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New Drupal Modules - 14 February 2019 - 9:10am
Categories: Drupal

Preserve changed timestamp

New Drupal Modules - 14 February 2019 - 8:53am
Description

There's no easy way to prevent the fields of type changed to be updated when the host entity is updating. There are business cases when you don't want this field to be refreshed on an entity save. A Drupal core issue is already dealing with this problem but it's not yet committed. This module covers this lack of API and will be dropped as soon the core issue is fixed.

Categories: Drupal

Drudesk: A glimpse at Drupal 8 and Vue.js combination

Planet Drupal - 14 February 2019 - 5:04am

The trend of using JavaScript frameworks with Drupal keeps gaining popularity. It is used for creating rich, fast, and interactive web interfaces. One of the hot use areas is decoupled (headless Drupal 8) architecture, with the front-end part completely entrusted to a JS framework. There are many JS frameworks and libraries that pair well with Drupal 8 — React, Angular, Gatsby, Ember, Elm etc. Today, we will review one of them — Vue.js. Let’s take a closer look at Drupal 8 and Vue.js combination.

Categories: Drupal

Sooper Drupal Themes: Sooperthemes 2015-2018 Retrospective: Crafting Enterprise-Ready Solutions For A Better Drupal Experience

Planet Drupal - 14 February 2019 - 2:30am

As of today Sooperthemes provides the only proven enterprise-grade drag and drop Drupal builder, and framework theme. Examples proving this point are sites being rolled out by the United NationsGoogle, and by the US Senate for all newly inaugurated senators!

3 years ago, Sooperthemes started developing Drupal tools in a novel way: developing every tool as a platform. This resulted in our theme agnostic Glazed Builder drag and drop solution, and our  Glazed framework theming platform. Throughout the years, Sooperthemes has evolved to become much more than just a theme shop. While we still provide a gallery of premium Drupal designs that can be found on our website, we now focus our efforts towards developing solutions rather than tools that bring great value to all Drupal users, organizations, governments, and enthusiasts worldwide.

At Sooperthemes we believe that building web content should be an easy and approachable process for anyone, even for people who aren't necessarily tech savvy. With this idea in mind we are headed on a mission: To empower Drupal users with the necessary capabilities to build high-end responsive websites as well as help experienced site builders and organizations work faster through development automation. 

Sooperthemes today

Our Glazed framework theme allows users to have control over every aspect of a Drupal site: from typography to colors, grid design and navigation. Combine this with our Drag and Drop builder and everything you need on a professional website can be designed and developed directly in the browser. This empowers your marketing and design staff to work efficiently without incurring heavy IT costs. 

When you take look at Drupal competitors such as WordPress and cloud based solutions like Squarespace, one of the main reasons they successfully skyrocketed in the web development industry is because of the simple front-end editing experience and the value this experience brings to the users. Glazed Builder brings this modern site-building experience to the Drupal world by combining the power and unique aspects of Drupal with the simplicity and intuitiveness of Drag and Drop technology. 

Glazed Builder is different from Wix, Squarespace, or any other Drag and Drop builders: it's made for Drupal and deeply integrated with Drupal APIs. It acts as a Drupal field formatter and you can have multiple instances per page, for your footer, main content, blocks, and even custom entity types. It automatically understands Drupal's revision system, language systems, workflow states, and permissions. This makes it one of the most advanced visual page builders in the world from a website architecture perspective.

How Sooperthemes products create a better Drupal experience 

Drag and Drop tools have evolved to be more powerful, produce better code, and leverage frontend frameworks to create a fluent authoring experience that runs in the browser. In Glazed Builder this experience is integrated with Views and the block systems: you can create highly dynamic pages and even dashboards with Drag and Drop, without losing reusability of the components you build. It is available for both Drupal 8 and Drupal 7, and provides the tools to easily perform difficult customization tasks. It lets the user focus on creating value for the customers and leave the technical aspects behind. It's intuitive and easy to use out of the box. 

