Drupal

Amazee Labs: Tour de DrupAlps - Cycling the Alps to DrupalCon Vienna

Planet Drupal - 23 August 2017 - 12:14am
Tour de DrupAlps - Cycling the Alps to DrupalCon Vienna

As per the extreme version of Tour de Drupal, my plan is to cycle from Switzerland to DrupalCon Vienna by crossing the Alps 6 times. The tour will take me over some of the most challenging Alp passes using my road cycle.

Josef Dabernig Wed, 08/23/2017 - 09:14

I’ll visit 5 different countries, including: Switzerland, Italy, Germany, Slovenia and Austria. Overcoming the Alps with the bicycle has been one of my long term dreams... Inspired by the sport achievements of my uncle, I am taking this challenge to see if I can make it from Switzerland to DrupalCon Vienna by taking some scenic and challenging detours over the Alps.

The final destination is DrupalCon Vienna which serves as the perfect goal because it’s my favorite conference and my hometown at the same time.

#DrupAlps in numbers

  • Days: 31
  • Distance: 2361 km
  • Total elevation gain: 57864 meters

Route

Here is how I planned out the route so far

Depending on weather and physical conditions, I will adapt the route along the way while riding.

Preparations

Over the last months, I have been riding various passes to get ready for the tour. Longer rides included St. Moritz - Splügenpass - Chur, Erstfeld - Oberalppass - Chur, and  Zurich - Vierwaldstättersee - Lucerne. In 2015, we cycled the Pyrenees as part of #TourDeDrupal Barcelona(1, 2, 3), early 2016 we cycled Sierra Nevada(1, 2) and later summer 2016 I cycled the biggest mountain of Austria on the Großglocknerstrasse.

Until now, I have no experience in cycling more than 3 consecutive days,  so I am really looking forward to seeing how it will go while being in the saddle for so many days in a row.

For DrupalCon Barcelona we cycled along the Pyrenees.

Amazee Extreme Challenge

“After three years of fulltime employment, our employees get one month off to free their mind and do something really extreme.”

I would like to thank Amazee for giving me this unique chance. Find out about what my colleagues are planning or have already accomplished at the Amazee Labs Extreme page.

DrupalCon Vienna

DrupalCon is the biggest Drupal conference, organized by the Drupal Association and will take place in Vienna from 26-29 September this year. I am especially looking forward to this one in my home town!

On Monday, there will be sprints, training sessions & summits organized by Drupal Austria.

Tuesday to Friday is packed with the official conference program and I am particularly excited about the site-building track, which I am a track chairing this year. Check out my blog post about what to expect from this week at DrupalCon.

Join Tour de Drupal

If you’d like to join my for the last few days of cycling, the last days are planned to be flat along the Danube river. For example, we plan to cycle from Linz to Krems on Saturday, 22nd of September. On Sunday, 23rd of September we go from Krems to Tulln where we will have a lunch break at the webshapers office. After that, we’ll cycle towards Vienna to arrive on Sunday afternoon.

Sign-up here and see my blog post for further details.

Follow me

Along the route, I will post regular updates about the ups and downs of the Tour de DrupAlps. To stay tuned, you can follow me here:

Categories: Drupal

Ben's SEO Blog: A Drupal SEO Expert and a Drupal Developer Hit the Mat

Planet Drupal - 23 August 2017 - 12:01am

[Photo credits: Ben Finklea, Jan 2017. Photos captured from iPhone video shot at Texas Grappling Challenge Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu tournament in Cedar Park, Texas.]

My Drupal developer friends and I (like any friendship) don’t always see eye-to-eye. While we have much in common—we both want stylish, high-performing websites—in some areas our goals are different. This can create the appearance of conflict. However, after working through the issues (or hitting the mats, as they say in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu), we can find common ground and mutual respect.

In Drupal 8 SEO, I lay out a list of modules that should be installed on your Drupal website to enhance SEO. I wrote this book for marketers and provide the step-by-step details you need to increase Google ranking, website traffic... Read the full article: A Drupal SEO Expert and a Drupal Developer Hit the Mat

Categories: Drupal

Container

New Drupal Modules - 22 August 2017 - 5:51pm
Categories: Drupal

Reservoir, a simple way to decouple Drupal

Dries Buytaert - 22 August 2017 - 1:52pm

Headless Drupal seems to be taking the world by storm. I'm currently in Sydney, and everyone I talked to so far, including the attendees at the Sydney Drupal User Group, is looking into headless Drupal. Digital agencies are experimenting with it on more projects, and there is even a new Decoupled Dev Days conference dedicated to the topic.

