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Acro Media: Do-It-Yourself Point of Sale Hardware

29 May 2018 - 7:45am

Did you know that Drupal has a Point of Sale (POS) module that pairs with the widely used Commerce module? That's right, Drupal Commerce is now the full end-to-end platform for a complete omnichannel ecommerce experience. Whether you're running an online store, a physical store, or both, you can do it all with Drupal Commerce!

One of the great things about a web-based POS is that all you need is a web browser for it to work. This opens the door to new POS hardware options. You can use an iPad, a laptop, or anything that has a browser. You don't need any expensive or specialized hardware from Moneris, nor do you need a branded solution such as Square. Instead, you now even have the option to build your own POS hardware for very little cost. Today we're featuring a Raspberry Pi based prototype that WE built! The whole setup cost about $250 CAD.

Watch the video below, or keep reading to learn more.

As mentioned above, we bought a simple touchscreen and mounted a Raspberry Pi on the back. Once up and running, all you have to do is plug it in, connect it to the Internet, and it will automatically boot up into the POS login screen. If your staff has a problem, all they have to do is unplug it and plug it back in. There's no messing with settings or anything. Just reboot. Easy!

Once you get the hardware working, the display can be used in 3 different ways depending on how you need it:

  1. The administrative view, which is what the cashier would use.

  2. A customer display view, which shows what the cashier has added so the customer can see the products and prices entered in real-time. Remember: all you need is a browser and something that can display a browser. The customer display is especially easy because it doesn't have to be a touchscreen; you could just use any monitor, a TV, etc, and run it off of the cashier hardware.

  3. A kiosk view, which is basically just running the front end of the site like your customers would do on their home computers. You could set that out in your store and let customers browse products and make purchases.

So, for a shoestring budget, we created a working point of sale that could be used in a store (see the video above). Aside from looking a little silly, our example is perfectly fine and works great. Plus, there are endless options for inexpensive enclosures to make it look better. You could even build or 3D print your own.

The do-it-yourself (DIY) route is a lot cheaper and gives you the freedom to do whatever you want. We will post further details soon on how to do all this yourself, including specific links to the components we used. And remember: it's Drupal, so it's open source, and all the software is free.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: Drupal.org gets videos that make Drupal easier to learn

29 May 2018 - 4:17am

In the beginning of the year I started doing some iOS development for my POSSE plan. As I was new to iOS development, I decided to teach myself by watching short, instructional videos. Different people learn in different ways, but for me, videos tutorials were the most effective way to learn.

Given that recent experience, I'm very excited to share that all of the task tutorials in the Drupal 8 User Guide are now accompanied by video tutorials. These videos are embedded directly into every user guide page on Drupal.org. You can see an example on the "Editing with the in-place editor" page.

These videos provide a great introduction to installing, administering, site building and maintaining the content of a Drupal-based website — all important skills for a new Drupalist to learn. Supplementing user guides with video tutorials is an important step towards improving our evaluator experience, as video can often convey a lot more than text.

Creating high-quality videos is hard and time-consuming work. Over the course of six months, the team at Drupalize.Me has generously contributed a total of 52 videos! I want to give a special shout-out to Joe Shindelar and the Drupalize.Me team for creating these videos and to Jennifer Hodgdon and Neil Drumm (Drupal Association) for helping to get each video posted on Drupal.org.

What a fantastic gift to the community!

Categories: Drupal

OPTASY: Top Enterprise Content Management Systems vs Drupal: Comparing Features and Prices 

29 May 2018 - 2:19am
Top Enterprise Content Management Systems vs Drupal: Comparing Features and Prices  adriana.cacoveanu Tue, 05/29/2018 - 09:19


Content is a way too valuable asset not to handle it with utmost care — from its creation to its revision, all the way to its... distribution. And with utmost efficiency, as well! But how do you choose the business software to “orchestrate” your entire content workflow? Since, on one hand, you have the top enterprise content management systems in 2018 and, on the other hand, you have... Drupal?

And the dilemma that you're facing right now could be summed up like this:

Categories: Drupal

Axelerant Blog: How Agency Values Fuel Success

29 May 2018 - 1:57am


Culture
is your agency’s environment and its identity. And it’s shaped by your agency values.

