Drupal

Login Switch

New Drupal Modules - 8 August 2019 - 7:26pm

This site will allow you to change the default login URL and disable the normal /user/login route built into core. Hackers today know all the usual entry points for the common CMS systems.

Categories: Drupal

ckeditor_wordcount

New Drupal Modules - 8 August 2019 - 3:47pm
Categories: Drupal

Hook 42: Drupal Core Initiative Meetings Recap - August 5th - 9th, 2019

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2019 - 12:12pm
Drupal Core Initiative Meetings Recap - August 5th - 9th, 2019 Will Thurston-… Thu, 08/08/2019 - 19:12
Categories: Drupal

Locale Manual Translate String

New Drupal Modules - 8 August 2019 - 10:59am

Adding manually a String Translation which it will be available in the translation Drupal interface

Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: Composer-Patches: The Dependency You Never Knew You Needed

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2019 - 8:49am

For most Drupal projects, patches are inevitable. It’s how we, in the Drupal community, share code. If that scares you, don’t worry-- the community is working hard to move to a pull/merge request workflow. Due to the collaborative nature of Drupal as a thriving open source community and the always growing ecosystem of contrib modules, patches are the ever-evolving glue that can hold a site together.  

Before Drupal 8, you may have seen projects use drush make which is a Drupal specific solution. As part of the “get off the island” movement,  Drupal adopted existing dependency manager Composer. Composer does a decent job alleviating the headaches of managing several sites with different dependencies. However, out of the box Composer will revert patched core files and contrib modules and it is for that reason composer-patches project was created. In this blog post, we are going to review how to set up composer-patches for a composer managed project and how to specify local or remote hosted patches.

The setup

In your favorite command line tool, you will want to add the composer-patches project:

composer require cweagans/composer-patches:~1.0 --update-with-dependencies

With this small change, your project is now set up for success because composer can manage your patches. 

Local patches

Sometimes you will find that you need patch contrib or core specifically for your project and therefore the patch exists locally. Composer-patches can apply that patch for you, we just need to tell it where it is.  Let’s look at an example project that has core patch applied and saved locally in the project root directory ‘patches/core-invalid-config-structures.patch’:
    ...
    "extra": {
      "patches": {
        "drupal/core": {
          "Core Invalid config structures ":"patches/core-invalid-config-structures.patch"
        }
      }
    }

In your composer.json, you will want to add an “extra” section if it doesn’t already exist.  Composer-patches will take the packages listed in “patches” and try to apply any listed patches. In our above example, the package we are patching is “drupal/core”. Patches are declared as follows:

“Patch description”: “path to patch file”

This information will be printed on the command line while composer tries to update the package which makes it important to summarize the patches purpose well.  If you would like to see what this looks like in the wild, take a look at our distribution Rain which leverages a couple of contrib patches.

After manually updating composer.json, it is always a good idea to run composer validate to confirm the json syntax is right.  If you get the green success message run composer update drupal/[projectname], e.g. composer update drupal/core to have the patch applied. 

You will know that the patch is applied based on the output:

As you can see, the package getting patched is removed, added back and the patch is applied. 

Note: Sometimes I feel like I have to give composer a nudge, always feel comfortable deleting /core, /vendor, or /modules/contrib, but if you delete composer.lock know that your dependencies could update based off your constraints.  Composer.json tracks our package dependencies at certain version constraints while composer.lock is the recipe of computed versions based off those constraints. I have found myself running the following:

rm -rf core && rm -rf modules/contrib && rm -rf vendor
composer install

Remote Patches

When possible we should open issues on Drupal.org and post patches there. That way, the community can work together to solve a problem and usually you’ll get a more reliable, lasting solution. Think about it this way - would you rather only you or your team review a critical patch to your project or hundreds of developers?

