Drupal

Chocolate Lily: Drupal and Governance

Planet Drupal - 1 October 2018 - 3:58pm

Way back in January 2005, I posted a proposal to improve the governance of the Drupal project and help make it "fully 'community-driven'". In response, one commenter wrote:

Yesterday evening on the #drupal channel there was a trial vote casting for "Leave Dries alone" and unamiously everyone voted +1 on this...

Categories: Drupal

Jacob Rockowitz: Why I am one of the top contributors to Drupal?

Planet Drupal - 1 October 2018 - 3:21pm

Who sponsors Drupal development?

We know who contributes

A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert published his annual who sponsors Drupal development. His report acknowledges individual and organization contributions and what projects they are supporting. This report provides a high-level overview of who contributing in the Drupal community. There are some old names on this list and some new names.

Asking why they contribute

Now that we know who is contributing to Drupal, the next and more difficult question is “Why are they contributing to Drupal?” Knowing the story behind why an individual or organization contributes to Drupal will inspire more people to get involved and give something back to Drupal and Open Source.

My contribution to Drupal

This year, I was the number three individual contributor to Drupal. The previous year, when I first appeared on the top contributor list, it was completely unexpected. I joked with my son, Ben, that, "I won a race that I did not know I was running." Being included on this list was an honor that I did not expect to achieve, partially because I’m always in awe of the ongoing work by all the core maintainers and contributors.

Since last year, I have not slowed down on my commitment to the Webform module for Drupal 8. So I was not surprised to be included in this year's list. Over the past year, I have had several interesting conversations with other developers on the top contributor list, and what resonated with me the most is that everyone on this list has a different history as to...Read More

Categories: Drupal

lakshminp.com: Local Drupal development using Docker

Planet Drupal - 1 October 2018 - 11:20am
Local Drupal development using Docker lakshminp Mon, 10/01/2018 - 14:20

One of the biggest arguments for using Docker to develop your app is to have isolated environments for different setups(The classic case of two different versions of PHP for two projects). Even that is sometimes not convincing enough. I find Docker to be damn useful when building production parity on local(Think trying to reproduce a production bug on your local). If you've faced this problem and want to solve it, read on.

Categories: Drupal

Imagefield Crop Image Convert

New Drupal Modules - 1 October 2018 - 9:09am

Convert an Image field to Imagecrop field OR convert an Imagecrop field to Image field without loosing images already attached!

Categories: Drupal

Acquia Developer Center Blog: Using Drupal 8 and AWS IoT to Power Digital Signage for New York’s Subway System

Planet Drupal - 1 October 2018 - 7:33am

“Digital Experiences” are the next big thing someone at your company is almost certainly talking about. These include visionary technology that operates based on rich data that is timely and location-based, interactions between other services and products, and perhaps most importantly: content that is not reliant on a user manually driving the experience (as they usually might on a website or mobile application). This article discusses a unique digital experience, thousands of countdown clocks, developed in Drupal 8 by Acquia for New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA). 

Tags: acquia drupal planet
Categories: Drupal

Taxonomy Quick Child

New Drupal Modules - 1 October 2018 - 7:10am

Taxonomy Quick Child allows users to quickly add child terms to a taxonomy term when adding or editing the term.

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Agiledrop.com Blog: Tips to Speed Up Your Drupal Site

Planet Drupal - 1 October 2018 - 6:07am
In this post, I highlight some easy to follow tips for speeding up a Drupal website. READ MORE
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OpenSense Labs: Leverage Open Source Security In Drupal

Planet Drupal - 1 October 2018 - 5:39am
Leverage Open Source Security In Drupal Shankar Mon, 10/01/2018 - 18:09

Think of your best friend who keeps things to himself - a characteristic that would sometimes make it strenuous for you to understand if he is in distress. Juxtapose such a character with another friend who is an open book which makes it a downhill task to know what he is thinking and feeling. Such a correlation can be observed in this digital world where the security of open source software and proprietary software is constantly debated.


