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Promet Source: Using Drupal 8 for Government Websites

Planet Drupal - 17 November 2015 - 11:15am
Categories: Drupal

Acquia Developer Center Blog: govCMS: My Experience So Far

Planet Drupal - 17 November 2015 - 10:43am
Stuart Rowlands

The Australian Government launched govCMS earlier this year, a custom Drupal distribution and hosting service catering to all of the Australian government. The aim is to provide a single solution for unclassified websites using a common codebase and a shared feature set on a scalable and secure infrastructure.

Tags: acquia drupal planet
Categories: Drupal

Views Rest Feed

New Drupal Modules - 17 November 2015 - 9:18am

This module adds a new "Rest Export Feed" view display type, allowing "REST Export" displays to be attached to other Views displays. This behaves in the same way as the core "Feed" display type, which permits the attachment of RSS feeds to other displays (among other things).

Categories: Drupal

Apachesolr Entityform

New Drupal Modules - 17 November 2015 - 9:02am

The Apache Solr Entityform module allows content stored with fieldable entities, Entityform to be searched with Apache Solr. It exposes the Entityform entity type as an indexable entity type so it can be indexed properly.

Categories: Drupal

Stanford Web Services Blog: Drupal 8 - A Festivus for the REST of Us

Planet Drupal - 17 November 2015 - 8:05am

The development team was recently given the opportunity to stand up a Drupal 8 REST server with the intent of improving on our D7 content server, learning what's new with the framework and seeing how our content types would fit into the revised architecture. Having just attended BADcamp at UC Berkeley, we were excited to use Drupal 8 and its new special sauce (yml, composer, console, bigpipe, twig, etc).

Categories: Drupal

Chromatic: Drupal Camp Chattanooga 2015

Planet Drupal - 17 November 2015 - 7:56am

A few weekends ago I was fortunate enough to attend my first Drupal Camp ever. What was even more fortunate for me was that it was located near where I grew up in Chattanooga, TN. I’ve been to several leadership/business conferences in my life, but this is the first one that I’ve been to where it felt like everyone was genuinely glad to be there, even on a rainy fall day. In the spirit of open source, it wouldn’t feel right to keep all of the helpful info I learned to myself, so I wanted to take a moment and share some of my key take-aways.

Selling Drupal

Bob Snodgrass from net2Community gave a great seminar on sales. He started his presentation on selling Drupal by stating "Don’t sell Drupal, sell results!" So many times we become entrenched in the technology that we use and sell, and that’s ok!, but we have to remember that clients are more interested in the results we can provide, instead of the medium we use to get there. A good example given was a donut in a donut box. People rarely care about what box it comes in, they just want the donut!

Bob also brought attention to how each team member contributes to "selling", whether they realize it or not. The interactions, work and relationships that we manage on a daily basis help clients decide if they will continue to work with us or recommend us to their work colleagues.

Becoming a PM Ninja

Justin Rhodes from Commerce Guys led a good discussion on increasing efficiencies as a Project Manager. One of the first things we discussed was Parkingson’s Law: tasks will swell or shrink according to the amount of time given to them. If you use this law to your advantage, you can create small window deadlines to create efficiencies in your development process.

When it comes to planning and estimating phases for a project, Justin shared the success he has had doing this by using relativity to help the team give input. For example, rather than trying to nail down hours for each process step right way, you can tell everyone to estimate the size of the task by using shirt sizes (S, M, L, XL) to align everyone by using relative sizes. This can give the resource planner a clear visual of which parts of the project are going to take the longest. Of course, there are no complete replacements for old fashioned hourly estimates. The key to success on estimates is to check the team’s accuracy by comparing estimates against actual spend.

Contributing to Open Source

Our keynote speaker was Mike Anello from Drupal Easy. He gave a great talk on why we should be contributing back to the Drupal community. It wasn’t the typical, do it because it is the right thing to do, lecture. Mike made the case that not only does contributing back to the community grow your network and visibility, but it has a very real probability of increasing your bottom line. It is easy to say that we are going to contribute, but unless you deliberately set aside time, it probably isn’t going to happen. One way to make contributing a priority is to work it into your marketing budget. Switching your perspective on contributing from a way to get karma points to a powerful marketing tool, will change your priorities around where it fits into the company’s strategy.

The last take away I got from Mike’s talk was that even those of us who are nontechnical team members can contribute back to the Drupal community. Reaching out to module owners and asking how you can help, cleaning up ticket queues on modules, confirming bugs and assisting in documentation, are all ways to help move the ball forward (and I’m told they are greatly appreciated). Don’t forget that Drupal events don’t just happen by themselves. There is always a need for folks to help with the planning and coordination of meetups, camps and conventions.