Roughly eight months ago, we asked ourselves in Acquia's Office of the CTO whether we could create a "headless" version of Drupal, optimized for integration with a variety of applications, channels and touchpoints. Such a version could help us build bridges with other developer communities working with different frameworks and programming languages, and the JavaScript community in particular.

I've been too busy with the transition at Acquia to blog about it in real time, but a few months ago, we released Reservoir. It's a Drupal-based content repository with all the necessary web service APIs needed to build decoupled front-end applications, be it a React application, an Ember front end, a native application, an augmented reality application, a Java or .NET application, or something completely different. You can even front-end it with a PHP application, something I hope to experiment with on my blog.

API-first distributions for Drupal like Reservoir and Contenta are a relatively new phenomenon but seem to be taking off rapidly. It's no surprise because an API-first approach is critical in a world where you have to operate agnostically across any channel and any form factor. I'm convinced that an API-first approach will be a critical addition to Drupal's future and could see a distribution like Reservoir or Contenta evolve to become a third installation profile for Drupal core (not formally decided).

Headless Drupal for both editors and developers The welcome screen after installing Reservoir.

The reason headless Drupal is taking off is that organizations are now grappling with a multitude of channels, including mobile applications, single-page JavaScript applications, IoT applications, digital signage, and content driven by augmented and virtual reality. Increasingly, organizations need a single place to house content.

What you want is an easy but powerful way for your editorial team to create and manage content, including administering advanced content models, content versioning, integrating media assets, translations, and more. All of that should be made easy through a great UI without having to involve a developer. This, incidentally, is aligned with Drupal 8's roadmap, in which we are focused on media management, workflows, layouts, and usability improvements through our outside-in work.

At the same time, you want to enable your developers to easily deliver that content to different devices, channels, and platforms. This means that the content needs to be available through APIs. This, too, is aligned with Drupal 8's roadmap, where we are focused on web services capabilities. Through Drupal's web service APIs, developers can build freely in different front-end technologies, such as Angular, React, Ember, and Swift, as well as Java and .NET. For developers, accomplishing this without the maintenance burden of a full Drupal site or the complexity of configuring standard Drupal to be decoupled is key.

API-first distributions like Reservoir keep Drupal's workflows and editorial UI intact but emphasize Drupal's web service APIs to return control to your developers. But with flexible content modeling and custom fields added to the equation, they also give more control over how editors can curate, combine, and remix content for different channels.

Success is getting to developer productivity faster Reservoir includes side-by-side previews of content in HTML and JSON API output.

The goal of a content repository should be to make it simple for developers to consume your content, including digital assets and translations, through a set of web service APIs. Success means that a developer can programmatically access your content within minutes.

Reservoir tries to achieve this in four ways:

  1. Easy on-boarding. Reservoir provides a welcome tour with helpful guidance to create and edit content, map out new content models, manage access control, and most importantly, introspect the web service APIs you'll need to consume to serve your applications.
  2. JSON API standard. Reservoir makes use of JSON API, which is the specification used for many APIs in JSON and adopted by the Ember and Ruby on Rails communities. Using a common standard means you can on-board your developers faster.
  3. Great API documentation. Reservoir ships with great API documentation thanks to OpenAPI, formerly known as Swagger, which is a specification for describing an API. If you're not happy with the default documentation, you can bring your own approach by using Reservoir's OpenAPI export.
  4. Libraries, references, and SDKs. With the Waterwheel ecosystem, a series of libraries, references, and SDKs for popular languages like JavaScript and Swift, developers can skip learning the APIs and go straight to integrating Drupal content in their applications.
Next steps for Reservoir API documentation auto-generated based on the content model built in Reservoir.

We have a lot of great plans for Reservoir moving forward. Reservoir has several items on its short-term roadmap, including GraphQL support. As an emerging industry standard for data queries, GraphQL is a query language I first highlighted in my 2015 Barcelona keynote; see my blog post on the future of decoupled Drupal for a quick demo video.

