Drupal

Axe

New Drupal Modules - 21 May 2018 - 2:13am
Categories: Drupal

Jeff Geerling's Blog: Hosted Apache Solr's Revamped Docker-based Architecture

Planet Drupal - 20 May 2018 - 6:18pm

I started Hosted Apache Solr almost 10 years ago, in late 2008, so I could more easily host Apache Solr search indexes for my Drupal websites. I realized I could also host search indexes for other Drupal websites too, if I added some basic account management features and a PayPal subscription plan—so I built a small subscription management service on top of my then-Drupal 6-based Midwestern Mac website and started selling a few Solr subscriptions.

Back then, the latest and greatest Solr version was 1.4, and now-popular automation tools like Chef and Ansible didn't even exist. So when a customer signed up for a new subscription, the pipeline for building and managing the customer's search index went like this:

Original Hosted Apache Solr architecture, circa 2009.

Categories: Drupal

Jeff Beeman: Rebuilding jeffbeeman.com: My local development environment and workflow

Planet Drupal - 20 May 2018 - 1:20pm
Rebuilding jeffbeeman.com: My local development environment and workflow Last week I talked about setting up a new project using BLT, Dev Desktop, and Lightning. Today, I’ll talk more about my local environment setup and give a brief overview of my development and deployment workflow. Jeff Beeman Sun, 05/20/2018 - 13:20
Categories: Drupal

GraphQL Redirect

New Drupal Modules - 20 May 2018 - 10:42am

GraphQL Redirect is a simple module extending contributed GraphQL module. It replaces default route handling so that GraphQL query follows redirect path and returns query result for the destination route. It supports multilingual environment and recursive redirects.

Categories: Drupal

Say Hello Dialogflow

New Drupal Modules - 20 May 2018 - 10:29am
Categories: Drupal

IDCP core

New Drupal Modules - 20 May 2018 - 7:52am

This is for idcp core package.

Categories: Drupal

IPS

New Drupal Modules - 19 May 2018 - 7:33pm

This is for hosting ip management, eg, management ip, and business ip.

Categories: Drupal

Server

New Drupal Modules - 19 May 2018 - 7:24pm

The hosting server.

Categories: Drupal

Orders

New Drupal Modules - 19 May 2018 - 7:17pm

This is orders for commerce.

Categories: Drupal

Bills

New Drupal Modules - 19 May 2018 - 6:53pm

It's used for billing sth in commerce. Under development.
Any idea could be added in issues.

Categories: Drupal

Products

New Drupal Modules - 19 May 2018 - 6:44pm

It is a idc products module. And it will be continous to be polished.

Categories: Drupal

The CodeMirror editor

New Drupal Modules - 19 May 2018 - 9:27am

This module integrates the CodeMirror editor into Drupal's textareas.

Categories: Drupal

DrupalEasy: Using the Markup module to add content to your entity forms

Planet Drupal - 19 May 2018 - 5:11am

Have you ever been building a form and found yourself wishing that you could insert additional help text - or even other forms of content (images, video) inline with the form? While each field's "Description" field is useful, sometimes it isn't enough.

The Markup module solves this problem in an elegant way by providing a new "Markup" field type.

 

This field doesn't expose any input widgets to the end user, rather it just allows for site builders to add additional markup (content) to an entity form.

 

The markup isn't saved with the resulting entity - it's just there to provide additional information to the user filling out the form.

Granted, this has always been possible by writing a small custom module utilizing hook_form_alter(), but having it as a field type makes it much more convenient to use.

 

Categories: Drupal

Resources

New Drupal Modules - 19 May 2018 - 3:29am

All of the resources would be management by this module, distinct with different bundle to store any data.

Categories: Drupal

User plus

New Drupal Modules - 19 May 2018 - 2:28am

I found it was a named by userplus module for D7, but it had already none update code in last long time;

so I build a new module named by user_plus for my project in D8, and for all anyone who needs it, and it will update more often.

Categories: Drupal

Ashday's Digital Ecosystem and Development Tips: 5 Reasons to Upgrade to Drupal 8 Today

Planet Drupal - 18 May 2018 - 11:57am

Drupal 8 has been available now for more than two years, but if your site is up and running on Drupal 6 or 7, you may be wondering… why should I upgrade? And why now?

Categories: Drupal

OPTASY: How to Integrate Alexa with Your Drupal 8 Website: A Step-by-Step Guide

Planet Drupal - 18 May 2018 - 9:05am
How to Integrate Alexa with Your Drupal 8 Website: A Step-by-Step Guide radu.simileanu Fri, 05/18/2018 - 16:05

Just imagine: a user asks Amazon Alexa to read out loud to him/her the headline of your latest blog post! Or maybe to look for a specific section on your Drupal site! Or, even better: quit imagining this and start implementing it instead! Right on your website. And here's how you integrate Alexa with your Drupal 8 website via the Alexa integration APIs.