To make composer-patches grab a remote patch make the following changes:
    ...
    "extra": {
      "patches": {
        "drupal/core": {

          "#2925890-10: Invalid config structures ":"https://www.drupal.org/files/issues/2018-09-26/2925890-10.patch"
        }
      }
    } 

The only change here is rather than the path to the local patch, we have substituted it for the URL the patch. This will have a similar success message when applied correctly:

Tips 

So far, I’ve shown you how to get going with composer-patches project but there are a lot of settings/plugins that can elevate your project.  A feature I turn on for almost all sites is exit on patch failure because it is a big deal when a patch fails.  If you too want to turn this feature on, add the following line to your “extras” section in your composer.json:

"composer-exit-on-patch-failure": true,

I have also found it helpful to add a link back to the original issue in the composer.json patch declaration. Imagine working on a release and one of your patches fail but the only reference you have to the issue is the patch file url? It is times like these that a link to the issue can make your day.  If we made the same change to our example before, it would look like the following:

 "drupal/core": {
          "#2925890-10: Invalid config structures (https://www.drupal.org/project/drupal/issues/2925890)" : "https://www.drupal.org/files/issues/2018-09-26/2925890-10.patch"
        }

Conclusion

Composer-patches is a critical package to any Drupal project managed by Composer. In this blog I showed you how to get started with the project and some of the tips and tricks I’ve learned along the way. How does your team user composer-packages? Do you have a favorite setting that I didn’t mention? Feel free to drop a comment and share what works for you and your team.

Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: Composer-Patches: The Dependency You Never Knew You Needed

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2019 - 8:49am

For most Drupal projects, patches are inevitable. It’s how we, in the Drupal community, share code. If that scares you, don’t worry-- the community is working hard to move to a pull/merge request workflow. Due to the collaborative nature of Drupal as a thriving open source community and the always growing ecosystem of contrib modules, patches are the ever-evolving glue that can hold a site together.  

Before Drupal 8, you may have seen projects use drush make which is a Drupal specific solution. As part of the “get off the island” movement,  Drupal adopted existing dependency manager Composer. Composer does a decent job alleviating the headaches of managing several sites with different dependencies. However, out of the box Composer will revert patched core files and contrib modules and it is for that reason composer-patches project was created. In this blog post, we are going to review how to set up composer-patches for a composer managed project and how to specify local or remote hosted patches.

The setup

In your favorite command line tool, you will want to add the composer-patches project:

composer require cweagans/composer-patches:~1.0 --update-with-dependencies

With this small change, your project is now set up for success because composer can manage your patches. 

Local patches

Sometimes you will find that you need patch contrib or core specifically for your project and therefore the patch exists locally. Composer-patches can apply that patch for you, we just need to tell it where it is.  Let’s look at an example project that has core patch applied and saved locally in the project root directory ‘patches/core-invalid-config-structures.patch’:
    ...
    "extra": {
      "patches": {
        "drupal/core": {
          "Core Invalid config structures ":"patches/core-invalid-config-structures.patch"
        }
      }
    }

In your composer.json, you will want to add an “extra” section if it doesn’t already exist.  Composer-patches will take the packages listed in “patches” and try to apply any listed patches. In our above example, the package we are patching is “drupal/core”. Patches are declared as follows:

“Patch description”: “path to patch file”

This information will be printed on the command line while composer tries to update the package which makes it important to summarize the patches purpose well.  If you would like to see what this looks like in the wild, take a look at our distribution Rain which leverages a couple of contrib patches.

After manually updating composer.json, it is always a good idea to run composer validate to confirm the json syntax is right.  If you get the green success message run composer update drupal/[projectname], e.g. composer update drupal/core to have the patch applied. 

You will know that the patch is applied based on the output:

As you can see, the package getting patched is removed, added back and the patch is applied. 

Note: Sometimes I feel like I have to give composer a nudge, always feel comfortable deleting /core, /vendor, or /modules/contrib, but if you delete composer.lock know that your dependencies could update based off your constraints.  Composer.json tracks our package dependencies at certain version constraints while composer.lock is the recipe of computed versions based off those constraints. I have found myself running the following:

rm -rf core && rm -rf modules/contrib && rm -rf vendor
composer install

Remote Patches

When possible we should open issues on Drupal.org and post patches there. That way, the community can work together to solve a problem and usually you’ll get a more reliable, lasting solution. Think about it this way - would you rather only you or your team review a critical patch to your project or hundreds of developers?