We also plan to expand API coverage by adding the ability to programmatically manipulate users, tags, and other crucial content elements. This means that developers will be able to build richer integrations.

While content such as articles, pages, and other custom content types can be consumed and manipulated via web services today, upstream in Drupal core, API support for things like Drupal's blocks, menus, and layouts is in the works. The ability to influence more of Drupal's internals from external applications will open the door to better custom editorial interfaces.

Conclusion

I'm excited about Reservoir, not just because of the promise API-first distributions hold for the Drupal community, but because it helps us reach developers of different stripes who just need a simple content back end, all the while keeping all of the content editing functionality that editorial teams take for granted.

We've put the Reservoir codebase on GitHub, where you can open an issue, create a pull request, or contribute to documentation. Reservoir only advances when you give us feedback, so please let us know what you think!

Special thanks to Preston So for contributions to this blog post and to Ted Bowman, Wim Leers, and Matt Grill for feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

Reservoir, a simple way to decouple Drupal

Dries Buytaert - 22 August 2017 - 1:52pm

Decoupled Drupal seems to be taking the world by storm. I'm currently in Sydney, and everyone I talked to so far, including the attendees at the Sydney Drupal User Group, is looking into decoupled Drupal. Digital agencies are experimenting with it on more projects, and there is even a new Decoupled Dev Days conference dedicated to the topic.

Roughly eight months ago, we asked ourselves in Acquia's Office of the CTO whether we could create a "headless" version of Drupal, optimized for integration with a variety of applications, channels and touchpoints. Such a version could help us build bridges with other developer communities working with different frameworks and programming languages, and the JavaScript community in particular.

I've been too busy with the transition at Acquia to blog about it in real time, but a few months ago, we released Reservoir. It's a Drupal-based content repository with all the necessary web service APIs needed to build decoupled front-end applications, be it a React application, an Ember front end, a native application, an augmented reality application, a Java or .NET application, or something completely different. You can even front-end it with a PHP application, something I hope to experiment with on my blog.

API-first distributions for Drupal like Reservoir and Contenta are a relatively new phenomenon but seem to be taking off rapidly. It's no surprise because an API-first approach is critical in a world where you have to operate agnostically across any channel and any form factor. I'm convinced that an API-first approach will be a critical addition to Drupal's future and could see a distribution like Reservoir or Contenta evolve to become a third installation profile for Drupal core (not formally decided).

Decoupled Drupal for both editors and developers The welcome screen after installing Reservoir.

The reason decoupled Drupal is taking off is that organizations are now grappling with a multitude of channels, including mobile applications, single-page JavaScript applications, IoT applications, digital signage, and content driven by augmented and virtual reality. Increasingly, organizations need a single place to house content.

What you want is an easy but powerful way for your editorial team to create and manage content, including administering advanced content models, content versioning, integrating media assets, translations, and more. All of that should be made easy through a great UI without having to involve a developer. This, incidentally, is aligned with Drupal 8's roadmap, in which we are focused on media management, workflows, layouts, and usability improvements through our outside-in work.

At the same time, you want to enable your developers to easily deliver that content to different devices, channels, and platforms. This means that the content needs to be available through APIs. This, too, is aligned with Drupal 8's roadmap, where we are focused on web services capabilities. Through Drupal's web service APIs, developers can build freely in different front-end technologies, such as Angular, React, Ember, and Swift, as well as Java and .NET. For developers, accomplishing this without the maintenance burden of a full Drupal site or the complexity of configuring standard Drupal to be decoupled is key.

API-first distributions like Reservoir keep Drupal's workflows and editorial UI intact but emphasize Drupal's web service APIs to return control to your developers. But with flexible content modeling and custom fields added to the equation, they also give more control over how editors can curate, combine, and remix content for different channels.

Success is getting to developer productivity faster Reservoir includes side-by-side previews of content in HTML and JSON API output.

The goal of a content repository should be to make it simple for developers to consume your content, including digital assets and translations, through a set of web service APIs. Success means that a developer can programmatically access your content within minutes.

