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Srijan Technologies: Next Steps to Securing your Apigee Drupal 7 Developer Portal

2 July 2019 - 4:40am

As of May 31, 2020, Apigee will no longer sponsor hosting of Drupal 7-based developer portals (D7P). Prior to this, starting on May 31, 2019, Apigee will no longer provision Drupal sites for customers. 

Categories: Drupal

Third & Grove: 5 Reasons to Upgrade Your Site to Drupal 8, then 9

2 July 2019 - 4:00am
5 Reasons to Upgrade Your Site to Drupal 8, then 9 curtis Tue, 07/02/2019 - 07:00
Categories: Drupal

ComputerMinds.co.uk: ComputerMinds do GatsbyJS!

2 July 2019 - 3:07am

Here at ComputerMinds, we think of ourselves as Drupal specialists for the UK, but we don't limit ourselves to that. We offer clients a close working relationship and our general flexibility to get stuck into applying our skills to most problems. One of our clients, Alfresco, has come to trust us with more than just our Drupal wisdom. They wanted a new hub that would bring together documentation for a variety of their open source products, which are already on Github. Their documentation was written as Markdown files, so the hub would need to import and transform those files into HTML pages for the web. Essentially, a static site generator was needed.

 

 

GatsbyJS is one of these static site generators, based on the incredibly popular React javascript library. It's very easy to get it to work with Markdown files, it's blazing fast, and helps us fulfil a variety of other requirements too. As much as we love Drupal, it's not the right tool for every job. (That's a subject for another day!) A 'JAMstack' approach was appealing for this project because the site would be a clever front-end for content that already existed elsewhere. There would be no need to have user authentication, content workflow, moderation, or many other dynamic website features that Drupal excels at.

A documentation page on the completed Alfresco Builder Network.

For many of us at ComputerMinds, this was our first dive into working with React, let alone Gatsby itself. So the wonderful documentation and tutorials for Gatsby were a huge help. As our project was for displaying documentation, the Gatsby documentation site itself was a helpful influence on the eventual design and user interaction of our site.

The most obvious difference between Drupal and GatsbyJS, was that the coding was mainly in javascript, rather than PHP. It was great to use much more modern javascript code patterns and tools - even if it took a bit of head-scratching to get there! All credit should go to Steve Tweeddale in our Coventry office for his patience with my million questions as we worked towards building a Minimum Viable Product early on in the project timeline. As the site took shape beyond that, we drew on more and more concepts from the GatsbyJS and React ecosystems. Here's a few that were particularly interesting:

No doubt someday we'll be turning our hands to bring the best of Gatsby and Drupal together! 'Headless', or 'decoupled' Drupal has become one of the new trendy ways to use Drupal. This means using Drupal to define your app's information architecture or as a content repository. Other applications can then connect to it to display content to users. Those applications could be made in Gatsby, React, Drupal, or almost anything else. We still feel this is usually only worthwhile when Drupal is used as a back-end system for multiple front-ends. But regardless we are looking forward to using GatsbyJS again!

Categories: Drupal

Srijan Technologies: A Weekend at My First DrupalCamp

1 July 2019 - 11:23pm

DrupalCamp is a unique experience that you have to attend to understand” 

Categories: Drupal

Drupal core announcements: New help system for core (!!) needs your help!

1 July 2019 - 5:44am

I'm very pleased to announce that we (hopefully) have a new help system in Core that will actually serve the needs of module, theme, and distribution developers! It is called "Help Topics", and is currently in "Experimental Module" status in Drupal core 8.8.x.

The way it works:

  • Modules, themes, and distributions can have a help_topics subdirectory in their projects, where they can write help topics in the form of Twig template files. Each project can have as many topics as they want/need to document their project.
  • The Twig files have meta-data (in HTML meta tags) at the top to define the title of the topic, whether the topic is "top-level" or not, and a list of other topics to mark as "related".
  • When a user visits the admin/help page (assuming the Help and Help Topics modules are enabled), they will see a list of the top-level topics, and can click through to read them. When reading a topic, at the end they'll see a list of all the topics that are "related" (and "related" is automatically a bi-directional relationship).

So... The module is currently in "Experimental" status, and we need your help to get it to "Beta" and then "Stable" status in Drupal Core:

This effort is being led by andypost, Amber Himes Matz, and jhodgdon... if you have questions, we can all often be found on Slack or on drupal.org.

