Drupal

Drupal.org blog: What's new on Drupal.org - September 2017

Planet Drupal - 17 October 2017 - 3:27pm

Read our Roadmap to understand how this work falls into priorities set by the Drupal Association with direction and collaboration from the Board and community.

We're back from DrupalCon Vienna, with updates on what's new from the month of our European event.

Announcement TLS 1.0 and 1.1 deprecated

Drupal.org uses the Fastly CDN service for content delivery, and Fastly has depreciated support for TLS 1.1, 1.0, and 3DES on the cert we use for Drupal.org, per the mandate by the PCI Security Standards Council. This change took place on 9 Aug 2017. This means that browsers and API clients using the older TLS 1.1 or 1.0 protocols will no longer be supported. Older versions of curl or wget may be affected as well.

Drupal.org updates DrupalCon Calendar syncing

In our last update, we teased a new feature for DrupalCon attendees - the ability to sync your personal schedule to a calendar program. We're pleased to report that this feature made it in time for the event, and was used by attendees throughout the week. If you've already synced your calendar for DrupalCon Vienna, you're already set up to use the same feed for DrupalCon Nashville next April!

Keynote simulcast to Youtube

This year at DrupalCon, in addition to live streaming on Events.Drupal.org itself, we simulcast the keynotes to YouTube. We also embedded the keynote on the Drupal.org homepage - to spread the latest news about Drupal beyond DrupalCon attendees.

In fact, if you couldn't attend DrupalCon or just missed the keynotes, you can watch Dries' update on the Drupal project here:

Industry Pages promoted in the front page Call-to-Action

We've also made some updates to how the industry pages are promoted. In addition to the dedicated block with icons linking to each industry, we now also promote the industry solutions landing page in the main CTA under the homepage header.

We hope to further encourage users evaluating Drupal to explore some of the tremendous solutions that are already out there, and take inspiration from their success.

First-in/First-out issue sorting

To make sure that issues are reviewed by maintainers in the order they are received, it is now possible to sort the issue queues by when the issue status last changed. This means RTBC issues can be reviewed on a first-in/first-out basis!

This 'status changed' date field is available on the advanced search view for any issue queue. Here's what it looks like for Drupal core:

Project creation analysis

About six months ago we opened up project creation on Drupal.org to allow any confirmed user to create a full project. We've put together a blog post outlining the impact these changes have had on the contrib landscape. In short, we've seen a tremendous increase in the rate of project creation, and the rate of applications for security advisory coverage, and a modest increase in projects receiving stable releases without yet opting in coverage. We're continuing to monitor project creation and work with the Security Working Group and others on next steps.

Displaying orphan dev releases

In last month's update we talked about a variety of changes we made to project pages, to provide better signals about project quality to evaluators. In response to feedback, we've restored the visibility of dev releases, even when they aren't associated with a tagged release.

This is particularly helpful for project maintainers trying to bring visibility to the next major development version of their modules, such as their Drupal 8 module port efforts.

———

As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who made it possible for us to work on these projects. In particular we want to thank:

If you would like to support our work as an individual or an organization, consider becoming a member of the Drupal Association.

Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

Categories: Drupal

myDropWizard.com: It's OK to build new sites on Drupal 7

Planet Drupal - 17 October 2017 - 2:11pm

In about a month, it'll be 2 years since Drupal 8.0.0 was released. Drupal 8 has come a long way since then, especially with Drupal 8.4.0 released two weeks ago, which is the most feature-packed release yet.

Drupal 8 is the future of Drupal. It's awesome.

However, looking at all the blogs and articles and podcasts in the Drupalsphere, we're sending a message that you should only build new sites on Drupal 8.

The common wisdom is that starting a new project on Drupal 7 is dumb idea.

While I'm sure there's lots of people who are OK with that or even think that's the right message...

I strongly believe that we are hurting the Drupal project by sending that message.

Read more to find out why!

Categories: Drupal

Drupal core announcements: Coding Standards Change Proposals 10/17

Planet Drupal - 17 October 2017 - 11:59am

The TWG coding standards committee is announcing two issues for final discussion. Feedback will be reviewed on 10/31/2017.

