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Code Karate: Deploy content changes for your Gatsby Drupal site on Netlify with Build Hooks

2 October 2019 - 9:58pm
Episode Number: 9

In the last episode you learned how to your previously created Gatsby site with Drupal content and to Netlify. In this episode, you learn how to use the Drupal 8 Build Hooks module to trigger automatic rebuilds on your Netlify website. You will learn how to trigger a rebuild when content is saved, when Drupal cron runs, or upon manual request from within your Drupal website.

Tags: GatsbyJSReactDrupalDrupal 8Drupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

Fuse Interactive: Changing the Rules for Drupal 8

2 October 2019 - 12:00pm
Changing the Rules for Drupal 8 Since moving development to Drupal 8 for all our new builds one of the modules that we relied on heavily for many of our Drupal 7 builds has been in a bit of a state of disarray in it’s Drupal 8 version. That module would be Rules. What was once a powerful tool for creating conditional reactions to specific events on your site is now something I actively avoid having to use on a build. Documentation is sparse, many features are missing or barely work without the help of multiple patches and the UI is just plain unintuitive. All of these issues leave you taking shots in the dark to achieve the functionality you’re looking for. Niall Morgan Wed, 10/02/2019 - 12:00
Categories: Drupal

Amazee Labs: DrupalCon Amsterdam – Here We Come!

2 October 2019 - 9:27am
DrupalCon Amsterdam 2019 is almost here and Amazee Labs has been busily preparing to share our most valuable practices at this year’s open source, community-driven event. DrupalCon Amsterdam gathers more than 1,500 of the top digital minds that use Drupal for collaboration, knowledge sharing, friendship, and moving their projects forward. As proud sponsors, presenters, and attendees, we can’t wait to bask in so much shared expertise, to help create collaborative solutions, build more relationships, and shape the future of Drupal, open source and the world.
Categories: Drupal

Acro Media: Top 5 Challenges of Drupal Custom Ecommerce Development and an Ideal Solution

2 October 2019 - 7:45am

With its open source software and proven technology, Drupal is the first choice for many business owners when it comes to deciding a framework for their digital commerce business. After all, it’s a great CMS and ecommerce can be added to it through custom-built development (although custom might not be best, more on that later).

So, how about your business? Are you using Drupal and have an integrated or custom ecommerce component? Or, maybe you’re still deciding on which way to go to add ecommerce functionality? If so, let’s talk about the features that you probably wish to have in your website:

  • Are you looking for limitless product presentation and customization options?
  • Do you have plans to set up multichannel marketing and automation for your website?
  • Are you planning to integrate third party systems or run custom social media campaigns?
  • Do you need the flexibility to scale your website with endless options?

If you replied “yes” to any of the above questions, I would say custom-built ecommerce probably isn’t your best option. Nor do I think you need a pre-packaged SaaS solution, either. Before I suggest what you might want to do, let’s first look specifically at why custom ecommerce can present its own difficult challenges you definitely want to avoid.

5 challenges of a custom ecommerce system

Depending upon the complexity of requirements, it can take anywhere from months to years to set up a proper ecommerce site, no joke. Let’s say you’ve decided on building custom ecommerce functionality into your Drupal site. You’ve hired a developer, or maybe an agency or an internal team, to build it and have been able to get the ecommerce functionality that your business needed to get started. Great!

Now, after a year or so, you start thinking of scaling it by adding more features and functionality. This is where you may start running into challenges. Let me outline some of the more critical challenges you may face.

1. Handcuffed to an internal development team or outside agency

This can be a touchy subject but is probably the biggest liability for a company using custom development, so let’s start here. Ideally you’d still want to use that original development team who has all the knowledge of how your ecommerce component was made. But what if you can’t get the same developers or what if you have a falling-out with the agency who built it? Imagine how difficult it might be to onboard new developers when you yourself don’t know the code. Without a predefined standard or framework, how your ecommerce was built is anyone's guess. Significant cost will be added just to get any new developers up-to-speed.

2. Slow to implement new features and/or functionality

If you’re constantly feeling like you are reacting to the market rather than being a proactive innovator, this can be a direct cause of custom development. Simply put, everything you add to your website needs to be built and nothing is ready-made that you can just plug in. There is no time saving options that you can take advantage of to speed things up.

3. Inability to integrate with desired third party platforms

Integrations are one of the biggest benefits of an open source platform so it can be a real problem if you’re not able to integrate quickly and effectively.

Consider the cost that you have to bear when you are introducing something as simple as a new payment system or a new tax rule. Something that should be easy might take far too much time than it’s worth because you don’t have access to an underlying framework that was made specifically to make building these integrations faster.

Or maybe a robust new marketing tool comes in to the market and if you want to take advantage of it by integrating it with your ecommerce site. Let peace be upon you… this larger integration could be a monumental task. Every integration you require means more custom development, more cost, and lengthy timelines to completion.

4. Sacrificing the front-end customer experience

Custom development is built by developers first and so the actual look and presentation is often sacrificed for functionality. This isn’t meant to be a knock on developers, but the simple truth of the matter is that building code and building layout and design are two entirely different specialties. It’s very rare that you find someone with both skill sets. Without good UX and design, your customers will not get the front-end experience they expect which could impact your business performance.

If the makeup of your team includes designers and frontend developers, great! This would alleviate presentation issues, but these extra specialists will add additional expense to your custom build.

5. Unable to take advantage of the community

If all you have is custom functionality, you could be spending a lot of time and money developing features and/or integrations that potentially already would have existed if you had gone a different route. If you think about it, one of the great things about Drupal in general is all of the community-made modules that you have access to for extending your site’s functionality. While you’ll still be able to use them with your Drupal site, the custom ecommerce side of things doesn’t have that benefit. Everything you need must be built and probably only your team of developers can do it.

If not custom development, then what?

So what do you choose when custom development is a hassle and I’ve already mentioned that I’m not pushing you towards a SaaS solution. Well, my suggestion is that you should consider using the Drupal-native ecommerce module, Drupal Commerce. I mean, why marry off your Drupal site with someone else when we have fully compatible Drupal Commerce with us. It has been a proven ecommerce framework since 2011 (view usage stats) and lets you build a secure, scalable, SEO and mobile friendly ecommerce site in whatever way your business needs! It’s framework has been made for extending. It’s documented and has a large community centered around it (which Acro Media is a part of). Maybe you’ve heard negative rumblings about it in the past, and if so, I think you should look again.

Here’s how I justify my view, or rather, how Drupal Commerce can help you fulfill your ecommerce requirements.

