Drupal

Dries Buytaert: The evolution of Acquia's product strategy

Planet Drupal - 11 October 2017 - 1:26pm

Four months ago, I shared that Acquia was on the verge of a shift equivalent to the decision to launch Acquia Fields and Drupal Gardens in 2008. As we entered Acquia's second decade, we outlined a goal to move from content management to data-driven customer journeys. Today, Acquia announced two new products that support this mission: Acquia Journey and Acquia Digital Asset Manager (DAM).

Last year on my blog, I shared a video that demonstrated what is possible with cross-channel user experiences and Drupal. We showed a sample supermarket chain called Gourmet Market. Gourmet Market wants its customers to not only shop online using its website, but to also use Amazon Echo or push notifications to do business with them. The Gourmet Market prototype showed an omnichannel customer experience that is both online and offline, in store and at home, and across multiple digital touchpoints. The Gourmet Market demo video was real, but required manual development and lacked easy customization. Today, the launch of Acquia Journey and Acquia DAM makes building these kind of customer experiences a lot easier. It marks an important milestone in Acquia's history, as it will accelerate our transition from content management to data-driven customer journeys.

Introducing Acquia Journey

I've written a great deal about the Big Reverse of the Web, which describes the transition from "pull-based" delivery of the web, meaning we visit websites, to a "push-based" delivery, meaning the web comes to us. The Big Reverse forces a major re-architecture of the web to bring the right information, to the right person, at the right time, in the right context.

The Big Reserve also ushers in the shift from B2C to B2One, where organizations develop a one-to-one relationship with their customers, and contextual and personalized interactions are the norm. In the future, every organization will have to rethink how it interacts with customers.

Successfully delivering a B2One experience requires an understanding of your user's journey and matching the right information or service to the user's context. This alone is no easy feat, and many marketers and other digital experience builders often get frustrated with the challenge of rebuilding customer experiences. For example, although organizations can create brilliant campaigns and high-value content, it's difficult to effectively disseminate marketing efforts across multiple channels. When channels, data and marketing software act in different silos, it's nearly impossible to build a seamless customer experience. The inability to connect customer profiles and journey maps with various marketing tools can result in unsatisfied customers, failed conversion rates, and unrealized growth.

Acquia Journey delivers on this challenge by enabling marketers to build data-driven customer journeys. It allows marketers to easily map, assemble, orchestrate and manage customer experiences like the one we showed in our Gourmet Market prototype.

It's somewhat difficult to explain Acquia Journey in words — probably similar to trying to explain what a content management system does to someone who has never used one before. Acquia Journey provides a single interface to define and evaluate customer journeys across multiple interaction points. It combines a flowchart-style journey mapping tool with unified customer profiles and an automated decision engine. Rules-based triggers and logic select and deliver the best-next action for engaging customers.

One of the strengths of Acquia Journey is that it integrates many different technologies, from marketing and advertising technologies to CRM tools and commerce platforms. This makes it possible to quickly assemble powerful and complex customer journeys.

Acquia Journey will simplify how organizations deliver the "best next experience" for the customer. Providing users with the experience they not only want, but expect will increase conversion rates, grow brand awareness, and accelerate revenue. The ability for organizations to build more relevant user experiences not only aligns with our customers' needs but will enable them to make the biggest impact possible for their customers.

Acquia's evolving product offering also puts control of user data and experience back in the hands of the organization, instead of walled gardens. This is a step toward uniting the Open Web.

Introducing Acquia Digital Asset Manager (DAM)

Digital asset management systems have been around for a long time, and were originally hosted through on-premise servers. Today, most organizations have abandoned on-premise or do-it-yourself DAM solutions. After listening to our customers, it became clear that large organizations are seeking a digital asset management solution that centralizes control of creative assets for the entire company.

Many organizations lack a single-source of truth when it comes to managing digital assets. This challenge has been amplified as the number of assets has rapidly increased in a world with more devices, more channels, more campaigns, and more personalized and contextualized experiences. Acquia DAM provides a centralized repository for managing all rich media assets, including photos, videos, PDFs, and other corporate documents. Creative and marketing teams can upload and manage files in Acquia DAM, which can then be shared across the organization. Graphic designers, marketers and web managers all have a hand in translating creative concepts into experiences for their customers. With Acquia DAM, every team can rely on one dedicated application to gather requirements, share drafts, consolidate feedback and collect approvals for high-value marketing assets.