Categories: Drupal

Specbee: Drupal CMS : A Success Factor for Better ROI for Online Businesses

28 May 2018 - 5:08am

Businesses and enterprise organisations today are falling into a trap. A trap built around the ROI of their business. Return on Investment is a term in its own right, capable of flipping over businessmen and marketers who have worked decades to understand how the market functions. In the form of an age-old formula, it is still one of the key reliable ways to measure the effectiveness of business strategies and campaigns.

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: Drupal for Mobile Solutions

28 May 2018 - 1:19am
There’s little doubt that mobile internet usage has soared over the past two years. In fact, the number of mobile internet users overtook desktop users in 2016. It has, then, become imperative for website and business owners to cater to mobile internet users in order to avoid losing potential customers. Adhering to this trend, CMSs like Drupal and WordPress are being constantly updated to implement ways to keep them mobile-friendly. In this post, let’s take a deeper look at how Drupal is great for mobile solutions and why you should use Drupal for your mobile needs.   ‘Headless’ Concept If… READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

DrupalEasy: Roadtrip(s)! Learn DDEV with us this summer at an event near you

27 May 2018 - 3:59pm

This summer, we're taking the all-new "Upgrading your local development environment with DDEV" lesson from our 12-week Drupal Career Online class and bringing it with us as we visit three different Drupal events around the USA. At each event, we'll be presenting it as a full-day workshop at no- or (very) low-cost to event attendees.

If you're looking to move your local development environment to a more modern solution, then we believe this workshop is exactly what you're looking for. DDEV is a Docker-based environment built on modern principles and designed to be flexible, customizable, and powerful. 

We have been using DDEV with our current Drupal Career Online students, and are confident that our workshop is providing the skills they need to use it as their day-to-day local environment. The workshop (and DDEV) is designed for developers on Mac OS X and Windows 10 Pro - at the end of the day, you'll have the confidence you need to make the switch.

In addition to the full-day of training, you'll also leave with access to our 20+ page workshop handout (PDF) as well as access to all of our DDEV-related screencasts.

So, if you're interested in making the change, be sure to sign up for one of our in-person workshops this summer!

 

Categories: Drupal

Colorfield: Drupal 8 progressive decoupling with React

27 May 2018 - 1:42am
Drupal 8 progressive decoupling with React christophe Sun, 27/05/2018 - 10:42 Progressive decoupling and ES6 support on Drupal 8 are definitely gaining some momentum. After having tested several methods to make use of React within Drupal, I had a look a the React Comments module, that provides a self contained, standard and developer friendly way to get started with React. It has been derived in a repository to have a kind of boilerplate to run tests on and a demo that loads article nodes from a JSON API endpoint.
Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: Making Legacy Sites More Performant with Modern Front-End Techniques

25 May 2018 - 3:00pm

Earlier this year Lullabot was engaged to do a redesign of Pantheon’s homepage and several landing pages. If you’re not familiar with Pantheon, they’re one of the leading hosting companies in the Drupal and WordPress space. The timeline for this project was very ambitious—a rollout needed to happen before Drupalcon Nashville. Being longtime partners in the Drupal community, we were excited to take this on.

The front-end development team joined while our design team was still hard at work. Our tasks were to 1) get familiar with the current Drupal 7 codebase, and 2) make performance improvements where possible. All of this came with the caveat that when the designs landed, we were expected to move on them immediately.

Jumping into Pantheon’s codebase was interesting. It’s a situation that we’ve seen hundreds of times: the codebase starts off modularly, but as time progresses and multiple developers work on it, the codebase grows larger, slower, and more unwieldy. This problem isn’t specific to Drupal – it’s a common pandemic across many technologies.

Defining website speed

Website speed is a combination of back-end speed and browser rendering speed, which is determined by the front-end code. Pantheon’s back-end speed is pretty impressive. In addition to being built atop Pantheon’s infrastructure, they have integrated Fastly CDN with HTTP/2.

80-90% of the end-user response time is spent on the front-end. Start there. – Steve Souders

In a normal situation, the front-end accounts for 80% of the time it takes for the browser to render a website. In our situation, it was more like 90%.