Categories: Drupal

ADCI Solutions: Drupal 8 best practices: site-building

30 June 2019 - 8:13pm

Do you consider yourself an experienced Drupal site-builder?

Check yourself before reading this article. What modules’ switching on and off can help with Drupal SEO, Drupal security, Drupal performance and maintenance? 

Now check the article and compare your answers!
Drupal 8 best practices: site-building

 

 

Categories: Drupal

DrupalEasy: Sharing your DDEV-Local site via a public URL using "ddev share" and ngrok

30 June 2019 - 9:34am

Version 1.9.0 of DDEV-local introduced the ability to share your local project online via a temporary, public URL using ngrok.

This allows you the ability to quickly and securely provide access to your local site to other developers and stakeholders as well as an easy way to test your local site on other devices.

ngrok is a service that exposes local servers behind NATs and firewalls via public URLs over secure tunnels. Once the small ngrok client is installed on your local machine, the ddev share command will enable the sharing and provide you with a public URL for your local site.

While there are paid tiers for the ngrok service, a free tier is provided with reasonable limits on usage. See the ngrok web site for details. In the first example, we'll utilize the free, anonymous tier.

The free, anonymous tier does not encrypt your data between your local and the ngrok servers, even though an https connection is provided from the ngrok servers to connected clients. Therefore, it is strongly suggested that once you get the free, anonymous tier working, create a free account and authenticate your local ngrok client to ensure your data is encrypted the entire trip.

Note that this is a one-time setup for your machine, and does not have to be repeated for each of your DDEV-Local projects.


Step 1: Install the ngrok client

Download and install the client specific to your OS from https://ngrok.com/download. While there are instructions to download and install ngrok on various operating systems, I found that using Homebrew (Mac OS X and Linux) was easiest:

brew cask install ngrok

If you're using Windows 10 and Chocolately, then I recommend installing with:

choco install ngrok

Step 2: Sharing your local site

Run the following:

ddev share

If successful, this command will return some information about the share, including public URLs with which you can access the site.

As requests are made to the site, the screen will update detailing each request.

Note that in the screenshot above, that the "https://94d5c548.ngrok.io" public URL is forwarding the insecure "http://127.0.0.1:32786". If we were to set up a ngrok account and authenticate our local ngrok client, it would be forwarding "https://127.0.0.1:32786" instead.

Use Crtl-C to stop the sharing.

Additional ngrok features and functionality

Secure your data by signing up for a free ngrok account and then authenticating your local ngrok client with your account credentials using the command provided by the ngrok web site:

./ngrok authtoken

Once your local ngrok client is authenticated, the next time you do a ddev share, you'll be able to see that your connection uses https from end-to-end.

While the free ngrok plan is normally sufficient for smaller projects, paid ngrok plans include multiple users, custom domains and subdomains, additional connections, static IP addresses, and other features.

This tutorial is an excerpt from version 3 of Michael Anello's Local Development with DDEV Explained book - coming soon! Version 3 will include everything new to DDEV-Local through version 1.9.1. Pick up an electronic copy of Version 2 for less than $10 and you'll automatically get free access to Version 3.

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: Recap of Acquia's webinar on Content as a Service

30 June 2019 - 7:00am

Here's a recap of Acquia's webinar on content as a service held on June 27. Give it a read if you weren't able to attend it or just need a refresher.

READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

Fuse Interactive: Adventures with Drupal's Layout Builder

28 June 2019 - 2:47pm
Adventures with Drupal's Layout Builder The layout builder which has debuted in the 8.5 release of Drupal core is one of the most exciting additions for site builders and clients. It gives site builders the ability to quickly prototype pages and create advanced layouts which we can then pass on to the client for them to further revise. With the right setup we can give a lot more power to our clients to make their own decisions about the content of their site. Niall Morgan Fri, 06/28/2019 - 14:47
Categories: Drupal

Ramsalt Lab: The ultimate guide for faster Drupal: Part 3: Theming

28 June 2019 - 12:37pm
  • Next step in our journey after Part 1 Caching and Part 2: Aggregation of our ultimate guide to Drupal performance is all about Drupal theming and this will be our part 3

    The next part will be some general tips and tricks about CSS/JS and then we will release a full blown article containing all parts. so lets cut the intro and get right into it.