Adding Glazed Builder on top of your existing Drupal 8 stack

Glazed Builder is theme agnostic, meaning it can plug directly into your existing site infrastructure and is compatible with any theme. You don’t necessarily have to use our Glazed Theme, you can add the Glazed Builder module directly on your website and get the same benefits you get from installing it on a Sooperthemes theme. Moreover, Sooperthemes products are built by developers who have 12+ years of experience working with Drupal and you don't have to worry about shortcodes or vendor lock-in when you use the product. 

Role based user profiles to customize the Glazed Builder interface

As a site administrator you can limit what users with specific Drupal roles see in their Glazed interface using the Glazed Builder profiles editor. You have total control over who has access to specific Glazed Builder elements, Drupal blocks, Views display and text editor buttons. This allows for a smooth workflow for your web team, giving them access to the tools that are relevant specifically to their tasks. While removing all elements and features that can distract them.

Front end development

When you add or change content on a page, you can see and experience what your visitor is going to see when browsing your website. Working from the front end allows you to focus on building amazing experiences and engage your audience on a deeper level by producing and designing valuable content for your audience. The freedom to leverage and shape your perfect web page is at your fingertips, the limit is your creativity and the way you use the tools.

Save time & reduce IT costs

Using Glazed products will save you precious time on a daily basis. Tasks that previously needed a developer's assistance and would take hours can now be performed directly in the front-end within minutes. Moreover, editing or adding new content to your website is just a couple of clicks away. IT costs savings come from automating technical challenges in designing websites and crafting high quality content. 

Marketing & SEO Tools

Glazed Builder empowers your marketing team by giving them the freedom to be creative. Designing landing pages that convert, personalized call to action buttons, including and editing global blocks are just few of the many features Glazed Builder has to offer. Moreover Glazed comes pre-installed with a number of 35 ready-to-go elements for building any type of content. The elements are divided into four categories: layout elements, content elements, media elements and interactive elements. Every element is fully customizable and can be personalized to meet the website’s overall design feel and your marketing strategy. Any type of content you create on your website is mobile-friendly right away. SEO managed right within the builder. You can easily add alt and title text to images, fully control your header tags, always get clean markup and fast performance. Our clean markup makes it easier for you to rank above your competitors in Google search results.

What's next for Sooperthemes?

After just uploading new 11 tutorial videos to the Sooperthemes YouTube channel I'm looking back at our first videos and see a lot of improvement. We're going to continue focussing even more on video content. Documentation is something very difficult to get right but when you do get it right it's very rewarding. 

In 2019 we're also going to develop more advanced features and integration for our core products. Glazed Builder is going to get more capabilities geared to large enterprise users and Glazed theme is simply in need of constant updates just in order to keep up with design trends. The power of the Glazed theme framework is that you can keep the same theme for 5 years and instead of having a dated looking website at the end of the line you can just update some settings and get right look for your brand.

A big milestone we're going to be working towards is a Bootstrap 4 update, probably coming in Q3 or Q4. Right now our customers are successful with Bootstrap 3 so it's not an urgent issue but eventually Bootstrap 4 will become the new standard across the Drupal community.

3 years ago when just releasing Glazed Builder the product was received well by early adopters and considered an "awesome tool". 3 years later we're seeing mainstream adoption and clients describing Glazed Builder as "basically a must-have to start a Drupal project". We hope to continue playing an important role to the Drupal community, as well as presenting a more modern and capable Drupal to potential Drupal adopters outside the community!

Categories: Drupal

Commerce Mastercard

New Drupal Modules - 14 February 2019 - 1:54am

This module provides a Drupal Commerce payment method using the Mastercard Hosted Checkout payment service.

The payment method redirects to the Mastercard-hosted payment page. Once the customer has entered their card details successfully, they are redirected back to the Drupal Commerce site where the order is marked as being Checkout Completed.

Categories: Drupal

OPTASY: Easy Page Speed Audit: How to Improve the Perceived Performance of Your Drupal Site

Planet Drupal - 14 February 2019 - 1:10am
Easy Page Speed Audit: How to Improve the Perceived Performance of Your Drupal Site radu.simileanu Thu, 02/14/2019 - 09:10

How do you run a page speed audit from a user experience standpoint? For, let's face it: website performance is user experience! 

