Drupal

Drupal.org blog: What’s new on Drupal.org? - October 2018

Planet Drupal - 18 December 2018 - 9:29am

Read our Roadmap to understand how this work falls into priorities set by the Drupal Association with direction and collaboration from the Board and community.

Lock in your DrupalCon tickets before the end of the year

DrupalCon Seattle is shaping up to be an outstanding conference. If your organization is sponsoring your trip, now's a great time to use your 2018 budget to register to attend. Your team can sign up for or renew your Supporting Partnership for steep discounts on ticket prices. Coming to DrupalCon on your own? The schedule is available now, so peruse the offerings and register before prices go up!

Drupal.org Updates A new taxonomy for DrupalCon sessions

As you've seen if you clicked the link to the schedule above, events.drupal.org was updated to support session submission by tag, rather than track, earlier this year. This provides more flexibility in finding the content you're interested in, and encourages sessions which cross the boundaries of traditional tracks.

Prototyping a new Try Drupal experience

In October we put together a visual prototype of our proposed revamp of the Try Drupal program. This includes a better, more targeted user experience for each persona, as well as the opportunity for more organizations to participate. More details will be shared soon as we get further along, but for a sneak preview you can review the operational update from our recent public board meeting.

Improving the experience of using Composer

In October significant progress was made on the initiative to Improve Drupal Core's use of Composer. In particular, kicking off the primary issue for building this better support into Core, as well as moving the issue for supporting Semantic Versioning for Contrib from a plan to the implementation phase. These changes will improve the user experience for Drupal users with composer based workflows, and especially for Drupal users who start sites without Composer, and then switch to Composer based workflows. This also lays the groundwork for necessary steps for supporting the Drupal 9 roadmap.

Promote Drupal Releasing the first draft of the Drupal Brand Book

In October, with the feedback of the Promote Drupal volunteer team, we developed and released the initial draft of the Drupal Brand book. This is one of the materials created by the Promote Drupal initiative, in order to unify the brand presentation for Drupal across agencies, internal sales, and regions. This will be updated with a vision statement for Drupal's business strategy and market position.

A new Community Section

In October we also spent time creating a beta experience for a new Drupal.org/community landing page. This page focuses on the onboarding process, helping visitors identify their need and persona, so they can get to the segment of the community that is relevant to them. (Hint: this beta experience has since gone live!) If you have feedback about making the community portal better, you can leave your suggestions in the drupal_org_community issue queue.

———

As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who make it possible for us to work on these projects. In particular, we want to thank:

If you would like to support our work as an individual or an organization, consider becoming a member of the Drupal Association.

Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

Categories: Drupal

Paystack Payment Field

New Drupal Modules - 18 December 2018 - 8:04am

A button field attachable to any entity. The button fires the paystack payment dialog box. On successful payment, you can fire any rule using the rules event "after successful payment "shipped with the module.

Paystack requires the secret and public keys. The module provides a configuration page to add the keys at admin/config/user-interface

#How to use

Categories: Drupal

Sooper Drupal Themes: Create a Drupal Pricing Page with Glazed Builder

Planet Drupal - 18 December 2018 - 6:44am

The pricing page is one of the key pages in a website, therefore it is important to have a clear and professional design that communicates the product benefits and pricing tiers your business offers. In today’s article we are going to learn how to recreate the new Sooperthemes pricing page. The Sooperthemes pricing page has a clean design style that mainly consists of rows, columns and text. Throughout this article we are going to work with the following elements:

  • Rows
  • Columns
  • Text
  • Buttons
Categories: Drupal

OpenSense Labs: Content driven Commerce with Drupal 8: Another Feather in the Hat

Planet Drupal - 18 December 2018 - 5:53am
Content driven Commerce with Drupal 8: Another Feather in the Hat Akshita Tue, 12/18/2018 - 19:23 “Sometimes I would buy Vogue instead of dinner. I felt it fed me more."  — Carrie Bradshaw from The Sex and the City

Consumer instincts have changed with time and so have market tactics. Today, the global brands not only selling the product, but they are also building a journey with the shopper, an impression that stays longer than the product (no pun intended). 

When shopping online it’s about knowing every little detail, almost like visiting the market and buying the product. Shopping is no more just about checking out the product and adding it to cart.

It is here that the commerce meets content.