     Faster Drupal - Part 3: Drupal Theming
    • Automate optimizing of CSS, JS & Images. The thing is, it really depends on the node packages that you use on your theme level and how you can take advantage of it, for instance, there are many (I MEAN MANY WITH ALL CAPS) packages that can help you achieve that using a build system such as gulp, grunt or the new favorite webpack.

    • Avoid using unnecessary bootstrap packages as much as possible. Usually, Starterkit themes load bootstrap packages one by one, why not remove the ones you don’t need? WHY? JUST TELL ME WHY?

    • Is your theme using fontAwesome or any other kind of font out of box? But you are using SVG icons from your design file! Well… why not just remove the built-in icon font from your theme then?

    • Fonts are nice, And it seems our designers usually like to use 12 billions of them in a single page, but you should never listen to your designer (Or should you?) Always remember to load fewer fonts and fewer font weights as much as possible.

    • While we are on the fonts topic:
      Control font performance with font-display - Resource

    • Are you the type that invents the wheel each time yourself? Then don’t use a base theme that comes with a lot of good stuff! we usually don't use half of those goodies. Create a new base theme off of Drupal core's "stable" theme and go with the bare minimum. Or use a proper Starterkit, strip off the unnecessary parts, get your own Starterkit and get rid of all the Drupal themes excessive wrappers and classes.
      On this note, it’s a good practice to get your DOM size less than 1500 nodes (recommended from Google Page Speed)
      For Drupal 7 also maybe just consider Fences module if nothing else works for you

    • Reduce the scope and complexity of style calculations

    • Prioritizing Your Resources with link rel='preload' and yes you can use <link> for scripts as well - Resource

    • When we were kids (Back in Windows XP era) you’d read everywhere that do not use inline styles for your HTML files, but now you should use inline-styling to avoid render blocking CSS files. All the CSS Styles loaded from external files is considered render blocking. Why You asked?
      In order for the browser to display your web page and use the styles you specified in the external CSS files, it has to load them first. This means that your web page won't be displayed until these files are loaded. In order to speed up the loading of your website, you can inline the parts from the external CSS files which are needed to render the above the fold content. After loading the page you can instruct the browser to load the rest of the CSS files via JS - There are many tools that you can use to achieve this but this one explains good enough and works: https://www.sitelocity.com/critical-path-css-generator
      Also, check penthouse as well, Can be set up easily as a task runner task!
      https://www.npmjs.com/package/penthouse - includes CSS for critical path above the fold in the HTML head.
      By the way, there’s a Drupal module for that (but we didn’t test it,  do so at your own risk)
      Our very own Sven played around with both penthouse and critical and let me just quote him in our slack chat here:
       

      critical is a wrapper for penthouse with the main advantage that it delivers critical css for several breakpoints in one file. 
      Note: To generate critical css, `link_css` module must be enabled, and you can not be using deter css loading in AdvAgg, otherwise you get an empty file. (Needs testing)
      Critical_css module on Drupal
    • Now that you have the critical CSS, the proper tool to load the rest of your CSS: https://github.com/filamentgroup/loadCSS

    • Remove unused CSS, there are tools inside the IDEs that can help you with that, you should search this part yourself since it depends on your weapon of choice for coding, also there are node packages that you can set up but I’d still go with the IDE approach and do it manually, just to be safe.

    • Use video tag instead of gif images (Yup, it loads faster)

    • Avoid using document.write, specifically for scripts injection - Resource

    • Images must not be delivered larger than they are actually displayed to avoid loading unnecessary data. Resizing images on the browser side to reduce their rendering size is not recommended.

     

     

    Written by Sohail Lajevardi 
    Developer at Ramsalt Lab 

     

    Categories: Drupal

    OPTASY: 5 Drupal Blog Posts in June with Useful and Valuable Content

    28 June 2019 - 9:17am
    5 Drupal Blog Posts in June with Useful and Valuable Content adriana.cacoveanu Fri, 06/28/2019 - 16:17

    Valuable, easy to navigate, useful and (most of all) usable content. This is the criterion that we use for selecting our favorite Drupal blog posts in a month.

    And this is precisely what all the pieces of content that we're about to highlight in this post here have in common.

    From:
     

    • inspiring lessons learned while working on a specific Drupal project
    • to actionable insights and valuable advice on how to keep up with Drupal's own advancement
    • to highlighted modules, that make the perfect fit for particular types of projects and challenges
       

    … each one of these blog posts provided us with content with... an impact.