What are the easiest and most effective ways to measure your Drupal website's performance? What auditing tools should you be using? How do you identify the critical metrics to focus your audit on?

And, once identified, how do you turn the collected data into speed optimization decisions? Into targeted performance improvement solutions...

Also, how fast is “ideally fast”, in the context of your competition's highest scores and of your users' expectations?

Here are the easiest steps of an effective page performance audit, with a focus on the prompt actions you could take for improving it.
 

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: Optimizing site performance by reducing JavaScript and CSS

Planet Drupal - 13 February 2019 - 6:04pm

I've been thinking about the performance of my site and how it affects the user experience. There are real, ethical concerns to poor web performance. These include accessibility, inclusion, waste and environmental concerns.

A faster site is more accessible, and therefore more inclusive for people visiting from a mobile device, or from areas in the world with slow or expensive internet.

For those reasons, I decided to see if I could improve the performance of my site. I used the excellent https://webpagetest.org to benchmark a simple blog post https://dri.es/relentlessly-eliminating-barriers-to-growth.

The image above shows that to render that page, it took a browser 0.722 seconds to download and render the page (see blue vertical line):

  • The first 210 milliseconds are used to set up the connection, which includes the DNS lookup, TCP handshake and the SSL negotiation.
  • The next 260 milliseconds (from 0.21 seconds to 0.47 seconds) are spent downloading one HTML file, two CSS files and one JavaScript file.
  • After everything is downloaded, the final 330 milliseconds (from 0.475 seconds to 0.8 seconds) are used to layout the page, execute the JavaScript code and download the Favicon.

By most standards, 0.722 seconds is pretty fast. In fact, according to HTTP Archive, it takes more than 2.4 seconds to download and render the average web page on a desktop.

Regardless, I noticed that the length of the horizontal green bars and the horizontal yellow bar was relatively long compared to that of the blue bar. In other words, a lot of time is spent downloading JavaScript (yellow horizontal bar) and CSS (two green horizontal bars) instead of the HTML, including the actual content of the blog post (blue bar).

To fix, I did two things:

  1. Use vanilla JavaScript. I replaced my jQuery-based JavaScript with vanilla JavaScript. Without impacting the functionality of my site, the amount of JavaScript went from almost 45 KB to 699 bytes, good for a savings of over 6,000 percent.
  2. Conditionally include CSS. For example, I use Prism.js for syntax highlighting code snippets in blog posts. prism.css was downloaded for every page request, even when there were no code snippets to highlight. Using Drupal's render system, it's easy to conditionally include CSS. By taking advantage of that, I was able to reduce the amount of CSS downloaded by 90 percent — from 4.7 KB to 2.5 KB.

According to the January 1st, 2019 run of HTTP Archive, the median page requires 396 KB of JavaScript and 60 KB of CSS. I'm proud that my site is well under these medians.

File type Dri.es before Dri.es after World-wide median JavaScript 45 KB 669 bytes 396 KB CSS 4.7 KB 2.5 KB 60 KB

Because the new JavaScript and CSS files are significantly smaller, it takes the browser less time to download, parse and render them. As a result, the same blog post is now available in 0.465 seconds instead of 0.722 seconds, or 35% faster.

After a new https://webpagetest.org test run, you can clearly see that the bars for the CSS and JavaScript files became visually shorter:

To optimize the user experience of my site, I want it to be fast. I hope that others will see that bloated websites can come at a great cost, and will consider using tools like https://webpagetest.org to make their sites more performant.

I'll keep working on making my website even faster. As a next step, I plan to make pages with images faster by using lazy image loading.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: Headless CMS: REST vs JSON:API vs GraphQL

Planet Drupal - 13 February 2019 - 11:52am

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog.