Final Thoughts

Although I was unable to attend the pre and post party, I have no doubt that the enthusiasm of the group spilled into every conversation that was had. Who knows where I will be living next year (the benefits of working for a distributed company), but if I am able to, I’ll be returning to DrupalCamp Chattanooga!

(photo credit goes to @DrupalNooga)

Categories: Drupal


New Drupal Modules - 17 November 2015 - 7:15am

DRUPAL 8 ONLY! In Active development. Use Facet API for Drupal 7.

Categories: Drupal Drupal 8 Field Labels - Hidden Vs Visually Hidden

Planet Drupal - 17 November 2015 - 6:58am

Was trying out D8 and while “Managing Display” of a content type, noticed a new option while choosing the visibility of the label of a field.



Was wondering how they are different. Apparently when “Visually Hidden” is selected, the label is still there in the markup but not visible on browsers/screen, allowing screenreaders to be able to readout the label of the field!


Markup of the field label when set to “Visually Hidden”:


The motivation for this feature on d.o issue reads:

“As a site builder managing the display of a node, I want the option to hide field labels from sighted users, but make them visible to screenreaders, so I can make my site as accessible as possible without a custom theme.”


Had been hearing a lot about Drupal 8 accessibility features, but was pleasantly surprised to see this on my first brush with D8. Way to go Drupal! Can’t wait to see your new face in a couple of days!

Categories: Drupal

HollyIT: Vagrant + VirtualBox + New Windows 10 Update = OH NO!

Planet Drupal - 17 November 2015 - 6:23am
Categories: DrupalPlanet DrupalTips

A quick post for others that might experience this same problem. Last night Windows 10, with its forced updates, provided me with the big update we've all been waiting for. As I awake, ready to go to work on Drupal 8 upgrades, I tried to start my Vagrant and jump right in. Suddenly I was hit with an error about the connection being in use. Quickly I opened VirtualBox and upgraded that. Once that updated, along with the extension pack, the error still persisted. Trying to open the boxes right from VirtualBox gave me a few more details about the error, but not much more.