On top of Drupal's asset and media management capabilities, Acquia DAM provides various specialized functionality, such as automatic transcoding of assets upon download, image and video mark-up during approval workflows, and automated tagging for images using machine learning and image recognition.

By using a drag-and-drop interface on Acquia DAM, employees can easily publish approved assets in addition to searching the repository for what they need.

Acquia DAM seamlessly integrates with both Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 (using Drupal's "media entities"). In addition to Drupal, Acquia DAM is built to integrate with the entirety of the Acquia Platform. This includes Acquia Lift and Acquia Journey, which means that any asset managed in the Acquia DAM repository can be utilized to create personalized experiences across multiple Drupal sites. Additionally, through a REST API, Acquia DAM can also be integrated with other marketing technologies. For example, Acquia DAM supports designers with a plug in to Adobe Creative Cloud, which integrates with Photoshop, InDesign and Illustrator.

Acquia's roadmap to data-driven customer journeys

Throughout Acquia's first decade, we've been primarily focused on providing our customers with the tools and services necessary to scale and succeed with content management. We've been very successful with helping our customers scale and manage Drupal and cloud solutions. Drupal will remain a critical component to our customer's success, and we will continue to honor our history as committed supporters of open source, in addition to investing in Drupal's future.

However, many of our customers need more than content management to be digital winners. The ability to orchestrate customer experiences using content, user data, decisioning systems, analytics and more will be essential to an organization's success in the future. Acquia Journey and Acquia DAM will remove the complexity from how organizations build modern digital experiences and customer journeys. We believe that expanding our platform will be good not only for Acquia, but for our partners, the Drupal community, and our customers.

Categories: Drupal

mark.ie: Drupal Camp Dublin is Next Week - Last Chance for Tickets

Planet Drupal - 11 October 2017 - 11:44am
Drupal Camp Dublin is Next Week - Last Chance for Tickets

Seems like just yesterday since we held DrupalCon in Dublin, now we're back with our annual Drupal Camp Dublin.

markconroy Wed, 10/11/2017 - 19:44

This year's Drupal Camp Dublin has a great line up of speakers from Ireland and abroad, covering such topics as:

  • Building multi-lingual, multi-region websites (Stella Power)
  • Working as a developer with attention-deficit disorder - add (Levi Govaerts)
  • Planning for disruptions (Jochen Lillich)
  • Migrating from Drupal 4 to 5 to 6 to 7 to 8 (Alan Burke)
  • Automating deployments (Luis Rodriguez)
  • Working webform and commerce and paragraphs and display suites and more (Chandeep Khosa)
  • Live debugging a site that's giving issues (Anthony Lindsay)
  • Deploy with Fabric, and test driven development (Oliver Davies)
  • Design in the Browser (yours truly, me, Mark Conroy)
  • Teaching web development at third level (Ruairi O'Reilly)
  • The QA process (Daniel Shaw)
  • Getting started with Docker (Ed Crompton)
  • The new theme coming to Drupal core (Mark Conroy)

And then there's some socials, and our Drupal Ireland AGM, and at least one other talk not announced yet, and ... you get the idea.

The full schedule is available on our website. There are some tickets left (only €20), get them before they are all gone.

Categories: Drupal

myDropWizard.com: Drupal 6 version of netFORUM Authentication not affected by SA-CONTRIB-2017-077

Planet Drupal - 11 October 2017 - 11:37am

Today, there was a Moderately Critical security advisory for an Access Bypass vulnerability in the netFORUM Authentication module for Drupal 7:

netFORUM Authentication - Moderately critical - Access Bypass - SA-CONTRIB-2017-077

The module was bypassing protections on the Drupal 7 user login form, to deter brute force attempts to login to the site, and so was an Access Bypass vulnerability by making login less secure when using this module.

However, Drupal 6 (including Pressflow 6) don't have these same protections for the user login form, and so, using this module is no less secure than using vanilla Drupal 6. Of course, these protections could be added to this module, and while this would be great security hardening, this doesn't represent a vulnerability - only a weakness which is also present (and widely known) in Drupal 6 core.

If you'd like all your Drupal 6 modules to receive security updates and have the fixes deployed the same day they're released, please check out our D6LTS plans.