The web used to be server-centric in that web content management systems managed data and turned it into HTML responses. With the rise of headless architectures a portion of the web is becoming server-centric for data but client-centric for its presentation; increasingly, data is rendered into HTML in the browser.

This shift of responsibility has given rise to JavaScript frameworks, while on the server side, it has resulted in the development of JSON:API and GraphQL to better serve these JavaScript applications with content and data.

In this blog post, we will compare REST, JSON:API and GraphQL. First, we'll look at an architectural, CMS-agnostic comparison, followed by evaluating some Drupal-specific implementation details.

It's worth noting that there are of course lots of intricacies and "it depends" when comparing these three approaches. When we discuss REST, we mean the "typical REST API" as opposed to one that is extremely well-designed or following a specification (not REST as a concept). When we discuss JSON:API, we're referring to implementations of the JSON:API specification. Finally, when we discuss GraphQL, we're referring to GraphQL as it used in practice. Formally, it is only a query language, not a standard for building APIs.

The architectural comparison should be useful for anyone building decoupled applications regardless of the foundation they use because the qualities we will evaluate apply to most web projects.

To frame our comparisons, let's establish that most developers working with web services care about the following qualities:

  1. Request efficiency: retrieving all necessary data in a single network round trip is essential for performance. The size of both requests and responses should make efficient use of the network.
  2. API exploration and schema documentation: the API should be quickly understandable and easily discoverable.
  3. Operational simplicity: the approach should be easy to install, configure, run, scale and secure.
  4. Writing data: not every application needs to store data in the content repository, but when it does, it should not be significantly more complex than reading.

We summarized our conclusions in the table below, but we discuss each of these four categories (or rows in the table) in more depth below. If you aggregate the colors in the table, you see that we rank JSON:API above GraphQL and GraphQL above REST for Drupal core's needs.

REST JSON:API GraphQL Request efficiency Poor; multiple requests are needed to satisfy common needs. Responses are bloated. Excellent; a single request is usually sufficient for most needs. Responses can be tailored to return only what is required. Excellent; a single request is usually sufficient for most needs. Responses only include exactly what was requested. Documentation, API explorability and schema Poor; no schema, not explorable. Acceptable; generic schema only; links and error messages are self-documenting. Excellent; precise schema; excellent tooling for exploration and documentation. Operational simplicity Acceptable; works out of the box with CDNs and reverse proxies; few to no client-side libraries required. Excellent; works out of the box with CDNs and reverse proxies, no client-side libraries needed, but many are available and useful. Poor; extra infrastructure is often necessary client side libraries are a practical necessity, specific patterns required to benefit from CDNs and browser caches. Writing data Acceptable; HTTP semantics give some guidance but how specifics left to each implementation, one write per request. Excellent; how writes are handled is clearly defined by the spec, one write per request, but multiple writes is being added to the specification. Poor; how writes are handled is left to each implementation and there are competing best practices, it's possible to execute multiple writes in a single request.

If you're not familiar with JSON:API or GraphQL, I recommend you watch the following two short videos. They will provide valuable context for the remainder of this blog post:

Request efficiency

Most REST APIs tend toward the simplest implementation possible: a resource can only be retrieved from one URI. If you want to retrieve article 42, you have to retrieve it from https://example.com/article/42. If you want to retrieve article 42 and article 72, you have to perform two requests; one to https://example.com/article/42 and one to https://example.com/article/72. If the article's author information is stored in a different content type, you have to do two additional requests, say to https://example.com/author/3 and https://example.com/author/7. Furthermore, you can't send these requests until you've requested, retrieved and parsed the article requests (you wouldn't know the author IDs otherwise).

Consequently, client-side applications built on top of basic REST APIs tend to need many successive requests to fetch their data. Often, these requests can't be sent until earlier requests have been fulfilled, resulting in a sluggish experience for the website visitor.

GraphQL and JSON:API were developed to address the typical inefficiency of REST APIs. Using JSON:API or GraphQL, you can use a single request to retrieve both article 42 and article 72, along with the author information for each. It simplifies the developer experience, but more importantly, it speeds up the application.

