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Promet Source: Save Yourself From Getting Sued... Improve your Web Accessibility Now!

2 May 2018 - 7:55pm
Does your website provide a “place of public accommodation”?
Categories: Drupal

Roy Scholten: Design system principles

2 May 2018 - 3:18pm
03 05 2018 Design system principles

Reviewed a list of design system sites today.

Not super strict, but mostly these are design systems that aim to support multiple apps, tools and services on multiple platforms.

I specifically looked at:

  1. The guiding design principles: which ones and why
  2. Top level sections for exploring the full system
Top level sections

Can be short on this: a quite consistent pattern of entries for "Getting started, Styleguide, Resources/downloads. What’s behind there varies a lot in depth and quality, mostly depending on the size of the organisation behind it. IBM goes very deep, Nachos understandably less so.

Design system principles

The most common pattern is to list a noun or short statement that expresses a characteristic of the type of designs the system wants to support. “Clarity”, “Empower but dont’t overwhelm”, “Universal”, “Engaging and immersive”, “Approachable”, etc. Material only lists 3 high-level ones but has more per section below. Nachos maybe goes a bit long with 10.

Not many of the systems listed mention content, text, words as an important part of a design. Shopify says: “Thoughtful, consistent interface content is a core element of a well-designed user experience.” IBM puts “Defer to content” as the first guiding principle for their visual design guidelines.

Even less mentions of designing for people. This may be inherent to what these sites do: describing the aspects of the system itself. Most of the times the human centered part is put under a usability or accessibility section further down the hierarchy.

One interesting outlier

IBM design language takes a different approach. Instead of listing the high level characteristics the systems aspires to, it defines 6 universal experiences:

  1. Discover, try and buy – Meet users where they are. Show, don’t tell. Create a seamless transition from “try” to “buy.”
  2. Get started – Invite users in and show them what they can do.
  3. Everday use – Users should get personal value every time they interact with your product.
  4. Manage and upgrade – Upkeep and receiving the newest improvements should be as elegant and predictable as using the product every day.
  5. Leverage and extend – Everything wants to be mashed up. Each part of your offering should be available as an API.
  6. Get support – Support users in the ways they want to get help. Expand their knowledge and encourage them to share.

These put user-centered design center stage, using a life cycle approach. It acknowledges that there are different stages in familiarity with the product and identifies different clusters of scenarios and tasks. Everyday use is something else than Manage and upgrade. Different frames or lenses for looking at the same product(s). This also implies that the same app, product, or even a single new feature has to worked on from all these perspectives.

Thinking about first time use (getting started), regular use (typical tasks), advanced use (extending, customizing) and managing/upgrading are all very relevant perspectives on how people work with Drupal. One example: “Getting started” currently gets special attention, see improving the Drupal evaluator experience.

Tags drupalplanet
Categories: Drupal

OSTraining: Videos to Get you Started with Drupal Development

2 May 2018 - 7:14am
How do I get started with Drupal development?

That's a common question we get from people who join OSTraining for the first time. They want to know about the skills they will need, and what kind of classes they should take.

In this guide, I'll give you an overview to help you get started with Drupal development.

Categories: Drupal

InternetDevels: Drupal 8’s web services & awesome third-party integration opportunities

2 May 2018 - 5:25am

Sites have truly unlimited opportunities in Drupal 8 — they are not even limited by the “website” concept! They can go far beyond it, and easily exchange data with all imaginable applications. Special opportunities for that have appeared thanks to built-in web services, which are listed among Drupal 8’s main improvements. Let’s see what web services can give you, how they work, and what extra special options are added by other Drupal 8 modules.

Read more
Categories: Drupal

ThinkShout: That's a wrap from New Orleans!

2 May 2018 - 5:00am

It feels like it was just yesterday… probably because we still have visions of beignets dancing in our head. But we had such a blast at 18NTC, and we have you, the nonprofit community to thank for it.

Our pre-conference Drupal Day was jam-packed with content from project management to content strategy, to Bene.

Brett and Mimi take over registration!

Here were some highlights:

Brett and Chris Carrol from University of Chicago Graham School definitely schooled us (sorry) on Content Strategy in Drupal.