    But let's just get started: here are the 5 Drupal-related blog posts that won the “popularity contest” in our team this month:
     

    Categories: Drupal

    OPTASY: Drupal on Blockchain: Why Would You Want to Decentralize Your Drupal Network?

    28 June 2019 - 2:27am
    Drupal on Blockchain: Why Would You Want to Decentralize Your Drupal Network? radu.simileanu Fri, 06/28/2019 - 09:27

    Just imagine: you update content on one of your Drupal websites and content across your whole network gets automatically synchronized! That's Drupal on Blockchain in just a few words...

    Say you manage a national library's infrastructure of Drupal websites. One for each one of its local branches.

    Now, here's how moving all the user data stored in there from your centralized database onto a decentralized blockchain system would benefit you:
     

    Categories: Drupal

    Agiledrop.com Blog: Interview with Cindy McCourt, Drupal trainer and author

    28 June 2019 - 12:35am

    For this week's interview, we spoke with Cindy McCourt, consultant at IDCM Innovations, Drupal trainer, and author and co-author of several books ranging from Drupal to fantasy fiction. Give it a read to see what drew her to Drupal and why she thinks it'll continue to be a great solution to site builders' and developers' needs.

    READ MORE
    Categories: Drupal

    Dries Buytaert: Acquia's new India office

    27 June 2019 - 11:43pm

    This week, Acquia announced the opening of its new office in Pune, India, which extends our presence in the Asia Pacific region. In addition to Pune, we already have offices in Australia and Japan.

    I've made several trips to India in recent years, and have experienced not only Drupal's fast growth, but also the contagious excitement and passion for Drupal from the people I've met there.

    While I wasn't able to personally attend the opening of our new office, I'm looking forward to visiting the Pune office soon.

    For now, here are a few pictures from our grand opening celebration:

    Categories: Drupal

    Drupal.org blog: What’s new on Drupal.org? – June 2019

    27 June 2019 - 3:25pm
    Drupal Association appoints Executive Director

    We announced on April 30, 2019 that Heather Rocker has been selected as the next Drupal Association Executive Director.

    Heather Rocker joins the Drupal Association with a strong history of leadership in technology and the nonprofit world. She was the first executive director of the Women in Technology Foundation, as well as the CEO of Girls Incorporated of Greater Atlanta. Most recently she acted as the Managing Principal of Systems Evolution, Inc. in Atlanta, Georgia. She also serves as Immediate Past-President of the Board of Directors of Georgia FIRST Robotics.

    GitLab phase 1 Completed!

    For the past 18 months, interoperability between the current Git infrastructure and migration to GitLab was a much larger effort than expected.  With several challenges: optimization of project syncing, disaster recovery, replication, high availability, and phasing out our old Git servers, to name a few. Each member of the Engineering Team has put a lot of time and effort in testing and addressing these challenges. We thank GitLab, The Drupal Association Engineering Team, and Partners for helping us achieve this launch date.

    I hope you are excited as we are in achieving this milestone. 

    The goals of phase 1 were to:

    ●      Transparently replace Drupal’s current underlying Git infrastructure (as part of this migration git.drupal.org’s SSH host key will change) for: repository hosting, maintainer permissions, code viewing with GitLab repositories, GitLab roles and permissions for maintainers, and the GitLab code viewing UI.

    ●      Enable inline code editing for project maintainers.

    ●      To unblock allowing pull requests, inline code editing for all contributors, and more in phase 2.

    Read more about the Drupal Association partnership with GitLab at:  https://www.drupal.org/drupalorg/blog/developer-tools-initiative-part-5-gitlab-partnership

    Please feel free to review our FAQs about GitLab at:  https://www.drupal.org/drupalorg/docs/gitlab-integration/gitlab-frequently-asked-questions

    If you have questions, please join us in Drupal Slack on channel #gitlab.

    Beginning of Gitlab Phase 2

    This phase is focused on:  enabling merge requests, inline code editing, and web-based code review.  Phase 2 will enable benefits to developer velocity and collaboration:

    ●      By adding merge requests, contributing to Drupal will become much more familiar to the broad audience of open source contributors who've learned their skills in the post-patch era.

    ●      By adding inline editing and web-based code review, it will be much easier to make quick contributions. This not only lowers the barrier to contribution for people new to our community, it also saves significant effort for our existing community members, as they'll no longer need to clone work locally and generate patches.

