Drupal

GD Header

New Drupal Modules - 3 December 2017 - 4:05pm

This module provides a block with the page title and a configurable image in the background. You can see a live demo of this module by browsing the original author's website in the credits section.

Categories: Drupal

Views Rows Wrapper

New Drupal Modules - 3 December 2017 - 3:48pm

Description

This is simple view style plugin, that combines a user defined number of rows into sets, wrapped by chosen elements and attributes.

Requirements: Views module.

Installation

To install this module, do the following:

1. Extract the tar ball that you downloaded from Drupal.org.

2. Upload the entire directory and all its contents to your modules directory.

Configuration

To enable and configure this module do the following:

1. Go to Admin -> Modules, and enable Views Rows Wrapper.

Categories: Drupal

Register display

New Drupal Modules - 3 December 2017 - 1:52pm
Categories: Drupal

Encrypt RSA

New Drupal Modules - 3 December 2017 - 8:19am

Encrypt RSA provides public-keys (asymmetrical) encryption method plugins for the Encrypt module, using RSA algorithm . These plugins offer a variety of solution to use public/private key to encrypt - and send - your date safely.

With normal symmetrical cryptography you use the same key to both encrypt and decrypt. Depending by the scenario, this has 2 downside:

Categories: Drupal

YAML Parser

New Drupal Modules - 3 December 2017 - 8:17am
Yaml parser

This module will add the spyc-library and provide a simple API to parse YAML from strings or files. It is an api-only module and has no UI. Other modules will depend on this one.

Installation

Copy the modules in sites/all/modules/contrib as usual
Download the spyc-library from https://github.com/mustangostang/spyc and place it into sites/all/modules/libraries

Categories: Drupal

Matt Glaman: MigrationWTF: Specified key was too long; max key length is 3072 bytes

Planet Drupal - 2 December 2017 - 6:56am
MigrationWTF: Specified key was too long; max key length is 3072 bytes mglaman Sat, 12/02/2017 - 08:56 I recently hit a curveball with a custom migration to import location data into Drupal. I am helping a family friend merge their bespoke application into Drupal. Part of the application involves managing Locations. Locations have a parent location, so I used taxonomy terms to harness the relationship capabilities. Importing levels one, two, three, and four worked great! Then, all the sudden, when I began to import levels five and six I ran into an error: Specified key was too long; max key length is 3072 bytes
Categories: Drupal

Commerce Moyasar

New Drupal Modules - 1 December 2017 - 9:17pm
Categories: Drupal

Freelock : Do your clients have the priorities you think they have?

Planet Drupal - 1 December 2017 - 3:00pm
black-and-white-interior-macbook-drawing-71983.jpeg

I just read a quick post over on another Drupal shop's blog, Be a Partner, not a Vendor, and added a comment to the great point Dylan made about not limiting your project to the specs.

We've recently started asking our clients directly about their priorities for the project. Not just overall, but specifically for each one -- and particularly how they would rank these three aspects:

QualityBudgetingEstimatingDeadlinesDrupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: Recording Remote Usability Tests with Invision App and ScreenFlow

Planet Drupal - 1 December 2017 - 11:49am

Great designers know that successful solutions begin with being a great listener. Whether we’re listening to stakeholders, the users' needs, or the trends and opportunities in the market, each voice is an important building block, informing the holistic design system. Usability testing is one way we listen to our audience’s feedback throughout the design process, with the goal of determining if a specific website experience is meeting the interviewees' needs, is easy to use and hopefully, even creates delight or surprise.

Usability testing, though, has a reputation for being time-consuming and expensive, and therefore it can be difficult to secure its spot in a design contract. Over the last few years, our design team has prioritized discovering new ways of conducting usability tests in the most efficient, yet effective, way possible. We’ve learned how to quickly organize tests throughout the design process as questions arise, employ tools that we already use on a daily basis, and utilize templates from previous projects wherever applicable.

With these tricks in our back pocket, we can spin up a usability test in minutes instead of hours. Having your preferred testing process and tools ready to go before the design project begins will help ensure that even the leanest-of-lean testing actually takes place, even if there is not a formal line item for testing in the project contract. 