Lev shares a case study on Bene with the crowd. Bene is an open source distribution intended for small to medium-sized nonprofits. We have a whole page dedicated to it here.

Jessica and Carie Lewis Carlson (formerly from the Humane Society of the United States) shared some wisdom on the challenges often faced in a redesign process.

We want to give a special shout out to our collaborators from Gizra and Fionta - who contributed to the breakout sessions – and to anyone who led a BOF (birds of a feather) breakout and conducted a lightning talk to close. We appreciate you adding your voice to the day.

Next year we’re especially excited about NTC because it’s happening right in our home town of Portland, Oregon! We’re eager to participate and contribute to the rich and vibrant nonprofit community that we deeply care about, and also show you some of what we love best about our hometown.

To stay up to date on everything pre-con / Drupal Day related, (or just to stay in touch!) sign up for our email list. We’ll send a monthly newsletter with the latest trends and case studies to share…and as 19NTC approaches (too soon?) you’ll be first to hear about our plans and how you can join in the fun.

Below is the full agenda from Drupal Day 2018, please reach out if you would like slides from any of the presentations. Thanks and see you all soon!

Categories: Drupal

TEN7 Blog's Drupal Posts: Episode 027: Kaleem Clarkson, Drupal Front End Developer, Inclusion Evangelist

2 May 2018 - 4:00am
TEN7 Podcast 027: Kaleem Clarkson, Drupal Front End Developer, Inclusion Evangelist
Categories: Drupal

OSTraining: How to Create a Search Box with a Sliding Effect in Drupal 8

1 May 2018 - 11:36pm

One of OSTrainings members asked how to create a search box with a sliding out effect. Their goal was to arrive at the search box similar to the one you can find at the top of Drupal's own website.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to create a search box that expands once you clicked on its icon. Also, while it stays expanded until you close it, it will keep blurring out your main menu.

Categories: Drupal

MTech, LLC: Guide to Estimating an Upgrade to Drupal 8 (from Drupal 6 or 7)

1 May 2018 - 3:01pm
Guide to Estimating an Upgrade to Drupal 8 (from Drupal 6 or 7)

If you are weighing whether to upgrade to Drupal 8 but aren’t sure what kind of budget to expect, we’re going to breakdown the upgrade (migration) process. Along the way, we'll highlight the factors that will add hours to your project. This guide is especially for non-technical folks (and written by one). However, all audiences should gain something. We’ll detail the questions you should go to your developer with before quoting your upgrade. We'll also discuss some best practices and common "gotchas".

Luke Pekrul Tue, 05/01/2018 - 16:01
Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association blog: Drupal Association Board Elections 2018

1 May 2018 - 8:30am

Now that Drupal 8 is maturing, it is an exciting time to be on the Drupal Association Board. With Drupal always evolving, the Association must evolve with it so we can continue providing the right kind of support. And, it is the Drupal Association Board who develops the Association’s strategic direction by engaging in discussions around a number of strategic topics throughout their term. As a community member, you can be part of this important process by becoming an At-large Board Member.

We have two At-large positions on the Association Board of Directors. These positions are self-nominated and then elected by the community. Simply put, the At-large Director position is designed to ensure there is community representation on the Drupal Association Board. If you are interested in helping shape the future of the Drupal Association, we encourage you to read this post and nominate yourself between 1-11 June, 2018.

What are the Important Dates

Self nominations: 1-11 June, 2018

Meet the candidates: 12-29 June 2018

Voting: 2-13 July, 2018

Votes ratified, Winner announced: 25 July, 2018

How do nominations and elections work?

Specifics of the election mechanics were decided through a community-based process in 2012 with participation by dozens of Drupal community members. More details can be found in the proposal that was approved by the Drupal Association Board in 2012 and adapted for use this year.

What does the Drupal Association Board do?

The Board of Directors of the Drupal Association are responsible for financial oversight and setting the strategic direction for serving the Drupal Association’s mission, which we achieve through Drupal.org and DrupalCon. Our mission is: Drupal powers the best of the Web.  The Drupal Association unites a global open source community to build and promote Drupal.

New board members will contribute to the strategic direction of the Drupal Association. Board members are advised of, but not responsible for matters related to the day-to-day operations of the Drupal Association, including program execution, staffing, etc.

