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Drupal Association News: Drupal Association Board Meeting: 18 March 2015

Planet Drupal - 25 March 2015 - 12:14pm

In our March board meeting we took a look at the month of February and all the goodness that the Association and the community have managed to stir up. Spoiler alert: it's a lot. We've got lots of impressive changes on Drupal.org, some big community events to recap, and elections. If you missed the meeting, no worries! I'm going to recap some main points below, but you can always watch the recording, review the minutes, or check out the meeting materials (or all of the above, because overacheiver). Here's what we talked about:

Operational Update
  • We have three new staff starting at the Association. We'll have a new post on our blog shortly to introduce them all, but the long and short of it is this: Our DrupalCon team is now at 100% strength again, our marketing team can now get even more great Drupal content out into the universe, and adding a CFO to our team means that well be able to position the Association to better tell our financial story and project into the future.
  • There is a brand (re)new newsletter going out - the Drupal Newsletter. Those of you who have been in the community for a while may remember that the last issue went out in 2008. We recently resuscitated the newsletter subscriptions functionality on your Drupal.org profile AND partnered with Bob Kepford to bring the Weekly Drop (plus a little extra Association goodness) to you once a week. Not subscribed? Go edit your D.O profile and you can subcribe right there!
  • We are moving our dashboards into a publicly viewable/slick looking location. Up until now we've been sharing our dashboard data as tables in our monthly board update. It was better than not tracking numbers, but did not allow us to share context for our metrics and frankly, tables are really hard for mere humans to parse. We'll be moving all our metrics into SimpleKPI over time, but for now, take a look at the pretty that is the Drupal.org Dashboard.
DrupalCon Latin America

We were thrilled to be in Bogota, Colombia for DrupalCon Latin America in February. Although we are really excited about what we accomplished, it did not happen without several very real bumps in the road. First, our attendance goal was 400, but we only hit 263, and one-third of those came in during the last two weeks. Managing the budget and logistics when attendance was so up in the air was a real challenge, but the DrupalCon team managed to ensure that we beat our budget expectations, so there was no negative financial impact for the Association. Most importantly, we learned a lot and saw some great outcomes:

  • Many of the sessions offered live translation between English, Spanish, and Portugese. Additionally, the amazing Lingotek donated translations service so that more than 25 of the session recordings are also available in those languages. This experience with multiple languages will help us in future events, as well as with Drupal.org and other resources we help steward.
  • We had amazing sprint participation - 38% of attendees stuck around on the final day and battled through a 2-hour internet outage (quite happily, I might add) to make their contributions to the project. Huge thanks to the sprint mentors who help make the day so successful.
  • Overall, we think we saw a huge community lift from the event. We had several candidates from Latin America throw their hat in the ring for a board seat in the elections, and we had an increased participation in Global Training Days by Latin American shops. We hope that means that our Latin American community is more closely connected now and that this participation will carry forward and grow into the future.
Working Group Updates

A lot of the Working Groups work right now is actually rethinking how they work. There are three Drupal.org working groups - Infrastructure, Content, and Software. As the Drupal Association staff has grown and taken on real work, we've had to define how the staff and Working Groups collaborate as we go. the new wrinkle is that there are other Working Groups out there that fall under the Drupal (as opposed to Drupal.org) structure that overlap or relate to the D.O working groups. 

For example, the Content Working Group is currently working on a content strategy to completment the user persona research we did and inform an iterative reimagination of Drupal.org. Turns out, a significant portion of that strategy relates to the Documentation Working Group. We didn't figure that out until well into the process, and missed the opportunity to get their feedback and incorporate their needs from the outset. It seems obvious in hindsight, but at the time, we were working with the Drupal.org Working Groups only, which was basically our known universe.

To remedy these kinds of issues, we plan to bring many of the Working Groups together in Los Angeles and are trying to map some process that will ensure that all the right players are brought in at the right time, So, charters are being adjusted, more communication is being planned. We know it's been rough at times, but are committed to finding a path forward that works for everyone.