What this means is that there are a lot of optimizations we can make to make the website even faster. Exciting!

Identifying the metrics we’ll use

For this article, we’re going to concentrate on four major website speed metrics:

  1. Time to First Byte – This is the time it takes for the server to get the first byte of the HTML to you. In our case, Pantheon’s infrastructure has this handled extremely well.
  2. Time to First Paint – This is when the browser has initially finished layout of the DOM and begins to paint the screen.
  3. Time to Last Hero Paint – This is the time it takes for the browser to finish painting the hero in the initial viewport.
  4. Time to First Interactive – This is the most important metric. This is when the website is painted and becomes usable (buttons clickable, JavaScript working, etc.).

We’re going to be looking at Chrome Developer Tools’ Performance Panel throughout this article. This profile was taken on the pre-design version of the site and identifies these metrics.

undefined Front-end Performance with H2

HTTP/2 (aka H2) is a new-ish technology on the web that governs how servers transfer data back and forth between the browser. With the previous version of HTTP (1.1), each resource request required an entire TCP handshake that introduced additional latency per request. To mitigate this, front-end developers would aggregate resources into as few files as possible. For example, front-end developers would combine multiple CSS files into one monolithic file. We would also combine multiple small images, into one “sprite” image, and display only parts of it at a time. These “hacks” cut down on the number of HTTP requests.

With H2, these concerns are largely mitigated by the protocol itself, leaving the front-end developer to split resources into their own logical files. H2 allows multiplexing of multiple files under one TCP stream.  Because Pantheon has H2 integrated with its global CDN, we were able to make use of these new optimizations.

Identifying the problem(s)

The frontend was not optimized. Let’s take a look at the network tab in Chrome Developer Tools:

undefined

The first thing to notice is that the aggregated CSS bundle is 1.4MB decompressed. This is extremely large for a CSS file, and merited further investigation.

The second thing to observe: the site is loading some JavaScript files that may not be in use on the homepage.

undefined Let's optimize the CSS bundle first

A CSS bundle of 1.4MB is mongongous and hurts our Time to First Paint metric, as well as all metrics that occur afterward. In addition to having to download a larger file, the browser must also parse and interpret it.

Looking deeper into this CSS bundle, we found some embedded base64 and encoded SVG images. When using HTTP/1.1, this saved the round-trip request to the server for that resource but means the browser downloads the image regardless of whether it's needed for that page. Furthermore, we discovered many of these images belonged to components that weren’t in use anymore.

Similarly, various landing pages were only using a small portion of the monolithic CSS file. To decrease the CSS bundle size, we initially took a two-pronged approach:

  1. Extract the embedded images, and reference them via a standard CSS background-image property. Because Pantheon comes with integrated HTTP/2, there’s virtually no performance penalty to load these as separate files.
  2. Split the monolithic CSS file into multiple files, and load those smaller files as needed, similar to the approach taken by modern “code splitting” tools.

Removing the embedded images dropped the bundle to about 700KB—a big improvement, but still a very large CSS file. The next step was “code splitting” the CSS bundle into multiple files. Pantheon’s codebase makes use of various Sass partials that could have made this relatively simple. Unfortunately, the Sass codebase had very large partials and limited in-code documentation.

It’s hard to write maintainable Sass. CSS by its very nature “cascades” down the DOM tree into various components. It’s also next-to-impossible to know where exactly in the HTML codebase a specific CSS selector exists. Pantheon’s Sass codebase was a perfect example of these common problems. When moving code around, we couldn't anticipate all the potential visual modifications.

Writing maintainable Sass

Writing maintainable Sass is hard, but it’s not impossible. To do it effectively, you need to make your code easy to delete. You can accomplish this through a combination of methods:

  • Keep your Sass partials small and modular. Start thinking about splitting them up when they reach over 300 lines.
  • Detailed comments on each component detailing what it is, what it looks like, and when it’s used.
  • Use a naming convention like BEM—and stick to it.
  • Inline comments detailing anything that’s not standard, such as !important declarations, magic numbers, hacks, etc.
Refactoring the Sass codebase

Refactoring a tangled Sass codebase takes a bit of trial and error, but it wouldn’t have been possible without a visual regression system built into the continuous integration (CI) system.