Directors are expected to contribute around five hours per month and attend three in-person meetings per year (financial assistance is available if required).

Association board members, like all board members for US-based organizations, have three legal obligations: duty of care, duty of loyalty, and duty of obedience. In addition to these legal obligations, there is a lot of practical work that the board undertakes. These generally fall under the fiduciary responsibilities and include:

  • Overseeing Financial Performance

  • Setting Strategy

  • Setting and Reviewing Legal Policies

  • Fundraising

  • Managing the Executive Director

To accomplish all this, the board comes together three times a year during two-day retreats. These usually coincide with the North American and major European Drupal Conferences as well as one February meeting. As a board member, you should expect to spend a minimum of five hours a month on board activities.

Some of the topics that will be discussed over the next year or two are:

  • Strengthen sustainability

  • Grow Drupal adoption through our channels and partner channels

  • Evolve drupal.org and DrupalCon goals and strategies.

Please watch this video to learn more.

Who can run?

There are no restrictions on who can run, and only self-nominations are accepted.

Before self-nominating, we want candidates to understand what is expected of board members and what types of topics they will discuss during their term. That is why we now require candidates to:

What will I need to do during the elections?

During the elections, members of the Drupal community will ask questions of candidates. You can post comments on candidate profiles here on assoc.drupal.org.

In the past, we held group “meet the candidate” interviews. With many candidates the last few years, group videos didn’t allow each candidate to properly express themselves. We replaced the group interview and allow candidates to create their own 3 minute video and add it to their candidate profile page. These videos must be posted by 11 June, the Association will promote the videos to the community from 12 -29 June. Hint - Great candidates would be those that exemplify the Drupal Values & Principles. That might provide structure for a candidate video?

How do I run?

From 1-11 June, go here to nominate yourself.  If you are considering running, please read the entirety of this post, and then be prepared to complete the self-nomination form. This form will be open on 1 June, 2018 through 11 June, 2018 at midnight UTC. You'll be asked for some information about yourself and your interest in the Drupal Association Board. When the nominations close, your candidate profile will be published and available for Drupal community members to browse. Comments will be enabled, so please monitor your candidate profile so you can respond to questions from community members. We will announce the new board member at the 25 July, 2018 public board meeting and via our blog and social channels.

Reminder, you must review the following materials before completing your candidate profile:

Who can vote?

Voting is open to all individuals who have a Drupal.org account by the time nominations open and who have logged in at least once in the past year. If you meet this criteria, your account will be added to the voters list on association.drupal.org and you will have access to the voting.

To vote, you will rank candidates in order of your preference (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.). The results will be calculated using an "instant runoff" method. For an accessible explanation of how instant runoff vote tabulation works, see videos linked in this discussion.

Elections process

Voting will be held from 2-13 July, 2018. During this period, you can review and comment on candidate profiles on assoc.drupal.org.

Finally, the Drupal Association Board will ratify the election and announce the winner on 25 July.

Have questions? Please contact Drupal Association Community Liaison, Rachel Lawson.

Many thanks to nedjo for pioneering this process and documenting it so well!

Categories: Drupal

Evolving Web: Mobile-First Content Strategy for Drupal

1 May 2018 - 8:26am

By now, we all know the importance of building responsive websites that dynamically adjust to any screen size. According to Statista, 52 percent of all global web pages served in 2018 were viewed on smartphones. And now that Google’s index is mobile first, it’s essential for websites to be designed (or redesigned) mobile first — with a smartphone screen size as the starting point, and resizing up from there.

Building a site to be fully responsive starts with organizing your content so it can be browsed and read on even the smallest smartphone. Whether you’re creating content for a new site, or restructuring a legacy site, begin with a responsive content strategy that defines how you will optimize and structure content for mobile users.

Here are the key components of responsive (and mobile first) content strategy:

1. Be mobile first

When you begin planning content, start with the smallest screen size and work your way up. This will allow you to tackle the most challenging task first, and it will help you make the most of the smallest interface. This process is also very effective for eliminating unnecessary content elements that you may be tempted to include if you’re designing desktop first. An effective and efficient mobile-first design will more easily translate to a clean desktop design (rather than trying to scale down your desktop design).

2. Structure your content first, design later

Begin by stripping all the design elements from your text content. Develop and structure your content, add it to your Drupal 8 CMS and then apply styling and design.