Note: if you use the myDropWizard module (totally free!), you'll be alerted to these and any future security updates, and will be able to use drush to install them (even though they won't necessarily have a release on Drupal.org).

Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: Mediacurrent Wins Three Nominations at 2017 Acquia Engage Conference

Planet Drupal - 11 October 2017 - 10:21am

Mediacurrent has been selected as finalists for the 2017 Acquia Engage Awards in the categories of Financial Services, Travel and Tourism, and Digital Experience. These awards recognize the amazing sites and digital experiences that leading digital agencies are building with the Acquia Platform.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: Drupal looking to adopt React

Planet Drupal - 11 October 2017 - 10:05am

This blog has been re-posted with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

Last week at DrupalCon Vienna, I proposed adding a modern JavaScript framework to Drupal core. After the keynote, I met with core committers, framework managers, JavaScript subsystem maintainers, and JavaScript experts in the Drupal community to discuss next steps. In this blog post, I look back on how things have evolved, since the last time we explored adding a new JavaScript framework to Drupal core two years ago, and what we believe are the next steps after DrupalCon Vienna.

As a group, we agreed that we had learned a lot from watching the JavaScript community grow and change since our initial exploration. We agreed that today, React would be the most promising option given its expansive adoption by developers, its unopinionated and component-based nature, and its well-suitedness to building new Drupal interfaces in an incremental way. Today, I'm formally proposing that the Drupal community adopt React, after discussion and experimentation has taken place.

Two years ago, it was premature to pick a JavaScript framework

Three years ago, I developed several convictions related to "headless Drupal" or "decoupled Drupal". I believed that:

  1. More and more organizations wanted a headless Drupal so they can use a modern JavaScript framework to build application-like experiences.
  2. Drupal's authoring and site building experience could be improved by using a more modern JavaScript framework.
  3. JavaScript and Node.js were going to take the world by storm and that we would be smart to increase the amount of JavaScript expertise in our community.

(For the purposes of this blog post, I use the term "framework" to include both full MV* frameworks such as Angular, and also view-only libraries such as React combined piecemeal with additional libraries for managing routing, states, etc.)

By September 2015, I had built up enough conviction to write several long blog posts about these views (post 1, post 2, post 3). I felt we could accomplish all three things by adding a JavaScript framework to Drupal core. After careful analysis, I recommended that we consider React, Ember and Angular. My first choice was Ember, because I had concerns about a patent clause in Facebook's open-source license (since removed) and because Angular 2 was not yet in a stable release.

At the time, the Drupal community didn't like the idea of picking a JavaScript framework. The overwhelming reactions were these: it's too early to tell which JavaScript framework is going to win, the risk of picking the wrong JavaScript framework is too big, picking a single framework would cause us to lose users that favor other frameworks, etc. In addition, there were a lot of different preferences for a wide variety of JavaScript frameworks. While I'd have preferred to make a bold move, the community's concerns were valid.

Focusing on Drupal's web services instead

By May of 2016, after listening to the community, I changed my approach; instead of adding a specific JavaScript framework to Drupal, I decided we should double down on improving Drupal's web service APIs. Instead of being opinionated about what JavaScript framework to use, we would allow people to use their JavaScript framework of choice.

I did a deep dive on the state of Drupal's web services in early 2016 and helped define various next steps (post 1, post 2, post 3). I asked a few of the OCTO team members to focus on improving Drupal 8's web services APIs; funded improvements to Drupal core's REST API, as well as JSON API, GraphQL and OpenAPI; supported the creation of Waterwheel projects to help bootstrap an ecosystem of JavaScript front-end integrations; and most recently supported the development of Reservoir, a Drupal distribution for headless Drupal. There is also a lot of innovation coming from the community with lots of work on the Contenta distribution, JSON API, GraphQL, and more.

The end result? Drupal's web service APIs have progressed significantly the past year. Ed Faulkner of Ember told us: "I'm impressed by how fast Drupal made lots of progress with its REST API and the JSON API contrib module!". It's a good sign when a core maintainer of one of the leading JavaScript frameworks acknowledges Drupal's progress.

The current state of JavaScript in Drupal

Looking back, I'm glad we decided to focus first on improving Drupal's web services APIs; we discovered that there was a lot of work left to stabilize them. Cleanly integrating a JavaScript framework with Drupal would have been challenging 18 months ago. While there is still more work to be done, Drupal 8's available web service APIs have matured significantly.