There are a handful of different ways to conduct a usability test and all approaches fall into a few categories: remote vs. in-person, automated vs. moderated. Choosing the best user-testing method depends on a number of things, like the type of asset you have to test (e.g. a sketch, a static wireframe, a prototype), the nature of the question you want to ask (e.g. navigation usability vs. marketing messaging effectiveness), the amount of time you have and whether you have physical access to your participants. Learn more about this process from Nielson Norman Group's Checklist For Planning Usability Studies

Because testing can be difficult to squeeze in early scoping phases, we’re most often conducting remote, moderated tests. In short, remote tests are cost-effective and save time when your audience is geographically diverse. Moderated tests can also save time in test preparation, and we like learning things we did not expect to learn when we can actually be present with the user as opposed to sending out an automated test.

Although our usability testing toolset often changes as we continue to learn and refine our process, one set of tools you’ll find us using for recording remote, moderated usability tests are Invision App and ScreenFlow

Using Invision App and ScreenFlow fit into our principles for choosing usability testing tools: 

  • Efficient: It needs to be as quick and easy to set up and conduct as possible. 

  • Participant-friendly: It needs to feel easy for the participants to quickly get setup (for example, lookback.io has a lot of great features, but requires Google Chrome and downloading an extension for users to get up and running). 

  • Inexpensive: We want testing to create value, not add cost. As often as possible, we’re looking to use tools that we already employ on a daily basis. 

  • Flexible: We need to be able to test on various devices (e.g. mobile, tablet, desktop) as well as different types of assets: from simple paper sketches to a clickable digital prototype.

Let’s take a look at how to conduct remote, moderated usability tests with Invision App and ScreenFlow.

Setting up a Test with Invision App and ScreenFlow

1. Close all apps on your computer (e.g. messenger, slack). Disable all notifications as well (on a Mac, option-click the little notification list icon on the top right of the menu bar). We want to make sure notifications are not popping up while recording the test.

2. Spin up an Invision Liveshare presentation. You can also create Liveshares with mobile projects. Invision Liveshares work best for testing static sketches, wireframes, mockups, or clickable prototypes built in Invision. If you have an HTML prototype, consider using a screen-sharing application (e.g. Google Hangout, GoToMeeting, Slack Calls) to watch the user interact with the prototype, or choose to conduct an automated test. 

Ask the interviewee to select the cursor icon in the Invision Liveshare toolbar. You will be able to see your cursor as well as the user’s cursor on the same screen, whereas in a screen sharing application like Google Hangouts or GoToMeeting, you can only see the cursor of the person who is sharing their screen. 

undefined 3. Setup your collaborative note-taking app of choice. We love Dropbox Paper for its simplicity. Google Docs works well too. You may choose to invite another co-worker or friend to be the note-taker so that you can focus on interacting with the interviewee. Setup your screen so that the Liveshare and note-taking app are visible. 

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4. Create a conference call line. Send conference call line information to your interviewee. You can also use the call feature in the Invision Liveshare. Although lately, we have used Uber Conference just to be sure that we have a backup recording. Loading the Invision Liveshare for the first time can also be a new experience for interviewees, and we find it more bulletproof to be on the phone while they are getting set up. We usually send an email and a calendar event with this call information included a few days in advance, as well as resending a few minutes before the call. Be sure to dial the conference call via your computer, or VOIP (e.g. Uber Conference, Google Voice, Skype, Slack Call), and not on your phone. Dialing in on your computer will allow ScreenFlow to pick up the call audio.

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4. Use ScreenFlow to record your screen and call audio. Make sure both “record audio from” and “record computer audio” boxes are checked in order to capture the interviewee's voice as well as yours. Remember to ask the interviewee for permission to record, even if you are not planning to share the video and are simply wanting to check your notes afterward. Also, consider scheduling a conference call test run with a friend or coworker to test that audio is being recorded correctly with ScreenFlow.