Finally, both JSON:API and GraphQL have a solution to limit response sizes. A common complaint against typical REST APIs is that their responses can be incredibly verbose; they often respond with far more data than the client needs. This is both annoying and inefficient.

GraphQL eliminates this by requiring the developer to explicitly add each desired resource field to every query. This makes it difficult to over-fetchdata but easily leads to very large GraphQL queries, making (cacheable) GET requests impossible.

JSON:API solves this with the concept of sparse fieldsets or lists of desired resource fields. These behave in much the same fashion as GraphQL does, however, when they're omitted JSON:API will typically return all fields. An advantage, though, is that when a JSON:API query gets too large, sparse fieldsets can be omitted so that the request remains cacheable.

REST JSON:API GraphQL Multiple data objects in a single response Usually; but every implementation is different (for Drupal: custom "REST Export" view or custom REST plugin needed). Yes Yes Embed related data (e.g. the author of each article) No Yes Yes Only needed fields of a data object No Yes; servers may choose sensible defaults, developers must be diligent to prevent over-fetching. Yes; strict, but eliminates over-fetching, at the extreme, it can lead to poor cacheability. Documentation, API explorability and schema

As a developer working with web services, you want to be able to discover and understand the API quickly and easily: what kinds of resources are available, what fields does each of them have, how are they related, etc. But also, if this field is a date or time, what machine-readable format is the date or time specified in? Good documentation and API exploration can make all the difference.

REST JSON:API GraphQL Auto-generated documentation Depends; if using the OpenAPI standard. Depends; if using the OpenAPI standard (formerly, Swagger). Yes; various tools available. Interactivity Poor; navigable links rarely available. Acceptable; observing available fields and links in its responses enable exploration of the API. Excellent; autocomplete feature, instant results or compilation errors, complete and contextual documentation. Validatable and programmable schema. Depends; if using the OpenAPI standard. Depends; the JSON:API specification defines a generic schema, but a reliable field-level schema is not yet available. Yes; a complete and reliable schema is provided (with very few exceptions).

GraphQL has superior API exploration thanks to GraphiQL (demonstrated in the video above), an in-browser IDE of sorts, which lets developers iteratively construct a query. As the developer types the query out, likely suggestions are offered and can be auto-completed. At any time, the query can be run and GraphiQL will display real results alongside the query. This provides immediate, actionable feedback to the query builder. Did they make a typo? Does the response look like what was desired? Additionally, documentation can be summoned into a flyout, when additional context is needed.

On the other hand, JSON:API is more self-explanatory: APIs can be explored with nothing more than a web browser. From within the browser, you can browse from one resource to another, discover its fields, and more. So, if you just want to debug or try something out, JSON:API is usable with nothing more than cURL or your browser. Or, you can use Postman (demonstrated in the video above) — a standalone environment for developing on top of an anyHTTP-based API. Constructing complex queries requires some knowledge, however, and that is where GraphQL's GraphiQL shines compared to JSON:API.

Operational simplicity

We use the term operational simplicity to encompass how easy it is to install, configure, run, scale and secure each of the solutions.

The table should be self-explanatory, though it's important to make a remark about scalability. To scale a REST-based or JSON:API-based web service so that it can handle a large volume of traffic, you can use the same approach websites (and Drupal) already use, including reverse proxies like Varnish or a CDN. To scale GraphQL, you can't rely on HTTP caching as with REST or JSON:API without persisted queries. Persisted queries are not part of the official GraphQL specification but they are a widely-adopted conventionamongst GraphQL users. They essentially store a query on the server, assign it an ID and permit the client to get the result of the query using a GETrequest with only the ID. Persisted queries add more operational complexity, and it also means the architecture is no longer fully decoupled — if a client wants to retrieve different data, server-side changes are required.