Furthermore, by not committing to a specific framework, we are seeing Drupal developers explore a range of JavaScript frameworks and members of multiple JavaScript framework communities consuming Drupal's web services. I've seen Drupal 8 used as a content repository behind Angular, Ember, React, Vue, and other JavaScript frameworks. Very cool!

There is a lot to like about how Drupal's web service APIs matured and how we've seen Drupal integrated with a variety of different frameworks. But there is also no denying that not having a JavaScript framework in core came with certain tradeoffs:

  1. It created a barrier for significantly leveling up the Drupal community's JavaScript skills. In my opinion, we still lack sufficient JavaScript expertise among Drupal core contributors. While we do have JavaScript experts working hard to maintain and improve our existing JavaScript code, I would love to see more experts join that team.
  2. It made it harder to accelerate certain improvements to Drupal's authoring and site building experience.
  3. It made it harder to demonstrate how new best practices and certain JavaScript approaches could be leveraged and extended by core and contributed modules to create new Drupal features.

One trend we are now seeing is that traditional MV* frameworks are giving way to component libraries; most people seem to want a way to compose interfaces and interactions with reusable components (e.g. libraries like React, Vue, Polymer, and Glimmer) rather than use a framework with a heavy focus on MV* workflows (e.g. frameworks like Angular and Ember). This means that my original recommendation of Ember needs to be revisited.

Several years later, we still don't know what JavaScript framework will win, if any, and I'm willing to bet that waiting two more years won't give us any more clarity. JavaScript frameworks will continue to evolve and take new shapes. Picking a single one will always be difficult and to some degree "premature". That said, I see React having the most momentum today.

My recommendations at DrupalCon Vienna

Given that it's been almost two years since I last suggested adding a JavaScript framework to core, I decided to talk bring the topic back in my DrupalCon Vienna keynote presentation. Prior to my keynote, there had been some renewed excitement and momentum behind the idea. Two years later, here is what I recommended we should do next:

  • Invest more in Drupal's API-first initiative. In 2017, there is no denying that decoupled architectures and headless Drupal will be a big part of our future. We need to keep investing in Drupal's web service APIs. At a minimum, we should expand Drupal's web service APIs and standardize on JSON API. Separately, we need to examine how to give API consumers more access to and control over Drupal's capabilities.
  • Embrace all JavaScript frameworks for building Drupal-powered applications. We should give developers the flexibility to use their JavaScript framework of choice when building front-end applications on top of Drupal — so they can use the right tool for the job. The fact that you can front Drupal with Ember, Angular, Vue, React, and others is a great feature. We should also invest in expanding the Waterwheel ecosystem so we have SDKs and references for all these frameworks.
  • Pick a framework for Drupal's own administrative user interfaces. Drupal should pick a JavaScript framework for its own administrative interface. I'm not suggesting we abandon our stable base of PHP code; I'm just suggesting that we leverage JavaScript for the things that JavaScript is great at by moving relevant parts of our code from PHP to JavaScript. Specifically, Drupal's authoring and site building experience could benefit from user experience improvements. A JavaScript framework could make our content modeling, content listing, and configuration tools faster and more application-like by using instantaneous feedback rather than submitting form after form. Furthermore, using a decoupled administrative interface would allow us to dogfood our own web service APIs.
  • Let's start small by redesigning and rebuilding one or two features. Instead of rewriting the entirety of Drupal's administrative user interfaces, let's pick one or two features, and rewrite their UIs using a preselected JavaScript framework. This allows us to learn more about the pros and cons, allows us to dogfood some of our own APIs, and if we ultimately need to switch to another JavaScript framework or approach, it won't be very painful to rewrite or roll the changes back.
Selecting a JavaScript framework for Drupal's administrative UIs

In my keynote, I proposed a new strategic initiative to test and research how Drupal's administrative UX could be improved by using a JavaScript framework. The feedback was very positive.

As a first step, we have to choose which JavaScript framework will be used as part of the research. Following the keynote, we had several meetings at DrupalCon Vienna to discuss the proposed initiative with core committers, all of the JavaScript subsystem maintainers, as well as developers with real-world experience building decoupled applications using Drupal's APIs.