That's all she wrote...

Have questions, ideas, thoughts concerns? Leave 'em in the comments! I would sincerely love to hear from you. Just to know that one person read this post... these take forever to write! :)

Categories: Drupal

Modules Unraveled: 131 The Job Market in Drupal with Mike Anello - Modules Unraveled Podcast

Planet Drupal - 25 March 2015 - 11:03am
Published: Wed, 03/25/15Download this episodeThe current job market in Drupal
  • What does the job market look like in the Drupal space?
  • Let’s talk about the pipeline idea.
    • Experienced developers vs. Junior developers
What to do to start your career
  • If you’re completely new what do you do?
  • If you’re a hobbyist, what do you do?
  • How do you get experience?
From the employers perspective
  • What should job descriptions look like?
Questions from Twitter
  • Paul Booker
    How should a small business, non-profit, charity, .. find a drupal developer when they need something doing?
  • Damien McKenna
    For someone who knows nothing about web development, what's their best path forward?
  • Chris Hall
    When do you know to ask for/be a Drupal Dev vs a PHP Dev with Drupal experience? Should/is there be a difference?
Episode Links: Mike on drupal.orgMike on TwitterDrupal Easy WebsiteDrupal JobsTags: JobsCareersHiringplanet-drupal
Categories: Drupal

HTTP Request Cache

New Drupal Modules - 25 March 2015 - 10:57am

Provides a wrapper around drupal_http_request() that will, by default, cache outgoing GET requests. Also defines an alter hook so that other modules can adjust if a request is cached or not.

Requirements

No additional requirements.

Usage

Just enable the module and it will start caching outgoing GET requests. More complex rules require implementing an alter hook.

Categories: Drupal

Addison Berry: Joining the Drupal Association Board

Planet Drupal - 25 March 2015 - 9:37am

Wow. That was the first thing I said when I found out that I had been elected to the Drupal Association Board. The next thought was how much trust the Drupal community has put in me. I'm honored to be elected. Thank you. I also want to thank my fellow nominees, who all stepped forward with passion and great ideas. It was a joy to be on the "meet the candidate" discussions with them, and I would have been thrilled had one of them been elected in my place. I'm excited to get to work with the amazing Drupal Association team. I'm not going to lie; one of the reasons I applied for this position was to be able to work with these great people. It is an amazing opportunity for me, and I hope to add my part to pushing the Drupal project and community into the future. Woohoo!

I'm very aware that as one of the two At-large Directors on the board, I've been chosen to represent your voice; the voice of the Drupal community. Please feel free to reach out to me, here on my blog, through Twitter (add1sun), or my Drupal.org profile, to share your thoughts, ideas, and concerns.

Categories: Drupal

Aten Design Group: How to Easily Create Drupal Views in Code

Planet Drupal - 25 March 2015 - 9:32am

Just a couple months ago the title of this post would have sounded crazy to me.

For the last several months I've been working on the CINC module as a way to make my work (and yours) with Drupal configuration better: faster, more predictable, more flexible, etc. Views is one of the most complex types of Drupal configuration, and I've been doing a great job of delaying what I saw as a daunting challenge of figuring out how Views should work with CINC. Even a simple Views export makes it clear that as you click around the Views UI, a lot is happening in the code, and it can be difficult to understand what exactly is going on. Here's an example Views export:

$view = new view(); $view->name = 'random_instructor'; $view->description = ''; $view->tag = 'default'; $view->base_table = 'node'; $view->human_name = 'Random Instructor'; $view->core = 7; $view->api_version = '3.0'; $view->disabled = FALSE; /* Edit this to true to make a default view disabled initially */   /* Display: Master */ $handler = $view->new_display('default', 'Master', 'default'); $handler->display->display_options['use_more_always'] = FALSE; $handler->display->display_options['access']['type'] = 'none'; $handler->display->display_options['cache']['type'] = 'none'; $handler->display->display_options['query']['type'] = 'views_query'; $handler->display->display_options['exposed_form']['type'] = 'basic'; $handler->display->display_options['pager']['type'] = 'some'; $handler->display->display_options['pager']['options']['items_per_page'] = '1'; $handler->display->display_options['pager']['options']['offset'] = '0'; $handler->display->display_options['style_plugin'] = 'default'; $handler->display->display_options['row_plugin'] = 'node'; /* Sort criterion: Global: Random */ $handler->display->display_options['sorts']['random']['id'] = 'random'; $handler->display->display_options['sorts']['random']['table'] = 'views'; $handler->display->display_options['sorts']['random']['field'] = 'random'; /* Filter criterion: Content: Published */ $handler->display->display_options['filters']['status']['id'] = 'status'; $handler->display->display_options['filters']['status']['table'] = 'node'; $handler->display->display_options['filters']['status']['field'] = 'status'; $handler->display->display_options['filters']['status']['value'] = 1; $handler->display->display_options['filters']['status']['group'] = 1; /* Filter criterion: Content: Type */ $handler->display->display_options['filters']['type']['id'] = 'type'; $handler->display->display_options['filters']['type']['table'] = 'node'; $handler->display->display_options['filters']['type']['field'] = 'type'; $handler->display->display_options['filters']['type']['value'] = array( 'instructor' => 'instructor', );   /* Display: Block */ $handler = $view->new_display('block', 'Block', 'block');

That view shows one random instructor node in a block. And if you read the code for a few minutes, you can probably figure that out. But I don't know anyone who would attempt to write that code from scratch. So the only way to create a view like that is to click around in the Views UI. As impressive as the Views UI is, clicking a dozen times and finding the few options I care about among the dozens I don't is still an incredibly tedious way to say "show one random instructor node in a block." Ideally I would say that with code that looks more like show_one_random_instructor_node_in_a_block(); I should be able to say what I want and move on to thinking about more interesting problems, without slowing down on implementation details for simple needs.

As of the beta 2 release, CINC has Views integration, and it's wonderful. It's not quite as simple as show_one_random_instructor_node_in_a_block(), but here's how I'm currently creating that Views block:

CINC::init('View')->machine_name('random_instructor') ->set('human_name', 'Random Instructor') ->set_row_style('node') ->set_view_mode('teaser') ->add_filter('published') ->add_node_type_filter('instructor') ->limit_items(1) ->add_sort('random') ->add_block_display() ->create();

So far that's only touching a small subset of what Views can do. I'll continue refining CINC Views toward this "say what you want and move on" ideal. But now that it's good enough that I'm personally no longer using Views UI at all, I wanted to invite you to the party.

Writing Views configuration from scratch is no longer daunting, and it will only get easier from here. So try it out and submit your own requests to make it even better.

Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: DrupalCon 2015: Lullabot Sessions

Planet Drupal - 25 March 2015 - 7:54am
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This year we have a variety of presentations for you at DrupalCon LA. These all come out of the hard work we're doing all year round on projects such as Tesla, Syfy, SNL, NBC, Bravo (to name a few), and also within the Drupal community.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association News: 2015 At-Large Board Elections Announced

Planet Drupal - 25 March 2015 - 7:00am

Everyone on the staff and Board of the Drupal Association would like to congratulate our newest board member:

Addison Berry.

In addition to congratulating Addison, please join me in thanking the 23 other candidates who put themselves out there in service of Drupal and stood for election. 

This was the fourth election we've held for At-Large board seats at the Drupal Association. This year we had two specific goals for the elections:

  • Increase the diversity of the candidates - Although we only had one female candidate, we saw great success by other measures of diversity. 24 candidates came from 14 different countries - including South American and Asian countries. 
  • Increase voter turnout - We fielded 1,432 votes in this election. Our pool of eligible voters was 159,758, so that means our voter tunrout was .89%. This is still low, but a vast improvement over the last election, which saw a .36% turnout. 