Reservoir tries to achieve this in four ways:

  1. Easy on-boarding. Reservoir provides a welcome tour with helpful guidance to create and edit content, map out new content models, manage access control, and most importantly, introspect the web service APIs you'll need to consume to serve your applications.
  2. JSON API standard. Reservoir makes use of JSON API, which is the specification used for many APIs in JSON and adopted by the Ember and Ruby on Rails communities. Using a common standard means you can on-board your developers faster.
  3. Great API documentation. Reservoir ships with great API documentation thanks to OpenAPI, formerly known as Swagger, which is a specification for describing an API. If you're not happy with the default documentation, you can bring your own approach by using Reservoir's OpenAPI export.
  4. Libraries, references, and SDKs. With the Waterwheel ecosystem, a series of libraries, references, and SDKs for popular languages like JavaScript and Swift, developers can skip learning the APIs and go straight to integrating Drupal content in their applications.
Next steps for Reservoir API documentation auto-generated based on the content model built in Reservoir.

We have a lot of great plans for Reservoir moving forward. Reservoir has several items on its short-term roadmap, including GraphQL support. As an emerging industry standard for data queries, GraphQL is a query language I first highlighted in my 2015 Barcelona keynote; see my blog post on the future of decoupled Drupal for a quick demo video.

We also plan to expand API coverage by adding the ability to programmatically manipulate users, tags, and other crucial content elements. This means that developers will be able to build richer integrations.

While content such as articles, pages, and other custom content types can be consumed and manipulated via web services today, upstream in Drupal core, API support for things like Drupal's blocks, menus, and layouts is in the works. The ability to influence more of Drupal's internals from external applications will open the door to better custom editorial interfaces.

Conclusion

I'm excited about Reservoir, not just because of the promise API-first distributions hold for the Drupal community, but because it helps us reach developers of different stripes who just need a simple content back end, all the while keeping all of the content editing functionality that editorial teams take for granted.

We've put the Reservoir codebase on GitHub, where you can open an issue, create a pull request, or contribute to documentation. Reservoir only advances when you give us feedback, so please let us know what you think!

Special thanks to Preston So for contributions to this blog post and to Ted Bowman, Wim Leers, and Matt Grill for feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

Reservoir, a simple way to decouple Drupal

Dries Buytaert - 22 August 2017 - 1:52pm

Decoupled Drupal seems to be taking the world by storm. I'm currently in Sydney, and everyone I talked to so far, including the attendees at the Sydney Drupal User Group, is looking into decoupled Drupal. Digital agencies are experimenting with it on more projects, and there is even a new Decoupled Dev Days conference dedicated to the topic.

Roughly eight months ago, we asked ourselves in Acquia's Office of the CTO whether we could create a "headless" version of Drupal, optimized for integration with a variety of applications, channels and touchpoints. Such a version could help us build bridges with other developer communities working with different frameworks and programming languages, and the JavaScript community in particular.

I've been too busy with the transition at Acquia to blog about it in real time, but a few months ago, we released Reservoir. It's a Drupal-based content repository with all the necessary web service APIs needed to build decoupled front-end applications, be it a React application, an Ember front end, a native application, an augmented reality application, a Java or .NET application, or something completely different. You can even front-end it with a PHP application, something I hope to experiment with on my blog.

API-first distributions for Drupal like Reservoir and Contenta are a relatively new phenomenon but seem to be taking off rapidly. It's no surprise because an API-first approach is critical in a world where you have to operate agnostically across any channel and any form factor. I'm convinced that an API-first approach will be a critical addition to Drupal's future and could see a distribution like Reservoir or Contenta evolve to become a third installation profile for Drupal core (not formally decided).

Decoupled Drupal for both editors and developers The welcome screen after installing Reservoir.

The reason decoupled Drupal is taking off is that organizations are now grappling with a multitude of channels, including mobile applications, single-page JavaScript applications, IoT applications, digital signage, and content driven by augmented and virtual reality. Increasingly, organizations need a single place to house content.

What you want is an easy but powerful way for your editorial team to create and manage content, including administering advanced content models, content versioning, integrating media assets, translations, and more. All of that should be made easy through a great UI without having to involve a developer. This, incidentally, is aligned with Drupal 8's roadmap, in which we are focused on media management, workflows, layouts, and usability improvements through our outside-in work.