There was unanimous agreement that:

  1. Adding a JavaScript framework to Drupal core is a good idea.
  2. We want to have sufficient real-use experience to make a final decision prior to 8.6.0's development period (Q1 2018). To start, the Watchdog page would be the least intrusive interface to rebuild and would give us important insights before kicking off work on more complex interfaces.
  3. While a few people named alternative options, React was our preferred option, by far, due to its high degree of adoption, component-based and unopinionated nature, and its potential to make Drupal developers' skills more future-proof.
  4. This adoption should be carried out in a limited and incremental way so that the decision is easily reversible if better approaches come later on.

We created an issue on the Drupal core queue to discuss this more.

Conclusion

Drupal should support a variety of JavaScript libraries on the user-facing front end while relying on a single shared framework as a standard across Drupal administrative interfaces.

In short, I continue to believe that adopting more JavaScript is important for the future of Drupal. My original recommendation to include a modern JavaScript framework (or JavaScript libraries) for Drupal's administrative user interfaces still stands. I believe we should allow developers to use their JavaScript framework of choice to build front-end applications on top of Drupal and that we can start small with one or two administrative user interfaces.

After meeting with core maintainers, JavaScript subsystem maintainers, and framework managers at DrupalCon Vienna, I believe that React is the right direction to move for Drupal's administrative interfaces, but we encourage everyone in the community to discuss our recommendation. Doing so would allow us to make Drupal easier to use for site builders and content creators in an incremental and reversible way, keep Drupal developers' skills relevant in an increasingly JavaScript-driven world, move us ahead with modern tools for building user interfaces.

Special thanks to Preston So for contributions to this blog post and to Matt Grill, Wim Leers, Jason Enter, Gábor Hojtsy, and Alex Bronstein for their feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

Commerce claim gift aid

New Drupal Modules - 11 October 2017 - 6:09am
Commerce claim gift aid

This simple module adds the ability for Commerce 2.0 shops to claim gift aid.

To determine whether or not an order item is eligible for gift aid simply update an order item type by visiting the following url

admin/commerce/config/order-item-types

Check the checkbox and the rest is done for you.

If a user adds in an order item where its eligible for gift aid then they will have the choice to choose whether you can claim gift aid.

You can edit the text about gift aid in the commerce configuration screens.

Categories: Drupal

Periodically Mail

New Drupal Modules - 11 October 2017 - 4:41am

This module allow you to send emails after some period to users with some role.

Example: You want to send emails every Monday.

To setup module visit: "/admin/config/services/periodically_mail" path.

Important: The mail is sent when cron runs.

Notice: For HTML emailing you can use extra modules like Mime Mail.

Categories: Drupal

Living style guide

New Drupal Modules - 11 October 2017 - 2:09am
Categories: Drupal

Online Visitors Count

New Drupal Modules - 10 October 2017 - 11:43pm

Online Visitor Counter module counts how many visitors on your website. This module provides real time counting.

Visitors Block :

1. Total visitors count.
2. Today visitors count.
3. weekly visitors count.
4. Yearly visitors count.
5. who's online now.

Categories: Drupal

Colorfield: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Planet Drupal

Planet Drupal - 10 October 2017 - 1:24pm
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Planet Drupal christophe Tue, 10/10/2017 - 22:24 In this newcomer guide, you will find:
  • How to accelerate the onboarding process and how to get a fresh Drupal 8 install, for testing.
  • The documentation reduced to the essential for the following topics: tools, projects, Drupal concepts and drupalisms, main events, contribution and service providers.
  • A brief comparison of other solutions, and when to use Drupal.

There are at least 42 reasons to onboard drupalship.org!

Categories: Drupal

Acro Media: Video: Integrating Payment Gateways in Drupal Commerce 2.x is a Snap!

Planet Drupal - 10 October 2017 - 1:00pm

 

 

To say that payment gateways are much improved in Commerce 2.x is a bit of an understatement. The process of implementing a payment gateway has been cut down to about a third of the time, with more functionality rather than less.

Categories: Drupal

jquery.timepicker polyfill

New Drupal Modules - 10 October 2017 - 10:59am

Provides a light wrapper for jquery.timepicker

Uses modernizr to detect browser support for html5 `time` inputs and applies the polyfill if not.

