Planet Drupal

Subscribe to Planet Drupal feed
Drupal.org - aggregated feeds in category Planet Drupal
Updated: 3 hours 5 min ago

Drupal blog: State of Drupal presentation (April 2018)

24 April 2018 - 9:11am

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

© Yes Moon

Last week, I shared my State of Drupal presentation at Drupalcon Nashville. In addition to sharing my slides, I wanted to provide more information on how you can participate in the various initiatives presented in my keynote, such as growing Drupal adoption or evolving our community values and principles.

Drupal 8 update

During the first portion of my presentation, I provided an overview of Drupal 8 updates. Last month, the Drupal community celebrated an important milestone with the successful release of Drupal 8.5, which ships with improved features for content creators, site builders, and developers.

Drupal 8 continues to gain momentum, as the number of Drupal 8 sites has grown 51 percent year-over-year:

This graph depicts the number of Drupal 8 sites built since April 2015. Last year there were 159,000 sites and this year there are 241,000 sites, representing a 51% increase year-over-year.

Drupal 8's module ecosystem is also maturing quickly, as 81 percent more Drupal 8 modules have become stable in the past year:

This graph depicts the number of modules now stable since January 2016. This time last year there were 1,028 stable projects and this year there are 1,860 stable projects, representing an 81% increase year-over-year.

As you can see from the Drupal 8 roadmap, improving the ease of use for content creators remains our top priority:

This roadmap depicts Drupal 8.5, 8.6, and 8.7+, along with a column for "wishlist" items that are not yet formally slotted. The contents of this roadmap can be found at https://www.drupal.org/core/roadmap.

Four ways to grow Drupal adoption

Drupal 8 was released at the end of 2015, which means our community has had over two years of real-world experience with Drupal 8. It was time to take a step back and assess additional growth initiatives based on what we have learned so far.

In an effort to better understand the biggest hurdles facing Drupal adoption, we interviewed over 150 individuals around the world that hold different roles within the community. We talked to Drupal front-end and back-end developers, contributors, trainers, agency owners, vendors that sell Drupal to customers, end users, and more. Based on their feedback, we established four goals to help accelerate Drupal adoption.

Goal 1: Improve the technical evaluation process

Matthew Grasmick recently completed an exercise in which he assessed the technical evaluator experience of four different PHP frameworks, and discovered that Drupal required the most steps to install. Having a good technical evaluator experience is critical, as it has a direct impact on adoption rates.

To improve the Drupal evaluation process, we've proposed the following initiatives:

Initiative Issue link Stakeholders Initiative coordinator Status Better discovery experience on Drupal.org Drupal.org roadmap Drupal Association hestenet Under active development Better "getting started" documentation #2956879 Documentation Working Group grasmash In planning More modern administration experience #2957457 Core contributors ckrina and yoroy Under active development

To become involved with one of these initiatives, click on its "Issue link" in the table above. This will take you to Drupal.org, where you can contribute by sharing your ideas or lending your expertise to move an initiative forward.

Goal 2: Improve the content creator experience

Throughout the interview process, it became clear that ease of use is a feature now expected of all technology. For Drupal, this means improving the content creator experience through a modern administration user interface, drag-and-drop media management and page building, and improved site preview functionality.

The good news is that all of these features are already under development through the Media, Workflow, Layout and JavaScript Modernization initiatives.

Most of these initiative teams meet weekly on Drupal Slack (see the meetings calendar), which gives community members an opportunity to meet team members, receive information on current goals and priorities, and volunteer to contribute code, testing, design, communications, and more.

Goal 3: Improve the site builder experience

Our research also showed that to improve the site builder experience, we should focus on improving the three following areas:

  • The configuration management capabilities in core need to support more common use cases out-of-the-box.
  • Composer and Drupal core should be better integrated to empower site builders to manage dependencies and keep Drupal sites up-to-date.
  • We should provide a longer grace period between required core updates so development teams have more time to prepare, test, and upgrade their Drupal sites after each new minor Drupal release.

We plan to make all of these aspects easier for site builders through the following initiatives:

Initiative Issue link Stakeholders Initiative coordinator Status Composer & Core #2958021 Core contributors + Drupal Association Coordinator needed! Proposed Config Management 2.0 #2957423 Core contributors Coordinator needed! Proposed Security LTS 2909665 Core committers + Drupal Security Team + Drupal Association Core committers and Security team Proposed, under discussion Goal 4: Promote Drupal to non-technical decision makers

The fourth initiative is unique as it will help our community to better communicate the value of Drupal to the non-technical decision makers. Today, marketing executives and content creators often influence the decision behind what CMS an organization will use. However, many of these individuals are not familiar with Drupal or are discouraged by the misconception that Drupal is primarily for developers.

With these challenges in mind, the Drupal Association has launched the Promote Drupal Initiative. This initiative will include building stronger marketing and branding, demos, events, and public relations resources that digital agencies and local associations can use to promote Drupal. The Drupal Association has set a goal of fundraising $100,000 to support this initiative, including the hiring of a marketing coordinator.

Megan Sanicki and her team have already raised $54,000 from over 30 agencies and 5 individual sponsors in only 4 days. Clearly this initiative resonates with Drupal agencies. Please consider how you or your organization can contribute.