3. Optimize and structure your content for mobile

Responsive content needs to be modular so it will easily break into mobile-friendly pieces. And it needs to be skimmable, so mobile readers can easily consume it.

Create less content (if that’s an option) and keep it short. Organize website copy into small, granular paragraphs or chunks, no longer than three paragraphs. Add subtitles that define each piece, so mobile users can easily browse and scan content.

Working in your Drupal CMS, define separate fields for different pieces of content. The more fields you create for your content, the more flexibility you will have. In other words, you’ll have a field for a title, subtitle, pull-quote, body text, instructions, etc. Each field can be uniquely styled according to its content type. Then prioritize fields based on their importance so they stack in a logical way on a user’s screen — the most important content up top, less useful content can be condensed, stacked below, or even hidden.

4. Simplify navigation

Nobody wants to browse a mega menu that consumes their entire smartphone screen. The ubiquity of mobile means menus need to be reduced and simplified. Put a lot of thought into how you will make your most important content accessible via your menu. How many menu items can you remove or de-prioritize? Flatten your navigation — stop nesting menus inside menus inside menus and instead create fewer layers and way less navigation points. If you’ve decided to take links out of the menu, you can add them elsewhere as links or call to action.

5. Be strategic with your calls to action

Take the time to prioritize your calls to action. On mobile, it’s even more important to define your most important CTAs — the ones that directly impact your business objectives. List your objectives in order of importance, and align a call to action with each one. Then choose objective that’s most critical to your bottom line. This is the only CTA that should live above the fold on your mobile screen.

6. Optimize media

Make sure your sound, video and image files are optimized for devices large and small. Always use image thumbnails so users don’t have to load a video player. And never, never use autoplay on your video and audio content.

For images, start with image sizes and proportions that can be adapted. And don’t resize or add image treatments before adding images to your CMS — let Drupal do the heavy lifting (just like you did with your text content). Images should not be larger than you need them to be (even on large screens). Rely on Drupal 8’s Responsive Image module to resize images to the screen-appropriate size.

7. Begin the long, hard task of cleaning up legacy content

Of course, there’s always the large, old-school website that needs to have its content converted to mobile first. In addition to all the content tips we’ve outlined above, you want to dive into that static HTML and clean it up. Remove fixed-width tables, inline media and floats with content (ouch). And on the content level, start to structure long content into browsable chunks that can be organized into content fields.

Mobile first: it’s universal

Many of us been applying similar content guidelines and strategies for quite some time; but the need for a mobile-first approach was not universal. It was dependent on the project, technology used, the target user, etc. In today’s digital ecosystem, mobile-first has become a given. Now it’s time to explore the creative potential for creating sharp, sparse, targeted content that fits in the palm of a user’s hand.

+ more awesome articles by Evolving Web
Categories: Drupal

Evolving Web: Mobile First Content Strategy: Once an Option, Now a Necessity

1 May 2018 - 8:26am

By now, we all know the importance of building responsive websites that dynamically adjust to any screen size. According to Statista, 52 percent of all global web pages served in 2018 were viewed on smartphones. And now that Google’s index is mobile first, it’s essential for websites to be designed (or redesigned) mobile first — with a smartphone screen size as the starting point, and resizing up from there.

Building a site to be fully responsive starts with organizing your content so it can be browsed and read on even the smallest smartphone. Whether you’re creating content for a new site, or restructuring a legacy site, begin with a responsive content strategy that defines how you will optimize and structure content for mobile users.

Here are the key components of responsive (and mobile first) content strategy:

1. Be mobile first

When you begin planning content, start with the smallest screen size and work your way up. This will allow you to tackle the most challenging task first, and it will help you make the most of the smallest interface. This process is also very effective for eliminating unnecessary content elements that you may be tempted to include if you’re designing desktop first. An effective and efficient mobile-first design will more easily translate to a clean desktop design (rather than trying to scale down your desktop design).

2. Structure your content first, design later

Begin by stripping all the design elements from your text content. Develop and structure your content, add it to your Drupal 8 CMS and then apply styling and design.

3. Optimize and structure your content for mobile

Responsive content needs to be modular so it will easily break into mobile-friendly pieces. And it needs to be skimmable, so mobile readers can easily consume it.

