaking to people from the Drupal Association, the Community Working Group and other initiative leaders, they also feel limitations. But to change their terms of reference and priorities they also need to have a community directive.

The community is stronger and more influential than we sometimes assume  --- when we are speaking together.

That's why at the heart of this proposal is a new community governance structure.

The second purpose of the proposal is to create a starting point --- a framework. We’ve been practical, highlighting a range of actions that form a backbone for community evolution. It’s not a defined roadmap, and it’s not a list of every idea we had or heard. We welcome the discussion, debate and idea generation that this document will spark. We want to hear your solutions on how to get change done, and what you would like to contribute.

We strived to make practical recommendations with the potential to make progress, lower barriers, and help our community to continue to evolve with time.

Throughout this process we have heard people say they believe change is necessary. Change is necessary for the longevity of Drupal the project and the code. Change is necessary to create a new generation of Drupallers — the people we want to help build ambitious things and to have the chance to build a career within our community.

It is hard to not feel the project is at a crossroads. We’ve climbed the mountain of Drupal 8, we sit at the peak and look to the valley below.

Where we go next, and who we take with us, is up to you.

We hope this proposal helps.

David, Ela, Stella, Lyndsey, Rachel, Hussain, and Adam

File attachments:  Drupal-Governance-Task-Force-Proposal-2018.pdf
Categories: Drupal

Sooper Drupal Themes: Drupal Costs & TCO: Proprietary vs. Open Source

8 November 2018 - 2:37am

The real cost of creating and maintaining a new website can be hard to estimate even for the best among Drupal professionals. By using the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) methodology, organizations can ensure that both direct and indirect expenses of operating a website are considered and calculated rather than just emphasize on the initial spending. In this article we are going to take a look at what are the Drupal costs of owning a website versus using a proprietary software.

There are some key considerations to decide on before diving into building a website:

  1. Open Source vs. Proprietary License
  2. Creating and Managing Web Content
  3. Re-designing and Updating Content
  4. Future Upgrades and Longevity
  5. Long Term Savings
Custom Code - a necessity of the past?
Categories: Drupal

OPTASY: Predictive UX in Drupal: Can We Create Anticipated User Experiences in Drupal 8?  

8 November 2018 - 12:33am
Predictive UX in Drupal: Can We Create Anticipated User Experiences in Drupal 8?   silviu.serdaru Thu, 11/08/2018 - 08:33

What do you get when you put together: Drupal 8 + AI + UX? Drupal8's content management features and integration capabilities, AI, for storing and interpreting data and building a predictive model and UX for anticipating user behavior while adding a “human touch” to the equation? You get predictive UX in Drupal!

Is it possible? Can we implement predictive UX in Drupal and thus create anticipated user experiences that:
 

  • help you deliver meaningful content only    
  • simplify user choice
  • simplify users'... lives?
     

But how does machine learning actually power these predictive user experiences? What's the whole mechanism behind?

Categories: Drupal

Ashday's Digital Ecosystem and Development Tips: Custom Cache Tags and Max-age: Advanced Cache Handling in Drupal 8

7 November 2018 - 12:02pm

Determining how content on your site should be cached isn't a simple topic. Last time, I covered cache contexts and tags. Today, I'd like to get into a couple more advanced topics: The use of custom cache tags and of max-age.

Categories: Drupal

TEN7 Blog's Drupal Posts: Episode 044: DrupalCamp Ottawa 2018

7 November 2018 - 6:06am
It is our pleasure to welcome once again Tess Flynn, TEN7's DevOps Engineer and DrupalCamp ambassador, to discuss the 2018 DrupalCamp Ottawa. Here's what we're discussing in this podcast: 2018 DrupalCamp Ottawa; Minnesota maple syrup; Camp format; Ottawa's move to Drupal open source; Award for travelling the farthest to attend; Camp without BOFs; Drupal 101; Keynote: “Building Accessible Experiences”; Accessibility is a core aspect of the entire design experience; Socketwench presents: "Healthcheck your site!"; Building software as a service Privacy laws differences between Canada and the US
Categories: Drupal

OSTraining: How to Create Drupal Charts With Views

7 November 2018 - 6:06am
There are many ways to present data to your readers. One example would be a table or a list. Sometimes the best approach is to show data on a chart.