And that is why everything has a story. This author, the perfume she wears, the website, images, rock, paper, scissors… everything.

Can Drupal provide the commerce organization the storyboard that they are looking for? And what about the conversational UI that is booming in the commerce industry? Can Drupal stand up to the expectations of its customers?

 

The Content-Driven Commerce. What is the Concept About?

Despite the fact that we have been experiencing content and commerce together since the start of marketing, content-commerce has never, until now, existed as a concept in itself. 

The best example of content-driven commerce are print magazines and that is what the retailers and business corporations have been trying to imitate online, today. 

An advertisement does that. Why aren’t we focussing there?

In 2013, Lab24 - an American market research firm - carried out a study that revealed that people had some serious trust issues with advertising. 

  • 76% of people believe that ads are “very exaggerated” or “somewhat exaggerated”.
  • 87% think half or more cleaning ads are photoshopped.
  • 96% think half or more weight loss ads are photoshopped.

Building a personal repo is more important than just throwing content in the form of ads. Meaningful content puts a filter on such garbage advertising also bringing rewarding results!

The fact that businesses can no longer ignore customers’ desire for content, purpose, is what has been changed in the market.

And yet, more often than not, online shops still resemble soulless product catalogs.

The story of Coco Chanel and her perfume No 5 is very beautifully presented in the series of 5. 


With the help of blogs, user-generated content, and rich multimedia, brands are not only able to stand out from the crowd, but also provide a curated commerce experience to their customers. 

However, product-centric their content may be, it still establishes an emotional connection with customers through inspirational stories that pave the road to successful commerce.

Understanding the Concept with Timex

The famous American watchmaker Timex and its 22 sites are built on Drupal. The iconic brand offers intuitive navigation and engaging mix of product, social, and editorial content. This website infuses content in the entire shopping experience, doing an amazing job of featuring useful imageries and text that is relatable to customers.


Timex needed to ensure a unified brand experience on all its sites while also delivering digital content relevant to local markets - allowing the addition of new product content when and where needed.

Drupal ensures that the content generated in the U.S. is localised as per the location and published to local markets according to their needs. 

Not only does it enable the team to deploy content across regional websites rapidly while remaining on-brand, but it also supplements them with an ability in fueling the company’s international growth.

Why Opt For Drupal When Building Content and Commerce?

Helpful content, and not discounts, should be the centerpiece of awareness. And that’s exactly the role that content is meant to play in commerce.

With the Lab24 statistics, it is clear that - while all the e-commerce platforms aim to serve their users with a better experience, without leveraging the power of storytelling it is not possible. 

As the admin to an online store, you need to select and add the various content types that you are looking for. Be it blogs, testimonials, customer reviews, or product description, Drupal has it all for you. 

Drupal is unique in its ability to easily integrate into ambitious commerce architectures in precisely the manner the brand prefers. Drupal can be integrated with other e-commerce platforms giving rise to a hybrid solution. The third-party platforms can typically interact with the users either through the glass as in the case of a headless commerce solution or it can work side by side. 

In any case, Drupal can cover the need for the content driven user experiences with the homepage, marketing-driven landing pages, blog content while commerce features such as the product detail, category landing pages, and the cart and checkout flow can be handled by the e-commerce platform. 

Whatever the case maybe content types are at the core of Drupal. 

  1. Easy Content Authoring: Intuitive tools for content creation, workflow and publishing make it easy for content creators. User permissions, authentication help manage the editorial workflows efficiently. Previews help the editors access how the content will look on any device before the users approve and publish.
     
  2. Mobile Editing: Team members can review, edit and approve content from mobile devices, to keep content and campaigns flowing, regardless of where they are and what device they’re on.
     
  3. In-place Authoring: The WYSIWYG editor in Drupal to create and edit content in-place. 
     
  4. Content Revisioning and Workflows: For a distributed team Drupal enables a quick and easy way to track changes, revisions, and stage. It tells you who did what, when, out of the box. Also, it lets you manage custom, editorial workflows for all your content processes. Content staging allows you to track the status of the content - from creation to review to publication - while managing user roles and actions, automatically. 
     
  5. Content Tagging and Taxonomy: Beyond creating content, Drupal’s strength lies in creating structured content. This comes when you define content elements, tag content based on their attributes, create relevant taxonomy so it can be searched, found, used, and reused in ways that satisfy the visitors.
     