Create less content (if that’s an option) and keep it short. Organize website copy into small, granular paragraphs or chunks, no longer than three paragraphs. Add subtitles that define each piece, so mobile users can easily browse and scan content.

Working in your Drupal CMS, define separate fields for different pieces of content. The more fields you create for your content, the more flexibility you will have. In other words, you’ll have a field for a title, subtitle, pull-quote, body text, instructions, etc. Each field can be uniquely styled according to its content type. Then prioritize fields based on their importance so they stack in a logical way on a user’s screen — the most important content up top, less useful content can be condensed, stacked below, or even hidden.

4. Simplify navigation

Nobody wants to browse a mega menu that consumes their entire smartphone screen. The ubiquity of mobile means menus need to be reduced and simplified. Put a lot of thought into how you will make your most important content accessible via your menu. How many menu items can you remove or de-prioritize? Flatten your navigation — stop nesting menus inside menus inside menus and instead create fewer layers and way less navigation points. If you’ve decided to take links out of the menu, you can add them elsewhere as links or call to action.

5. Be strategic with your calls to action

Take the time to prioritize your calls to action. On mobile, it’s even more important to define your most important CTAs — the ones that directly impact your business objectives. List your objectives in order of importance, and align a call to action with each one. Then choose objective that’s most critical to your bottom line. This is the only CTA that should live above the fold on your mobile screen.

6. Optimize media

Make sure your sound, video and image files are optimized for devices large and small. Always use image thumbnails so users don’t have to load a video player. And never, never use autoplay on your video and audio content.

For images, start with image sizes and proportions that can be adapted. And don’t resize or add image treatments before adding images to your CMS — let Drupal do the heavy lifting (just like you did with your text content). Images should not be larger than you need them to be (even on large screens). Rely on Drupal 8’s Responsive Image module to resize images to the screen-appropriate size.

7. Begin the long, hard task of cleaning up legacy content

Of course, there’s always the large, old-school website that needs to have its content converted to mobile first. In addition to all the content tips we’ve outlined above, you want to dive into that static HTML and clean it up. Remove fixed-width tables, inline media and floats with content (ouch). And on the content level, start to structure long content into browsable chunks that can be organized into content fields.

Mobile first: it’s universal

Many of us been applying similar content guidelines and strategies for quite some time; but the need for a mobile-first approach was not universal. It was dependent on the project, technology used, the target user, etc. In today’s digital ecosystem, mobile-first has become a given. Now it’s time to explore the creative potential for creating sharp, sparse, targeted content that fits in the palm of a user’s hand.

+ more awesome articles by Evolving Web
Categories: Drupal

Acro Media: Drupal for Education: Why Universities use Drupal, but not Commerce

1 May 2018 - 8:00am

A lot of universities use Drupal in some capacity. Universities don't typically have just one site; they're made up of a ton of different pieces put together for course registrations and calendars and events and alumni and so on. So a couple of those pieces might use Drupal. Or one or two departments might use Drupal even if others do not.

Many educational institutions like Drupal because it's open source. Universities are often publicly funded and favor open stuff more than proprietary products. Plus, they need to manage a ton of content by a ton of different people, so they need a really big robust CMS.

 

 

Introducing OpenEDU 3.0

The new OpenEDU 3.0 is a Drupal distribution setup for educational institutions. The older version was mostly a set of custom configurations, whereas 3.0 actually has unique functionality. It has analytics and monitoring built right into it, for instance. There's a new analytics dashboard that allows a central admin to see what's going on in all the different sections without having to check a while bunch of different accounts, which is pretty cool. There's also new functionality related to content management, workflows and editing flows that universities need to handle.

OpenEDU is also being integrated into the Commerce (keep an eye out at commercekickstart.com), so you can have both of them together.

The Commerce Disconnect

Strangely, a ton of universities are using Drupal, but they are not using Commerce. Even those they use Drupal and perform ecommerce are typically using pretty terrible antiquated systems, if they have a system at all.

Lack of awareness is a big factor in this. A lot of universities are so focused on the publishing end that they don't even think about commerce. Another stumbling block is security—they don't want to deal with the compliance issues around online payments, so they just keep doing what they're doing (i.e. accepting cash or taking credit card details over the phone, which is even less secure).