REST JSON:API GraphQL Scalability: additional infrastructure requirements Excellent; same as a regular website (Varnish, CDN, etc). Excellent; same as a regular website (Varnish, CDN, etc). Usually poor; only the simplest queries can use GET requests; to reap the full benefit of GraphQL, servers needs their own tooling. Tooling ecosystem Acceptable; lots of developer tools available, but for the best experience they need to be customized for the implementation. Excellent; lots of developer tools available; tools don't need to be implementation-specific. Excellent; lots of developer tools available; tools don't need to be implementation-specific. Typical points of failure Fewer; server, client. Fewer; server, client. Many; server, client, client-side caching, client and build tooling. Writing data

For most REST APIs and JSON:API, writing data is as easy as fetching it: if you can read information, you also know how to write it. Instead of using the GET HTTP request type you use POST and PATCH requests. JSON:API improves on typical REST APIs by eliminating differences between implementations. There is just one way to do things and that enabled better, generic tooling and less time spent on server-side details.

The nature of GraphQL's write operations (called mutations) means that you must write custom code for each write operation; unlike JSON:API the specification, GraphQL doesn't prescribe a single way of handling write operations to resources, so there are many competing best practices. In essence, the GraphQL specification is optimized for reads, not writes.

On the other hand, the GraphQL specification supports bulk/batch operations automatically for the mutations you've already implemented, whereas the JSON:API specification does not. The ability to perform batch write operations can be important. For example, in our running example, adding a new tag to an article would require two requests; one to create the tag and one to update the article. That said, support for bulk/batch writes in JSON:APIis on the specification's roadmap.

REST JSON:API GraphQL Writing data Acceptable; every implementation is different. No bulk support. Excellent; JSON:API prescribes a complete solution for handling writes. Bulk operations are coming soon. Poor; GraphQL supports bulk/batch operations, but writes can be tricky to design and implement. There are competing conventions. Drupal-specific considerations

Up to this point we have provided an architectural and CMS-agnostic comparison; now we also want to highlight a few Drupal-specific implementation details. For this, we can look at the ease of installation, automatically generated documentation, integration with Drupal's entity and field-level access control systems and decoupled filtering.

Drupal 8's REST module is practically impossible to set up without the contributed REST UI module, and its configuration can be daunting. Drupal's JSON:API module is far superior to Drupal's REST module at this point. It is trivial to set up: install it and you're done; there's nothing to configure. The GraphQL module is also easy to install but does require some configuration.

Client-generated collection queries allow a consumer to filter an application's data down to just what they're interested in. This is a bit like a Drupal View except that the consumer can add, remove and control all the filters. This is almost always a requirement for public web services, but it can also make development more efficient because creating or changing a listing doesn't require server-side configuration changes.

Drupal's REST module does not support client-generated collection queries. It requires a "REST Views display" to be setup by a site administrator and since these need to be manually configured in Drupal; this means a client can't craft its own queries with the filters it needs.

JSON:API and GraphQL, clients are able to perform their own content queries without the need for server-side configuration. This means that they can be truly decoupled: changes to the front end don't always require a back-end configuration change.

These client-generated queries are a bit simpler to use with the JSON:API module than they are with the GraphQL module because of how each module handles Drupal's extensive access control mechanisms. By default JSON:API ensures that these are respected by altering the incoming query. GraphQL instead requires the consumer to have permission to simply bypass access restrictions.

Most projects using GraphQL that cannot grant this permission use persisted queries instead of client-generated queries. This means a return to a more traditional Views-like pattern because the consumer no longer has complete control of the query's filters. To regain some of the efficiencies of client-generated queries, the creation of these persisted queries can be automated using front-end build tooling.

REST JSON:API GraphQL Ease of installation and configuration Poor; requires contributed module REST UI, easy to break clients by changing configuration. Excellent; zero configuration! Poor; more complex to use, may require additional permissions, configuration or custom code. Automatically generated documentation Acceptable; requires contributed module OpenAPI. Acceptable; requires contributed module OpenAPI. Excellent; GraphQL Voyager included. Security: content-level access control (entity and field access) Excellent; content-level access control respected. Excellent; content-level access control respected, even in queries. Acceptable; some use cases require the consumer to have permission to bypass all entity and/or field access. Decoupled filtering (client can craft queries without server-side intervention) No Yes Depends; only in some setups and with additional tooling/infrastructure. What does this mean for Drupal's roadmap?