Fortunately, Pantheon had BackstopJS integrated within their CI pipeline. This system looks at a list of representative URLs at multiple viewport widths. When a pull request is submitted, it uses headless Chrome to reach out to the reference site, and compare it with a Pantheon Multidev environment that contains the code from the pull request. If it detects a difference, it will flag this and show the differences in pink.

undefined

Through blood, sweat, and tears, we were able to significantly refactor the Sass codebase into 13 separate files. Then in Drupal, we wrote a custom preprocess function that only loads CSS for each content type.

From this, we were able to bring the primary CSS file down to a manageable 400KB (and only 70KB over the wire). While still massive, it’s no longer technically mongongous. There are still some optimizations that can be made, but through these methods, we decreased the size of this file to a third of its original size.

Optimizing the JavaScript stack

Pantheon’s theme was created in 2015 and made heavy use of jQuery, which was a common practice at the time. While we didn’t have the time or budget to refactor jQuery out of the site, we did have time to make some simple, yet significant, optimizations.

JavaScript files take much more effort for the browser to interpret than a similarly sized image or media file. Each JavaScript file has to be compiled on the fly and then executed, which utilizes up the main thread and delays the Time to Interactive metric. This causes the browser to become unresponsive and lock up and is very common on low-powered devices such as mobile phones.

Also, JavaScript files that are included in the header will also block rendering of the layout, which delays the Time to First Paint metric.

undefined

The easiest trick to avoid delaying these metrics is simple: remove unneeded JavaScript. To do this, we inventoried the current libraries being used, and made a list of the selectors that were instantiating the various methods. Next, we scraped the entirety of the HTML of the website using Wget, and cross-referenced the scraped HTML for these selectors.

# Recursively scrape the site, ignore specific extensions, and append .html extension. wget http://panther.local -r -R gif,jpg,pdf,css,js,svg,png –adjust-extension

Once we had a list of where and when we needed each library, we modified Drupal’s preprocess layer to load them only when necessary. Through this, we reduced the JavaScript bundle size by several hundred kilobytes! In addition, we moved as many JavaScript files into the footer as possible (thus improving Time to First Paint).

Additional front-end performance wins

After the new designs were rolled out, we took an additional look at the site from a performance standpoint.

undefined

You can see in the image above that there’s an additional layout operation happening late in the rendering process. If we look closely, Chrome Developer Tools allows us to track this down.

The cause of this late layout operation down is a combination of factors: First, we’re using the font-display: swap; declaration. This declaration tells the browser to render the page using system fonts first, but then re-render when the webfonts are downloaded. This is good practice because it can dramatically decrease the Time to First Paint metric on slow connections.

Here, the primary cause of this late layout operation is that the webfonts were downloaded late. The browser has to first download and parse the CSS bundle, and then reconcile that with the DOM in order to begin downloading the webfonts. This eats up vital microseconds.

undefined

In the image above, note the low priority images being downloaded before the high priority webfonts. In this case the first webfont to download was the 52nd resource to download!

Preloading webfonts via resource hints

What we really need to do is get our webfonts loaded earlier. Fortunately, we can preload our webfonts with resource hints!

<link rel="preload" href="/sites/all/themes/zeus/fonts/tablet_gothic/360074_3_0.woff2" as="font" type="font/woff2" crossorigin> <link rel="preload" href="/sites/all/themes/zeus/fonts/tablet_gothic/360074_2_0.woff2" as="font" type="font/woff2" crossorigin> <link rel="preload" href="/sites/all/themes/zeus/fonts/tablet_gothic/360074_4_0.woff2" as="font" type="font/woff2" crossorigin> <link rel="preload" href="/sites/all/themes/zeus/fonts/tablet_gothic/360074_1_0.woff2" as="font" type="font/woff2" crossorigin> <link rel="preload" href="/sites/all/themes/zeus/fonts/tablet_gothic_condensed/360074_5_0.woff2" as="font" type="font/woff2" crossorigin> undefined