Top 7 reasons why you should use Drupal Commerce

Below are the top 7 reasons why you should be selecting Drupal Commerce over any custom or off-the-shelf hosted solutions out there.

1. Commerce and content will easily get along

When we use Drupal Commerce with Drupal, it will let you manage your content strategy right within your ecommerce platform. You can easily manage complex relationship between products and other contents in the site. The CMS part will let you create custom landing pages to attract the attention of users while flexibility in the ecommerce part will make it easier for a site owner to manage new products and its workflow.

2. Requires less development effort

When you need a content site as well as an ecommerce site, With out-of-the-box modules and pre-configured distributions, a Drupal Commerce store can be easily setup without much hassle. Plus, when custom development is required, Drupal’s strict code standards ensure that any competent Drupal developer can easily jump-in and understand what’s going on. You’re not stuck with just a single developer or agency to manage your project. You have the freedom to shop around.

3. Highly customizable and scalable

Unlike most SaaS systems, Drupal and Drupal Commerce can be customized according to the business’s needs. Even though Drupal and Drupal Commerce are architected to be extended limitlessly, all the extensions follow a general standard. This makes sure that when the next person with knowledge in Drupal Commerce comes along, either from a development or administrator standpoint, this person can handle the software easily. New features or integrations can be performed faster which takes the system scalable to the next level.

From a performance perspective, Drupal and Drupal Commerce are more than capable of scaling to meet the needs of small business all the way to enterprise. Need proof, we’ve tested their performance and you can see the results here.

4. Integration with external systems

This is the core strength of Drupal. Drupal modules have been built so that they can interact with one another easily. If you need to connect your ecommerce to payment gateways, marketplaces, CRMs, analytics tools, SEO tools, shipping providers, the list goes on, they can be done as quickly as within a few hours (integration depending, of course). Drupal takes an API first approach which is what you want for integrations now and in the future.

5. Free and open source

Unlike proprietary ecommerce systems, Drupal Commerce is open source and there is no licensing cost or usage limits. Unlike other open source solutions, there are no paid modules within the Drupal community. You have access to it all and can extend and customize it in whatever you like. By saving money on the software, you can instead invest that money in your Drupal based platform and your own business needs.

6. Community support

Drupal has an immensely large community with thousands of active users helping to build and maintain the core software and its extensions. The features you require for your site could be already created by someone else and available on Drupal.org, waiting for you to take advantage of. Various IRC channels, blogs, forums, agencies, etc. will help you in case you are blocked or need advice on almost anything related to Drupal.

7. Solid future version support

With the release of Drupal 8, we are quite clear on how migrations to the next version will happen. If your site is already using Drupal 8, then you don’t have to worry about Drupal 8 being unsupported by community because you will easily be able to migrate your site to Drupal 9 (and future versions) when the time comes.

It doesn’t mean that your Drupal 7 site will be isolated either. The stable Migrate module in Drupal 8 will make a migration of your Drupal 7 site to Drupal 8 easier than ever before, saving time and money when adopting the newer version.

View a Drupal Commerce demo

To help show you what a Drupal Commerce ecommerce solution looks like, check out our fully functional Drupal Commerce demo site, Urban Hipster.

Here you can click around and “buy” products just like you would using any real ecommerce site. You will see content pages, a best-practice product catalog, a variety of product types, and more. This feature rich demo was made to give you an idea of what your Drupal Commerce site could do, but of course this is just one example. The possibilities are endless.

Plan your move to Drupal Commerce

Leave custom development and integrated ecommerce frameworks behind by starting your move to Drupal Commerce today. Acro Media is an ecommerce consulting and development company that specializes in open source and Drupal Commerce. Take a look at our Drupal Commerce solutions today and let us know if you have any questions. We’d love to help you understand if Drupal Commerce is a good fit for your business.

Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: Drupal Behind the Firewall with Gatsby

2 October 2019 - 7:17am

Mediacurrent works with a variety of customers across many verticals to build secure Drupal applications. We sometimes encounter strict hosting policies, including on-premise requirements.

One of the great benefits of decoupling Drupal from the web frontend is the ability to move Drupal’s CMS to a secured environment that is only accessible from a VPN or private network. Statically generated frontends like Gatsby further reduce vulnerabilities to provide a robust security architecture overall.

This article will outline three options for securing Drupal, two of which include hosting the CMS behind a Firewall only accessible by a user on a secured network. The third option is the more common alternative that provides some security but does not completely lock down the CMS.

 All options provide added security benefits over a traditional hosted Drupal application. Let’s weigh the pros and cons of each approach. 

Option 1 - Self-hosted
 

The first option runs completely on self-hosted hardware, which could be stood up on-premise if so desired. While this type of approach is becoming increasingly rare, there are still contracts in the government and financial space that require all self-hosted applications. 

This method will keep Drupal locked down on a web server behind a firewall that only privileged CMS users can access. GitLab is a great choice when Git repositories need to be self-managed but still require robust features that GitHub, BitBucket and GitLab’s cloud offerings provide. 

A Jenkins server can be stood up to handle the automation of Gatsby builds. This includes compiling the artifacts that will be deployed to the public web server on the right-hand side. For deployments, a read-only Git deploy key is a secure way of grabbing the latest Gatsby release.

Pros:
  • Ability to completely lock down the CMS environment and Git repositories

Cons:
  • Must maintain web servers, Gitlab server, and automation (Jenkins)
  • Most expensive solution to stand up and maintain

Why you would use this solution:
  • Strict security requirements
  • On-premise requirements for servers

 

Option 2 - Self-hosted + Cloud
 

The second option keeps the CMS web server behind a firewall while leveraging Cloud services for the rest of the architecture. As with the first solution, only privileged users will be able to access the CMS server. In this scenario, a Cloud Git service like GitHub will host the Gatsby source files and Netlify’s static host will run the compiled website. Netlify’s CLI can be used by the webserver behind the file server to rebuild artifacts when content is updated. A Jenkins server is a good way to handle the automation of Gatsby builds.

Pros:
  • Relatively straightforward to set up
  • An easier solution to maintain than completely self-hosted
  • Saves cost over a self-hosted solution
  • Leverage great features from Netlify (High availability, A/B testing, etc.)
Cons:
  • Requires web server maintenance for CMS behind the firewall

Why you would use this solution:
  • Balance security while leveraging Cloud
  • A desire for CMS to be completely locked down from outside access


 

Option 3 - Private with Cloud
 

The last solution will not use a Firewall but instead obscure access to the webserver and in some cases add basic auth for additional protections. A CDN is recommended for inline images so that media is server from a service like Cloudfront instead of directly from the server. This method will leverage a Drupal managed host provider like Acquia or Pantheon.