Categories: Drupal

Kodamera Screencast: Drupal: Introduction and installation

Planet Drupal - 17 November 2015 - 5:45am

Drupal is an awesome CMS (content management system), but it is so much more than just your ordinary blogposting system (though you can use Drupal for that as well). But the road to your own site (and perhaps internet success) must start somewhere, and if you want to set up a local environment on your computer to play around with Drupal (or any other PHP-driven system) you need a program or software to make this happen. In this introductory screencast I show you how to download MAMP and install that on your Macintosh computer, followed by how you download and install Drupal (8, the latest version). Download MAMP MAMP is a bundle of programs, made especially for running a local server on your computer. This means that an installation of Drupal can run on your own computer, not accessible for other people, only for you. To make your webpage accessible for the whole world, you need to upload your files and database to a hosting company of some kind and get some kind of domain name and point that to your hosting companys server. But I'm getting ahead of myself. Back to MAMP. You can find MAMP at Download and install the software first of all. The downloaded file ends up in your Downloads folder by default. If you choose some other folder, remember where you put it... Or download it again (yes, we have all made that mistake at least one time.) MAMP is freeware, but you can also buy MAMP Pro which is a more powerful solution if you want to handle or develop many sites simultaneously. Here, we will use the free version of MAMP for this introduction. With MAMP you also get a program called Sequel Pro, which is a program that let's you connect and handle databases. More on that later on. When the installation progress is finished, start the program and press "Start servers". When the on/off-icon turns green, your webserver is up and running. Good job! Download Drupal Next step is to download Drupal. Go to and choose Download & Extend in the top menu on the page. The Download & Extend page is your first step to downloading Drupal, themes and modules (plugins to Drupal). Is this case we just want to download Drupal, so click the green button. Next up, you get the choice to download different versions of Drupal, but we want the latest version. When we made this screencast the latest version was 8.0.0-rc1, but when you read/watch this, you should just choose the latest version of Drupal, which begins with and 8 (for example: 8.0.0, 8.0.1, 8.1.x etc and so on). The download file (.tar.gz och .zip) ends up in your Downloads-folder (see above). Doubleclick it to extract the files. Get ALL the files, not just the ones you see This is a bit tricky. To make Drupal work, you need all the files you've just extracted. The problem is that some of the files are hidden, and by default Macintosh computers don't show hidden files. There are programs that let you see hidden files, but you can also make the magic happen by writing a simple command in the Terminal program. Click your Spotlight magnifying glass-icon on your computer or open up a Spotlight search via your keyboard (most likely cmd+space) and type in Terminal. Terminal is a terminal emulator included in the OS X operating system by Apple (Wikipedia), and from that you can list files, create folders etc. In short, you can do almost anything you can to in i Finder window - but more. And to make hidden files be visible you open up a terminal windows and type defaults write AppleShowAllFiles YES Press Enter and on the next line, write killall Finder This sound horrifying, but it's ok, it doesn't kill something you're attached to (your kitten, your parents or your favourite snack or slippers). It just restarts the Finder application on Mac.  By now, if you open the folder the the extracted Drupal files are located in, you should see some files that are halfway see-through. These are the hidden files. Not to hidden now, ey?! Good. Now on to the next step of fun and glory! Choose the web docs folder We need to place the Drupal files in a folder that MAMP can use. If you swich to your MAMP window and press Preferences you can see four tabs: Start/Stop, Ports, PHP and Web server. Click the Web server tab. Here you can see where MAMP will look for the files to execute (run) Drupal. You can choose a completely different folder if you want, but I recommend you to use the folder MAMP suggests which is: Your harddrive > Application > MAMP > htdocs If you click the round icon with an arrow you open up a Finder window that shows the content of the folder we want to use. Let's move all the files Now that we can see all the files, even the hidden ones, we can choose all the files and either drag'n'drop them in the htdocs-folder we just opened.  Choose the Drupalfiles and press cmd+C if you want to copy the files, or drag the files and the folders to the htdocs folder. If you chose to copy and paste the files, just click somewhere in the htdocs window and press cmd+V to paste the copied files into that folder. It should end up looking something like this: Create a database You also need a database for Drupal to work. The database is where your content is stored, at least the text you enter as a blog post or story on your website. (Files you upload doesn't end up in the database, they are stored on the computer's hard drive.) To create a database you can use a program called Sequel Pro, that ships with MAMP. Open up the MAMP applications folder or start Sequel Pro via your Spotlight. Create a connection to the database by entering this information in this way: By default MAMP has set both the Username and Password to root. You also need to enter the port, which in MAMPs case is 8889. You can find this information under the tab named Ports, under MAMP Preferences. Back to Sequel Pro and press the blue button named Connect. If you have entered everything correct you will get connected to the database server. You should see a rather blank window like this. Choose Database in the menu and then Add database.  Choose a name that's easy to remember, for example drupal.  Choose UTF-8 Unicode (utf8) as Database Encoding. End this strange thing by clicking the button named Add. "Are we there yet?" Yes, yes we are. The next step is actually to start the installation of Drupal. Switch to your web browser and enter http://localhost:8888. This instructs MAMP to search the htdocs folder (where you have placed the Drupal files) and see what's there. MAMP will find Drupal's index.php that instructs Drupal to start an installation since we haven't don't that yet. http://localhost:8888 will result in this webpage: If you want some other language than English, you can choose this at this start screen. Language files will automatically load from Drupal's servers and set the default language to whatever you choose. Press Save and continue. Installations profiles Drupal can use installation profiles to make different settings to you system. In this screencast we will only use the standard one, so just click Save and continue during this phase. We will cover installation profiles in a later screencast. Database configuration Now it's time to tell Drupal where to find the database. The only things we need are the name of the database, the database username and password. We have all that so lets type them in. Database name: drupal (we entered that when we created the database earlier) Database username: root (MAMP default) Database password: root (MAMP default) Click Save and continue. Time to configure your site When you have entered the database credentials the installation starts. This will take a minute or so depending on how fast your computer is. It could also take up top 5-10 minutes if you have an older computer. During the installation process Drupal enables all the different parts of Drupal (modules) and sets up the system to make it work. We will cover the different parts in upcoming screencasts. When you see this the installation process is almost finished and it is now time to create your admin account and set the title of your website. Choose some classy and nice information for the following fields: Site name Site email address Username (this will be the first user account, the user/1 account, the head honcho, the big kahuna... you get the picure) Password (password for the big kahuna account, see above) Email address (for the big kahuna account, see above) Default county Default time zone You can also check for updates automatically. This will instruct Drupal to scan to see if there has are any new versions of Drupal and the modules you have downloaded and enabled. Good to know, but not vital if you are just playing around on your local computer. When you go live with your site, you should really see to it to keep your installation updated and secure. That's it! You are done. Drupal is installed and you can begin your Columbus-like journey through the menues and structure of Drupal. In the left part of the website you have the option to create content. Choose to create an Article for example and see what happens. We will make more screencasts on Drupal to make you discover more of Drupal. Check us out on Twitter, our RSS feed or YouTube channel to get continuous updates. Take care!
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Categories: Drupal

ERPAL: How to sell Drupal support with value

Planet Drupal - 17 November 2015 - 4:03am

Selling support is not so easy. Mostly you end up with agreements such as getting paid only if there’s a support request. If you want to provide reliable support with a well-defined response time, you need to allocate resources constantly, and that's why you need to get paid separately for the response time.