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5. Host the recorded files securely and privately. Export your ScreenFlow video file and host via your provider of choice. We usually use YouTube (remember to make sure the video is privately listed, meaning that no one can find the video unless they have a link), or Dropbox. Both allow us to easily share links if necessary.

undefined Usability testing adds incredible value to the design process and most of all can save a lot of time and heartache down the road. And it does not have to be expensive or time-consuming! Explore and practice ways you can utilize tools you already use on a daily basis so that when the time comes, you can easily organize, record and share a usability test as easily and quickly as possible.

More Resources But wait! There's more!

Curious about the project referenced in the images used in this article? That would be our soon-to-be-released product called Tugboat, the solution for generating a complete working website for every pull request. Developers receive better feedback instantly and stakeholders are more connected enabling confident decision-making. Sign up for our mailing list to receive Tugboat product and release updates!

Categories: Drupal

Entity Reference Labels

New Drupal Modules - 1 December 2017 - 8:31am

Tired of the non-descriptive entity reference autocomplete labels? This module enhances the core labels with the entity's machine name, which is especially useful if a referenced entity has the same name as another one being referenced.

Before (with core):

After (with this module in use):

REQUIREMENTS

You must have the entity_reference core module installed.

Categories: Drupal

Link Field Autocomplete Filter

New Drupal Modules - 1 December 2017 - 7:33am
Description

Currently the autocomplete in Link Field widgets always shows content suggestions from all content (node) types.

This module adds a Link Field configuration for filtering the allowed content types in the autocomplete field.

Use

Simply activate the module, and a series of checkboxes (one fore each content type) will appear in the Link Field field-instance configuration form. If you check none, then all content types will appear as suggestions in the autocomplete. Otherwise only those checked will appear.

Categories: Drupal

InternetDevels: A glimpse at handy product customization in Drupal 8 online stores

Planet Drupal - 1 December 2017 - 4:00am

What a busy and interesting life an online store has! The Black Friday excitement is replaced with the holiday season rush, and so it goes on and on. But, no matter the season or occasion, your products will be always be ready to attract customers.

Read more
Categories: Drupal

Amazee Labs: Teams - Amazee Agile Agency Survey Results - Part 3

Planet Drupal - 1 December 2017 - 3:49am
Teams - Amazee Agile Agency Survey Results - Part 3

Let’s focus on teams for part 3 of our series, processing the results of the Amazee Agile Agency Survey. What’s the size of your delivery team? Where does your team work? And how do you match projects and teams in a continuously evolving agency environment?

Josef Dabernig Fri, 12/01/2017 - 12:49

In Part 1 we already looked at different sizes of project teams. The average team sizes were the following: 30% have teams of “3 or less”, 26.7% of the teams have “5” members, 13.3% have “4” members, another 13.3% have “6” members and 10% stated “8 or more”.

We didn’t ask for this, but I think team size heavily depends on factors like project size and duration. At Amazee our teams are usually made up of five people. Compared to smaller teams we can benefit from a lot of knowledge transfer and collaboration within the team. Also, we are less affected by off time from individual team members, and most of the T-shaped skill sets are represented at least twice within a team.

The highest rated option for where teams work was 33.3% “mostly co-located with some degree of remote”. This setup is followed by 23.3% “all co-located in an office” as well as 23.3% “mostly remote”.

At Amazee we always had some degree of remotes, but over the last years we transitioned more and more into “50% co-located and remote”. Having the option to work remotely provides a flexibility we don’t want to miss. I.e. it allows those team members who work from an office to visit friends and family abroad easily. Also, if you are on the way to a client meeting, you would still be able to join team meetings such as standups remotely via our preferred video conferencing tool zoom. More thoughts on working remotely versus locally can be found in Vasi’s recent blog post.

Regarding matching teams and projects, 50% choose to “form a team when a new project starts” whereas 30% have “stable teams with multiple projects at the same time”. 10% have the luxury of “stable teams with one project at a time”. I called it a luxury because this is what Scrum is designed for, but in an agency environment, it is often hard or impossible to achieve this setup.