Dr. A.P.J Abdul Kalam, former President and renowned scientist of India, once reiterated that “open source codes can easily introduce the users to build security algorithms in the system without the dependence of proprietary platforms”. The security that open source software offers is unparalleled. Drupal, as an open source content management framework, is known for its provision of magnificent security for your online presence and is worth considering.

Getting to know open source software

It was in 1999 when Eric Raymond stipulated that more eyeballs can make the bugs look shallow. He coined the term “Linus’ Law” which was named in honour of Linux creator Linus Torvalds. Since then, it has been almost two decades for continuous usage of Linus’ Law as a doctrine by some to explain the security benefits of open source software.

Given a large enough beta-tester and co-developer base, almost every problem will be characterized quickly and the fix obvious to someone - The Cathedral and the Bazaar by Eric S. Raymond (Lesson 8)

Open source software consists of source code that is openly available for anyone to do inspection, adjustments or improvements. This code may comprise of bugs or issues that require to be flagged.

Furthermore, public availability means attackers could study and exploit the code that emphasises on inculcating code level security practices. Some of the common open source security practices constitute:

  • Governing an inventory of all software used. This data must consist of the version, hash value and the original source of the code.
  • Verification of the availability of security updates and bug fixes. This makes sure that the patch management processes are being done regularly.
  • Testing and scanning the source code. This is performed using code analysers, auditing tools, or a community like Drupal.
  • Make sure that open source applications are in compliance with the existing network architecture to avoid violations of any firewall or security policies.
Myth or fact: Is Open source software more secure than closed source software?

 

Whether it is the Heartbleed incident in 2014, where the vulnerability was discovered in OpenSSL. Or, the Microsoft Vulnerability Exploit in 2014, when credit card information of millions of Home Depot customers was compromised. Both open source and closed source software have a history of encountering security threats. But which one is more secure?

Closed-source software, also known as proprietary software, is only distributed to authorized users with private modification and republishing restrictions. On the flip side, OSS is distributed under a licensing agreement which makes it available for the general public to use and modify for no cost.

It is this ability to modify the code that forms the crux of the argument within the Linux community that open source is more safer and less susceptible to security attacks in comparison to closed source software Microsoft Windows.

OSS allows anyone to rectify the broken code. In contrast, closed source can only be fixed by the vendor. 

So, when more people are testing and fixing the code within the OSS community, open source gradually increases its salience on security over time. Although attacks are still discovered, it has become a lot easier to identify and fix bugs. Open source enthusiasts believe that they experience fewer exploits and their code receives patches more rapidly as there are a plethora of developers contributing to the project.

When digging deeper, the notion that open source platforms offer users the capability to keeping itself relevant with new and altering requirements underpins the argument for open source over closed. OSS does have a reputation of being more secure as the University of Washington states in a report.

Open source security in Drupal Source: AcquiaDrupal Security Team in action

The Drupal open source project has a dedicated team of volunteers who track security-related bugs and release updates. They help in:

  • Resolving security issues that are reported in a Security Advisory.
  • Offering help for contributed module maintainers in fixing security issues.
  • Offering documentation for writing secure code and safeguarding Drupal sites
  • Providing assistance to the infrastructure team for keeping the Drupal.org infrastructure safe.

Anyone, who discovers or learns about a potential error, weakness or a security threat that can compromise the security of Drupal, can submit it to the Drupal security team.

Process cycle

The process cycle of the Drupal security team involves:

  • Analysis of issues and evaluation of potential impact on all the supported releases of Drupal.
  • Mobilizing the maintainer for its removal if found with a valid problem
  • Creation, assessment, and testing of new versions
  • Creation of new releases on Drupal.org
  • Using available communication channels to inform users when issues are fixed
  • Issuing an advisory if the maintainer does resolve the issues within the deadline and recommending to disable the module thereby marking the project as unsupported on Drupal.org.