Yes! With resource hints, the browser knows about the files immediately, and will download the files as soon as it is able to. This eliminates the re-layout and associated flash of unstyled content (FOUT). It also decreases the time to the Time to Last Hero Paint metric.

undefined Preloading responsive images via resource hints

Let’s look at the Film Strip View within Chrome Developer Tools’ Network Tab. To do this, you click the toolbar icon that looks like a camera. When we refresh, we can see that everything is loading quickly—except for the hero’s background image. This affects the Last Hero Paint metric.

undefined

If you we hop over to the Network tab, we see that the hero image was the 65th resource to be downloaded. This is because the image is being referenced via the CSS background-image property. To download the image, the browser must first download and interpret the CSS bundle and then cross-reference that with the DOM.

We need to figure out a way to do resource hinting for this image. However, to save bandwidth, we load different versions of the background image dependent on the screen width. To make sure we download the correct image, we include the media attribute on the link element.

We need to make sure we don’t load multiple versions of the same background image, and we certainly do not want to fetch the unneeded resources.

  <link rel="preload" href="/<?php print $zeus_theme_path; ?>/images/new-design/homepage/hero-image-primary--small.jpg" as="image" media="(max-width: 640px)">   <link rel="preload" href="/<?php print $zeus_theme_path; ?>/images/new-design/homepage/hero-image-primary--med.jpg" as="image" media="(min-width: 640px) and (max-width: 980px)">   <link rel="preload" href="/<?php print $zeus_theme_path; ?>/images/new-design/homepage/hero-image-primary--med-large.jpg" as="image" media="(min-width: 980px) and (max-width: 1200px)">   <link rel="preload" href="/<?php print $zeus_theme_path; ?>/images/new-design/homepage/hero-image-primary.jpg" as="image" media="(min-width: 1200px)">

At this point, the correct background image for the viewport is being downloaded immediately after the fonts, and this completely removes the FOUT (flash of unstyled content)—at least on fast connections.

Conclusion

Front-end website performance is a constantly moving target, but is critical to the overall speed of your site. Best practices evolve constantly. Also, modern browsers bring constant updates to performance techniques and tools needed to identify problems and optimize rendering. These optimizations don’t have to be difficult, and can typically be done in hours.

undefined Special thanks

Special thanks to my kickass coworkers on this project: Marc Drummond, Jerad Bitner, Nate Lampton, and Helena McCabe. And to Lullabot’s awesome designers Maggie Griner, Marissa Epstein, and Jared Ponchot.

Also special thanks to our amazing counterparts at Pantheon: Matt Stodolnic, Sarah Fruy, Michelle Buggy, Nikita Tselovalnikov, and Steve Persch.

Categories: Drupal

Agaric Collective: Embracing Data Privacy

25 May 2018 - 2:05pm

With Europe threatening $25,000,000 fines and Facebook losing $80,000,000,000 of stock value, are you paying attention to data privacy yet? If millions and billions of dollars in news headlines never grabbed you, maybe you've noticed the dozens of e-mails from services you'd forgotten ever signing up for, declaring how much they respect your right to control your data. These e-mails are silly and possibly illegal, but they nonetheless welcome us to a better world of greater privacy rights and people's control of their own data that we web developers should embrace.

The huge potential fines (for large companies, the sky's the limit at four percent of global revenue) come from the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation, and they signal that the GDPR is more than a suggestion. If you're not a European-based company, the European Union does not intend to discriminate: You're still liable when citizens of member states use your services or are monitored by you.

Don't lose sleep for Facebook's wealthy stockholders. That sizeable dip in Facebook stock was not due to the impending GDPR enforcement, but came in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal. Since then, the privacy-invading monopoly so many rich people are betting on regained its market cap and then some. (GDPR-related lawsuits are just starting.)

There's a lot of good resources for GDPR-proofing existing sites (see the bottom of this article); the work ranges from trivial for most sites to monumental tasks for web developers who, fortunately for me, aren't me (and who have finished their labor, I hope, as GDPR enforcement took effect today).