Drupal grew up as a traditional web content management system but has since evolved for this API-first world and industry analysts are praising us for it.

As Drupal's project lead, I've been talking about adding out-of-the-box support for both JSON:API and GraphQL for a while now. In fact, I've been very bullish about GraphQL since 2015. My optimism was warranted; GraphQL is undergoing a meteoric rise in interest across the web development industry.

Based on this analysis, for Drupal core's needs, we rank JSON:API above GraphQL and GraphQL above REST. As such, I want to change my recommendation for Drupal 8 core. Instead of adding both JSON:API and GraphQL to Drupal 8 core, I believe only JSON:API should be added. That said, Drupal's GraphQL implementation is fantastic, especially when you have the developer capacity to build a bespoke API for your project.

On the four qualities by which we evaluated the REST, JSON:API and GraphQL modules, JSON:API has outperformed its contemporaries. Its web standards-based approach, its ability to handle reads and writes out of the box, its security model and its ease of operation make it the best choice for Drupal core. Additionally, where JSON:API underperformed, I believe that we have a real opportunity to contribute back to the specification. In fact, one of the JSON:API module's maintainers and co-authors of this blog post, Gabe Sullice (Acquia), recently became a JSON:API specification editor himself.

This decision does not mean that you can't or shouldn't use GraphQL with Drupal. While I believe JSON:API covers the majority of use cases, there are valid use cases where GraphQL is a great fit. I'm happy that Drupal is endowed with such a vibrant contributed module ecosystem that provides so many options to Drupal's users.

I'm excited to see where both the JSON:API specification and Drupal's implementation of it goes in the coming months and years. As a first next step, we're preparing the JSON:API to be added to Drupal 8.7.

Special thanks to Wim Leers (Acquia) and Gabe Sullice (Acquia) for co-authoring this blog post and to Preston So (Acquia) and Alex Bronstein(Acquia) for their feedback during the writing process.

 February 11, 2019

 11 min read time

 Permalink

Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: Introducing the Quicklink module for Drupal

Planet Drupal - 13 February 2019 - 10:03am

The mobile web is too slow. According to the HTTP Archive, the median time to first contentful paint is 5.8 seconds — this means that the average person waits almost 6 seconds just to view an average website on their phone. 

Categories: Drupal

Blair Wadman: Easy way to find the Drush command you are looking for

Planet Drupal - 13 February 2019 - 9:22am

Both Drush and Console have built-in help. If you type drush, you will get a long list of available commands. If you type drupal, again you will get a long list of available console commands. If you can’t remember the exact command to use to do what you need, you can scroll through the long list of commands to find the one you want.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association blog: Keeping up to date with information for Drupal Event Organizers

Planet Drupal - 13 February 2019 - 9:10am

The events that every year bring us together all over the World are the lifeblood of our vibrant and diverse community. From BADCamp in California, USA, through Global Training Days in Omsk, Russia to Contribution Weekends in Leeds, UK, we have a combined wealth of knowledge and experiences but also challenges and opportunities.

At the Drupal Association, we value highly the commitment made by those who volunteer their time to make these events happen. If I wasn’t British, and therefore terribly understated, at this point I would probably say “You rock!”.

As an event organiser, I wanted to take the opportunity to bring to your attention a few things happening in the community that we hope will help you in your efforts.

The Event Organizers’ Group

We were very pleased to see the creation of a growing group of event organizers forming and beginning to have regular meetings to share experiences and resources. One of its founders, Kaleem Clarkson, has blogged about this and their plans for the future.

To help with their formation, we helped them become one of the first groups to create one of the new Community Group Sections at Drupal.org/community/event-organizers.

One thing that is super important, though, is that this group has representation by event organizers from all around the World. Wherever you live, do join this group, make your voice heard and ensure that it meets in a way that works for you.