To make composer-patches grab a remote patch make the following changes:
    ...
    "extra": {
      "patches": {
        "drupal/core": {

          "#2925890-10: Invalid config structures ":"https://www.drupal.org/files/issues/2018-09-26/2925890-10.patch"
        }
      }
    } 

The only change here is rather than the path to the local patch, we have substituted it for the URL the patch. This will have a similar success message when applied correctly:

Tips 

So far, I’ve shown you how to get going with composer-patches project but there are a lot of settings/plugins that can elevate your project.  A feature I turn on for almost all sites is exit on patch failure because it is a big deal when a patch fails.  If you too want to turn this feature on, add the following line to your “extras” section in your composer.json:

"composer-exit-on-patch-failure": true,

I have also found it helpful to add a link back to the original issue in the composer.json patch declaration. Imagine working on a release and one of your patches fail but the only reference you have to the issue is the patch file url? It is times like these that a link to the issue can make your day.  If we made the same change to our example before, it would look like the following:

 "drupal/core": {
          "#2925890-10: Invalid config structures (https://www.drupal.org/project/drupal/issues/2925890)" : "https://www.drupal.org/files/issues/2018-09-26/2925890-10.patch"
        }

Conclusion

Composer-patches is a critical package to any Drupal project managed by Composer. In this blog I showed you how to get started with the project and some of the tips and tricks I’ve learned along the way. How does your team user composer-packages? Do you have a favorite setting that I didn’t mention? Feel free to drop a comment and share what works for you and your team.

Categories: Drupal

Auto Save Form

New Drupal Modules - 8 August 2019 - 8:22am

# Auto Save Form

This module automatically stores and recovers form values to prevent
losing data when editing an form.

The plugin listens for the form change and keyup events and then stores
the values of your form controls (select, input, and textarea) in the local
storage and automatically clears the storage on form submit.

## Installation
1) Copy all contents of this package to your modules directory preserving
subdirectory structure.

Categories: Drupal

Commerce Stripe Payment Intent

New Drupal Modules - 8 August 2019 - 7:30am

This module is a fork of commerce_stripe. I use commerce_stripe for a long time in D7 project with some patchs to support 3DS and other features which has never been commited.

It implements Stripe with :

Categories: Drupal

wishdesk.com: Why build a local business website on Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2019 - 6:30am
If you have a local business, you will benefit immensely from a strong online presence. In this post, we will discuss why Drupal 8 is a great choice to build a local website.
Categories: Drupal

Specbee: Setup Responsive Images in Drupal 8 - A Step-by-Step Guide

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2019 - 5:11am
Setup Responsive Images in Drupal 8 - A Step-by-Step Guide Akshay Devadiga 08 Aug, 2019 Top 10 best practices for designing a perfect UX for your mobile app

Back in early 2010, when Jason Grigsby pointed out that simply setting a percentage width on images was not enough, and that you needed to resize these images as well for a better user experience. He pointed out that if you served the right sized images on the original responsive demo site, more than 75% of the weight of those images can be shaved on smaller screens. 

Ever since, the debate on responsive images have evolved in what is the best solution to render the perfect, responsive images without any hassle.

We all know how Drupal 7 does a great job in handling responsive images with its modules. However, with Drupal 8, things are even better now!

Responsive Images in Drupal 8

The Responsive Image module in Drupal 8 provides an image formatter that maps the breakpoint of the original image to render a flawless responsive image using a picture tag.

When we observe how Drupal 8 handles responsive images when compared to Drupal 7, some of the features to be noted are:

Drupal 7 consists of the contributed module picture element, which in the latest version is known as Responsive Images.
In addition to this, Responsive images & Breakpoint modules are a part of the Drupal core in the latest version of the CMS.

The Problem

One of the major problems with the images in web development is, browsers do not know about the images, and are clueless about what sized images are rendering in relation with a viewport of different screens until the CSS & Javascripts are loaded.

However, the browser can know about the environment in which the images are rendering, which includes the size of the viewport and resolution of the screen.