In this second post of our business support series I'll present you different kinds of support teams and pick up their pros and cons. Read more

Categories: Drupal

Sooper Drupal Themes: How To Improve Your Drupal Site's Traffic Using Google Search Console

Planet Drupal - 17 November 2015 - 1:51am

As webmaster or owner of a Drupal website, it’s common practice to look out for new customers. It is also crucial to understand how prospective customers behave when they come to visit your website, and this is possible with the help of Google Analytics. Unfortunately Drupal site owners often fail to see the importance of their websites being properly crawled or indexed by Google. Now, Google has made things easier for businesses with Google Search Console (formerly webmaster tools) by directly communicating with website owners in order to help them get important information.

Google Search Console may not come with the trendiest user interface, but there’s more raw data in there than colorful charts and graphs. Using the system will help you improve your Drupal site's ranking in the Search Engine Results Pages (SERPs) if you take some time to learn how it works.

Let us now try to understand how GSC can help grow your business.

Why Use Google Search Console (GSC)?

Google Search Console is free if you have a Google account. It automatically opens a two-way communication channel between your website and Google. Search Console can help you monitor, maintain, and improve your website presence in Google’s search results. More specifically, once you log into Google Search Console, you will be able to see what search queries are tied to your business and where you could improve your website ranking. You will also be able to manage your website sitemaps, indexing of links, besides determining what Googlebot should be crawling and indexing content from your website.

How to Set Up GSC?

Setting up Google Search Console for your website is simple and easy. If you already have an account, look for it under Search Console. You just have to follow 3 simple steps:

Categories: Drupal

X-Team: Drupal 8: Finally Ready for Production

Planet Drupal - 17 November 2015 - 12:37am

It’s been awhile since Drupal 8 was first ready to try out. But even since then, I was checking out news, reading updated docs, working on my Drupal 7 projects… still waiting for something real. And it finally happened – during the keynote at DrupalCon Barcelona, Dries announced the first D8 release candidate and basically...

The post Drupal 8: Finally Ready for Production appeared first on X-Team.

Categories: Drupal

SVG Sanitizer

New Drupal Modules - 16 November 2015 - 8:38pm

Integrates Drupal with the SVG Sanitizer library

Categories: Drupal

Video Embed Vidyard

New Drupal Modules - 16 November 2015 - 7:30pm

This module adds support for Vidyard to the video_embed_field module.

Categories: Drupal

MasterCard poised for growth

Dries Buytaert - 16 November 2015 - 7:23pm

I don't usually write about the topic of investing, but it is something I enjoy, so I decided to take the jump by sharing some thoughts on MasterCard, one of my favorite companies. Although it's not an obvious technology disruptor, MasterCard is a successful technology company. When it comes to investing, boring can be beautiful. Mastercard is relevant in the context of my blog, where I often write about the digitization of the world.

An investor who invested $10,000 in MasterCard around the time of its IPO in 2006 would have seen that investment grow to $200,000 today. MasterCard has significantly outperformed the S&P 500, since a $10,000 investment in the S&P 500 would have returned less than $20,000 over the same 9.5 year time frame. I was not fortunate enough to buy at the IPO; I only got into MasterCard 18 months ago.

MasterCard, along with its rival Visa, has one of the most lucrative business models I've seen. MasterCard and Visa enjoy a virtual duopoly in payment transaction processing. Unlike other credit card companies like American Express, MasterCard and Visa don't assume any of the credit risk; the customer's bank takes on the risk of its customer not being able to pay the bill, and either the merchant or their bank takes the risk for charges that are fraudulent or unrecoverable. What makes MasterCard and Visa so lucrative is that they simply act as "digital tollbooths" that take a small interchange or "swipe fee" on every credit or debit card transaction that goes through their network, without assuming any of the risk.

When you pay $100 with your MasterCard, MasterCard takes about $2.60 in interchange fees and the retailer collects the remaining $97.40. MasterCard has a net profit margin of an astounding 52%. So of that $2.60, MasterCard gets to keep $1.30. Now consider that MasterCard processes many billions of credit card "swipes" each year, and you start to see the beauty of their business model. Because MasterCard has minimal capital expenses, it is able to generate enormous free cash flows and maintain a pristine balance sheet with virtually no debt. It can then invest the retained profits toward new technology, advertisements, share buybacks, dividends, etc.