At the same time, you want to enable your developers to easily deliver that content to different devices, channels, and platforms. This means that the content needs to be available through APIs. This, too, is aligned with Drupal 8's roadmap, where we are focused on web services capabilities. Through Drupal's web service APIs, developers can build freely in different front-end technologies, such as Angular, React, Ember, and Swift, as well as Java and .NET. For developers, accomplishing this without the maintenance burden of a full Drupal site or the complexity of configuring standard Drupal to be decoupled is key.

API-first distributions like Reservoir keep Drupal's workflows and editorial UI intact but emphasize Drupal's web service APIs to return control to your developers. But with flexible content modeling and custom fields added to the equation, they also give more control over how editors can curate, combine, and remix content for different channels.

Success is getting to developer productivity faster Reservoir includes side-by-side previews of content in HTML and JSON API output.

The goal of a content repository should be to make it simple for developers to consume your content, including digital assets and translations, through a set of web service APIs. Success means that a developer can programmatically access your content within minutes.

Reservoir tries to achieve this in four ways:

  1. Easy on-boarding. Reservoir provides a welcome tour with helpful guidance to create and edit content, map out new content models, manage access control, and most importantly, introspect the web service APIs you'll need to consume to serve your applications.
  2. JSON API standard. Reservoir makes use of JSON API, which is the specification used for many APIs in JSON and adopted by the Ember and Ruby on Rails communities. Using a common standard means you can on-board your developers faster.
  3. Great API documentation. Reservoir ships with great API documentation thanks to OpenAPI, formerly known as Swagger, which is a specification for describing an API. If you're not happy with the default documentation, you can bring your own approach by using Reservoir's OpenAPI export.
  4. Libraries, references, and SDKs. With the Waterwheel ecosystem, a series of libraries, references, and SDKs for popular languages like JavaScript and Swift, developers can skip learning the APIs and go straight to integrating Drupal content in their applications.
Next steps for Reservoir API documentation auto-generated based on the content model built in Reservoir.

We have a lot of great plans for Reservoir moving forward. Reservoir has several items on its short-term roadmap, including GraphQL support. As an emerging industry standard for data queries, GraphQL is a query language I first highlighted in my 2015 Barcelona keynote; see my blog post on the future of decoupled Drupal for a quick demo video.

We also plan to expand API coverage by adding the ability to programmatically manipulate users, tags, and other crucial content elements. This means that developers will be able to build richer integrations.

While content such as articles, pages, and other custom content types can be consumed and manipulated via web services today, upstream in Drupal core, API support for things like Drupal's blocks, menus, and layouts is in the works. The ability to influence more of Drupal's internals from external applications will open the door to better custom editorial interfaces.

Conclusion

I'm excited about Reservoir, not just because of the promise API-first distributions hold for the Drupal community, but because it helps us reach developers of different stripes who just need a simple content back end, all the while keeping all of the content editing functionality that editorial teams take for granted.

We've put the Reservoir codebase on GitHub, where you can open an issue, create a pull request, or contribute to documentation. Reservoir only advances when you give us feedback, so please let us know what you think!

Special thanks to Preston So for contributions to this blog post and to Ted Bowman, Wim Leers, and Matt Grill for feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

Type Style

New Drupal Modules - 22 August 2017 - 1:47pm
Summary

Type Style allows users to associate colors and icons with their types. This is an important feature for building rich user interfaces, as content editors can quickly associate iconography and colors with a type. Currently Content types, Custom block types, (core) Media types, Taxonomy vocabularies, and File types are supported, but any custom or contributed type can be supported.

Categories: Drupal

Web3

New Drupal Modules - 22 August 2017 - 1:09pm

This will be the place where we enable Drupal for the next web - web 3.0.

Categories: Drupal

Account Activation Reminder

New Drupal Modules - 22 August 2017 - 10:46am

A module allowing site administrators to resend activation emails from a selected user account page.

It also offers
- a custom email subject line
- a custom email body

This module is safe to use on a production site. Just be sure to only grant 'administer users' permission to developers.

Categories: Drupal

Group Role Delegation

New Drupal Modules - 22 August 2017 - 10:43am

This module allows group owner to grant specific roles to users.
User can set expiry date for selected roles, expiry dates are controlled by cron job, so it automatically removes any expired roles.

Categories: Drupal

Workflows Assignee

New Drupal Modules - 22 August 2017 - 10:38am
Categories: Drupal

Pages

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