The security team keeps issues private until there is a fix available for the issue or if the maintainer is not addressing the issue from time-to-time. Once the threat is addressed and a safer version is available, it is publicly announced.

In addition, the security team coordinates the security announcements in release cycles and works with Drupal core and module maintainers. For any concern with the management of security issues, you can also ask security@drupal.org. 

Security features
  • You can enable a secure access to your Drupal site as it has the out-of-the-box support for salting and repeatedly hashing account passwords when they are stored in the database.
  • It also lets you enforce strong password policies, industry-standard authentication practices, session limits, and single sign-on systems.
  • It provides granular access control for giving administrators full control over who gets to see and who gets to modify different parts of a site.
  • You can also configure Drupal for firm database encryption in the top-notch security applications.
  • Its Form API helps in data validation and prevents XSS, CSRF, and other malicious data entry.
  • It limits the login attempts that can be made from a single IP address over a predefined time period. This helps in avoiding brute-force password attacks.
  • Its multilayered cache architecture assists in reducing Denial of Service (DoS) attacks and makes it the best CMS for some of the world’s highest traffic websites like NASA, the University of Oxford, Grammys, Pfizer etc.
  • Notably, the Drupal addresses all of the top 10 security risks of Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP).

Statistical reports

In the 2017 Cloud Security Report by Alert Logic, among open source frameworks assessed for content management and e-commerce, Drupal was reported for the least number of web application attacks.

Source: Alert Logic

Sucuri’s Hacked Website Report also showed that Drupal was the most security-focused CMS with fewer security vulnerabilities reported. It stood on top against leading open source CMSs like Wordpress, Joomla, and Magento.

Source: SucuriChallenges in open source security

Open source software has its share of challenges as well. Equifax’s 2017 breach was notable because of the millions of US consumers who were affected. For the digital transformation to transpire, developers are moving from perfect to fast using open source components as vital assets for swiftly adding common functionality. For letting developers move as swiftly as customers demand, security pros must address some fundamental challenges.

For the digital transformation to transpire, developers are moving from perfect to fast using open source components as vital assets for swiftly adding common functionality

The time between disclosure and exploit is shrinking. Today, there is enough information in the Common Vulnerability and Exposures (CVE) description of a vulnerability consisting of affected software versions and how to execute an attack. Malicious hackers can make use of this information and decrease the time between disclosure and exploit as was witnessed in the case of Equifax.

Identification of open source component vulnerabilities listed in the National Vulnerability Database (NVD) increased by 10% from 2015 to 2016 with a similar increase in 2017. For instance, in components from Maven packages, Node.js packages, PyPi packages, and RubyGems, published vulnerabilities doubled (see graph below).


Security pros must assume that prerelease vulnerability scans are not executed by open source developers. So, software composition analysis (SCA) and frequent updates to open source components will be the responsibility of the enterprise.

Conclusion

Open source security does pose a significant case for itself and can be a better option than a closed source or proprietary software. Also, it is a matter of preference looking at the organisational needs and project requirement, to choose between them for your digital business.

Drupal, as an open source content management framework, comes out as the most secure CMS in comparison to leading players in the market. At Opensense Labs, we have been perpetually offering digital transformation with our strong expertise in Drupal development.

Contact us at hello@opensenselabs.com for amazing web development projects and leverage open source security in Drupal 8.

blog banner blog image open source security Open Source closed source proprietary cms closed source cms open source cms closed source security Drupal 8 Drupal CMS drupal security open source cms vs closed source cms open source cms vs proprietary cms Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On
Categories: Drupal

Opigno Search

New Drupal Modules - 1 October 2018 - 2:44am

This project is related to Opigno LMS distribution.

It provides a search feature based on Search API.

For additional details, please consult Opigno website.

Categories: Drupal

Opigno Commerce

New Drupal Modules - 1 October 2018 - 2:17am

This project is related to Opigno LMS distribution.

It provides the commerce feature, allowing to sell access to some trainings.