From the free-form survey replies, it appears that “forming teams when a new project starts” is preferred to achieve the best pairing of available resources. Also mixing people/teams allows for knowledge transfer and refresh team members minds from time to time. However, a reason why solid teams are preferable is that they can improve themselves over extended periods of time.

When I joined Amazee, we used to have one big team of 10 developers handling multiple projects at the same time. Every week, between the tech leads and project managers we would assign the different developers to a project and decide how much they would work on that project, which was great because we could always appoint the best person to a job. But, this also proved to have some drawbacks, as there was limited ownership of developers and projects. Since we introduced Scrum, we have “stable teams working on multiple projects at the same time”. This setup allows our teams to continuously improve their processes and take full ownership of the projects assigned to them.

We also formed a separate support team that focuses on reacting quickly. We also noticed that having maintenance projects assigned to the teams, that run off a Scrum-based workflow for new delivery projects comes with a challenge, which is why we created a dedicated global maintenance team. You can find out more about that here: recent talk “Maintenance and Longevity - Keeping customers and developers happy”

70% of the teams change “once a quarter” or less often which indicates that stability is an essential factor teams take into account when it comes to changing their assignments.

Initially, when we evaluated Scrum, we were thinking about forming teams for every project. As we would have a new project kick-off every couple of months, we were concerned about team stability and had to find another solution. By building stable teams, we can continuously invest in team dynamics and have them fully self-organised. The downside of this is that the team will work on multiple projects at the same time but so far we are happy with balancing that, and it is also refreshing for the team to not work only on one project for a year.

As a conclusion of part 3 of the Amazee Agile Agency Survey Results, I would like to pose a couple of questions. How do you form contracts? What works and what does not? Leave us a comment below. If you are interested in an Agile Scrum training, don’t hesitate to contact us.

Stay tuned for the next post where we’ll look at discovery and planning.

 
Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: Why Drupal is the most secure CMS

Planet Drupal - 1 December 2017 - 3:17am
Since Drupal is an open-source system, many people wonder whether it's safe. Drupal is carefully tested by Drupal experts, and they are keeping it extremely secure. The information is constantly transmitted, passwords are encrypted, the community reviews the modules ... all these are the reasons that Drupal is one of the safest CMSs in the world. That is why it is used by a large number of organizations that have sensitive data such as the White House, UNESCO, Tesla Motors and others.   Open Web Application Security Project Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) is a non-profit… READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

Node View Language Permissions

New Drupal Modules - 1 December 2017 - 2:57am

This module enables permissions "View own content" and "View any content" for each content type per language on permissions page.

The permissions lists will be very long, if you have many languages and content types.

It is the extended version of Node View Permissions

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: Massachusetts launches Mass.gov on Drupal

Planet Drupal - 1 December 2017 - 12:06am

This year at Acquia Engage, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts launched Mass.gov on Drupal 8. Holly St. Clair, the Chief Digital Officer of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, joined me during my keynote to share how Mass.gov is making constituents' interactions with the state fast, easy, meaningful, and "wicked awesome".

Since its founding, Acquia has been headquartered in Massachusetts, so it was very exciting to celebrate this milestone with the Mass.gov team.

Constituents at the center

Today, 76% of constituents prefer to interact with their government online. Before Mass.gov switched to Drupal it struggled to provide a constituent-centric experience. For example, a student looking for information on tuition assistance on Mass.gov would have to sort through 7 different government websites before finding relevant information.

To better serve residents, businesses and visitors, the Mass.gov team took a data-driven approach. After analyzing site data, they discovered that 10% of the content serviced 89% of site traffic. This means that up to 90% of the content on Mass.gov was either redundant, out-of-date or distracting. The digital services team used this insight to develop a site architecture and content strategy that prioritized the needs and interests of citizens. In one year, the team at Mass.gov moved a 15-year-old site from a legacy CMS to Acquia and Drupal.