The Event Organizers’ Round Table with Dries Buytaert

One of the requests we had from the group was to be able to spend more time discussing their aims with the Project founder, Dries Buytaert.

Dries agreed that spending quality time with representatives of such a key part of our community was highly valuable, so we have created a round table at DrupalCon Seattle 2019 to which event organizers will be invited to attend and participate.

The invites will be sent to the mailing segment introduced below - make sure you read on!


Image of Dries taking notes from a previous Round Table, courtesy Baddý Sonja Breidert

A mailing list segment especially for event organizers

To ensure that we can alert event organizers to activities like the above, we have created a special segment in our mailing list system that allows us to send updates to only those that want to hear about them.

If you are an Event Organizer, or looking to become one in the future, I highly recommend you visit your user profile on Drupal.org and check the box “Contact me regarding local organizing (camps, groups, etc.)”

For the above mentioned Round Table with Dries Buytaert, we will be sending invites to member of this mailing list so make sure you are on it!

Categories: Drupal

Inline Help

New Drupal Modules - 13 February 2019 - 7:44am

Inline Help module, originally written by Giancarlo Diana, provides small icons (like "i" or "?") that at mouse hover or tap show a contextual pop-up with an help text.
The help text is the body of an entity made with eck module.
This module comes with an administrative interface and dedicated permission that allow to control access and data manipulation.
Furthermore this module allow to put the contextual help wherever you want in the page, via php or via ajax.
Each help entity instance has a machine name

Categories: Drupal

Acquia Developer Center Blog: Building Usable Conversations: Conversational Usability Testing

Planet Drupal - 13 February 2019 - 7:31am

In this fifth installment of our series on conversational usability, our focus shifts to conversational usability and the process of evaluating and improving conversational interfaces that often differ significantly from the visual and physical interfaces we normally use to test with end users.

Tags: acquia drupal planet
Categories: Drupal

Answer Stack Core

New Drupal Modules - 13 February 2019 - 6:56am

This will be the core of the Answer Stack module.

Functionality:
- Ask questions
- Post answers
- Tags
- Comment on both
- Drupal View That lists questions
- Permissions scheme for “members”
- Permissions scheme for “moderator”
- Log unique views on questions
- Extend user view to show your own questions (to be extended later)

Categories: Drupal

InternetDevels: Updated and stable Webform module in Drupal 8 for form creation

Planet Drupal - 13 February 2019 - 5:38am

Various forms are the heart of website’s interaction with the user. They are vital for usability, conversions, marketing analytics, and more. So form building tools are in demand — the Drupal Webform module ranks 7th on the 42,000+ list of contributed modules. The Webform module has recently got its stable version for Drupal 8. We will give it an overview and show an example of creating a simple form with the Webform module.

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Categories: Drupal

YATEO - SEO TOOLS

New Drupal Modules - 13 February 2019 - 3:53am
YATEO

Opens all the essential tools for SEO in one click with the Yateo SEO tools.
A simple install presents the bests SEO links to check your site stats.

Categories: Drupal

PDF JS

New Drupal Modules - 13 February 2019 - 3:07am
Categories: Drupal

Flocon de toile | Freelance Drupal: Provide a footer to a micro site with Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 13 February 2019 - 3:04am

The Micro Site module allows you to set up a Drupal web factory, from a single Drupal 8 instance, to power a multitude of sites, of a different nature if necessary. Micro Site provides a new content entity that allows you to customize these different site types at will, using the APIs available on Drupal 8, and modify their behavior according to business needs.

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: Interview with Taco Potze: Why Drupal was the CMS of choice and what potential open source has

Planet Drupal - 12 February 2019 - 11:54pm

We had a delightful talk with Taco Potze, co-founder of GoalGorilla, Open Social and THX. Taco revealed to us why his team decided for Drupal among the various possible CMS choices and what Drupal initiative they are most excited about. He thinks open source has the potential to balance out the power of tech giants and give people all over the world equal opportunities. Take a look to find out more about his projects and his contributions to the community.

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Categories: Drupal

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