Our next steps will be to reach out to the candidates for their evaluation of the elections experience. We also want to hear from you. Please tell us about your experience with the elections process in the comments below so that we can include them in our planning for the 2016 elections.

Flickr photo: Kodak Views

Categories: Drupal

Redis Logging

New Drupal Modules - 25 March 2015 - 4:20am

Redis logging provides a logging backend for the Redis key-value store, as well as a dblog-like user interface to view watchdog entries.

Categories: Drupal

Kristian Polso: My talk on Drupal security in Drupal Days Milan

Planet Drupal - 25 March 2015 - 12:06am
So I just came back from European Drupal Days in Milan. I had great fun at the event, it was well organized and filled with interesting talks. I'll be sure to attend it next year too!
Categories: Drupal

ThinkShout: The How and Why of Nonprofits Contributing to Open Source

Planet Drupal - 24 March 2015 - 5:00pm

Originally published on February 23rd, 2015 on NTEN.org. Republished with permission.

For the last 15 years or so, we’ve seen consistent growth in nonprofits’ appreciation for how open source tools can support their goals for online engagement. Rarely do we run across an RFP for a nonprofit website redesign that doesn’t specify either Drupal or WordPress as the preferred CMS platform. The immediate benefits of implementing an open source solution are pretty clear:

  • With open source tools, organizations avoid costly licensing fees.

  • Open source tools are generally easier to customize.

  • Open source tools often have stronger and more diverse vendor/support options.

  • Open source platforms are often better suited for integration with other tools and services.

The list goes on… And without going down a rabbit hole, I’ll simply throw out that the benefits of open source go well beyond content management use cases these days.

But the benefits of nonprofits supporting and contributing to these open source projects and communities are a little less obvious, and sometimes less immediate. While our customers generally appreciate the contributions we make to the larger community in solving their specific problems, we still often get asked the following in the sales cycle:

"So let me get this straight: First you want me to pay you to build my organization a website. Then you want me to pay you to give away everything you built for us to other organizations, many of whom we compete with for eyeballs and donations?"

This is a legitimate question! One of the additional benefits of using an open source solution is that you get a lot of functionality "for free." You can save budget over building entirely custom solutions with open source because they offer so much functionality out of the box. So, presumably, some of that saving could be lost if additional budget is spent on releasing code to the larger community.

There are many other arguments against open sourcing. Some organizations think that exposing the tools that underpin their website is a security risk. Others worry that if they open source their solutions, the larger community will change the direction of projects they support and rely upon. But most of the time, it comes down to that first argument:

"We know our organization benefits from open source, but we’re not in a position to give back financially or in terms of our time."

Again, this is an understandable concern, but one that can be mitigated pretty easily with proper planning, good project management, and sound and sustainable engineering practices.

Debunking the Myths of Contributing to Open Source

Myth #1: "Open sourcing components of our website is a security risk."

Not really true. Presumably the concern here is that if a would-be hacker were to see the code that underlies parts of your website, they could exploit security holes in that code. While yes, that could happen, the chances are that working with a software developer who has a strong reputation for contributing to an open source project is pretty safe. More importantly, most strong open source communities, such as the Drupal community, have dedicated security teams and thousands of developers who actively review and report issues that could compromise the security of these contributions. In our experience, unreviewed code and code developed by engineers working in isolation are much more likely to present security risks. And on the off chance that someone in the community does report a security issue, more often than not, the reporter will work with you, for free, to come up with a security patch that fixes the issue.

Myth #2: "If we give away our code, we are giving away our organization’s competitive advantage."

As a software vendor that’s given away code that powers over 45,000 Drupal websites, we can say with confidence: there is no secret sauce. Trust me, all of our competitors use Drupal modules that we’ve released - and vice versa.

By leveraging open source tools, your organization can take advantage of being part of a larger community of practice. And frankly, if your organization is trying to do something new, something that’s not supported by such a community, giving away tools is a great way to build a community around your ideas.