    ●      Finally, by creating a tight integration between the Drupal.org issue queues and GitLab's development tools, we'll be able to transition to this new toolset without disrupting the community's existing way of collaborating.

    The Engineering team and our partners are currently evaluating the timeline for Phase 2 and will update our issue tracker once it’s established.

    Drupal Steward Program

    The program will focus on protection that closes the gap between security releases and site updates. The Security Team and the Drupal Association have been developing this program for over a year.

    The goals are:

    ●      Provide a new service to the Drupal community, from small site owners to enterprise-scale end users, to protect their sites in the gap from security release to the time it takes them to patch.

    ●      Create a new model for sustainability for the Security Team, generating funding that 1) covers the operating costs of the program 2) can support security team operations and 3) can support additional Drupal Association programs.

    Drupal Steward will offer sites a form of mitigation through the implementation of web application firewall rules to prevent mass exploitation of some highly critical vulnerabilities (not all highly critical vulnerabilities can be protected in this fashion, but a good many can be—this method would have worked for SA-CORE-2018-002 for example).

    It will come in three versions:

    ●      Community version - for small sites, low-budget organizations, and nonprofits, we will offer a community tier, sold directly by the DA. This will be effectively at cost.

    ●      Self-hosted version - for sites that are too large for the community tier but not hosted by our vendor partners.

    ●      Partner version - For sites that are hosted on vetted Drupal platform providers, who have demonstrated a commitment of contribution to the project in general and the Security Team in particular, protection will be available directly through these partners.

    We will announce more details of the program over the coming weeks and months as we get it up and running.

    If you are a hosting company and are interested in providing this service to your customers, please reach out to us at drupalsteward@drupal.org.


    Updates to Drupal.org metrics and visualizations

    Please visit our new graphical display of project usage information at:  https://www.drupal.org/project/usage/drupal. The usage graph now displays a stacked chart by version. In the long term, we have plans to revise how our usage data is tabulated to provide more accurate and useful data. 

    Changes in credit attribution

    We have made available by default giving commenters credit attribution as we believe comments are an important part of the development process. Although we deployed this successfully, we had to roll this back so we can refine our guidelines a bit. For now this issue is in backlog and expect to have our guidelines by the end of the year.

    Introducing Community Group Sections in the Community Portal

    /Community has been expanded to include more targeted sections upon landing at the /Community page. We’ve defined these sections in groups. We also have a framework that will enable these groups to tell us:

    • Who they are
    • What they do
    • How they work
    • Their latest updates
    • How you can get involved

    Some of the early adopters that are now posted are:

    Each section will have “standard” home page content, detailing the info above, as many content pages as the group can muster, and a blog that will go on to Drupal Planet.

    Drupal 7 Extended Support - request for partners

    With the upcoming release of Drupal 9 in June 2020, it's time to start thinking about migration. Drupal 7 will be supported through November 2021, but after that any end-users who haven't yet updated will want to partner with a Drupal 7 Extended Support vendor.

    The Drupal Security Working Group is accepting applications for vendors who want to be part of the extended support program.

    A renewed push on the Composer Initiative

    At DrupalCon Seattle there was also renewed interest in the Composer Initiative—this initiative seeks to rationalize the way that Composer is used in Core, to make it easier to manage sites using Composer, and also to make it easier for sites set up using a non-Composer method to be converted to using Composer, something increasingly important as contributed modules add Composer dependencies.

    ———

    As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who make it possible for us to work on these projects. In particular, we want to thank:

    • Srijan - Renewing Signature Supporting Partner
    • FFW - Renewing Signature Supporting Partner
    • Sixeleven - Renewing Signature Supporting Partner
    • Acquia - Renewing Signature Hosting Supporter
    • Nexcess.net - *NEW* Signature Hosting Supporter
    • Specbee - *NEW* Premium Supporting Partner
    • EPAM - Renewing Premium Supporting Partner
    • Elevated Third - Renewing Premium Supporting Partner
    • publicplan - Renewing Premium Supporting Partner
    • CI&T - Renewing Premium Supporting Partner
    • Capgemini - Renewing Premium Supporting Partner
    • Zoocha - Renewing Premium Supporting Partner
    • 1XInternet - Renewing Premium Supporting Partner
    • Message Agency - Renewing Premium Supporting Partner
    • Lullabot - Renewing Premium Supporting Partner
    • Aten - Renewing Premium Supporting Partner
    • Contegix - Renewing Premium Hosting Supporter
    • Platform.sh - Renewing Premium Hosting Supporter
    • Contegix - Renewing Premium Hosting Supporter
    • KWALL - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • ANNAI - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Softescu - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • SymSoft - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Vardot - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Forum One - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Berger Schmidt - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Catalyst IT - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Old Moon Digital - *NEW* Classic Supporting Partner
    • AddWeb Solution - *NEW* Classic Supporting Partner
    • Urban Insight - *NEW* Classic Supporting Partner
    • Asentech - *NEW* Classic Supporting Partner
    • One Shoe - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Hook 42 - *NEW* Classic Supporting Partner
    • Electric Citizen - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Beaconfire RED - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • University Of Virginia - *NEW* Classic Supporting Partner
    • Bear Group - *NEW* Classic Supporting Partner
    • Dropsolid - *NEW* Classic Supporting Partner
    • ezCompany - *NEW* Classic Supporting Partner
    • Spry Digital - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Perpetuum - *NEW* Classic Supporting Partner
    • Factorial - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Acro Media - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Third & Grove - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Digital Circus - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Bounteous - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Cybage - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • QED42 - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Digitalist Group - *NEW* Classic Supporting Partner
    • Red Crackle - *NEW* Classic Supporting Partner
    • SeeD - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Last Call - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • CivicActions - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Morpht - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Tata Consultancy Services - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Wunder - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Promet Source - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Unleashed Technologies - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Digital Echidna - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Evolving Web - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Adapt - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Microserve - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • ImageX - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Therefore - Renewing Classic Supporting Partner
    • Sevaa Group - Renewing Classic Hosting Supporter
    • DRUD - Renewing Classic Hosting Supporter
    • Smartling - Renewing Classic Technology Supporter

    If you would like to support our work as an individual, consider becoming a member of the Drupal Association.

    Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

    Categories: Drupal

    Jeff Geerling's Blog: Moving on, aka 'New job, 2019 edition'

    27 June 2019 - 12:43pm

    Since 2014, I've been working for Acquia, doing some fun work with a great team in Professional Services. I started out managing some huge Drupal site builds for Acquia clients, and ended up devoting all my time for the past couple years to some major infrastructure projects, diving deeper into operations work, Ansible, AWS, Docker, and Kubernetes in production.

    In that same time period, I began work on my second book, Ansible for Kubernetes, but have not had the dedicated time to get too deep into writing—especially now that I have three young kids. When I started writing Ansible for DevOps, I had one newborn!

    Categories: Drupal

    LakeDrops Drupal Consulting, Development and Hosting: Migrate Drupal 6 files to Drupal 8 media entities

    27 June 2019 - 12:48am
    Migrate Drupal 6 files to Drupal 8 media entities Richard Papp Thu, 06/27/2019 - 09:48 Drupal 8 already provides the necessary configuration files and PHP plugins to migrate files from Drupal 6. But if you are using the Drupal 8 core media module for your files you need to add a second migration.
    Categories: Drupal

    Palantir: How to Scale Through Design Systems

    26 June 2019 - 11:45am
    How to Scale Through Design Systems brandt Wed, 06/26/2019 - 13:45 Kate Eyler-Werve Jun 26, 2019

    A design system gives you a “lego box” of components that you can use to create consistent, beautiful interfaces.

    Design System artifacts go by many names - Living Style Guides, Pattern Libraries, UI Libraries, and just plain Design Systems. The core idea is to give digital teams greater flexibility and control over their website. Instead of having to decide exactly what all pages should look like in one big redesign and then sticking with those templates until the next redesign, a design system gives you a “lego box” of components the team can use to create consistent, beautiful interfaces. Component-based design is how you SCALE.

    At Palantir we build content management systems, so we’ve named our design system artifact a “style guide” in a nod to the editorial space.

    Our style guides are organized into three sections:

    1. 'Design Elements' which are the very basic building blocks for the website.
    2. 'Components' which combine design elements into working pieces of code that serve a defined purpose.
    3. 'Page Templates' which combine the elements and components into page templates that are used to display the content at destination URLs.

    But how do we help our clients determine what the list of elements, components and page templates should be?

    How to Identify Elements for Your Design System

    In this post I’ll walk through how we worked with the University of Miami Health System to create a style guide that enabled the marketing team to build a consistent, branded experience for a system with 1,200 doctors and scientists, three primary locations, and multiple local clinics.