New issues for discussion: Pending ratification Provisionally approved issues Interested in helping out?

You can get started quickly by helping us to update an issue summary or two or dive in and check out the full list of open proposals and see if there's anything you'd like to champion!

Categories: Drupal

Commerce Multiple Payments

New Drupal Modules - 17 October 2017 - 10:39am

This module allows you to accept multiple payments during checkout for an order. It's intended for payment types like gift cards or store credit, where the customer may not be able to fully pay for the order with the available balance. This module allows payments from supporting gateways to be added in a new checkout pane, where they can reduce the balance due on an order. Then, the remainder can be paid with the standard payment information pane.

Categories: Drupal

Elevated Third: Elevated 3 Takeaways: Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 17 October 2017 - 9:35am
Elevated 3 Takeaways: Drupal 8 Elevated 3 Takeaways: Drupal 8 Nelson Harris Tue, 10/17/2017 - 10:35

In this edition of 3 Takeaways, our Business Development Strategist, Nelson Harris, reviews Drupal 8 and how the latest improvements help get more out of the box, leverage mobile, and upgrade smoothly.

 

 

Hi, I’m Nelson Harris, Business Development Strategist at Elevated Third. A question I get a lot from people is “what’s new and interesting about Drupal 8, and why might I upgrade.” There are a lot of reasons why you might want to upgrade to Drupal 8 but I’m just going to list three of them.

Takeaways #1: First, you get more out of the box.

There are a lot of useful modules in Drupal 8 core that have been built in. Things like views, multilingual, a WYSIWYG editor, and more types of fields. This means you can spend less time configuring and installing modules, and more time working on your site.

Takeaway #2: Second of all, mobile is in it’s DNA.

Built-in themes are all responsive and adapt well to different screen sizes. Tables will scale, and the new admin toolbar is really good on mobile devices. Chances are, you’re probably watching this video on the screen of your mobile device right now, so you can imagine why mobile might be important.

Takeaway #3: Finally, it’s built to be more future proof.

Where an upgrade from 7 to 8 or 6 to 7 requires scraping your codebase and starting all over from scratch, Drupal 8 is designed to go from 8 to 9 and 9 to 10 more seamlessly and more like an update patch as opposed to starting over. An investment in Drupal 8 really means that you're investing in your website because it's going to be easier to upgrade in the future.

Categories: Drupal

Block Formatter

New Drupal Modules - 17 October 2017 - 9:02am

-- SUMMARY --

If you would like to render a block in an entity reference field, this is the module for you!

-- REQUIREMENTS --

You must have the block, block_content and entity_reference core modules installed.

-- INSTALLATION --

* Install as usual as per http://drupal.org/node/895232.

-- USAGE --

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Modules: The One Percent: Drupal Modules: The One Percent —Timelogin (video tutorial)

Planet Drupal - 17 October 2017 - 6:47am
Drupal Modules: The One Percent —Timelogin (video tutorial) NonProfit Tue, 10/17/2017 - 08:47 Episode 40

Here is where we seek to bring awareness to Drupal modules running on less than 1% of reporting sites. Today we'll look at Timelogin, a module which restricts users, based on role, from logging in during certain times of the day.

Categories: Drupal

Appnovation Technologies: Appnovator Spotlight: Paulo Gomes

Planet Drupal - 17 October 2017 - 3:35am
Appnovator Spotlight: Paulo Gomes Who are you? What's your story? My name is Paulo Gomes, I am from Portugal and moved to the UK with my wife in 2016 to join Appnovation crew. I am an tech and web enthusiast since the 90's (so not too old and not too young), I graduated in Computers and Management in 2002, after that worked in many places and companies, as freelancer, trainer and t...
Categories: Drupal

Dropsolid: Load testing Drupal with Blazemeter and JMeter

Planet Drupal - 17 October 2017 - 2:59am
17 Oct Load testing Drupal with Blazemeter and JMeter Niels A Tech

When going live with a big project, it is all about reassuring the client that the project will be able to handle all those excited visitors. To achieve that state of zen, it is paramount that you do a load test. The benefits of load tests go beyond peace of mind, however. For example, it enables you to spot issues that only happen during high load or let’s you spot bottlenecks in the infrastructure setup. The added bonus is that you can bask in the glory of your high-performance code - on the condition the test doesn’t fail, of course.