The Solution 

As we mentioned in previous sections, responsive images use picture element which basically has sizes and srcset attributes which play a major role in notifying the browser to choose the best images based on the image style selections.  

So Drupal 8 has done a great job in providing the responsive images module in the core. This will download the lower sized images for the devices with lower screen resolution, resulting in better website load time and improved performance. 

Steps to reproduce
  1. Enable Responsive images and breakpoint module.
  2. Setup the breakpoints for your projects theme.
  3. Setting up the image styles for responsive images
  4. Creating a responsive image style for your theme
  5. Assigning the responsive image style to an image field.
Enable Responsive images and breakpoint module

Since it's a part of drupal 8 core, we will not require any other extra module. All you have to do is enable the responsive images module, since the breakpoint module will be installed with the standard profile. Else enable the breakpoint module.

To enable the module goto->admin->extends select the module and enable the module.

Setup the breakpoints for your project's theme
 

Setting up the theme’s breakpoint is the most important part for the responsiveness of your site.


If you are using a core theme like bartik , seven, umami or claro, you will already have the breakpoints file and you don’t have to create any new ones. 

However, if you are using a custom theme for your project, it is important that you define the breakpoints in "yourthemename.breakpoints.yml" which can be found in your theme directory, usually found in "/themes/custom/yourthemename".

Each breakpoint will assign the images to media query.  For example images which are rendering in mobile might be smaller i.e width less than 768px, where in medium screens will have a width between 768px to 1024px.


Each breakpoint will have: 

label:  Is the valid label given for the breakpoint.
mediaQuery:  Is the viewport within which the images are rendered.
weight:  For the order of display.
multipliers:  It's a measure of the viewport's device resolution normally 1x will be used for standard sizes and 2x for retina display.

Setting up the image styles for responsive images

Now we will have to create an image style for each of the breakpoints. You can configure your own Drupal 8 image styles at admin->config->media->image-styles

Click ‘Add image style’.  Give the valid name for your image style & use scale and crop effect which will provide the cropped images. If the images are stretched, add multiple image style for different viewports.

Creating a responsive image style for your theme 

This is where you provide the multiple image style options to the browser and let the browser choose the best out of the lot. 


To create new responsive Drupal 8  image style navigate to:
Home -> admin- > config-> media->responsive-image-style and click on ‘Add responsive image’. 

Give a valid name for your responsive image style & select the breakpoint group (choose your theme) & assign the image styles to the breakpoints listed 

There are multiple options for the image style configurations

  • Choose single image style: Where you can select the single image style that will be rendered on the particular screen
  • Choose multiple image style: Where you can select the multiple-image style and also specify the viewport width for the image style

At last, there is an option to select a fallback image style. The fallback image style should only appear on the site if an error occurs.

Assigning the responsive image style to an image field 
  • Once all the configurations are done, move to the image field by adding the responsive image style.
  • To do that go to the field’s manage display and select the responsive image style which we created.
  • Add content and see the results on the page with a responsive image style.

     

Final Results 

 The image at a minimum width of 1024px (For large Devices).

Image at minimum width of 768px (For Medium Devices).

Image at maximum width 767px (For Small Devices).

Drupal Planet Shefali ShettyApr 05, 2017 Subscribe For Our Newsletter And Stay Updated Subscribe Shefali ShettyApr 05, 2017 Recent Posts Image Setup Responsive Images in Drupal 8 - A Step-by-Step Guide Image Top 15 Drupal Distributions for Accelerating Your Web Development Process Image Headless Drupal – Why Top Enterprises Are Choosing Decoupled Drupal Websites? Explore Our Drupal Services TAKE ME THERE Featured Success Stories

Know more about our technology driven approach to recreate the content management workflow for [24]7.ai

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Categories: Drupal

Body node ID class

New Drupal Modules - 8 August 2019 - 4:05am

Body node ID class module is used to add node ID (nid) as a class to <body> tag on node pages.
In Drupal 7 core there was a unique node ID class in the <body> tag.
This is forward-port of that functionality for Drupal 8.

Installation

Install as you would normally install a contributed Drupal module.