We’ve seen many examples of this. Four years ago, we helped a local nonprofit implement a robust mobile mapping solution on top of the Leaflet Javascript library. At the time, there wasn’t an integration for this library and Drupal. So, as part of this project we asked the client invest 20 hours or so for us release the barebones scaffolding of their mapping tool as a contributed Drupal module.

At first, this contributed module was simply a developer tool. It didn’t have an interface allowing Drupal site builders to use it. It just provided an easier starting point for custom map development. However, this 20 hour starting point lowered the cost for us to build mapping solutions for other clients, who also pitched in a little extra development time here and there to the open source project. Within a few months, the Leaflet module gained enough momentum that other developers from other shops started giving back. Now the module is leveraged on over 5,700 websites and has been supported by code contributions from 37 Drupal developers.

What did that first nonprofit and the other handful of early adopters get for supporting the initial release? Within less than a year of initially contributing to this Drupal module, they opened the door to many tens of thousands of dollars worth of free enhancements to their website and mapping tools.

Did they lose their competitive advantage or the uniqueness of their implementation of these online maps? I think you know what I’m gonna say: No! In fact, the usefulness of their mapping interfaces improved dramatically as those of us with an interest in these tools collaborated and iterated on each other’s ideas and design patterns.

Myth #3: "Contributing to an open source project will take time and money away from solving our organization’s specific problems."

This perception may or may not be true, depending on some of the specifics of the problems your organization is trying to solve. More importantly, this depends upon the approach you use to contribute to an open source project. We’ve definitely seen organizations get buried in the weeds of trying to do things in an open source way. We’ve seen organizations contribute financially to open source projects on spec (on speculation that the project will succeed). This can present challenges. We’ve also seen vendors try to abstract too much of what they’re building for clients up front, and that can lead to problems as well.

Generally, our preferred approach is generally to solve our clients immediate problems first, and then abstract useful bits that can be reused by the community towards the end of the project. There are situations when the abstraction, or the open source contribution, needs to come first. But for the most part, we encourage our clients to solve their own problems first, and in so doing so provide real-life use cases for the solutions that they open source. Then, abstraction can happen later as a way of future-proofing their investment.

Myth #4: "If we open source our tools, we’ll lose control over the direction of the technologies in which we’ve invested."

Don’t worry, this isn’t true! In fact:

Contributing to an open source project is positively selfish.

By this I mean that by contributing to an open source project, your organization actually gets to have a stronger say in the direction of that project. Most open source communities are guided by those that just get up and do, rather than by committee or council.

Our team loves the fact that so many organizations leverage our Drupal modules to meet their own needs. It’s great showing up at nonprofit technology conferences and having folks come up to us to thank us for our contributions. But what’s even better is knowing that these projects have been guided by the direct business needs of our nonprofit clients.

How to Go About Contributing to Open Source

There are a number of ways that your nonprofit organization can contribute to open source. In most of the examples above, we speak to financial contributions towards the release of open source code. Those are obviously great, but meaningful community contributions can start much smaller:

  • Participate in an open source community event. By engaging with other organizations with similar needs, you can help guide the conversation regarding how a platform like Drupal can support your organization’s needs. Events like Drupal Day at the NTC are a great place to start.

  • Host a code sprint or hackathon. Sometimes developers just need a space to hack on stuff. You’d be surprised at the meaningful that connections and support that can come from just coordinating a local hackathon. One of our clients, Feeding Texas, recently took this idea further and hosted a dedicated sprint on a hunger mapping project called SNAPshot Texas. As part of this sprint, four developers volunteered a weekend to helping Feeding Texas build a data visualization of Food Stamp data across the state. This effort built upon the work of Feeding America volunteers across the country and became a cornerstone of our redesign of FeedingTexas.org. Feeding Texas believes so strongly in the benefits they received from this work that they felt comfortable open sourcing their entire website on GitHub.