Need help with your load and performance testing?
Contact us 

 

When doing a load test it is important to do the following steps:

  • Analyse existing data
  • Prepare tests
  • Set up tools
  • Run the tests
  • Analyse the results

 

Analyse existing data

If you are in luck, you will already  have historic data available to use from Google Analytics. If this isn’t the case, you’ll have to get in touch with your client and ask a few to-the-point questions to help you estimate all the important metrics that I’ll be covering in this post.

 

A couple of tips I can give if you lack the historic data:

  • Ask if the client has a mailing (digital or old-school) list and how many people are on it
  • If you have made comparable sites in the past, look at their Google Analytics data
  • Ask the client how they are going to announce their new website
  • When you are working on an estimate, it is always better to add an extra 15% to it. Better safe than sorry!

The first thing you need to do, is set a reference frame. Pick a date range that has low activity as well as the highest activity you can find. Then start putting that data into a spreadsheet, as pictured below:

You can download an example copy of the file here

 

The most important metrics we are going to calculate are:

  • Peak concurrent user (Hourly sessions x Average sessions Duration / 3600)
  • Peak page views per second

 

The values you need to find or estimate are:

  • Peak daily page views
  • Peak hourly page views
  • Total page view for period
  • Peak hourly sessions
  • Total amount of sessions
  • Average session duration in seconds

As you can see, we mainly focus on the peak activity, because you test with the worst-case scenario in mind - which is, funnily enough, usually the best-case scenario for your client.

Before we start preparing our test, it is also handy to check which pages receive the most traffic. This benefits the validity of your test scenario.

 

Prepare the tests

For our tests we are going to start out with Apache JMeter, which you can grab here.

With JMeter you can test many different applications/server/protocol types, but we’re going to use it to make a whole lot of HTTP requests.

Make sure you have the required Java library and go boot up the ApacheJMeter.jar file.

 

Adding and configuring a Thread Group

Start by adding a Thread Group to your test plan by right clicking your Test plan and selecting Add > Threads (Users) > Thread Group

 

Eventually you will need to fill in the number of (concurrent) users and ramp-up period based on your analysis, but for now keep it low for debugging your test.

 

Adding and configuring User-Defined Variables

Then right click the thread group to add User Defined Variables (Add > Config Element > User Defined Variables).

Add two variables named url and protocol and assign them a value.

Using these user-defined variables makes it easy to choose another environment to test on. It avoids the painstaking and error-prone work of finding all references and changing them manually.

You can use these variables in input fields in your test by doing this: ${url} or ${protocol}

 

Adding and configuring HTTP config elements

 Next up, you need to add the following HTTP config elements to your thread group:

  • HTTP Request Defaults
  • HTTP Header Manager
  • HTTP Cookie Manager

On the first one, you use your variables to fill in the protocol and the server name.

On the second one, you can set default headers for each one of your requests. See the screenshot below for what I’ve put in default.

For the third one, you only select cookie policy: standard.

 

A simple page request sampler

Right-click your test again and add the HTTP request sampler (Add > Sampler > HTTP Request).

Here we are going to call the home page. The only things you need to set here are:

  • Method: GET
  • Path: /

We don’t fill in the protocol or server name because this is already covered by our HTTP Request Defaults.

 

Posting the contact form

In this one we are going to submit the contact form (which is located at www.example.com/contact), so add another HTTP Request like we did before. Now only fill in the following values:

  • Method: POST
  • Path: /contact
  • Follow redirects: True
  • Use KeepAlive: True

In order for Drupal to accept the submit, we need to add some parameters to our post, like this:

The important ones here are form_build_id and form_id. You can manually get the form id because it always stays the same. The form build ID can vary, so we need to extract this from the page. We’ll do this using the CSS/JQuery Extractor (right-click your HTTP Request sampler: Add > Post Processors > CSS/JQuery Extractor)

Configure it like the screenshot below:

It will now get that form_build_id from the page and put into a variable the sampler can use.$

 

Posting some Ajax on the form

Imagine our contact form has some Ajax functionality and we also want to test this. The way we go about it is identical to posting the regular form like we did before. The only difference is the post parameters, the path and an extra HTTP Header Manager.