Categories: Drupal

Elevated Third: 5 Ways Web Development Project Management Will Make Your Project More Successful

Planet Drupal - 10 October 2017 - 9:45am
5 Ways Web Development Project Management Will Make Your Project More Successful 5 Ways Web Development Project Management Will Make Your Project More Successful Lily Berman Tue, 10/10/2017 - 10:45

As account managers at Elevated Third, we manage many projects across our accounts. Web development project management is intangible though not unimportant. We do not create wireframes or write code, so our direct impact on the Drupal websites Elevated Third produces may be less clear to our clients.

During the sales process, some clients see their communication budget as an unnecessary expense. Similar to limiting overhead spending when choosing recipients for charitable organizations, limiting the communication budget means more time goes to execution, right?

Maybe not. In the same way that a successful benefit event can dramatically increase the funds available for a nonprofit’s mission, strong account management directly contributes to our clients achieving their business goals across projects.

So, how does an account manager foster a successful Drupal project at Elevated Third?

  1) Account managers are the single consistent knowledge holder throughout the life of a project

Our team’s level of involvement will vary throughout a project. While UX has a large impact in the beginning, developers complete the majority of the tasks at the end. The account manager is the only member of the team who is in every meeting from kickoff to launch. It can be frustrating (and often expensive) for clients when the team veers from their vision. As a consistent project knowledge holder, an account manager can guide the team to ensure that they are considering the big picture, even when the client is not in the room.

For Instance: A designer knows he needs to create visual design for the project. He reviews what he believes is the necessary documentation, but did not see the client’s email update describing her new brand direction. He spends hours designing with the original brand guidelines in mind, then presents it to the client. The client is then frustrated that her feedback was not implemented and additional hours will be needed to modify the design. As our contracts are time and materials, every additional hour spent on a project has a corresponding cost to our clients.

When an account manager is involved in a project, she is part of every conversation and reviews every client email. This means no feedback will get lost in translation and costly adjustments will be avoided. Account managers are not responsible for creating any element of the website, so we can focus on ensuring that our clients and end users are kept in mind in every meeting and throughout the whole project.

  2) Account managers keep budget and timeline top of mind

A core part of the account manager’s role is managing the client’s budget and timeline. No other member of the team has that responsibility. We balance designers and developers who, if given a chance, would often prefer to build the most beautiful, perfect user-friendly functionality. Their desire to build the best thing ever is valuable, but it has to be balanced with the client’s budget and timeline needs. The account manager sets deadlines and monitors burndown throughout the project. From early discussions of which features will be prioritized to consistent check-ins and tweaks throughout execution, account managers ensure that the project aligns with the established constraints.

For instance: A UX strategist, excited about how valuable the tool we are building will be for its users, starts planning her user testing. She creates a first round of prototypes and tests with five users. Their feedback is so beneficial, she creates another iteration of prototypes to test with another five users, and then tests a third. Although she has gained valuable insight, she has now used half of the project hours that were allocated for visual design, as the budget did not accommodate extensive user testing. When an account manager takes on the role of web development project management, she knows the scope and the hours that are allocated for each task. She completes a variety of checks and balances to ensure the execution aligns with the project constraints.

  3) Account managers communicate with clients and with the team

Custom web development can often be a mysterious and complex process. Luckily, an account manager has learned to translate jargon for our clients. As a result of working in this industry, we understand the terminology used along with the impact of the choices we are asking our clients to make. Not only do we coordinate meetings and send status updates to keep clients in the loop, but we are also uniquely equipped to ensure they understand the process. This means that our team can stay focused on their tasks and more efficiently complete work with minimal interruptions.

For Instance: A developer has spent an hour working on a very complex task. Knowing that he needs to maximize concentration and minimize interruptions, he silences all of his notifications. This practice, called going “heads down,” is common when tackling problem-solving tasks. During this time, a client reaches out with an extremely urgent issue. Since he is the only person available to answer her request, it lingers for hours before she receives a response. For some development-related issues, especially on a live site, this delay can dramatically impact the client’s bottom line. When an account manager is involved in the project, she can immediately alert the developer of the request and let the client know her concern is being addressed right away.

  4) Account managers are organization wizards

For all projects, but especially for complex projects, there can be a lot of documentation. Luckily, account managers choose this field because we love organizing chaos. This skill helps our team work faster throughout the course of a project. Although a client rarely sees our organization and management of tasks and documentation, they will see the benefits of more accurate work and increased efficiency across teams.