Pros:
  • Able to use image CDN for inline Media
  • Can add light protections like basic auth
  • No server maintenance
  • Managed host providers provide enterprise support and features

 

Cons:
  • Server is still publicly accessible, so less secure than solution behind firewall

Why you would use this solution:
  • CMS does not need to be locked down
  • Security through obscurity, CMS server not indexed which shields from most attacks
Inline Images

One challenge with Gatsby is that it won’t automatically handle inline images coming from Drupal’s CMS. Gatsby does convert images that are served from Drupal’s JSON:API but it does not do anything with image paths that exist in say the body Wysiwyg HTML for any particular page. 

One option is to use the TUI Editor module that converts these images to Gatsby image assets: https://www.drupal.org/project/tui_editor

Another option would be to integrate the Drupal Amazon S3 module. This can be combined with Amazon Cloudfront to serve inline images from a secure server. Whenever a file gets saved it would be pushed up to Amazon S3 through an API and then made publicly available by Cloudfront. The AmazonS3 module allows developers to rewrite image URLs to the publicly accessible URLs that will be served by Gatsby.

Your Feedback

We hope that you have found this article helpful. Want to know more? Talk to our team of experts to discuss a solution that works for your organization.

Comments or questions? Hit me up at @drupalninja

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: Top Drupal blog posts from September 2019

2 October 2019 - 3:29am

September was another exciting month for the Drupal community, with quite a lot of important pieces of news. Our recap of the top Drupal blog posts from last month covers these, as well as some interesting posts by Drupalers concerning the future of Drupal and open source in general. Enjoy!

READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

Code Karate: Deploying your Gatsby Drupal Site to Netlify

1 October 2019 - 9:12pm
Episode Number: 8

In this episode, you will learn how to take your previously created Gatsby site with Drupal content and deploy it to Netlify. Netlify is a great hosting service that allows you to get started hosting your Gatsby site for free. It also provides automated build tools that will build a production version of your Gatsby site from a Git repository.

Tags: GatsbyJSReactDrupalDrupal 8Drupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: Open Waters Podcast Ep 5: Getting Into Gatsby With Jason Lengstorf

1 October 2019 - 10:22am

Meet Gatsby, an open source React-based framework for building super fast websites and apps. 

In this episode, we talk with Jason Lengstorf to discuss the GatsbyJS project and what it solves.


Audio Download Link

Project Pick: https://gatsbyjs.org

Interview

  • What's your role at Gatsby, when did you start?
  • How did you get involved in the project? 
  • What did you do before Gatsby?
  • What is Gatsby?
  • How do you feel about the response from the community about Gatsby?
  • Did you think it would take off as it has?
  • Why should an org choose it over a traditional CMS?
  • What separates Gatsby from other static site generators?
  • What features is the team currently working on?
  • Closing comments
Links: 
Categories: Drupal

Promet Source: Real Solutions for Online Accessibility

1 October 2019 - 10:21am
If ADA compliance was not on your radar screen at the time your website was developed, you are in good company. But in the current environment, accessibility of your digital assets may be an ADA-mandated fact of life. A recent flood of lawsuits is driving home this reality and the fact is, sometimes the search for fast fixes can lead to unintended consequences. Of course, your objective is to get your website into conformance as efficiently and cost-effectively as possible. 
Categories: Drupal

Drupal Modules: The One Percent: Drupal Modules: The One Percent — Views Send (video tutorial)

1 October 2019 - 7:10am
Drupal Modules: The One Percent — Views Send (video tutorial) NonProfit Tue, 10/01/2019 - 09:10 Episode 54

Here is where we bring awareness to Drupal modules running on less than 1% of reporting sites. Today we'll investigate Views Send, a module which permits you to execute personalized mass mailings to recipients referenced in a view.

Categories: Drupal

Sooper Drupal Themes: Drupal accessibility: 20 Tips and More

1 October 2019 - 2:43am
Drupal accessibility is vital for your website

It is vital to create accessible content on your website. Among your audience, people with impairments will also be included. On top of that, the website itself will become more user-friendly and you will better meet the Drupal accessibility standards that exist today. In this blog post, we will go over 20 tips that will improve your content and website accessibility, then I'm going to make a brief description of W3C and the WCAG guidelines and finally, I'm going to suggest 5 Drupal modules that will aid you in your quest to improve your Drupal accessibility. Let's get started.

1. Incorporate a Site Map

A site map is a beneficial tool that lets a user of your website assess the logical structure of your website. This, in turn, will make it easier for the user to be able to overview the content of your website. On top of that, it makes the content on your website easier to be accessed and increases your Drupal accessibility. 

2. ALT attributes to describe pictures

Alt attributes are a very important part of enabling your website to have accessible content. The main purpose of ALT attributes is that is going to help the search engines and website better be able to describe and understand what the picture is all about. This can be very helpful for people who can’t see and receive their image descriptions through audio feedback. Probably your website was built from the start with alt attributes in the content, but you need to train your writers and site maintainers to not skip over the alt attributes when updating the website.

3. Clean and distraction-free content

Another paramount point to make your content more accessible is to host your content on a clutter-free website. This will enable easier access to the content on your website. Which in turn will make it less frustrating for impaired people to navigate your website and to get to the important parts of it.

4. Clear and simple language

Language is another factor that has to be taken into account if you want to make accessible content. It’s important to adapt your language to be able to be understood by a wide range of people. That is why, even in writing, it’s important for the language level to remain conversational. That means no fancy words that can make it more difficult for the screen reader to do its job. If you install the Yoast SEO Drupal module you'll get a real-time score of how easy-to-read your content is! 

5. Meaningful link text

It is important that the link text is as clear as possible. Link texts like “click here” or “read here” are not descriptive enough. Instead, try to link a sentence or group of words that are describing what the link is about. This will lead to a decrease in frustration for users that are unable to see and use a reader.

6. Ensure keyboard accessibility

People that have motor disabilities, visual impairment or are amputees, often have trouble using a keyboard or any device that requires a high degree of motor coordination. That’s why keyboard accessibility is so important. The main point of keyboard accessibility is to make every element or link be selectable by using the TAB key. In order to test if your website has this functionality, just press TAB and see if every element will be able to be selected. This way, you will greatly reduce the struggles of impaired people.

7.Provide videos and audios with transcripts or captions

In order to make accessible content, video and audio should have transcripts or captions. This is a crucial step in making the content on your website accessible. With this, screen readers will be able to aid the visually impaired by reading the text, while the deaf will be able to read the text. 