Of course, if your organization is considering a more direct contribution to an open source project, for example, by releasing a module as part of a website redesign, we have some advice for you as well:

  • First and foremost, solve your organization’s immediate problems first. As mentioned earlier in the article, the failure of many open source projects is that their sponsors have to handle too many use cases all at once. Rest assured that if you solve your organization’s problems, you’re likely to create something that’s useful to others. Not every contribution needs to solve every problem.

  • Know when to start with abstraction vs. when to end with abstraction. We have been involved in client-driven open source projects, such as the release of RedHen Raiser, a peer-to-peer fundraising platform, for which the open source contribution needed to be made first, before addressing our client’s specific requirements. In the case of RedHen Raiser, the Capital Area Food Bank of Washington, DC came to us with a need for a Drupal-based peer-to-peer fundraising solution. Learning that nothing like that existed, they were excited to help us get something started that they could then leverage. In this case, starting with abstraction made the most sense, given the technical complexities of releasing such a tool on Drupal. However, for the most part, the majority of open source contributions come from easy wins that are abstracted after the fact. Of course, there’s no hard and fast rule about this - it’s just something that you need to consider.

  • Celebrate your contributions and the development team! It might sound silly, but many software nerds take great pride in just knowing that the stuff they build is going to be seen by their peers. By offering to open source even just small components of your project, you are more likely to motivate your development partners. They will generally work harder and do better work, which again adds immediate value to your project.

In conclusion, I hope that this article helps you better understand that there’s a lot of value in contributing to open source. It doesn’t have to be that daunting of an effort and it doesn’t have to take you off task.

Categories: Drupal

btmash.com: Using Dev Desktop with Composer Drush

Planet Drupal - 24 March 2015 - 4:55pm

Before recently settling into the path of using Vagrant + Ansible for site development (speaking of Ansible: I absolutely love it and need to blog about some of my fun with that), I had been using Acquia Dev Desktop. Even now, I'll use it from time to time since it is easy to work with.

planet drupaldrush
Categories: Drupal

Imagefield Info

New Drupal Modules - 24 March 2015 - 4:04pm

This tiny module provides an information about selected image styles URLs to imagefield widget.

It's very handy if you want to insert uploaded images into a WYSIWYG editor.

You can also select what image style URLs you want to display in the imagefield widget.

Categories: Drupal

Web Wash: Define Custom Validation using Field Validation in Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - 24 March 2015 - 2:45pm

Out of the box, Drupal offers only a single type of validation for fields; required or not required. For most use cases this is fine, however, it can be a little difficult to define your own custom validation logic. What if you need to validate a field value and make sure it's unique?

The Field validation module allows you to define custom validation rules using Drupal's administration interface. The module ships with a lot of its own validators: "Plain text", "Specific value(s)" and much more.

If none of the validators meet your requirement, you can write your own by implementing a validator plugin. Because validators are Ctools plugin, they are easy to maintain as each one gets its own file.

In this tutorial, we'll use Field validation to validate a field value and make sure it's unique.

Categories: Drupal

Web Wash: Define Custom Validation using Field Validation in Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - 24 March 2015 - 2:45pm

Out of the box, Drupal offers only a single type of validation for fields; required or not required. For most use cases this is fine, however, it can be a little difficult to define your own custom validation logic. What if you need to validate a field value and make sure it's unique?

The Field validation module allows you to define custom validation rules using Drupal's administration interface. The module ships with a lot of its own validators: "Plain text", "Specific value(s)" and much more.

If none of the validators meet your requirement, you can write your own by implementing a validator plugin. Because validators are Ctools plugin, they are easy to maintain as each one gets its own file.

In this tutorial, we'll use Field validation to validate a field value and make sure it's unique.

Categories: Drupal

Panopoly Internationalization

New Drupal Modules - 24 March 2015 - 2:22pm

Panopoly app to provide internationalization support!