A 7-step tutorial:
 

  • on how to get Alexa to “talk to” your site users/online customers
  • on turning your site's content into the needed “raw material” for setting up your custom Alexa skills
  • on how you can leverage Drupal 8's outstanding third-party integration capabilities to “fuel” your implementation plan with
     

So, here's how it's done: 
 

Categories: Drupal

Zivtech: Drupal 8 Content Moderation Tips & Tricks

Planet Drupal - 18 May 2018 - 8:19am

The Content Moderation core module was marked stable in Drupal 8.5. Think of it like the contributed module Workbench Moderation in Drupal 7, but without all the Workbench editor Views that never seemed to completely make sense. The Drupal.org documentation gives a good overview.

Content Moderation requires the Workflows core module, allowing you to set up custom editorial workflows. I've been doing some work with this for a new site for a large organization, and have some tips and tricks.

Less Is More

Resist increases in roles, workflows, and workflow states and make sure they are justified by a business need. Stakeholders may ask for many roles and many workflow states without knowing the increased complexity and likelihood of editorial confusion that results.

If you create an editorial workflow that is too strict and complex, editors will tend to find ways to work around the  system. A good compromise is to ask that the team tries something simple first and adds complexity down the line if needed.

Try to use the same workflow on all content types if you can. It makes a much simpler mental model for everyone.

Transitions are Key

Transitions between workflow states will be what you assign as permissions to roles. Typically, you'll want to lock down who can publish content, allowing content contributors to create new drafts only.

Read more
Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: Working toward a JavaScript-driven Drupal administration interface

Planet Drupal - 18 May 2018 - 8:18am

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

As web applications have evolved from static pages to application-like experiences, end-users' expectations of websites have become increasingly demanding. JavaScript, partnered with effective user-experience design, enable the seamless, instantaneous interactions that users now expect.

The Drupal project anticipated this trend years ago and we have been investing heavily in making Drupal API-first ever since. As a result, more organizations are building decoupled applications served by Drupal. This approach allows organizations to use modern JavaScript frameworks, while still benefiting from Drupal's powerful content management capabilities, such as content modeling, content editing, content workflows, access rights and more.

While organizations use JavaScript frameworks to create visitor-facing experiences with Drupal as a backend, Drupal's own administration interface has not yet embraced a modern JavaScript framework. There is high demand for Drupal to provide a cutting-edge experience for its own users: the site's content creators and administrators.

At DrupalCon Vienna, we decided to start working on an alternative Drupal administrative UI using React. Sally Young, one of the initiative coordinators, recently posted a fantastic update on our progress since DrupalCon Vienna.

Next steps for Drupal's API-first and JavaScript work

While we made great progress improving Drupal's web services support and improving our JavaScript support, I wanted to use this blog post to compile an overview of some of our most important next steps:

1. Stabilize the JSON API module

JSON API is a widely-used specification for building web service APIs in JSON. We are working towards adding JSON API to Drupal core as it makes it easier for JavaScript developers to access the content and configuration managed in Drupal. There is a central plan issue that lists all of the blockers for getting JSON API into core (comprehensive test coverage, specification compliance, and more). We're working hard to get all of them out of the way!

2. Improve our JavaScript testing infrastructure

Drupal's testing infrastructure is excellent for testing PHP code, but until now, it was not optimized for testing JavaScript code. As we expect the amount of JavaScript code in Drupal's administrative interface to dramatically increase in the years to come, we have been working on improving our JavaScript testing infrastructure using Headless Chrome and Nightwatch.js. Nightwatch.js has already been committed for inclusion in Drupal 8.6, however some additional work remains to create a robust JavaScript-to-Drupal bridge. Completing this work is essential to ensure we do not introduce regressions, as we proceed with the other items in our roadmap.

3. Create designs for a React-based administration UI

Having a JavaScript-based UI also allows us to rethink how we can improve Drupal's administration experience. For example, Drupal's current content modeling UI requires a lot of clicking, saving and reloading. By using React, we can reimagine our user experience to be more application-like, intuitive and faster to use. We still need a lot of help to design and test different parts of the Drupal administration UI.

4. Allow contributed modules to use React or Twig

We want to enable modules to provide either a React-powered administration UI or a traditional Twig-based administration UI. We are working on an architecture that can support both at the same time. This will allow us to introduce JavaScript-based UIs incrementally instead of enforcing a massive paradigm shift all at once. It will also provide some level of optionality for modules that want to opt-out from supporting the new administration UI.