Commerce feature is based on Drupal Commerce, allowing to integrate with several different payment gateways and add-ons.

For additional details, please consult Opigno website.

Categories: Drupal

Message Thread History

New Drupal Modules - 30 September 2018 - 4:24pm

This module is similar to the Message History module except where Message History marks each message as read, Message Thread History marks the thread as read. This enables a list of threads to display which threads have new messages in them. When a single message in a thread is read then the whole thread is considered read.

Categories: Drupal

Social Auth Odnoklassniki

New Drupal Modules - 30 September 2018 - 12:45pm

Social Auth Odnoklassniki is a ok.ru Authentication integration for Drupal. This module supports getting user's name, email and picture from OK.

It uses max107/oauth2-odnoklassniki package as a back-end for authentication.

Categories: Drupal

Don't Panic: A blog about Drupal: Recording a pod at DrupalEurope in Darmstadt!

Planet Drupal - 30 September 2018 - 10:50am

Not only did DrupalEurope in Darmstadt a couple of weeks ago give me the opportunity to learn more about Drupal and meet old friends and community members - it was also the new start of coming back to doing a pod again.

The Drupal pod Drupalsnack has been on hold for a year when I wrote a book about old commercials found in comic books during the 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s. But when the book now is printed and can be found in stores - it's time to go back to recording a pod.

And the first episode is about DrupalEurope. Me and my podcast colleague Kristoffer took the opportunity to interview Michael Miles who came all the way from Boston, USA, to visit DrupalEurope. I also spoke to Baddysonja - Baddy Breidert - who has been the project manager, leading the masses in organising DrupalEurope, and Kristoffer stopped Dries in the hallway and interviewed him about all the news around Drupal.

All in all, it is great doing a podcast again, and this episode is in English since we did all the interviews in English. Next episode will be in Swedish again, which will be a relief. I consider my English to be quite good, but it is always easier to do a podcast in your native language.

Listen to the DrupalEurope episode of Drupalsnack by clicking here.

Categories: Drupal

sinceago

New Drupal Modules - 30 September 2018 - 8:00am

The sinceago module used to display node and comment created date as "less than a minute ago" or "10 minutes ago" and frequently updating the time ago without refreshing the page.

Nodes:

  1. Admin have provision to enable and disable this option for node created date.
  2. Admin have provision to enable and disable this option for comment created date.
  3. Its exploring the same for anywhere in the templates.

Please see the README for about more details.

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Commerce Views Reports

New Drupal Modules - 29 September 2018 - 3:14pm
Categories: Drupal

hussainweb.me: Drupal Meetup Bangalore – September 2018

Planet Drupal - 29 September 2018 - 6:54am
Another month, another Drupal meetup in Bangalore. This month’s meetup was held at Athenahealth office on Lavelle Road in Bangalore. Since the last month’s meetup was scheduled a week early, there was more than usual gap since the last meetup. This time, we had a full schedule and exciting sessions planned.
Categories: Drupal

Ashday's Digital Ecosystem and Development Tips: 5 More Tips to Get the Most out of Drupal

Planet Drupal - 28 September 2018 - 1:00pm

Previously, we covered some simple tips that allow you to get more out of Drupal and I think we covered some basics. This time we are going to go a bit deeper to see what Drupal can really do. In the right hands, Drupal can be a very powerful tool for more than just content management. The following tips will take you through a few different topics to get more out of Drupal than ever before. Some of these tips are a bit more on the advanced side, but they are very useful.

Categories: Drupal

Evolving Web: What's New in Drupal 8.6

Planet Drupal - 28 September 2018 - 12:57pm

Drupal 8.6 was released a couple weeks ago and it’s probably the most exciting release since Drupal 8.0. As you might know, new features are added with each minor release of Drupal 8 (e.g. between 8.5 and 8.6). At first, I thought that this would just change how we test and update our sites. But it’s amazing to see how many new, valuable features are being added in minor versions. These are the features that allow Drupal to constantly evolve and innovate, and keep everyone excited about using Drupal.