8. Support screen readers

Screen reader support is the most important piece for improving your Drupal accessibility. With this kind of software support, your website will be able to read out loud the text that it’s being displayed on your website. Basically, it lets blind people hear the text from your website. On top of that, paired with captions and translations, the screen reader can also read what is happening in a multimedia video. Also, the screen reader gives two types of feedback, either through speech or through braille. A general awareness of how screenreaders work is a great first step in training your writers on accessibility.

9. Don’t use automated media

What is automated media? Automated media is the media that starts automatically after a website is accessed. It either can be an ad or a video. In both cases, it can be annoying for somebody with an impairment to have to find and mute or close the media windows. This is why automated media should be turned off on your website.

10. Review your website using automated accessibility assessment tools

It’s always a good idea to assess your website's Drupal accessibility with an automated testing tool for accessible content. This tool will automatically scan and see how compliant your website is. After this, you can see the areas of your website were your doing great and the areas were you could still improve on your accessibility.

11. Make your website seizure proof

It’s really important to make sure that your website is not causing some unwanted seizures in your audience. For example, someone that suffers from epilepsy can have it triggered by rapid flashing animations. A simple rule to avoid such an unfortunate event is to not have content that flashes for more than 3 times per second. This way you will make sure that you’re not going to trigger any photosensitive seizures.

12. Content that has to be input by the user has clear instructions

If a website requires its users to input content, then instructions have to be crystal clear in order to avoid confusion. The easy way to do this is to provide labels for every form control. Examples of such control are drop-down menus, text fields, and checboxes. On top of that, the labels have to describe the function and purpose of the control. This will make sure that the assistive technology will refer to the correct form, increasing your Drupal accessibility.

13. Character key shortcuts

If a website supports keyboard shortcut that consists of numbers, letters, punctuation or symbols, then it should have the option to be able to be turned off. This will make sure that people will not trigger accidentally a shortcut in by pressing on the wrong button.

14. Users are allowed to turn animations off

Another important feature that your website has to have in order to be more inclusive and accessible has to be the function to turn animations off. It’s important to have this feature because animations can be distracting and can make the navigation on your website harder.

15. Pointer gestures

Complex actions such as pinching for zooming or swiping should also be able to be done through other means. This will ensure that the people of your audience that cannot perform for various reasons, will not be left out. This is a vital point for your Drupal accessibility.

16. Motion actuation

The interaction that can be used by moving your phone, for example shaking it, should also be able to be done through the interface, without the need of physically doing the interaction. This will increase the Drupal accessibility, inclusiveness, and user-friendliness of your website.

17. No time limits

Having no time limits is really important. Imposing time limits on your website can make people with motor, visual or hearing disabilities have a hard time reaching their goal in a timely manner on your website. This, in turn, can lead to an increase in user frustration. In order to avoid that, disabling time limits is the way to go.

18. Text resizability

Another important aspect of improving your Drupal accessibility is text resizability. Basically, your website has to allow its users to zoom to up to 200% from the original size. This will ensure that even with some sort of visual impairment might be able to read the text or view your photos.

19. Visual presentation

This is another important criteria when you are considering making your website more inclusive. Adhering to this guideline will give our end users the ability to choose how to visualize your website. This includes the colors, the line spacing, and sizes. This will give your users the freedom to choose the visual representation of your website however it suits him best. 

20. Bypass Blocks

Another tip to make your website more inclusive and user-friendly is to create the opportunity for the users to be able to bypass blocks. This is important because a screen reader will read all the navigation links, header links and all sorts of repetitive content that is present on a website, regardless of how long the links are. Now, you can imagine how frustrating it can be for a person to have to sit and listen to a high number of links, that may be irrelevant for them, before actually getting to see or hear the content that they were originally searching for. This may lead to a lot of your visitors becoming frustrated and leaving your page. So, in order to avoid this situation, the easiest way is to provide a skip to content link in your header. With this, you create better Drupal accessibility for your website.

WCAG Guidelines

WCAG was developed by the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) as a set of regulations that help make digital content accessible to all users, including those with disabilities.

 

There are 3 versions of these regulations. These are WCAG 1.0, WCAG 2.0 and WCAG 2.1. The latter two have at their core four basic principles that have to be met in order for a website to be compliant. These principles are as follows: 

  • Perceivable: The information and user interface has to be presented to the user in a way that can be perceived.

  • Robust: The content has to be robust enough to be able to be interpreted by many types of users, including assistive technology and future technology.

  • Operable: Navigation and user interface components have to be operable.

  • Understandable: Information and user interface have to be understandable.

 

On top of that, each guideline has a level of compliance that is assigned to it. The levels of compliance are as follows:

 
  • A: This level of compliance usually has the highest priority and is the easiest to achieve out of them all.

  • AA: This is a more extensive guideline. It is usually regarded as the standard to meet.

  • AAA: This is the most extensive design standards to meet. It is also more strict, thus it is the one that is the least common to meet.

 

Currently, most laws require websites to be WCAG 2.0 compliant. Only if the laws in your country explicitly state that your website should comply with the standards of WCAG 2.1, then you should adopt that. However, the W3C does suggest that the new website should be built in compliance with the WCAG 2.1 since they tend to be more inclusive and user-friendly.

Drupal Modules that help with your Content accessibility

Now that you have an idea of the compliance levels for accessibility, it’s time to see a list of Drupal modules that can help you improve the Drupal accessibility of your website and become more user-friendly and inclusive.

Automatic alternative text

This Drupal module makes it easy for the images on your website to have an alternative text, even if there is none specified by the user. This module uses Microsoft's Azure Cognitive Services API. It basically identifies what the image is about and makes a description or more based on the confidence level.

Text resize

This module allows the text on your website to be adjusted to the needs of your user. This module is available for both Drupal 7 and 8. 

Style Switcher

This module provides a high degree of functionality for the users that are suffering from colorblindness. It gives the ability for themers to create themes with alternative stylesheets. This, in turn, gives the ability for the user to select the right color scheme for their particular type of colorblindness.

Accessibility Scanner

This module allows you to perform website accessibility assessments in order to see where your website can be improved. This module has to be used in conjunction with achecker. On top of that, the websites that can be asses are both local and remote.

Fluidproject UI Options

This module provides the user with the ability to control and modify a page’s font size, font style, height, contrast and link style. On top of that, those preferences are remembered on the website by using cookies. A perfect module to ensure a higher degree of customizability for all its users.