    1. Start by generating a list of your most important types of content.

    Why are people coming to your site? What content helps them complete the task they are there to do? This content list is ground zero for component ideation: how can design support and elevate the information your site delivers?

    The list of content serving user needs is your starting point for components. In addition, we can use this list to identify a few page templates right off the bat:

    • Home page
    • Treatment landing page
    • Search page
    • Listing page: Search results, news, classes
    • Clinical trials landing page
    • Clinical trial detail page
    • Location landing page
    • Appointment landing page
    • Appointment detail page
    • Basic page (About us, contact us, general information)

    This is just the start of the UHealth style guide; we ultimately created about 80 components and 17 page templates. But it gives you a sense of how we tackled the challenge!

    2. Sort your list of important types of content into groups by similarities.

    Visitors should be able to scan your website for the information they need, and distinctive component designs help them differentiate content without having to read every word. In addition, being rigorous about consistently using components for specific kinds of information creates predictable interfaces, and predictable interfaces are easy for your visitors to use.

    In this step, you should audit the design and photo assets you have available now, and assess your capacity to create them going forward. If, for example, you have a limited photo library and no graphic artist on staff, you’ll want to choose a set of components that don’t heavily rely on photos and graphics.

    In this example, we have three component types: News, Events/Classes, and a Simple Success story.

    1. News Component: This component has no images. This is largely about content management; UHealth publishes a lot of news, and they didn’t want to create a bottleneck in their publishing schedule by requiring each story to have a digital-ready photo.
    2. Events/Classes Component: This component has an option for images or a pattern. Because UHealth wants visitors to take action on this content by signing up, we wanted these to have an eye-catching image. Requiring a photo introduces a potential bottleneck in publishing, so we also gave them the option to make the image a pattern or graphic.
    3. Simple success story: This is the most visually complex component because successful health narratives are an important element of UHealth’s content strategy. We were able to create a complex component here because there’s a smaller number of success stories compared to news stories or classes and events. That means the marketing team can dedicate significant time and resources to making the content for this component as effective as possible.
    3. Now that you’ve sorted your list by content, do a cross-check for functionality.

    Unlike paper publications, websites are built to enable actions like searching, subscribing, and making appointments. Your component set should include interfaces for your functionality.

    Some simple and common functions for the UHealth site included searching for a treatment by letter, map blocks, and step forms.

    In a more complex example, the Sylvester Cancer Center included a dynamic “Find a lab” functionality that was powered by a database. We designed the template around the limitations of the data set powering the feature, rather than ideating the ideal interface. Search is another feature that benefits from planning during the design phase.

    For example, these components for a side bar location search and a full screen location search require carefully structured databases to support them. The design and technical teams must be in alignment on the capacity and limits of the functionality underlying the interface.

    4. Differentiate components by brand.

    UHealth is an enormous health care system, and there are several centers of excellence within the system that have their own logos and distinct content strategies. As a result, we created several components that were differentiated by brand.

    In this example, you see navigation interfaces that are different by brand and language. Incorporating the differentiated logos for the core UHealth system and the Centers of Excellence is fairly straightforward. But as you can see the Sylvester Center also has three additional top nav options: Cancer treatments, Research, and For Healthcare Professionals.

    That content change necessitated a different nav bar - you can see that it’s longer. We also created a component for the nav in Spanish, because sometimes in other languages you find that the menu labels are different lengths and need to be adjusted for. In this case, they didn’t, but we kept it as a reference for the site builders.

    5. Review the list: can you combine any components?

    Your overall goal should be creating the smallest possible set of components. Depending on the complexity and variety of your content and functionality, this might be a set of 100 components or it might be just 20. The UHealth Design System has about 80 components, and another 17 page templates.

    The key is that each of the components does a specific job and is visually differentiated from components that do different jobs. You want clear visual differences that signal clear content differences to your audience, and you don’t want your web team spending time trying to parse minor differences - that’s not how you scale!

    In my experience, the biggest stumbling block to creating a streamlined list of components is stakeholders asking for maximum flexibility and control. I’ve found the best way to manage this challenge is to provide stakeholders with the option to differentiate their fiefdoms through content rather than components.

    In this example, we have the exact same component featuring different images, which allows for two widely different experiences. You can also enable minor differentiation within a component: maybe you can leave off a sub-head, or allow for two buttons instead of one.