Growth opportunity

As someone living in the United States, I take my credit cards for granted and use them to pay for almost everything; at the grocery store, at Starbucks, my utility bills, train and plane tickets, etc. I almost never use cash.

But that is far from the norm; MasterCard cites a global credit card penetration of just 15%. Cash usage has declined to 59.4% in developed markets, while it is still 92.7% in emerging markets. This means that MasterCard is likely to have years of growth ahead, as 85% of global transactions are still cash-based. For example, at present, the Chinese market is dominated by state-backed UnionPay, but China recently opened its domestic transactions to foreign companies like MasterCard. The company claims it is already seeing double-digit annual growth in cross-border credit card transaction volume in China, primarily fueled by e-commerce. Beyond China, the ecommerce market is growing 25% year-over-year globally, opening up even more opportunity. All things considered, I believe MasterCard is poised to continue to see tremendous revenue growth. In addition, MasterCard continues to buy back stock (3-5% of the float per year) which further adds to their earnings-per-share growth.

Possible risks

Technology disruption seems like the biggest risk to MasterCard. While MasterCard and Visa currently play prominent roles in both Apple and Google's digital wallet as the processing "middlemen", that could change. If Apple or Google creates a more secure payment infrastructure, there might be no need for a MasterCard or Visa. Furthermore, technologies like the Blockchain could render companies like MasterCard and other middlemen in the payments value chain obsolete. Merchants are more likely to adopt new technologies if they get some sort of benefit in the form of reduced interchange fees or risk. What better way to reduce fees than cutting out the middleman?

While emerging markets do represent the largest areas for growth for a company like MasterCard, in some countries, it will be extremely difficult to set up the same level of banking infrastructure that the US or Europe has. That is why we're seeing mobile payment technologies like M-PESA take off in Kenya, enabling the easy transfer of cash over an alternative to credit card rails. There is a chance that technologies like M-PESA could leapfrog traditional credit card infrastructure entirely.

There are also some big legal and regulatory risks. Since Visa and MasterCard operate a near-duopoly, they have a lot of government eyes watching them on behalf of merchants. For example, in 2010, the US passed the Durbin Amendment, which forced Visa and MasterCard to lower interchange fees on credit card transactions. Also, both Visa and MasterCard are being investigated for price-fixing and possible collusion in a near $6 billion settlement lawsuit with merchants. Each of these legal and regulatory hurdles could become a significant hit to MasterCard's bottom-line.


Despite these risks, MasterCard isn't going anywhere anytime soon. The strong growth drivers, the relative lack of immediate competitive threats, and their profitable business model make me believe that MasterCard will keep outperforming the market. There are a few things to dislike about MasterCard; at 0.65% the dividend is low and at 30 the price-to-earnings ratio is high. The high price-to-earnings ratio makes MasterCard somewhat risky, as stocks with a premium valuation are more vulnerable to a steep corrections. I think MasterCard is a buy-and-hold, as long you buy into it at the right price point ...

Disclaimer: I'm long MasterCard. Before making an investment in any of the companies mentioned, you should do your own proper due diligence. Any material in this article should be considered general information, and not a formal investment recommendation.

Categories: Drupal

Four Kitchens: Austin's Drupal 8 Launch Party Here we come!

Planet Drupal - 16 November 2015 - 6:36pm

Join us and the rest of the Austin community for a well-deserved par-tay! We have quite the party planned: including BBQ, a cake, a pinata and even a raffle.

Categories: Drupal

Web Experience Toolkit: Webform

New Drupal Modules - 16 November 2015 - 4:03pm

Provides Webform functionality in [Drupal WxT][drupalwxt].

Key Features

Categories: Drupal

Drupal @ Penn State: Cache warming authenticated sites with XMLRPC

Planet Drupal - 16 November 2015 - 12:56pm

This video talks through how XMLRPC Page Load and HTTPRL Spider can be used to warm caches on private / authenticated sites. XMLRPC Page Load provides a callback that tricks Drupal into thinking that it’s delivering a page to certain user account. It does this by simulating page delivery but then never actually writing the output anywhere.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal @ Penn State: The future of Drupal under the hood

Planet Drupal - 16 November 2015 - 12:56pm

I’m in the middle of several Drupal Camp / Con’s (any event over 1000 people is no longer a “Camp” but that’s for another time) and it’s occured to me: I can no longer learn by going. Now, this is learn in the traditional sense of what I used to go to Camps for (been coming to camps for 8 years now).

Categories: Drupal
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