Categories: Drupal

Srijan Technologies: Your Step-by-Step Drupal Migration Guide

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2019 - 3:14am

With Dries’ latest announcement on the launch of Drupal 9 in 2020, enterprises are in an urgent need to upgrade from Drupal 7 and 8 to version 9.

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: Interview with Ricardo Amaro: The future is open, the future is community and inclusion

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2019 - 1:54am

In our latest interview, Ricardo Amaro of Acquia reveals how his discovery of Drupal has enabled him to work on projects he enjoys and that make a meaningful impact. Give it a read to learn more about his contributions and what the Drupal community in Portugal is like.

READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

JSON:API example

New Drupal Modules - 7 August 2019 - 11:19pm

Intends to show how to dialog with a JSON:API server (drupal 8 in this particular case).

The authentification type used is oAuth2.

Categories: Drupal

Agaric Collective: Migrating files and images into Drupal

Planet Drupal - 7 August 2019 - 7:37pm

We have already covered two of many ways to migrate images into Drupal. One example allows you to set the image subfields manually. The other example uses a process plugin that accomplishes the same result using plugin configuration options. Although valid ways to migrate images, these approaches have an important limitation. The files and images are not removed from the system upon rollback. In the previous blog post, we talked further about this topic. Today, we are going to perform an image migration that will clear after itself when it is rolled back. Note that in Drupal images are a special case of files. Even though the example will migrate images, the same approach can be used to import any type of file. This migration will also serve as the basis for explaining migration dependencies in the next blog post.

File entity migrate destination

All the examples so far have been about creating nodes. The migrate API is a full ETL framework able to write to different destinations. In the case of Drupal, the target can be other content entities like files, users, taxonomy terms, comments, etc. Writing to content entities is straightforward. For example, to migrate into files, the process section is configured like this:

destination: plugin: 'entity:file'

You use a plugin whose name is entity: followed by the machine name of your target entity. In this case file. Other possible values are user, taxonomy_term, and comment. Remember that each migration definition file can only write to one destination.

Source section definition

The source of a migration is independent of its destination. The following code snippet shows the source definition for the image migration example:

source: constants: SOURCE_DOMAIN: 'https://agaric.coop' DRUPAL_FILE_DIRECTORY: 'public://portrait/' plugin: embedded_data data_rows: - photo_id: 'P01' photo_url: 'sites/default/files/2018-12/micky-cropped.jpg' - photo_id: 'P02' photo_url: '' - photo_id: 'P03' photo_url: 'sites/default/files/pictures/picture-94-1480090110.jpg' - photo_id: 'P04' photo_url: 'sites/default/files/2019-01/clayton-profile-medium.jpeg' ids: photo_id: type: string

Note that the source contains relative paths to the images. Eventually, we will need an absolute path to them. Therefore, the SOURCE_DOMAIN constant is created to assemble the absolute path in the process pipeline. Also, note that one of the rows contains an empty photo_url. No file can be created without a proper URL. In the process section we will accommodate for this. An alternative could be to filter out invalid data in a source clean up operation before executing the migration.

Another important thing to note is that the row identifier photo_id is of type string. You need to explicitly tell the system the name and type of the identifiers you want to use. The configuration for this varies slightly from one source plugin to another. For the embedded_data plugin, you do it using the ids configuration key. It is possible to have more than one source column as identifier. For example, if the combination of two columns (e.g. name and date of birth) are required to uniquely identify each element (e.g. person) in the source.

You can get the full code example at https://github.com/dinarcon/ud_migrations The module to enable is UD migration dependencies introduction whose machine name is ud_migrations_dependencies_intro. The migration to run is udm_dependencies_intro_image. Refer to this article to learn where the module should be placed.

Process section definition

The fields to map in the process section will depend on the target. For files and images, only one entity property is required: uri. Its value should be set to the file path within Drupal using stream wrappers. In this example, the public stream (public://) is used to store the images in a location that is publicly accessible by any visitor to the site. If the file was already in the system and we knew the path the whole process section for this migration could be reduced to two lines:

process: uri: source_column_file_uri

That is rarely the case though. Fortunately, there are many process plugins that allow you to transform the available data. When combined with constants and pseudofields, you can come up with creative solutions to produce the format expected by your destination.