5. Implement missing web service APIs

While we have been working for years to add web service APIs to many parts of Drupal, not all of Drupal has web services support yet. For our React-based administration UI prototype we decided to implement a new permission screen (i.e. https://example.com/admin/people/permissions). We learned that Drupal lacked the necessary web service APIs to retrieve a list of all available permissions in the system. This led us to create a support module that provides such an API. This support module is a temporary solution that helped us make progress on our prototype; the goal is to integrate these APIs into core itself. If you want to contribute to Drupal, creating web service APIs for various Drupal subsystems might be a great way to get involved.

6. Make the React UI extensible and configurable

One of the benefits of Drupal's current administration UI is that it can be configured (e.g. you can modify the content listing because it has been built using the Views module) and extended by contributed modules (e.g. the Address module adds a UI that is optimized for editing address information). We want to make sure that in the new React UI we keep enough flexibility for site builders to customize the administrative UI.

All decoupled builds benefit

All decoupled applications will benefit from the six steps above; they're important for building a fully-decoupled administration UI, and for building visitor-facing decoupled applications.

Useful for decoupling of visitor-facing front-ends Useful for decoupling of the administration backend 1. Stabilize the JSON API module ✔ ✔ 2. Improve our JavaScript testing infrastructure ✔ ✔ 3. Create designs for a React-based administration UI ✔ 4. Allow contributed modules to use React or Twig ✔ ✔ 5. Implement missing web service APIs ✔ ✔ 6. Make the React UI extensible and configurable ✔ Conclusion

Over the past three years we've been making steady progress to move Drupal to a more API-first and JavaScript centric world. It's important work given a variety of market trends in our industry. While we have made excellent progress, there are more challenges to be solved. We hope you like our next steps, and we welcome you to get involved with them. Thank you to everyone who has contributed so far!

Special thanks to Matt Grill and Lauri Eskola for co-authoring this blog post and to Wim Leers, Gabe Sullice, Angela Byron, and Preston So for their feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

mark.ie: My Approach to PatternLab?

Planet Drupal - 18 May 2018 - 7:43am
My Approach to PatternLab?

I'm sometimes asked for an overview of my general approach to PatternLab. Simple: put everything for each component in the same directory!

markconroy Fri, 05/18/2018 - 15:43

When working with PatternLab, which I use for all my Drupal themes, including the theme for this website, I don’t use the full atomic approach. I don't use the approach of atoms > molecules > organisms > etc. I’m sure many people seriously disagree with me for that ( I do think it's a very clever concept). Instead I’ve renamed things to match the language we use with our clients.

I tried talking about atoms and molecules to some clients and their eyes glazed over. Clients do not want a science lesson. They do not want to be told that we are going to take two of these atoms, and mix them with one of these atom, and eventually we'll have water. No, they want to know what their final website is going to look like. When I changed the conversation and started talking about ‘Building Blocks’ (what we call our Drupal paragraph types), site blocks (Drupal's search block, branding block), display types (Drupal's view modes such as teaser, search result), etc, they immediately understood. Then we started hearing things like, "Oh, so we can create a page by adding a number of different building blocks?" and "I see, so the search results page is made up of a group of pages using the 'Search Result' display type?". And my response, "Yes!". You see, we are using plain English to ease with understanding.

Another aspect of my approach that I really like is that _everything_ for each of my components is within the same directory. For example, if it’s a nested paragraph component such as an accordion (so we need a paragraph type called 'Accordion' and one called 'Accordion Item') each template and css and js and readme and json and yaml is all in the same folder. That means when I want to reuse one in another project, I don’t need to remember what sub-particles (atoms/molecules) are used to create the organism. It also means my CSS is scoped to that specific component and doesn’t bleed out of it, so making changes or adding new features is very easy, you just scope the new component's CSS to it, so it won't affect other previously-created components.

Now the top bar of my PatternLab that used to say Atoms | Molecules | Organisms, etc has tabs for:

  • Base
    • Colours
    • Spacing
    • Breakpoints
  • Basic Elements
    • Headings
    • Paragraphs
    • Lists
  • Site Blocks (Drupal Blocks)
    • Search Block
    • Login Block
    • Branding Block
  • Building Blocks (Paragraph Types)
    • Accordion
    • Image with Text
    • Video
  • Content
    • Display Types (View Modes)
      • Teaser
      • Card
      • Search Result
    • Lists (Views)
      • Blog
      • Search Results
    • Content Types
      • Basic Page
      • Blog
      • Event
  • Page Sections (Regions)
    • Header
    • Footer
    • Sidebar
  • Sample Pages
    • Homepage
    • Blog Listing Page
    • Blog Node

After that, I have Backstop.js set up to regression test all of these, so each time I create a new component I can quickly run the visual regression tests and check that nothing has broken. Since all my CSS/JS is scoped to each individual component, it's rare if something is.

Categories: Drupal

Pages

Subscribe to As If Productions aggregator - Drupal