You should set the path in your sampler to: /system/ajax

Then right click your sampler to add your new HTTP Header Manager (Add > Config Element > HTTP Header Manager). Configure it like shown in the screenshot:

  Saving the results of your test

Now that we’ve configured samplers, we need to add some listeners. You can add these listeners everywhere, but in our example we’ve added it to the test in a whole.

 

We’ll add three listeners:

  • View Results in Table:
    • Show every request in a table format
    • Handy for getting some metrics like latency and connect time
  • Simple Data Writer:
    • Writes test data to a file
    • Handy for debugging when using Blazemeter (check out this link)
    • Just load the file into the View Results Tree
  • View Results Tree:
    • It shows you the actual response and request.
    • Uses a lot of resources (so only good for debugging)

 

There is a lot more you can do with JMeter. You can read all about it here.


Test-run the test

Now that we’ve configured our test it is time to try it out. So make sure not to put too much concurrent users in there. Just run the test by pressing the green ‘Play’ icon.

If you get errors, debug them using the feedback you got from your listeners.

As this wise man once said: "Improvise. Adapt. Overcome."

After you’ve validated your test, it’s always handy to turn up the concurrent users until your local site breaks. It’ll give you a quick idea of where a possible bottleneck could be.

Just a small warning: doing that load test on your local machine (running the test and the webserver) will take up a lot of resources and can give you skewed results.

You can download an example here.

 

Set up tools Load testing with Blazemeter

When you have a project that will have a lot of concurrent users, your computer is most likely not able to handle doing all those calls and that is why it is good to test from a distributed setup like Blazemeter does.

 

You can have multiple computers running the same test with only a part of the concurrent users or you can pay for a service like Blazemeter.

 

The downside of using multiple computers is that they still use the same corporate WiFi or ethernet, blocking yourself possibly to the lowest common denominator, which is most likely unknown and could cause trouble that might skew your test. On top of that you will also have to aggregate all those results yourself, costing you precious time.

 

For us the mayor benefits of Blazemeter are the following:

  • Simulate a massive amount of concurrent users with little hassle
  • Persistence of test results and comparison between tests
  • Executive report to deliver to a technical savvy client
  • Sandbox mode tests that don’t count against your monthly testing quota

 

Adding your JMeter test in Blazemeter is very easy and straightforward. Just click ‘Create Test’ in the menu and select JMeter Test.

Upload the file and you can start to configure your test to reflect your test scenario from the analysis chapter. We suggest to choose to ‘Originate a load’ from a service that is closest to your target population.

Before you run your test, it is important to have set up your monitoring of the environment you want to test.

 

Monitoring performance

At Dropsolid, we like to use New Relic to monitor performance of our environments but you could also use open source tools like Munin.

The most important factors in your decision of monitoring tool should be:

  • Persistence of monitoring data
  • Detail of monitoring data
  • Ease of use

If you are using New Relic, we recommend to install both APM and Server. The added value of having APM is that you can quickly get an overview of possible bottlenecks in PHP and MySQL.

 

Run the test

Now that everything is set up, it is important to have an environment that is a perfect copy of your production environment. That way you can easily optimize your environment without having to wait for a good moment to restart your server.

Run your test, sit back and relax.

 

Analyse the results

If everything has gone according to plan, you should now have reports from both Blazemeter and New Relic.

Blazemeter report of a test of 854 concurrent usersNew Relic monitoring during the same test

If your server was able to handle the peak amount of users, then your job is done and you can inform the client that they can rest assured that it won’t go down.

If your server couldn’t handle it, it is time to compare the results from Blazemeter and New Relic to find out where your bottleneck is.

Common issues are the following:

  • Not the right memory allocation between parts of the stack.
  • Misconfiguration of your stack. For example, MySQL has multiple example configuration files for different scenarios
  • Not using extra performance enhancing services like varnish, memcache, redis,...
  • Horrible code

If the issue is horrible code, then use tools like xhprof or blackfire.io to profile your code.