Conclusion

Hopefully, now that you find out those tips and have a better understanding of the WCAG guidelines imposed by the W3C, you can put your newfound knowledge into practice and use the suggested Drupal modules to make the most amazing, inclusive and user-friendly website that you can make. These will get the Drupal accessibility of your website to new heights!

Categories: Drupal

qed42.com: Building custom skill for Alexa multi-turn dialog management

1 October 2019 - 1:31am
Building custom skill for Alexa multi-turn dialog management Body

We have witnessed rapid developments around voice assistants over the past few years. With mobile users increasing exponentially every passing day it would be fair to assume that voice searches will rise simultaneously. Fiction has transformed into the truth, one can pose questions to a device and get human-like reactions, stunning isn't it? This is what millions of users are doing every day with Alexa, Apple pod, Google assistant, etc. User interfaces have changed over time, and with each new user interface, a bundle of new difficulties has emerged. 

 

Conventional user interfaces are displayed as controls in an application (text boxes, buttons) or web pages. They are vigorously utilized and have been demonstrated to be sufficiently effective for human-machine interaction. 

| The question persists, why build voice assistants? What are the advantages of having voice assistants? 
  1. The magic of conversational interfaces is that users don’t have to learn how to use them. Alexa skill (android app) should leverage the power of natural language understanding to adapt to the user’s word choices, instead of forcing them to memorize a set of commands. 
  2. As someone said, “Don’t play the odds, play the man”. The voice assistant will be able to do that as voice search keywords are normally longer than text search which is why they are more conversational. 
  3. One of the significant benefits of voice assistants is their machine learning capabilities. The more we interact with these devices, the more the assistants grasp. After a period, they can return highly customized outcomes.
  4. With voice assistants, you can take into account the customer based on who they are and not simply their behavior. While it's still early for personalization of the customer experience through voice assistants, this is tremendous for businesses.
  5. Conversations are classified into two types, single-turn, and multi-turn dialogs.
| Single-turn Vs Multi-turn Dialog with Drupal

Single turn: Dialogs where the conversation ends with one question and one response in return. For example: Asking Alexa to set an alarm, a reminder, play a song, adjust the volume, is not a technical conversation. This is called a single-turn conversation.

Let’s consider an example in context with the Drupal and Alexa module. Here we have created Alexa skill which provides information related to Drupal. The user asks Alexa ‘who is the founder of Drupal?’ she responds ‘Dries’. But when you ask her “Which year it open-sourced?”. Alexa fails to determine the context of the question i.e “Drupal” and treats it as a brand new query. 

A few questions cannot be answered in a single turn. A user may pose a question that should be filtered or refined to determine the correct answer. That is where Multi-turn conversations come in to picture.

  | Dialog Management

Genuine conversations are dynamic, moving among topics and thoughts smoothly. To make conversational Alexa skills, structure for adaptability and responsiveness. Skills ought to have the capacity to deal with varieties of discussion, contingent gathering of information, and switching context mid-discussion. Dialog management makes these regular communications conceivable. - Definition from Alexa docs

| How do you make this work? Create an Alexa skill: 
  • Amazon Alexa skills are equivalent to Android apps. You have to create a custom Alexa skill using the Alexa skill kit (ASK) on the Amazon developer console. 
  • You define an interaction model and point it to your Drupal site.
Interaction model: 
  • With the Alexa Skills Kit, you can create skills with a custom interaction model. 
  • You implement the logic for the skill, and also define the voice interface through which users interact with the skill. 
  • To define the voice interface, you map users' spoken input to the intents your cloud-based service can handle.
Components for Alexa custom skill:
  • Use an invocation name to start a conversation with a particular custom skill. For example, if the invocation name is "Drucom", the users can say “Alexa, open Drucom”.  
  • An invocation name can be called to get things going or you can combine invocation name with intent such as “Alexa, open Drucom, order wine”.
  • Each intent corresponds to something that the Alexa skill is capable of doing. Intent can capture the things that your users want to do. You might design intents to capture the details. Each intent in the Alexa skill contains the following:
  1. Intent name
  2. Utterances
  3. Slot (optional)
  • Utterances are nothing but an invocation phrase for intents. Users can express the same intent using different statements. For example, if we were building a help intent, there are different ways one can express that he/she requires help:
  1. I need help
  2. Help me
  3. Alexa, can you help me?
  • The way Alexa works is, it will parse what the user says. It will not just send the raw sentence but it will pass the intent that’s being triggered too. 
  • The utterances you provide to an intent do not have to be perfect which covers all the cases and scenarios, it is training data for Alexa to figure out what the intent here is.

Let's start with implementing the interaction model for the Add to cart functionality.

Step 1:  Create a new skill with Drucom as the skill name
Step 2: Set an invocation name   Step 3: Create an intent

For our interaction model, we will create an intent called AddToCartIntent, which will be responsible for handling the utterances for adding items to the cart. Adding utterances: When users interact with our skill, they may express additional things that indicate what they want to order.

Looking at the above utterances we can say that the AddTocartIntent will only be invoked when the user tries to add Red Wine to cart but it will not invoke if a user tries to add some other product and that's where custom slot types come to the rescue. 

Step 4: Create slot types and using them in AddToCartIntent
  • Glancing through the utterances above, we can identify the two slots that we have to catch i.e productName and quantity.
  • We have to create one custom slot type for productName and will use one built-in slot type AMAZON.number for quantity.
  • Custom slot types are a list of possible values for a slot. They are utilized for a list of things that are not secured by the built-in slot types provided by Amazon.

 

Once we have set up the slot types, it’s time to apply them in our intent. Once you are done with the changes our intent will look something like this:

  Step 5: Activating Dialog management

To activate the dialog, you will have to mark at least one slot as ‘required’.

Slot form - you need to provide the sample prompts which Alexa will use while asking questions to the user,  along with these sample utterances the user might also add a slot value. Now our interaction model for AddToCartIntent is ready.

Conclusion

I have covered what single-turn and multi-turn conversations are, and how multi-turn conversations with Alexa and Drupal are vital. I have also described the steps to create a custom Alexa Skill. In my next blog, we will learn more about Configuring a Drupal site.

anand.toshniwal Tue, 10/01/2019 - 14:01
Categories: Drupal

Third & Grove: Should You Jump Ship Before Drupal 9?

30 September 2019 - 8:52pm

Because of the horror stories of migrating to Drupal 8, you just might be considering other CMS options to finally yourself of the upgrade pains every few years. We hear your concerns but we can promise you this: now is the absolute worst time to jump ship to another CMS.