    6. Start building your design system and stay flexible.

    The list you generated here will get you 80% of the way there, but as you proceed with designing and building your design system, you will almost certainly uncover new component needs. When you do, first double check that you can’t use an existing component. This can be a little tricky, because of course content can essentially be displayed any way you want.

    At Palantir, we solve for this challenge by building our Style Guide components with real content. This approach solves for a few key challenges with building a design system:

    1. Showing the “why” of a component. Each component is designed for a specific type of content - news, classes, header, testimonial, directory, etc. This consistency is critical for scaling design: the goal is to create consistent interfaces to create ease of use for your visitors. By building our Style Guides with real content, we document the thought process behind creating a specific component.
    2. Consistency. Digital teams change and grow. We use content in our Style Guide to show your digital team how each component should be used, even if they weren’t a part of the original design process.
    3. Capturing User Testing. Some of our components, like menus, are heavily user-tested to ensure that we’re creating intuitive interfaces. By building the components with the tested content in place, we’re capturing that research and ensuring it goes forward in the design.
    4. Identifying gaps. If you’ve got a piece of content or functionality that you think needs a new component, you can check your assumptions against the Style Guide. Does the content you’re working with actually fit within an existing pattern, or is it really new? If it is, add it to the project backlog!
    Outcomes

    The most important takeaway here is that design systems let your web team scale. Through the use of design systems, your digital team can generate gorgeous, consistent and branded pages as new needs arise.

    But don’t take our word for it! Tauffyt Aguilar, the Executive Director of Digital Solutions for Miller School of Medicine and UHealth, describes the impact of their new design system:

    “One of the major improvements is Marketing’s ability to maintain and grow their site moving forward. Previously each page was designed and developed individually. The ability to create or edit pages using various elements and components of the Design System is a significant improvement in the turnaround time and efficiency for the Marketing department.”

    My favorite example of a new page constructed with the UHealth design system is this gorgeous interface for the Sports Medicine Institute.

    The Sports Medicine audience has unique needs and interests: they are professional and amateur athletes who need to get back in the game. The UHealth team used basic components plus an attention-grabbing image to create this interface for finding experts by issue.

    And ultimately, that’s Palantir’s goal: your digital team should have the tools to create gorgeous, effective websites.

    Content Strategy Design Industries Healthcare
    Categories: Drupal

    myDropWizard.com: Drupal 6 security update for Advanced Forum module

    26 June 2019 - 9:42am

    As you may know, Drupal 6 has reached End-of-Life (EOL) which means the Drupal Security Team is no longer doing Security Advisories or working on security patches for Drupal 6 core or contrib modules - but the Drupal 6 LTS vendors are and we're one of them!

    Today, there is a Critical security release for the Advanced Forum 6.x-2.x module to fix an Cross Site Scripting (XSS) vulnerability.

    Advanced Forum builds on and enhances Drupal's core forum module.

    The module doesn't sufficiently sanitise user input in specific circumstances relating to the module's default functionality. It is not possible to disable the vulnerable functionality.

    This vulnerability is mitigated by the fact that an attacker must have a role with permission to create forum content.

    See the security advisory for Drupal 7 for more information.

    Here you can download the Drupal 6 patch or the full release.

    Note: This only affects Advanced Forum 6.x-2.x -- not 6.x-1.x.

    If you have a Drupal 6 site using the Advanced Forum 6.x-2.x module, we recommend you update immediately! We have already deployed the patch for all of our Drupal 6 Long-Term Support clients. :-)

    If you'd like all your Drupal 6 modules to receive security updates and have the fixes deployed the same day they're released, please check out our D6LTS plans.

    Note: if you use the myDropWizard module (totally free!), you'll be alerted to these and any future security updates, and will be able to use drush to install them (even though they won't necessarily have a release on Drupal.org).

    Categories: Drupal

    InternetDevels: Editorial workflows in Drupal 8: easy creation & management

    26 June 2019 - 7:32am

    Streamlining the content creation and approval processes is necessary on many websites. Editorial workflows in Drupal 8 are easy to create and manage. This is achieved by the Content Moderation and Workflows modules.

    These modules are Drupal 8’s innovation — they have appeared in the core and reached stability during the time from Drupal 8.2 to Drupal 8.5. So welcome on a tour of creating and managing editorial workflows with them.

    Read more
    Categories: Drupal

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