Categories: Drupal

Drupal for Government: Drupal, Tableau, and Media Tableau

Planet Drupal - 24 March 2015 - 12:31pm

Tableau is a helluva tool.  For data visualization it is at the top of its game... we recently had a 3 day seminar at UVa regarding Tableau, and I was stoked to see that they use Drupal heavily for their portal design.  

While I don't have the $$'s to run Tableau Server right now, it's a cool tool and something to consider...  Anyhow - here's a quick look at Tableau + Drupal + media tableau.  The upshot is that by integrating at the database level you can use views to display all of your workbooks... if all you want is to embed some visualizations in your content this isn't necessary as tableau provides iFrames for workbooks too... to use that just install media tableau, integrate with your wysiwyg editor of choice and move on... I wanted to test it all, so here's the kitchen sink :)

Here are the steps I've taken for the complete integration with views etc... if you just want to embed some tableau views in drupal skip down a bit :)

Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: Paying It Forward: Drupal 8 Accelerate

Planet Drupal - 24 March 2015 - 11:00am

Have you heard about the Drupal 8 Accelerate fund? The Drupal Association is collaborating with Drupal 8 branch maintainers to provide grants for those actively working on Drupal 8, with the goal of accelerating its release.

Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: A Comparison of Drupal 7 Image Caption Methods using WYSIWYG Module with CKEditor

Planet Drupal - 24 March 2015 - 10:18am

I recently had the opportunity to explore popular methods of adding captions to images inside the WYSIWYG editor using the setup of WYSIWYG module with CKEditor library. Our two main criteria were Media module integration and a styled caption in the WYSIWYG editor. As I discovered, we couldn’t have both without custom coding which the budget didn’t allow for. Media module integration won out and the File Entity with View Modes method was chosen. 

The modules/methods I reviewed were:

Categories: Drupal

Daniel Pocock: The easiest way to run your own OpenID?

Planet Drupal - 24 March 2015 - 9:57am

A few years ago, I was looking for a quick and easy way to run OpenID on a small web server.

A range of solutions were available but some appeared to be slightly more demanding than what I would like. For example, one solution required a servlet container such as Tomcat and another one required some manual configuration of Python with Apache.

I came across the SimpleID project. As the name implies, it is simple. It is written in PHP and works with the Apache/PHP environment on just about any Linux web server. It allows you to write your own plugin for a user/password database or just use flat files to get up and running quickly with no database at all.

This seemed like the level of simplicity I was hoping for so I created the Debian package of SimpleID. SimpleID is also available in Ubuntu.

Help needed

Thanks to a contribution from Jean-Michel Nirgal Vourgère, I've just whipped up a 0.8.1-14 package that should fix Apache 2.4 support in jessie. I also cleaned up a documentation bug and the control file URLs.

Nonetheless, it may be helpful to get feedback from other members of the community about the future of this package:

  • Is it considered secure enough?
  • Have other people found it relatively simple to install or was I just lucky when I tried it?
  • Are there other packages that now offer such a simple way to get OpenID for a vanilla Apache/PHP environment?
  • Would anybody else be interested in helping to maintain this package?
  • Would anybody like to see this packaged in other distributions such as Fedora?
  • Is anybody using it for any online community?
Works with HOTP one-time-passwords and LDAP servers

One reason I chose SimpleID is because of dynalogin, the two-factor authentication framework. I wanted a quick and easy way to use OTP with OpenID so I created the SimpleID plugin for dynalogin, also available as a package.

I also created the LDAP backend for SimpleID, that is available as a package too.

Works with Drupal

I tested SimpleID for login to a Drupal account when the OpenID support is enabled in Drupal, it worked seamlessly. I've also tested it with a few public web sites that support OpenID.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal core announcements: Drupal 8 beta 8 TOMORROW on Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Planet Drupal - 24 March 2015 - 9:24am

The next beta for Drupal 8 will be beta 8! Here is the schedule for the beta release.

Wednesday, March 25, 2015 Drupal 8.0.0-beta8 released. Emergency commits only.
Categories: Drupal
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