Skipping invalid records

The source for this migration contains one record that lacks the URL to the photo. No image can be imported without a valid path. Let’s accommodate for this. In the same step, a pseudofield will be created to extract the name of the file out of its path.

psf_destination_filename: - plugin: callback callable: basename source: photo_url - plugin: skip_on_empty method: row message: 'Cannot import empty image filename.'

The psf_destination_filename pseudofield uses the callback plugin to derive the filename from the relative path to the image. This is accomplished using the basename PHP function. Also, taking advantage of plugin chaining, the system is instructed to skip process the row if no filename could be obtained. For example, because an empty source value was provided. This is done by the skip_on_empty which is also configured log a message to indicate what happened. In this case, the message is hardcoded. You can make it dynamic to include the ID of the row that was skipped using other process plugins. This is left as an exercise to the curious reader. Feel free to share your answer in the comments below.

Tip: To read the messages log during any migration, execute the following Drush command: drush migrate:messages [migration-id].

Creating the destination URI

The next step is to create the location where the file is going to be saved in the system. For this, the psf_destination_full_path pseudofield is used to concatenate the value of a constant defined in the source and the file named obtained in the previous step. As explained before, order is important when using pseudofields as part of the migrate process pipeline. The following snippet shows how to do it:

psf_destination_full_path: - plugin: concat source: - constants/DRUPAL_FILE_DIRECTORY - '@psf_destination_filename' - plugin: urlencode

The end result of this operation would be something like public://portrait/micky-cropped.jpg. The URI specifies that the image should be stored inside a portrait subdirectory inside Drupal’s public file system. Copying files to specific subdirectories is not required, but it helps with file organizations. Also, some hosting providers might impose limitations on the number of files per directory. Specifying subdirectories for your file migrations is a recommended practice.

Also note that after the URI is created, it gets encoded using the urlencode plugin. This will replace special characters to an equivalent string literal. For example, é and ç will be converted to %C3%A9 and %C3%A7 respectively. Space characters will be changed to %20. The end result is an equivalent URI that can be used inside Drupal, as part of an email, or via another medium. Always encode any URI when working with Drupal migrations.

Creating the source URI

The next step is to create assemble an absolute path for the source image. For this, you concatenate the domain stored in a source constant and the image relative path stored in a source column. The following snippet shows how to do it:

psf_source_image_path: - plugin: concat delimiter: '/' source: - constants/SOURCE_DOMAIN - photo_url - plugin: urlencode

The end result of this operation will be something like https://agaric.coop/sites/default/files/2018-12/micky-cropped.jpg. Note that the concat and urlencode plugins are used just like in the previous step. A subtle difference is that a delimiter is specifying in the concatenation step. This is because, contrary to the DRUPAL_FILE_DIRECTORY constant, the SOURCE_DOMAIN constant does not end with a slash (/). This was done intentionally to highlight two things. First, it is important to understand your source data. Second, you can transform it as needed by using various process plugins.

Copying the image file to Drupal

Only two tasks remain to complete this image migration: download the image and assign the uri property of the file entity. Luckily, both steps can be accomplished at the same time using the file_copy plugin. The following snippet shows how to do it:

uri: plugin: file_copy source: - '@psf_source_image_path' - '@psf_destination_full_path' file_exists: 'rename' move: FALSE

The source configuration of file_copy plugin expects an array of two values: the URI to copy the file from and the URI to copy the file to. Optionally, you can specify what happens if a file with the same name exists in the destination directory. In this case, we are instructing the system to rename the file to prevent name clashes. The way this is done is appending the string _X to the filename and before the file extension. The X is a number starting with zero (0) that keeps incrementing until the filename is unique. The move flag is also optional. If set to TRUE it tells the system that the file should be moved instead of copied. As you can guess, Drupal does not have access to the file system in the remote server. The configuration option is shown for completeness, but does not have any effect in this example.