The reality is that businesses or organizations within a university could really benefit from using Commerce, particularly if they already use Drupal. They could just tack on a bit of Commerce and easily sell club memberships and accept donations (remember: Commerce has a built-in point of sale). There could be one central system that IT could maintain and keep secure, and everyone could still spin up their own customized version of it.

TL:DR - Educational institutions already use Drupal and so should really adopt Drupal Commerce to replace their old, antiquated payment systems.

More from Acro Media Chat with us

Our team understands that one-size does not fit all, especially in the education space, so we listen and work together to bring your students and staff the most secure and integrated open source solution available in the Commerce arena. Contact us today to discuss how Drupal Commerce can fit it with your existing systems.

Categories: Drupal

Manifesto: Drupal’s Plugin API – an introduction through examples

1 May 2018 - 7:58am
My second session at DrupalCamp in March aimed to provide an introduction to Drupal 8’s Plugin API, illustrated by examples. The plugin system in Drupal 8 provides a powerful way for developers to swap in and out reusable bits of code within modules, reducing the amount of code you need to write to provide versatile,. Continue reading...
Categories: Drupal

Acquia Developer Center Blog: Experience Express in Philadelphia: Promoting Drupal at Drupaldelphia

1 May 2018 - 7:54am

When Phillies hats begin to dot the landscape and one of the most beautiful train stations in the country materializes around you, you know you're in Philadelphia, a city I can never seem to stop loving. After a brief hiatus, Drupaldelphia was in full swing this year, attracting developers, creatives, and businesspeople from all over Pennsylvania and surrounding states to a conference that is always full of pleasant surprises.

Tags: acquia drupal planet
Categories: Drupal

Zoocha Blog: Drupal and Bootstrap

1 May 2018 - 6:07am
Drupal Drupal and Bootstrap

Bootstrap 3 With all previous large scale Drupal projects, we have used Bootstrap 3. It has worked well as an all round solid framework with a good structure for handling mobile and desktop styling. The grid system is the most useful and helpful thing about it, saving us time and…

01 May 2018 Drupal and Bootstrap
Categories: Drupal

Zivtech: How to Prevent Your Server from Getting Hacked

1 May 2018 - 2:00am

When coming up with a security plan for your Drupal website, or any website for that matter, you need to take several key factors into account. These key factors include your server host, server configuration, and authorized users. Typically, the weakest link in that chain is how your authorized users access the server, so first we want to secure access to allow your admins and developers in, but keep hackers out.

Hosting Provider

Choosing your hosting provider is one of the most important decisions to make when it comes to site security. Your server is your first line of defense. Not all hosts have the options that you need to implement best practices for securing the server itself, let alone websites or other services that will be running on it too. 

At Zivtech, we use VPS servers for some hosting solutions for our clients, but we also use specialized hosting solutions such as Pantheon and Acquia when it makes sense. Taking the time to figure out which services your site(s) needs prior to moving to a host will save time later; you won’t need to move to another when you realize they don’t provide the services you really need. It’s the concept of “measure twice and cut once.”

Authorized Users

Many shared hosting solutions are set up with cPanel, which typically gives users FTP access to their web server environment by default. FTP is not encrypted like communications over SSH, so configuring sFTP is recommended if that’s all your host allows. 

Read more
Categories: Drupal

Matt Glaman: Using Drupal Console to manage your RESTful endpoints

1 May 2018 - 2:00am
Using Drupal Console to manage your RESTful endpoints mglaman Tue, 05/01/2018 - 04:00

This is a follow up to my early blog post about enabling RESTful web services in Drupal 8Jesus Olivas, one of the creators of Drupal Console, brought up that you can actually manage your RESTful endpoint plugin configurations direct from the command line!

Categories: Drupal

Appnovation Technologies: Expert Corner: Getting started with React and Drupal

1 May 2018 - 12:00am
Expert Corner: Getting started with React and Drupal Over the weekend I decided it was long overdue that I learnt React, or at least understood what all the fuss was about, so with npm in hand I installed yarn and started my quest. We're going to use Create React App to setup our base React install. First install then run the command to create a react app called "drupal-react": ...
Categories: Drupal

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