We’ve reached a remarkable point in Drupal’s evolution: the Achilles heel (upgrades that require major efforts) will be repaired with the release of Drupal 9. That means once you make it to Drupal 8, everything is going to be a hell of a lot easier for you. We’ll do our best to address each of the major concerns below.
 

Categories: Drupal

Tag1 Consulting: Drupal Automatic Updates - TagTeamTalk #003

30 September 2019 - 12:39pm
Automatic updates are coming to Drupal at the end of October! Long one of the most commonly requested features in the Drupal community, Drupal 7 and D8 will soon have an automatic updater that will allow Drupal installations to stay up-to-date more easily. How does Drupal's new auto updater work, and what do you need to know about it? In this Tag1 Team Talk, we dive into not only Drupal's new automatic updates feature itself but also its architecture, components, and roadmap, as well as why it's such an important part of Drupal's Core Strategic Initiatives. Join moderator Preston So (Contributing Editor, Tag1 Consulting) and guests Lucas Hedding (Senior Architect and Data and Application Migration Expert, Tag1), Tim Lehnen (CTO, Drupal Association), Fabian Franz (Senior Technical Architect and Performance Lead, Tag1), and Michael Meyers (Managing Director, Tag1) for a deep dive into the nuts and bolts of Drupal's groundbreaking automatic updates feature, directly from the module maintainer, and the strategic initiative sponsors including the Drupal Association, MTech, Tag1, and the European Commission. ------------------------------------ Further reading ------------------------------------ Automatic Update - Module https://www.drupal.org/project/automatic_updates Automatic Updates - D7 and D8 Documentation Pages https://www.drupal.org/docs/7/update/automatic-updates https://www.drupal.org/docs/8/update/automatic-updates Automatic Updates - Issue Queue https://drupal.org/project/issues/automatic_updates To provide your... Read more michaelemeyers Mon, 09/30/2019 - 12:39
Categories: Drupal

OpenSense Labs: Roles Facilitating Successful Drupal Development

30 September 2019 - 5:00am
Roles Facilitating Successful Drupal Development Shilpi Mon, 09/30/2019 - 17:30

All about Drupal development and the people behind.

More and more businesses look for Drupal developers as the market has been skyrocketing for the past decade. Drupal has emerged to be an enterprise-level content management system compared to rivals Wordpress and Joomla.  

As Drupal development involves various segments, there is always a scope of confusion regarding skill sets and responsibilities. We, at OpenSense Labs, comprise of Drupal Developers, Architects, Themers and Back-end experts. All of us lay the foundation for any project we pursue. 

Welcome to our first of the three series articles on Drupal developers. Let’s dive in and understand the distinct categories and their skills which make Drupal development a success. 


The entire development process in Drupal comprises of various segments which contribute equally to the overall well-being of the website. From laying the foundation of the website to providing it a UX-friendly design, it is collaboration at its peak. Let us decode every single role here:

Drupal Site Builder 


Site building is the core Drupal competency which is much needed for the site creation. It includes, getting Drupal up and running, and configuring the options to build a full-fledged functional website.

One of the most rewarding features of site-building is that a Drupal site builder approaches building sites with the only point and click on the admin UI (user interface), without writing a single line of custom code.  Site Builders are known to lay the foundation of any Drupal website. 

Meaning, they build the taxonomy, content types, image presets, lists with views, layouts, menus, rules and setting up roles and permissions.

By understanding, a completely functional Drupal website is curated with a lot of  Drupal core and contributed modules (such as References, Scheduler, and Automatic Nodetitles). A site builder has a sound experience of these core and contributed modules.

They have the skills to play with a combination of modules, along with the limitations which might result in resolving a respective problem or a set of problems. Every module in itself is grounded to some capabilities which the site builders understand. Except for the earlier mentioned, the site builders also have:

  • The general understanding of the working of the web, installation of dynamic web applications are the important prerequisites for Drupal site-building. In addition to that, familiarity with HTML, CSS with a code understanding is an aid.
     
  • Can install and setup Drupal manually or by using an application or a service, configure core, add new features and evaluate the contributed modules.
     
  • Capable to test out the configuration changes before deploying or configuring them on a live website.
Drupal Themer


A Drupal themer, also known as a Front-end developer has a seat in between the designer and the developer. They are the specialist in front-end designing and development and are responsible for maintaining the implementation of the client-facing architecture of an application or a website. Along with HTML, CSS expertise, they know:

  • Front-end technologies like Javascript, JQuery and AngularJS.
     
  • Basic theming skills like installing themes, creating sub-themes, and tweaking sub-themes with CSS and custom template files. They use some PHP in template files and in Drupal 8, Twig is used for templating.
     
  • They have expertise in the Drupal theme layer. They ought to have the capacity to take a design and transform it into a functional issue like implementing responsive design.
     
  • The expert front-end developers create "glue code" modules or functions in PHP that expose configuration options to site builders. 
Drupal Backend Developer

A click on the front-end is of no-use if there is no functionality implementation in the backend. A backend developer writes the code that hooks distinct sections altogether for the proper functioning of an application as a whole.

Also known as the Drupal Module Developer, they are proficient coders who write a lot of code in PHP and other server-side languages. The backend developers in Drupal are fully aware of the basic site building architectures and best practices. In addition to that they are:

  • Well versed in creating and executing the new modules. They are also adequately equipped to customize and extend the existing Drupal modules.
     
  • Involved in the advanced side of theme layers, automated tests, consume web services, automated deployment, etc.
     
  • Along with the knowledge of HTML, CSS, JS/JQuery and JavaScript, a clear and in-depth understanding of back-end tools like PHP and MySQL.
     
  • For D8, they know the concepts related to architecture and planning, development of custom modules and D8 performance and security concerns. 
Drupal Architect

Drupal architect has an understanding of complete project architecture and they provide the direction to the project path. A lead role in the Drupal development process, a Drupal architect performs backend development, various front-end tasks and theming in the project. Following is the must-have skills for a Drupal architect:

  • Strong understanding of front-end and back-end development tools and other web development aspects.
     
  • Well-versed with the optimization of Drupal.
     
  • Highly proficient in languages such as PHP, SQL, JQuery, and CSS.
     
  • Well versed with the implementing tools like Varnish, GeoIP, Commerce, Ubercart, Solr, and CRM integration, to name a few.
Drupal DevOps/Sysadmin Engineer

DevOps is known with a variety of definitions as a culture, trends, perspective, etc. A Drupal DevOps Engineer wields the tasks of both software development and information technology operations. They run the live stack and deploy Drupal websites from the development environment to the live server environment. Additionally, a DevOps Engineer handles performance-related hurdles that might interrupt business operations or cause any sort of harm, such as setting up Varnish, CDN, and Memcache, etc. 