It can ease understanding of large quantities of data. There is a way to make charts in Drupal with the help of the Charts module and Views.

In this tutorial, you will learn the basic usage of the module in combination with the Google Charts library. Let’s start!

Categories: Drupal

InternetDevels: The scheduled release of Drupal 9: what it means for Drupal 8 and 7

7 November 2018 - 6:03am

Every big Drupal release opens fantastic opportunities for websites. Three years ago, the eighth Drupal version came to this world — and the world fell in love with top-notch Drupal 8 improvements.

Read more
Categories: Drupal

iRolo.net: Installing Lando on Windows

7 November 2018 - 5:54am

Installing Lando on a Windows machine is easy. Just follow these 30 (or more) simple steps:

  1. Review the directions.
  2. Figure out which version of Windows you are running.
  3. Realize that you need to upgrade to Windows 10 Professional, because apparently you have to pay extra to actually do work on a Windows machine.
  4. Open the Windows Store.
  5. Spend half an hour trying to figure out why the Windows store is only showing blank pages.
  6. Take a break, go vote, spend some time with your kids, and seriously consider buying a Mac so that you don't have to deal with this shit.
  7. Reboot your computer and finally get Windows store to respond.
  8. Pay $100 dollars, while updating your account information because everything is three years out-of-date. Do not pass Go.
  9. Reboot your computer twice.
  10. Go to the Lando releases page.
  11. Spend some time looking for the last stable release (note: there is no spoon stable release).
  12. Download and run the latest .exe.
  13. The installer will complain that you don't have Hyper V, which you just paid for.
  14. Find the obscure command you need to enable Hyper V.
  15. Find Powershell in the Start menu.
  16. Discover that you can paste into PowerShell just by right-clicking your mouse. This seems convenient, but it's a trap!
  17. Run the command. It doesn't work.
  18. Learn how to run PowerShell as an administrator.
  19. Run the command, again.
  20. Reboot your computer, again.
  21. Run the .exe, again.
  22. The installer wants to install Docker. Let it.
  23. The Docker installer wants you to log you out. Let it
  24. Log back in.
  25. Open Babun and try the lando command. It isn't found.
  26. Open Powershell and try the lando command. It isn't found.
  27. Open the Command Prompt and try the lando command. It isn't found.
  28. Re-run the Lando installer, for the third time. It turns out that it never finished because Docker logged you out.
  29. Open Powershell and try the lando command.
  30. It works! Congratulations, you are done!*

* Just kidding...

  1. Open PowerShell. Go to the directory where you have your Drupal site.
  2. Run lando init.
  3. Choose the drupal 7 recipe.
  4. Why is it asking for a Pantheon machine token? This isn't a Pantheon site! Hit Ctrl-C.
  5. Log into Pantheon, create a machine token for your Windows machine. note: Terminus and Lando are notorious for asking for this machine token over and over, so make sure to paste this machine token into a file somewhere, which kind of defeats the entire point of having a machine token.
  6. Run lando init, again.
  7. Right clicking to paste doesn't work for the hidden machine token. So, learn a different way to paste the machine token into PowerShell.
  8. Congratulations, you are done!**

** Just kidding...

  1. Run lando start. Your terminal will proceed to spew error messages for several minutes.
  2. Spend an hour searching through the Lando issue queue trying to find the magic sequence that will fix these errors.
  3. Go apple.com and start comparing the new MacBook Air to the new Mac Mini. Figure out if you can afford either one so that you don't have to deal with this shit.
  4. Your kids are picking up on your frustration, and everyone is melting down because it is bedtime (and your are anxious about the election).
  5. Give up for the night, and obsessively refresh the election results at fivethirtyeight.com until the results are clear at 11:00 PM.
  6. Get up the next morning and write a satirical article about installing Lando on your Windows machine.

I will let you know if I ever actually get it working.

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Appnovation Technologies: 5 Tips to Attend a Conference Like a Pro

7 November 2018 - 5:24am
5 Tips to Attend a Conference Like a Pro This week we're wheels up for Acquia Engage, where the foremost leaders in digital will take center stage to share their insights, revelations, and lessons learned in the quest to deliver best-in-class customer experiences. We're excited to be sponsoring the event again this year and can't wait to learn, share, meet and discuss with our peer...
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