Fostering community with values and principles

This year at DrupalCon Nashville, over 3,000 people traveled to the Music City to collaborate, learn, and connect with one another. It's at events like DrupalCon where the impact of our community becomes tangible for many. It also serves as an important reminder that while Drupal has grown a great deal since the early days, the work needed to scale our community is never done.

Prompted by feedback from our community, I have spent the past five months trying to better establish the Drupal community's principles and values. I have shared an "alpha" version of Drupal's values and principles at https://www.drupal.org/about/values-and-principles. As a next step, I will be drafting a charter for a new working group that will be responsible for maintaining and improving our values and principles. In the meantime, I invite every community member to provide feedback in the issue queue of the Drupal governance project.

An overview of Drupal's values with supporting principles.

I believe that taking time to highlight community members that exemplify each principle can make the proposed framework more accessible. That is why it was very meaningful for me to spotlight three Drupal community members that demonstrate these principles.

Principle 1: Optimize for Impact - Rebecca Pilcher

Rebecca shares a remarkable story about Drupal's impact on her Type 1 diabetes diagnosis:

Principle 5: Everyone has something to contribute - Mike Lamb

Mike explains why Pfizer contributes millions to Drupal:

Principle 6: Choose to Lead - Mark Conroy

Mark tells the story of his own Drupal journey, and how his experience inspired him to help other community members:

Watch the keynote or download my slides

In addition to the community spotlights, you can also watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 19:25), or you can download a copy of my slides (164 MB).

Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: Defining Drupal's values and principles

24 April 2018 - 8:25am

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

Since its founding, Drupal has grown a great deal, and today there are thousands of contributors and organizations that make up our community. Over the course of seventeen years, we have spent a great amount of time and effort scaling our community. As a result, Drupal has evolved into one of the largest open source projects in the world.

Today, the Drupal project serves as a role model to many other open source projects; from our governance and funding models, to how we work together globally with thousands of contributors, to our 3,000+ person conferences. However, the work required to scale our community is a continuous process.

Prompted by feedback from the Drupal community, scaling Drupal will be a key focus for me throughout 2018. I have heard a lot of great ideas about how we can scale our community, in addition to improving how we all work together. Today, I wanted to start by better establishing Drupal's values and principles, as it is at the core of everything we do.

Remarkably, after all these years, our values (what guides these behaviors) and our principles (our most important behaviors) are still primarily communicated through word of mouth.

In recent years, various market trends and challenging community events have inspired a variety of changes in the Drupal community. It's in times like these that we need to rely on our values and principles the most. However, that is very difficult to do when our values and principles aren't properly documented.

Over the course of the last five months, I have tried to capture our fundamental values and principles. Based on more than seventeen years of leading and growing the Drupal project, I tried to articulate what I know are "fundamental truths": the culture and behaviors members of our community uphold, how we optimize technical and non-technical decision making, and the attributes shared by successful contributors and leaders in the Drupal project.

Capturing our values and principles as accurately as I could was challenging work. I spent many hours writing, rewriting, and discarding them, and I consulted numerous people in the process. After a lot of consideration, I ended up with five value statements, supported by eleven detailed principles.

I shared both the values and the principles on Drupal.org as version 1.0-alpha (archived PDF). I labeled it alpha, because the principles and values aren't necessarily complete. While I have strong conviction in each of the Drupal principles and corresponding values, some of our values and principles are hard to capture in words, and by no means will I have described them perfectly. However, I arrived at a point where I wanted to share what I have drafted, open it up to the community for feedback, and move the draft forward more collaboratively.

An overview of Drupal's values with supporting principles.

While this may be the first time I've tried to articulate our values and principles in one document, many of these principles have guided the project for a very long time. If communicated well, these principles and values should inspire us to be our best selves, enable us to make good decisions fast, and guide us to work as one unified community.

I also believe this document is an important starting point and framework to help address additional (and potentially unidentified) needs. For example, some have asked for clearer principles about what behavior will and will not be tolerated in addition to defining community values surrounding justice and equity. I hope that this document lays the groundwork for that.

Throughout the writing process, I consulted the work of the Community Governance Group and the feedback that was collected in discussions with the community last fall. The 1.0-alpha version was also reviewed by the following people: Tiffany Farriss, George DeMet, Megan Sanicki, Adam Goodman, Gigi Anderson, Mark Winberry, Angie Byron, ASH Heath, Steve Francia, Rachel Lawson, Helena McCabe, Adam Bergstein, Paul Johnson, Michael Anello, Donna Benjamin, Neil Drumm, Fatima Khalid, Sally Young, Daniel Wehner and Ryan Szrama. I'd like to thank everyone for their input.

As a next step, I invite you to provide feedback. The best way to provide feedback is in the issue queue of the Drupal governance project, but there will also be opportunities to provide feedback at upcoming Drupal events, including DrupalCon Nashville.

Categories: Drupal

aleksip.net: How popular is decoupled Drupal?

24 April 2018 - 7:59am
Decoupled Drupal has been an increasingly visible topic at Drupal events and on the web for several years now. But what is the percentage of decoupled Drupal sites out of all Drupal sites?
Categories: Drupal

Pages