In addition to downloading the image and place it inside Drupal’s file system, the file_copy also returns the destination URI. That is why this plugin can be used to assign the uri destination property. And that’s it, you have successfully imported images into Drupal! Clever use of the process pipeline, isn’t it? ;-)

One important thing to note is an image’s alternative text, title, width, and height are not associated with the file entity. That information is actually stored in a field of type image. This will be illustrated in the next article. To reiterate, the same approach to migrate images can be used to migrate any file type.

Technical note: The file entity contains other properties you can write to. For a list of available options check the baseFieldDefinitions() method of the File class defining the entity. Note that more properties can be available up in the class hierarchy. Also, this entity does not have multiple bundles like the node entity does.

What did you learn in today’s blog post? Had you created file migrations before? If so, had you followed a different approach? Did you know that you can do complex data transformations using process plugins? Did you know you can skip the processing of a row if the required data is not available? Please share your answers in the comments. Also, I would be grateful if you shared this blog post with your colleagues.

This blog post series, cross-posted at UnderstandDrupal.com as well as here on Agaric.coop, is made possible thanks to these generous sponsors. Contact Understand Drupal if your organization would like to support this documentation project, whether the migration series or other topics.

 

Read more and discuss at agaric.coop.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association blog: Because...Drupal!

Planet Drupal - 7 August 2019 - 4:15pm

Today is the start of our membership campaign which runs through August 31. This month, we've asked members to share why they are part of the Association. We hope you find some inspiration from your fellow community and that you'll join and share:

Join membership

Share the campaign


"I believe in Drupal's future and I love the opportunity that Drupal provides to people around the world." ~ Jiang Zhan


"The Drupal Association helps to support the Drupal community.

The Drupal community is the reason most folks start using Drupal and never leave.
Attend a local Drupal camp, meetup, or contribution day to experience how welcoming + helpful the community is." ~ Leslie Glynn


"I love developing for…
Working with…
Problem solving with…
Enhancing…
Drupal!" ~ Wil Roboly


"I support the people, time, and commitments made by those who build and grow Drupal." ~ Erica Reed


"I believe in socially sustainable ecosystems and Drupal is just that. It's very powerful to have local communities supporting Drupal, with the Drupal Association empowering global communication and a unified message. This must endure!" ~ Imre Gmelig Meijling


"I feel this will help others the way Drupal has helped me pursue my career and open up possibilities of learning and exploring.

This is another way of giving back to Drupal." Jaideep Singh Kandari

Help grow our membership by joining to support the global Drupal Association or by sharing this campaign. We're here because we love Drupal and the opportunities that come from being part of this open source project. Thanks for being here and for all that you contribute!

Categories: Drupal

Migrate Source JCR

New Drupal Modules - 7 August 2019 - 10:48am
Categories: Drupal

Prevent homepage deletion

New Drupal Modules - 7 August 2019 - 10:39am
Synopsis

This module adds a permission 'delete homepage node'. Users with this permission can delete the node that is defined as frontpage in the system settings. Users without this permission cannot.

Users who cannot delete this page will not see the delete-button on the nodes, and also this option will not be available on the administer content view.

Categories: Drupal

TEN7 Blog's Drupal Posts: Case Study: Animal Humane Society

Planet Drupal - 7 August 2019 - 8:34am
Website Refresh: The Only Thing Missing is a Purring Sound

The Animal Humane Society (AHS), in Minneapolis, Minnesota is the leading animal welfare organization in the Upper Midwest, helping 25,000 dogs, cats and critters in need find loving homes each year, while providing a vast array of services to the community, from low-cost spay and neuter services to dog training to rescuing animals from neglectful and abusive situations. 

Categories: Drupal

Commerce Slimpay

New Drupal Modules - 7 August 2019 - 8:05am

This project integrates Slimpay into the Drupal Commerce payment and checkout systems using hapiclient-php library.

It currently supports electronic signature with mandate generation :

  • paymentScheme : SEPA.DIRECT_DEBIT.CORE
  • Iframe mode : Embedded
  • Single Slimpay entity account
Categories: Drupal

Pages

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