For Instance: A developer knows that she needs to reference a particular piece of documentation for the element of the site she is building today, but she can’t find it. She spends 15 minutes digging through folders to find what she needs, which seems to happen every time she completes a task. When an account manager is involved in a project, she knows what documentation the developer will need, so she has already attached it to the current task, saving the developer time.

 

5) Account managers are flexible and adapt their skills to maximize their value

Every other role on a project is clear. A UX strategist helps to define which features will best achieve the business goals and how to maximize a user’s experience of interacting with them. A designer crafts how they will appear. A developer builds them. An account manager’s role in web development project management is less clear. When people ask me what I do on a typical day, my answer often comes after a long pause, and it’s rarely the same. Many others in my field find it difficult to describe their role succinctly, as our work can vary dramatically from day to day and from project to project.

For instance: Some days, my role is quite technical, and I am preparing or reviewing project documentation or checking the quality of completed development tasks. Other days, my role is more interpersonal, and I am supporting my team in delivering their best work or in back-to-back meetings with my clients. With each project comes a new business to learn, often along with new technologies and additional nuance to my role. To be successful, I am always switching between the various priorities outlined here, along with many more.

 

At Elevated Third, we value our clients’ investment in our work and are always evolving to maximize the value of that investment. We build communication time into our projects because we know how invaluable strong account managers are to ensuring our Drupal websites generate the outcomes our clients value most.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Security Warning for Composer

New Drupal Modules - 10 October 2017 - 8:05am

This Composer plugin will display a warning when users install or update Drupal packages (via Composer) that are not supported by the Drupal Security team, as per the Security Advisory Policy.

Example

Installing or updating a "non-covered" Drupal package via composer install will display:

Categories: Drupal

Zivtech: Drupal is Not Just for Your Marketing Site

Planet Drupal - 10 October 2017 - 7:51am

As a Drupal expert, many of the projects I’ve done over the years have been marketing websites. Drupal is widely understood as a content management system that’s used to power sites like ours, but this is actually only the tip of the iceberg of what Drupal can do for an organization. Our team has used Drupal to build a variety of complex custom web applications that help companies work more efficiently.

Do you need an intranet?

We’ve used Drupal to build intranets that securely keep internal content and documents for staff eyes only. Drupal has an abundance of community features that make it easy to have wikis, commenting, user profiles, and messaging. Many organizations we’ve worked with integrate their intranet with their LDAP or other Single Sign On system. 

Radial's intranet allows team members to quickly locate information about co-workers

We’ve also used Drupal for our own intranet for the past eight years. Our intranet helps keep our internal knowledge base easy to access and organizes information like our servers, sites, clients, and projects.

Read more
Categories: Drupal

Defined table field

New Drupal Modules - 10 October 2017 - 6:56am

This module provides a new "Defined table" field type, that allows administrators and content builders to add tables to content.

Table header row and column (data labels) can be either predefined in field settings (the same for a field instance) or set to dynamic and definable per entity.

Possible label sources:

  • Taxonomy vocabulary
  • Custom input

Other table field modules:

Categories: Drupal

Taxonomy Move

New Drupal Modules - 10 October 2017 - 6:29am

Move terms between vocabularies.

Categories: Drupal

Leaflet Entity Browser

New Drupal Modules - 10 October 2017 - 6:29am

This module allows you to use a Leaflet map as a views widget inside Entity Browser.

Note: This module depends on the following patches to the Leaflet drupal module (if the issues are not fixed already):

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Modules: The One Percent: Drupal Modules: The One Percent —Content connected (video tutorial)

Planet Drupal - 10 October 2017 - 5:32am
Drupal Modules: The One Percent —Content connected (video tutorial) NonProfit Tue, 10/10/2017 - 07:32 Episode 39

Here is where we seek to bring awareness to Drupal modules running on less than 1% of reporting sites. Today let's consider Content connected, a module which displays where content has been referenced.

Categories: Drupal

ADCI Solutions: Web Designers methods and tools for enhancing a workflow

Planet Drupal - 10 October 2017 - 4:28am

Designers do love order, so don’t believe in stereotypes. Our Drupal team’s designer created her own approach of the working files organization. It helps her to communicate with the rest of the team - developers and managers - efficiently.

 

Try out our approach and improve the workflow

 

 

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