The fun and exciting part starts when we get to build new sites or new features on existing sites and from the beginning put privacy by design into practice (which also is in the law). And yes, I'm referring to complying with a continental government's regulations as fun and exciting.

This goes well beyond an organization's web site, of course. Web developers may be the ones to introduce it to organizations, though, so we should be prepared. Here's the gist.

Organizations must request any personal data in clear and plain language describing the specific pieces of information and how it will be used, such that consent can be given freely and unambiguously through an affirmative action.

This means you need to be always thinking of why you are collecting information, and not collecting information you don't need at all, and deleting any personal information you no longer need. You can collect nearly anything if you get clear consent, but if you have a legitimate business interest for the data you collect, you'll have even fewer requirements, and the people who use your site or service will have a smoother experience.

You further need to allow people to export their personal data, to rectify inaccurate data, and to challenge decisions you make on the basis of their personal data. If you don't have a legitimate business interest for the data (or it's overridden by people's rights), then you must also provide a mechanism for people to erase their data.

If your business interests involve spying, lying, or trying to manipulate people into bad financial, personal, and political decisions— maybe re-think your business. At the very least, try to avoid becoming part of the infrastructure for a police state.

It's GDPR day, a wonderful opportunity to think ethically, and explore another way to put your customers, clients, or constituents first!

Resources

From most thorough to most practical.

Categories: Drupal

Ashday's Digital Ecosystem and Development Tips: Solr search with Drupal 8

25 May 2018 - 11:57am

Search is an important facet of any large website these days. We’d talked previously about why you want to take full control of your site search. Bombarding your users with a mess of links won’t do anyone any favors. One of our favorite solutions for this problem is Apache Solr and recently we had the opportunity to set it up on Drupal 8. Let’s take a moment to go through a bit of what that solution looked like and some thoughts along the way.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: When should we release Drupal 9?

25 May 2018 - 8:50am

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

Since the release of Drupal 8.0.0 in November 2015, the Drupal 8 core committers have been discussing when and how we'll release Drupal 9. Nat Catchpole, one of Drupal 8's core committers, shared some excellent thoughts about what goes into making that decision.

The driving factor in that discussion is security support for Drupal 8’s third party dependencies (e.g. Symfony, Twig, Guzzle, jQuery, etc). Our top priority is to ensure that all Drupal users are using supported versions of these components so that all Drupal sites remain secure.

In his blog, Nat uses Symfony as an example. The Symfony project announced that it will stop supporting Symfony 3 in November 2021, which means that Symfony 3 won't receive security updates after that date. Consequently, by November 2021, we need to prepare all Drupal sites to use Symfony 4 or later.

Nothing has been decided yet, but the current thinking is that we have to move Drupal to Symfony 4 or later, release that as Drupal 9, and allow enough time for everyone to upgrade to Drupal 9 by November 2021. Keep in mind that this is just looking at Symfony, and none of the other components.

This proposal builds on top of work we've already done on in the context of making Drupal upgrades easy, so upgrades from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 should be smooth and much simpler than previous upgrades.

If you're interested in the topic, check out Nat's post. He goes in more detail about potential release timelines, including how this impacts our thinking about Drupal 7, Drupal 8 and even Drupal 10. It's a complicated topic, but the goal of Nat's post is to raise awareness and to solicit input from the broader community before we decide our official timeline and release dates on Drupal.org.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: The Royal Family using Drupal

25 May 2018 - 8:45am

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

Last weekend, over 29 million people watched the Royal Wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. While there is a tremendous amount of excitement surrounding the newlyweds, I was personally excited to learn that the royal family's website is built with Drupal! Royal.uk is the official website of the British royal family, and is visited by an average of 12 million people each year. Check it out at https://www.royal.uk!