The team at Mass.gov also incorporated user testing into every step of the redesign process, including usability, information architecture and accessibility. In addition to inviting over 330,000 users to provide feedback on the pilot site, the Mass.gov team partnered with the Perkins School for the Blind to deliver meaningful accessibility that surpasses compliance requirements. This approach has earned Mass.gov a score of 80.7 on the System Usability Scale; 12 percent higher than the reported average.

Open from the start

As an early adopter of Drupal 8, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts decided to open source the code that powers Mass.gov. Everyone can see the code that make Mass.gov work, point out problems, suggest improvements, or use the code for their own state. It's inspiring to see the Commonwealth of Massachusetts fully embraced the unique innovation and collaboration model inherent to open source. I wish more governments would do the same

Congratulations Mass.gov

The new Mass.gov is engaging, intuitive and above all else, wicked awesome. Congratulations Mass.gov!

Categories: Drupal

Massachusetts launches Mass.gov on Drupal

Dries Buytaert - 1 December 2017 - 12:06am

This year at Acquia Engage, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts launched Mass.gov on Drupal 8. Holly St. Clair, the Chief Digital Officer of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, joined me during my keynote to share how Mass.gov is making constituents' interactions with the state fast, easy, meaningful, and "wicked awesome".

Since its founding, Acquia has been headquartered in Massachusetts, so it was very exciting to celebrate this milestone with the Mass.gov team.

Constituents at the center

Today, 76% of constituents prefer to interact with their government online. Before Mass.gov switched to Drupal it struggled to provide a constituent-centric experience. For example, a student looking for information on tuition assistance on Mass.gov would have to sort through 7 different government websites before finding relevant information.

To better serve residents, businesses and visitors, the Mass.gov team took a data-driven approach. After analyzing site data, they discovered that 10% of the content serviced 89% of site traffic. This means that up to 90% of the content on Mass.gov was either redundant, out-of-date or distracting. The digital services team used this insight to develop a site architecture and content strategy that prioritized the needs and interests of citizens. In one year, the team at Mass.gov moved a 15-year-old site from a legacy CMS to Acquia and Drupal.

The team at Mass.gov also incorporated user testing into every step of the redesign process, including usability, information architecture and accessibility. In addition to inviting over 330,000 users to provide feedback on the pilot site, the Mass.gov team partnered with the Perkins School for the Blind to deliver meaningful accessibility that surpasses compliance requirements. This approach has earned Mass.gov a score of 80.7 on the System Usability Scale; 12 percent higher than the reported average.

Open from the start

As an early adopter of Drupal 8, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts decided to open source the code that powers Mass.gov. Everyone can see the code that make Mass.gov work, point out problems, suggest improvements, or use the code for their own state. It's inspiring to see the Commonwealth of Massachusetts fully embrace the unique innovation and collaboration model inherent to open source. I wish more governments would do the same!

Congratulations Mass.gov

The new Mass.gov is engaging, intuitive and above all else, wicked awesome. Congratulations Mass.gov!

Categories: Drupal

Ontology

New Drupal Modules - 30 November 2017 - 1:30pm

Publishes site structure as OWL ontology. Enable module and open /owl page.

Drupal 8 version only publishes entity type and bundles information.

Drupal 7 version also publishes fields and RDF mappings.

Categories: Drupal

KB

New Drupal Modules - 30 November 2017 - 11:10am

The KB (Knowledge Base) module provides content types, taxonomy vocabularies, and Views necessary for building a simple knowledge base system. As the module develops, we will also add integration modules to integrate Knowledge base with the Group Module, among others.

Categories: Drupal

Valuebound: Flood Table in Core Drupal with user ID/IP Management

Planet Drupal - 30 November 2017 - 7:22am

As a Drupal professional you might have heard of Flood Table (user session management) but didn’t give much thought to it. 

Having little theoretical knowledge of the core behavior of Drupal is not bad. So allow me to explain what user session management is all about? And how it can protect you from bot or malware. I will also share few #Tweaks that help you to understand how to Flood & Unblock user from your site.

Drupal 6 does not provide security from login attempt attack from Core until you enable login security contributed module. In Drupal 7, however, the core has an in-built functionality to …

Categories: Drupal

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