Need expert help with your performance tests? Just get in touch!

Contact us for performance testing 


Final note

As Colin Powell once said: "There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work and learning from failure." That is exactly what we did here: we prepared our test thoroughly, we tested our script multiple times and adapted when it failed.

Categories: Drupal

GraphQL Twig

New Drupal Modules - 17 October 2017 - 2:02am
Categories: Drupal

GraphQL XML

New Drupal Modules - 17 October 2017 - 2:01am
Categories: Drupal

GraphQL JSON

New Drupal Modules - 17 October 2017 - 1:59am
Categories: Drupal

matrixchat

New Drupal Modules - 16 October 2017 - 2:18pm

Project space for matrix integration.

Categories: Drupal

Chapter Three: Presentation: Aprendiendo D8 a través de Single Sign-On (Learning Drupal 8 through Single Sign-On)

Planet Drupal - 16 October 2017 - 10:35am

Last week at DrupalCamp Quito, I presented an updated, Spanish-language version of my DrupalCon session. If you would like to view the presentation in English, you can find it on my DrupalCon blog post.

Las estructuras orientadas a objetos han reemplazado a nuestros queridos "hooks" que nos permitían extender Drupal con nueva funcionalidad sin necesidad de hackear core (u otros módulos de contrib). Pero, ¿cómo funciona esto? En esta charla revisamos cómo extender un módulo para implementar single sign-on (SSO), y al hacerlo nos adentramos a cómo la programación orientada a objetos hace magia en nuestros módulos, haciéndolos más fáciles de escribir, entender y depurar. Adicionalmente, se describen algunos de los patrones de diseño de Drupal, cómo utilizar event listeners, sobreescribir rutas y otras herramientas.

 

Categories: Drupal

Sage Pay

New Drupal Modules - 16 October 2017 - 9:19am
Categories: Drupal

Nextide Blog: Drupal Ember Basic App Refinements

Planet Drupal - 16 October 2017 - 9:04am

This is part 3 of our series on developing a Decoupled Drupal Client Application with Ember. If you haven't yet read the previous articles, it would be best to review Part1 first. In this article, we are going to clean up the code to remove the hard coded URL for the host, move the login form to a separate page and add a basic header and styling.

We currently have defined the host URL in both the adapter (app/adapters/application.js) for the Ember Data REST calls as well as the AJAX Service that we use for the authentication (app/services/ajax.js). This is clearly not a good idea but helped us focus on the initial goal and our simple working app.

Categories: Drupal

Ubercart Facebook Pixel

New Drupal Modules - 16 October 2017 - 4:54am

Ubercart Facebook Pixel module make available for use the Facebook Pixel.

This module control the Facebook Pixel's ViewContent, CompleteRegistration,
AddToCart, InitiateCheckout and Purchase events to understand the actions people take on your website.

The AddToCart, InitiateCheckout and Purchase events are based on the Ubercart integration.

Categories: Drupal

Command Runner UI

New Drupal Modules - 16 October 2017 - 4:01am

This module allows running commands via a form.

It is meant to be used only in development environments in closed networks since it opens the gates of hell.

Categories: Drupal

Matt Glaman: Why and How for SSLs and your website

Planet Drupal - 16 October 2017 - 2:00am
Why and How for SSLs and your website mglaman Mon, 10/16/2017 - 04:00 Secure sites. HTTPS and SSL. A topic more and more site owners and maintainers are having to work with. For some, this is a great thing and others it is either nerve-wracking or confusing. Luckily, for us all, getting an SSL and implementing full site HTTPS is becoming easier.
Categories: Drupal

Alternative Block Regions

New Drupal Modules - 16 October 2017 - 1:23am

The module it's done https://github.com/oskarcalvo/acb, but as there is a module :
Access Control Bridge (acb) So I have to refactor the files and hooks, and push it.

The idea to use this module is when you have a lot of modules* and neither blocks,context, or pannels helps. Acb try to be much more friendly with the content creator.

Categories: Drupal

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