File attachments:  royal-uk-742x1114.jpg
Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: Drupal Camp Asheville 2018

25 May 2018 - 6:39am

Mediacurrent team members will be heading to the mountains in North Carolina for a two day Drupal-filled event for all levels of Drupal skills. Asheville Drupal User Group is a small but dedicated community of Drupalers who will host their 8th annual Asheville Drupal Camp on July 13-15th at UNC Asheville. Mediacurrent will be sponsoring the event and will have 6 team members presenting sessions. We even have Mediacurrent Lead Drupal Architect, April Sides as one of the organizers of the event. From technical Drupal developing to making friends in a remote work place, check out what Mediacurrent has in store for Asheville Drupal Camp 2018:  

Demystifying Decoupled Drupal with Contenta CMS

Speakers: Mark Shropshire, Open Source Security Lead at Mediacurrent and Bayo Fodeke, Senior Drupal Developer at Mediacurrent

Contenta is an open source API-first Drupal distribution that makes out of the box decoupled Drupal accessible. This session will demonstrate installing Contenta, working with included features, using demo content and consumers, and working with the Contenta community.

Takeaways:

  • Install Contenta
  • Know how to contribute back to Contenta
  • Know how to connect a frontend application to a Contenta backend
Pivoting in a Project: Strategies for adjusting to scope changes

Speakers: Brian Manning, Project Manager at Mediacurrent and Kelly Dassing, Senior Project Manager at Mediacurrent

Pivots come in a variety of shapes and sizes. They can be a minor change that’s quickly integrated into scope, or a major departure that alters the entire course of the project. When you encounter these shifts, it’s vital you strategize, communicate, and continue to capture the vision of the client so the final product is a solid foundation for your client’s goals and KPIs—not a point of resentment.

Key points:

  • Kicking off the project with an organized team and plan of attack
  • Communicating with your whole team and the client
  • Being ready to PIVOT
  • Keeping your team grounded in the delivery
  • Conducting a retrospective and additional planning—not a postmortem
GatsbyJS: A Powerful FE Tool for Decoupled Devs

Speaker: Grayson Hicks, Front End Developer at Mediacurrent

GatsbyJS is an exciting way of thinking about building sites for the modern web. Is it a framework? Is it a static site generator? This session will cover the benefits of using GatsbyJS and will include the best and not so best use cases.

Key points:

  • What Gatsby's GraphQL data layer is and how and why to embrace it
  • Gatsby's internal API for building a Gatsby starter to fit your team
  • Looking at Gatsby's plugin/source/transformer system for taking Gatsby from a a blog-generator to a site-generator
Common Accessibility Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

Speaker: Ben Robertson, Front End Developer at Mediacurrent

Accessible web design really boils down to a few basic principles and when you have these as your first principles when starting a project, you can save your self, your team, and your clients hours of headaches around accessibility testing. 

This presentation will describe a few basic principles to keep in mind when building accessible web experiences, provide explanations and examples of these principles in code, and identify common accessibility pitfalls and how to avoid them.

Topics covered:

  • Simple JavaScript techniques for ensuring accessible components
  • CSS properties that affect accessibility
  • How to use modern CSS (flexbox, grid) without compromising accessibility
Only load what you need with Drupal 8 Libraries

Speaker: Zack Hawkins, Director of Front End Development at Mediacurrent

Gone are the days of having one massive JavaScript or CSS file. his session will explore the use of libraries to conditionally load assets and resolve dependencies.

Key topics:

  • Introduction to libraries in Drupal 8.
  • Library options and configuration.
  • What a component based workflow looks like with libraries.
  • Code splitting with Webpack and libraries.
  • Library gotchas and things to be aware of.
Friends Inside My Computer: Making Connections in a Remote Workplace

Speaker: Kelly Dassing, Senior Project Manager at Mediacurrent, Chris Manning, Director of QA at Mediacurrent, and Sam Seide, Drupal Developer at Mediacurrent

Hear the story of the real-life friendship that blossomed between these three Mediacurrent team members from different departments and how it helps them in their day-to-day work.

This session will be best appreciated by anyone who is a remote worker, whether employed by a small company or larger corporation.
 

Additional Resources

"Shrop" Talk at Drupal Camp Asheville 2016
Drupal Camp Asheville 2016
Mediacurrent to Present 7 Sessions at Drupalcon Nashville

Categories: Drupal

ADCI Solutions: Drupal Cafe #17: inspiring to adopt Drupal and attend DrupalCon

25 May 2018 - 3:21am

On the spring Saturday morning we gathered together experienced and beginning developers to talk about Drupal, share how to get to DrupalCon and charge each other with inspiration.