Following are the skills of a Drupal Sysadmin that every Drupal ecosystem requires:

  • Linux is a mandate for a Drupal DevOps engineer, that includes proficiency in managing the Linux servers, an expert in internals and Linux Kernel working.
     
  • Bash Scripting, Continuous Integration (CI) so as to automate the time-consuming and repetitive tasks in the application development process, like deployment on the server, backups, restores, refreshes of the databases, etc. 
     
  • Hands-on in automation technologies such as Chef, Puppet, Ansible, etc. for configuration management and deployment.
     
  • A DevOps Engineer needs to be capable of performing multifaceted roles, such as Site Reliability Engineer (SRE), Build Engineer (BE), System Operations Engineer (SOE), Database Administrators (DBA).
     
  • Solid understanding of Infrastructure as Code (IAC) in order to manage the networks, virtual machines, load balancers, and connection topology in a descriptive model for source code versioning.
Drupal QA Engineer

The profile which imitates as an end-user and has the skills of a developer is a Drupal QA engineer. This profile ensures the quality of product deliveries. They run the manual as well as automated tests to meet quality thresholds. 

To ensure quality delivery of projects, a Drupal QA engineer develops corrective action programs as a part of the Quality Assurance process. Following are the must-have skills for a Drupal QA engineer:

  • Sound understanding of the product or industry-specific requirements.
     
  • Experience in testing web technologies. 
     
  • Well versed with Drupal 7 and higher.
     
  • Strong command in various programming languages, such as HTML, CSS, and JS. 
     
  • Ability to document test cases, capture the test result details, setting up an automated test environment, etc.  
Drupal Project Manager/Scrum Master

Also known as the Scrum Master who ensures agile practices in the entire term of the project. They manage and run scrum teams, take responsibility for daily progress in the project to meet project delivery timelines. A quality project manager who acts as a central node between the client and the team while ensuring transparency for both ends. Following are the must-have skills of a Drupal project manager:

  • Skilled in client servicing domain, plus sufficient technical expertise to regulate the workload of the team. 
     
  • Capable to forecast/foretell potential risks and mold the project plan accordingly. 
     
  • Well versed with the content strategy, implementation and other existing, emerging technologies in order to integrate it with the Drupal CMS. 
     
  • Knowledge of SEO and reporting tools like Google Analytics to check how the content is performing across the web.
Drupal Designer

A Drupal designer accelerates the process of user experience (UX) and user interface (UI ), so as to create the best experience for end-users. They know what the technology stack is capable of, thus delivering to design requirements and win over stakeholders before development kicks off. Following are the must-have skills of a Drupal Designer:

  • Knowledge of the capabilities of Twig is imperative for the upcoming Drupal versions.
     
  • Knowledge of HTML, CSS and Javascript.
     
  • A clear understanding of the basics of theme creation and site-building.
Drupal Product Owner

Most of the time, product owners are the clients who have the final sign off of all the project changes. But they can be the people from the drupal development team too. A product owner (PO) comes up with the requirements of a project and has extensive experience in various industrial domains. They work in close coordination with the project managers to prioritize the backlogs. Following are the must-have skills of a Drupal product owner:

  • They should be capable of seeing how things integrate and work together to decide the future or usability of the project.  A clear vision and commitment of a product owner will set up a strong base for a Drupal project.
     
  • Also known as the organizers of the project, they should have excellent communication skills to deliver their message across the application development teams.
     
  • Excellent reporting and record-keeping capabilities to measure the current state of the project. 
     
  • With excellent decision-making skills and the power of managing the business feedback, product owners should be capable enough to drive projects towards its successful completion. 
Content Marketer 

How to market the content so that it delivers the maximum output is the major concern of a content marketer. They own the complete content publishing process and ensures that the content matches with the latest search engine optimization (SEO) and search engine marketing (SEM) practices.  Following are the must-have skills for a content marketer:

  • Well versed with the latest Drupal versions.
     
  • Knowledge of administration functions and perform changes that don’t require any coding related upgradations in the project. 

So we saw, similar to other web development life cycles, projects developed under the Drupal roof requires a range of roles streamlining the seamless process of building and support of the Drupal website and applications. 

Stay tuned for more!

Conclusion

Drupal has brought a major paradigm shift by being a leading content management system for enterprise-level organizations. A successful Drupal website is powered by a list of different roles having substantial knowledge and skills of the platform. 

Want to join the Drupal league? There are seemingly unlimited opportunities for a person who is crazy about Drupal. With over 15+ years of experience in the Drupal community, we at OpenSense Labs are the growth-bound team of architects, developers, designers, themers and more.

We love contributing to resolve community hurdles and help escalate the potential of Drupal as an Enterprise Content Management System. Let's speak for your enterprise needs at hello@opensenselabs.com

Or you can connect with us on our social media channels: Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

blog banner blog image Drupal 8 Drupal Drupal development Backend Developer Drupal Developer Site Builder Themer Content Marketer Drupal DevOps Engineer Drupal Architect Drupal QA Engineer Drupal Project Manager Drupal Designer Drupal Product Owner Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On
Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: Lullabot Podcast: 31 Days of Drupal Migrations with Mauricio Dinarte

27 September 2019 - 12:52pm

Matt and Mike are joined by Mauricio Dinarte, who recently completed his "31 Days of Drupal Migrations' series, as well as migration-expert April Sides.

Categories: Drupal

Srijan Technologies: Essential Drupal SEO Modules to Boost Traffic On Your Website

27 September 2019 - 9:30am

Search engine optimization (SEO) is the chief ingredient in preparing the recipe of top ranking on Google. SEO assist websites in acquiring traffic from organic, natural, or editorial search engine results. There are several other factors also that affects the ranking of the website, such as quality of content, site loading time, backlinks, and responsive designs.

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: Interview with Lullabot’s Cristina Chumillas, co-organizer of the Drupal Admin UI and JavaScript Modernization initiative

27 September 2019 - 2:22am

For our latest interview, we chatted with Cristina Chumillas, designer, and front-end developer at Lullabot and one of the organizers of Drupal's Admin UI and JavaScript Modernization initiative. Give it a read to learn more about Cristina, the supportive and welcoming attitude of her colleagues at Lullabot, and her work on modernizing Drupal's administration UI.

READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

qed42.com: Recap of my DrupalCamp Pune 2019 experiences

26 September 2019 - 10:28pm
Recap of my DrupalCamp Pune 2019 experiences Body

Recording my experiences of Drupal Camp Pune before they fade away. If you are connected with me on twitter, you must have seen a spike in my tweets over the weekend of 14th-15th September 2019. 

I was privileged to attend this 2-day event and want to admit that my experience of co-presenting a workshop, attending several amazing sessions, meeting old friends and new was great. Had the chance to meet a lot of people from the Drupal community, who were earlier only familiar to me via their usernames. The diversity of the sessions was really impressive. #DCP19 contained sessions for Backend, Frontend Devs, Quality Analysts, Managers, Students, Community, etc. ranging from Beginners to Experts levels.

Being a co-organizer of a Drupal event earlier, I knew how important it was to get the audience on the day of the event. The attendance was more than what was expected for both the days. This was a good sign for the event organizers.

| Keynote

Undoubtedly, the star of the event was none other than Mr. Preston So. It was great to interact with him. I had initially expected his keynote to be around Gatsby. Instead, his topic was a broader one, he highlighted the transition from Content Management systems to Content Management Stack.

 

He also showed how modern applications are being developed and the role of Drupal & Gatsby in it. His keynote sparked a thought in my head around how applications can be developed and what is the way forward. I would like to share a couple of non-technical highlights of his prenote:

  • Preston started his keynote in Hindi and everyone in the auditorium was in awe. He truly is a master of languages.
  • He gave references to the Bollywood movie “Sui Dhaaga” for explaining the challenges developers face in our day-to-day lives.
  • He gave away 2 copies of his book “Decoupled Drupal in practice”.
  • Preston also shared his love for India, especially Mumbai.

Post the Keynote, Preston was surrounded by people and he was busy answering dozens of questions (I was a part of that group). Questions ranged from technical aspects of Drupal, Gatsby, to him learning so many languages, etc.

| Drupal India Association

 

The Drupal India Association board members addressed the audience, where they showcased brand new the DIA logo designed by QED42’s design team! For more updates around DIA follow their twitter handle - @india_drupal

| Drupal in a Day

A massive part of my role at #DCP19 was to co-present a 5 hour  “Drupal in a Day” workshop for the students. I co-presented with Nitesh Sethia & Meena Bisht, training and educating students who hadn’t heard of Drupal, around concepts like Opensource, Drupal, community, etc. Students gained hands-on experience with Drupal through:  

  • Familiarization of Drupal concepts 
  • Installing all prerequisites and Drupal itself
  • Introduction to the basic building blocks of Drupal like Content Types, Fields, Blocks, Menus, Views, etc.

We also spoke about the Drupal Campus Ambassador Programme which aims to bridge the gap between students and the Industry.

 

One of my favourite moments from the workshop was the attendee’s reactions when they witnessed the power of Views. They were amazed at how Views can be used to fetch data we want from the database and display it according to our needs. The responses and students eagerness to learn more new topics was a really satisfying experience.

| Sponsors

Sponsors are one of the building blocks in making DrupalCamps successful! This year we had 6 sponsors. 

 

QED42 was the platinum sponsor for DrupalCamp Pune 2019. We were not only the sponsors but were also the organizers for the event. QED42’s booth, vibrant standees, Quizzes around Drupal, JavaScript, Machine Learning, and Hackathon appealed to the students and event attendees. We also carried out an internship drive for students. QED42 is known in the Drupal community for its designs and goodies, this year we had T-shirts, stickers, notepads, and designed quiz cards as giveaways.  

| After-Party!

Day one was tiring and about to get over, and we received an update regarding the After-party from the @drupalcamppune twitter handle!  

The after-party was one of the memorable moments of #DCP19 wherein I had numerous great conversations. I met a lot of people informally and got to know the jolly side of their life. I was so engaged in the conversations that I totally missed the dance floor. We reminisced memories from our past Drupal events, the current event and discussed future events too. Sharing a few snaps from the party at the end of this blog. Since I was caught up with “Drupal in a Day” workshop on the first day, I missed most of the sessions presented on that day. You can find out more about the sessions here - http://camp2019.drupalpune.com/accepted-sessions. However, I was lucky to attend sessions on the second day. Here are some sessions I loved: 

1. Multi-turn conversations with Alexa” — Anand Toshniwal

 

The demo amazed the audience and received loud applause. Anand had set up a Drupal e-commerce store and he showcased how he could place an order with Alexa via a Multi-turn dialog. PS: Reach out to me for the recorded video of the demo! 

2. “Pixel Perfect Web” — Kiran Kadam

 

Filled with Frontend enthusiasts, Kiran Kadam spoke passionately about what pixel-perfect web is and how to achieve it. 

3. “Effective storytelling with Clients and Teams” — Nikhil Anant

 

Nikhil shared his experience of visiting Manali and the challenges it brought with it, describing how things can be explained in the form of stories for effective team communication.

4. “Making Front-end Testing Easier using Visual Regression” — Ambuj Gupta and Kanchan Patil

 

Automation is my favorite part in Quality Assurance process, and these guys took it to the next level. 

5. Good UX = Accessible UI design - Nikita Aswani and Asmita Wagh

 

The best thing about the session was the fact that not only QAs but also Developers who were equally interested in implementing A11Y and considered it to be an inseparable part of their web-development practices. 

| DrupalCamp Pune Closing Session

Overall, it was a great event put up by the organizers of #DCP19. The closing session was hosted by Sushyl & Ajit, where we acknowledged the organizing team’s efforts and thanked them for making DrupalCamp Pune a huge success. Right from the swag-kits, keynotes, sessions, speakers, venue, food, after-party, and countless important items, the organizers deserve a huge round of applause. 

Next year, I am looking forward to being a part of the organizing team and experience the excitement of planning DrupalCamp Pune! 

I have collected some pictures from the event and would like to share them with you. 

  | Conclusion

I really appreciate and thank you for taking out time for reading this post. Hope we cross paths at the next Drupal event. #DrupalThanks

jaideep.kandari Fri, 09/27/2019 - 10:58
Categories: Drupal

Code Karate: Gatsby Live Preview with Drupal and Gatsby Cloud

26 September 2019 - 9:36pm
Episode Number: 6

In this episode, you will learn how to set up Gatsby Live Preview with Drupal using Gatsby Cloud. We will walk through how to install and configure the Gatsby Drupal module as well as how to get your Gatsby site working in Gatsby cloud. Using this combination, you will be able to immediately preview your content on your Gatsby site after editing the content on your Drupal site.

Tags: GatsbyJSReactDrupalDrupal 8Drupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

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