Also, minor releases that add features are a great reason to keep your Drupal site up-to-date with the latest minor version!

I tried out Drupal 8.6 the other day and here are some of the highlights. Note that some of these features (Media management, Workspaces) are provided by experimental modules. They are not ready to use in production yet, but are ready to be tested out in development and sandbox environments:

Media

As a Drupal site builder, the media features are a huge step forward. I watch a lot of content editors use Drupal and it’s clear that having media editing work smoothly greatly improves the content editing experience. From the Admin UX research I’ve worked on, better media management is one of the number one things that content editors want.

So, what does media in core provide? You can now add media (images, video, audio, etc) through the WYSIWYG editor and via a new media field. You can re-use media that’s already been added to the site, or upload new items. You can also manage the media via an overview page and add new media items directly without creating content.

Quickstar

Drupal 8.6 comes with a Quickstart command that lets you install Drupal on your machine with a limited number of requirements. This makes it really easy to test out Drupal without installing other software, configuring a VM, or finding a vendor that provides cloud hosting.

I think it’s great to have a feature like this out-of-the-box so that we can have a better experience for newcomers to Drupal. In fact, there’s already updated documentation on Drupal.org about how to install a quick version of Drupal.

Thanks to Matt Grasmick for putting this together!

Out-of-the-box Demo

At DrupalCon Nashville, I tested out the new Umami install profile, which provides a demo of Drupal out-of-the-box. When you install Drupal, you’ll now see the Umami as an option on the install profile step. Umami comes with content, content types, views, and a theme for a recipe website. I think this profile, along with the Quickstart feature will allow developers and site builders new to Drupal to easily test out and demo its features.

Migrate!

Migrate has been around since the first minor release of Drupal 8, it’s the module that allows you to pull content into Drupal 8 from previous versions of Drupal or external sources. Migrate is now a stable module, which means that it will be easier for developers to create custom migrations without worrying about changes to the underlying code. This will also make it easier to write documentation and blog posts about how to do things with Migrate.

There are some features around migrating multilingual content which have been set aside in a separate module (Migrate Drupal Multilingual). This module is an experimental module, as there is still some outstanding work to be done in this area.

Workspaces

You are probably wondering: what is « workspaces »? This is a new, experimental module that allows a site administrator to create a new, parallel version of the site content - e.g. a Staging workspace - that can be deployed to the live site in one go. In Drupal 8.5, content moderation was introduced to Drupal, providing a workflow for content to be drafted, reviewed, and approved by different types of users. Workspaces takes this to the next level, allowing entire sections of content to be staged before publishing.

More Under the Hood

Besides new modules, there have been other improvements made to Drupal under the hood. There have been updates to the experimental Layout Builder module. It is now possible to create blocks via the layout builder interface, which will not show up in the global list of blocks. The process of porting tests from Simpletest to PHPUnit is almost done. Nightwatch.js was added to allow for automated javascript testing.

What’s next?

There are lots of new features planned for Drupal 8.7 including support for JSON API in core, potentially a refresh of the default Drupal admin theme (Seven) and work on features like automatic upgrades. Looking forward to seeing what’s next with Drupal in that release, which will come out early next year. Watch the latest DriesNote here, from Drupal Europe for an overview of the Drupal roadmap and new development in the works.

You can get more information from the blog post on drupal.org and the Drupal 8.6 press release.

Let us know in the comments what’s your favourite part of Drupal 8.6!

+ more awesome articles by Evolving Web
Categories: Drupal

Stopwatch

New Drupal Modules - 28 September 2018 - 10:45am

This module provides a block with a stopwatch

Categories: Drupal

TUS file upload protocol

New Drupal Modules - 28 September 2018 - 10:30am

Adds a file upload endpoint that supports the chunking, resumable, TUS file transfer protocol (https://tus.io/).

For decoupled / CORS purposes, you will need to add these allowed headers to your services.yml (included are a few other common headers):

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