Check what Drupal Cafe was like

 

Categories: Drupal

Third & Grove: The Long Road to Drupal 9

25 May 2018 - 2:33am
The Long Road to Drupal 9 catch Fri, 05/25/2018 - 05:33
Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: The Royal Family using Drupal

25 May 2018 - 1:09am

Last weekend, over 29 million people watched the Royal Wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. While there is a tremendous amount of excitement surrounding the newlyweds, I was personally excited to learn that the royal family's website is built with Drupal! Royal.uk is the official website of the British Royal Family, and is visited by an average of 12 million people each year. Check it out at https://www.royal.uk!

Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: Workspace in Drupal Core

24 May 2018 - 8:00pm
Matt and Mike talk with Andrei Mateescu and Tim Millwood about Workspace, what it is, and including it in Drupal core.
Categories: Drupal

roomify.us: Tutorial: how to accept payment for bookings in Drupal 8 with BEE

24 May 2018 - 1:41pm
BEE makes it easy to quickly implement all kinds of booking & reservation use cases. We've created a new video that walks you through taking payments for bookings using BEE and Drupal Commerce 2:
Categories: Drupal

Amazee Labs: Recent Drupal Security Updates

24 May 2018 - 1:33pm
Recent Drupal Security Updates Drupal is all about security  

The Drupal community is unique in many ways, and the Drupal Security Team is an example of this. They provide documentation about writing secure code and keeping your site secure. They work with the drupal.org infrastructure team and the maintainers of contributed modules, to look into and resolve security issues that have been reported.

Felix Morgan Thu, 05/24/2018 - 22:33

When a security issue is reported, the Drupal Security Team mobilizes to investigate, understand, and resolve it as soon as possible. They use a Coordinated Disclosure policy, which means that all issues are kept private until a patch can be created and released. Public announcements are only made when the issue has a solution and a secure version is available to everyone. This communication is sent out through all of the channels possible so that everyone is made aware of what they need to do to keep their sites safe and secure.

This means that everyone finds out about the patches, and therefore the vulnerabilities, at the same time. This includes people who want to keep their sites secure, as well as those who want to exploit vulnerabilities. Security updates become a matter of speed, and the development teams at Amazee Labs, along with our hosting partner amazee.io, are always ready to make sure patches are implemented as quickly as possible.

Recent Drupal Security Releases

On March 28th 2018, the Drupal Security Team released SA-CORE-2018-002. This patch was a critical security vulnerability that needed to be implemented on every Drupal site in the world as quickly as possible. At the time of the patch release there were no publically known exploits or attacks using the vulnerability, which was present on Drupal versions 6.x, 7.x & 8.x and was caused by inadequate input sanitization on Form API (FAPI) AJAX requests.

On April 25th, 2018 SA-CORE-2018-004 was released as a follow up patch. This release fixed a remote code execution (RCE) bug that would affect any site with Drupal versions 7.x or 8.x. The vulnerability was critical, and both issues resulted from problems with how Drupal handles a “#” character in URLs.

What are the dangers?

There are a number of different kinds of attacks that could take advantage of vulnerabilities fixed in the recent security updates. One kind of attack that is becoming more common is the installation of cryptocurrency mining software. These attacks are both subtle and resilient and use the CPU of the site server to generate cryptocurrency for the attacker.

Amazee Labs is keeping your sites safe

The Amazee Labs team takes these security releases seriously and works quickly to prepare for these updates. We inform our clients as soon as possible about the upcoming release and organize the maintenance and development teams to be ready to run the updates at the time of the release. During these “patch parties” our global teams work together to solve problems and secure all sites by leveraging everyone’s expertise all at once.

Implementing these measures takes development time not alloted in our usual maintenance budgets. We will always let you know when additional work is needed, and keep the communication channels open to address any concerns.

An additional layer of security is provided to our clients who host with our partner amazee.io. As soon as the security patch is released, the amazee.io team work to put an infrastructure level mitigation in place. This means that all Drupal sites that they host are immediately secured against initial attacks. You can read a detailed breakdown of how they accomplished this here.

Categories: Drupal

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