  6. Modules for Multimedia Content: Entity browser, paragraphs, pathauto, admin toolbar, linkit, blog, meta tag, and other content editing modules give the extra lease of life by extending and customizing content features and capabilities. They allow you to choose what features you want for your site. 

With multimedia content, your commerce-based site better serves the need for integrated, unified and hiccup-free user experience. In addition, you can also push content outside from your website to other channels.

As marketing horizons are expanding to social media it is important to deliver highly relevant and personal content via video (YouTube), stores, TV, etc. Brands no more can afford to continue to deliver disconnected and uncoordinated across a variety of different channels.

 

But Trust the Case Studies
  • Benefit


The new content-centric website is an integrated, robust online store managed with SAP Hybris and Drupal. As the marketing department’s needs became more sophisticated, the content management system offered by Hybris was no longer able to adequately manage the store’s front end and content experience. 

Benefit Cosmetics is known for their colorful personality, irreverent voice, and unique dilemma based shopping experience. And so is the content that mirrors the seamless provide a seamless shopping experience. Benefit’s marketing and content teams are now able to maintain the brand’s unique design aesthetic while customizing content for users’ needs. 

The new platform leveraged commerce for over thirty countries. To ensure the sanity of the translations workflow, with Translations.com.
 

  • Strand of Silk


Strand of Silk website required a smart blend of commerce and content, such that the content generated by the editor and user can be easily linked to the products on the website. 

Various other e-commerce only solutions were evaluated, but Drupal was selected because of the ability to easily combine e-commerce and content - a trend that was seen as the de-facto requirement in the near future for e-commerce sites. 

The Rise of Content, Commerce, and Conversation

Content and commerce were coming together for a long time. But conversational commerce is catching up really fast. For consumers, a conversational experience is a way for them to learn about the product and services.

Informal exchange of ideas by the spoken words. 

Shoppers are looking for easy interactions like conversations, which are also casual and convenient. Conversational commerce as it catches up will be the guiding experience moving forward. 

The idea of conversational UI, shouldn’t be limited to a chatbot. The old trick still works. Content still rules. Although the new techniques and technologies can change the way we are doing things we can’t abandon the channels.  

As messaging platforms have become so universal and common, they are also easy to build. 


There can be many ways the model works. It can be one-to-one and one-to-many. Sending messages to the customer who has applauded their service on Facebook, comes under the one-to-one approach. 

But if a new shopping store sends a custom message to a targeted audience segment living in the area it comes under the one-to-many approach.

Add to the scene, the boom of voice assistants. Amazon Alexa and Google Home do actually assist the consumer in finding products, stores, events and much more. 

The Drupal community has been focusing on the bot frameworks and other cognitive services that can be used to develop bots for different use cases.  it all started with a framework called Open Source Bot Builder SDK for Node.js which is used for building bots. 

Further several bot frameworks like Facebook Messenger (wit.ai), Google Dialogflow, IBM Watson, Microsoft Bot Framework and open source conversational AI like Rasa are considered for the integration. 

The main idea was that the bots will enable search and explore the products by incorporating Drupal Commerce APIs. On the basis of message-based interaction, bots can also enable simple Add To Cart and Review Cart functionality among others and can offer relevant actions while looking for a product.
 

Whatever perspective you acquire, integrating content into commerce is easier said than done. The product has to be worthy, content authentic, and the transaction without a breach. Providing a seamless experience to both retailers and publishers, Drupal is the bridge you need. 

Connect with us to build a seamless, content-commerce experience. Drop a mail at hello@opensenselabs.com.

blog banner blog image Commerce E-Commerce Content and Commerce User Experience Drupal 8 Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On
Categories: Drupal

ComputerMinds.co.uk: Custom AJAX loading icon

Planet Drupal - 18 December 2018 - 2:48am

There's nothing like Drupal's stock AJAX spinner (this:    Drupal's default blue loading throbber graphic) to make you notice that a site's design hasn't been fully customised. The code from my previous article showing how to fetch a link over AJAX to open in a Foundation reveal popup would suffer from this without some further customisation. After clicking the 'Enquire' button, a loading icon of some kind is needed whilst the linked content is fetched. By default, Drupal just sticks that blue 'throbber' next to the link, but that looks totally out of place. Our client's site uses a loading graphic that feels much more appropriate in style and placement, but my point is that you can set up your own bespoke version. Since it's Christmas, let's add some festive fun! Here's a quick video showing what I'll take you through making:

A few things are needed:

  1. Create a javascript method that will add a custom progress indicator
  2. Ensure the javascript file containing the method is included on the page
  3. Set a custom attribute on the link that will trigger the AJAX
  4. Override Drupal core's javascript method that adds the standard progress throbber, to respect that custom attribute

There are many ways to achieve points 1 and 2. Usually, you would define a library and add it with #attached. But I decided I wanted to treat my work as if it were part of Drupal's core AJAX library itself, rather than something to add separately. So I implemented hook_library_info_alter() in my theme's main .theme file:

/** * Implements hook_library_info_alter(). */ function MYTHEME_library_info_alter(&$libraries, $extension) { // Add our own extension to drupal.ajax, which is aware of the page markup so // can add AJAX progress loaders in the page. if ($extension == 'core' && isset($libraries['drupal.ajax'])) { $libraries['drupal.ajax']['js']['/' . drupal_get_path('theme', 'MYTHEME') . '/js/ajax-overrides.js'] = []; } }

My ajax-overrides.js file contains this:

(function ($, window, Drupal, drupalSettings) { /** * Creates a new Snowman progress indicator, which really is full screen. */ Drupal.Ajax.prototype.setProgressIndicatorSnowman = function () { this.progress.element = $(' '); // My theme has a wrapping element that will match #main. $('#main').append(this.progress.element); }; })(jQuery, window, Drupal, drupalSettings);

My theme happens to then style .ajax-progress-snowman appropriately, to show a lovely snowman in the middle of the page, rather than a tiny blue spinner next to the link that triggered the AJAX. Given that the styling of the default spinner happens to make links & lines jump around, I've got the ajax-progress-fullscreen class in there, to be more like the 'full screen' graphic that the Views UI uses, and avoid the need to add too much more styling myself.

Part 3, adding a custom attribute to specify that our AJAX link should use a Snowman animation, is easily achieved. I've already added the 'data-dialog-type' attribute to my link, so now I just add a 'data-progress-type' attribute, with a value of 'snowman'. I want this to work similarly to the $element[#ajax]['progress']['type'] property that can be set on form elements that use AJAX. Since that only gets applied to form elements, not arbitrary links using the 'use-ajax' class, we have to do the work to pick this up ourselves.

So this is the last part. Back in my ajax-overrides.js file, I've added this snippet to override the standard 'throbber' progress type that AJAX links would otherwise always use. It falls back to Drupal's original method when the progress type isn't specified in a 'data-progress-type' attribute.

// Override the progress throbber, to actually use a different progress style // if the element had something specified. var originalThrobber = Drupal.Ajax.prototype.setProgressIndicatorThrobber; Drupal.Ajax.prototype.setProgressIndicatorThrobber = function () { var $target = $(this.element); var progress = $target.data('progressType') || 'throbber'; if (progress === 'throbber') { originalThrobber.call(this); } else { var progressIndicatorMethod = 'setProgressIndicator' + progress.slice(0, 1).toUpperCase() + progress.slice(1).toLowerCase(); if (progressIndicatorMethod in this && typeof this[progressIndicatorMethod] === 'function') { this[progressIndicatorMethod].call(this); } } };

So there you have it - not only can you launch beautiful Foundation Reveal popups from links that fetch content via AJAX, you can now avoid Drupal's little blue throbber animation. If it's an excuse to spread some cheer at Christmas, I'll take it.

Happy Christmas everyone!

Categories: Drupal

DrupalCon News: Community Connection - Mario Hernandez

Planet Drupal - 18 December 2018 - 12:11am

We’re featuring some of the people in the Drupalverse! This Q&A series highlights some of the individuals you could meet at DrupalCon.

Every year, DrupalCon is the largest gathering of people who belong to this community. To celebrate and take note of what DrupalCon means to them, we’re featuring an array of perspectives and some fun facts to help you get to know your community.

Categories: Drupal

Relentlessly eliminating barriers to growth

Dries Buytaert - 17 December 2018 - 7:11pm

In my last blog post, I shared that when Acquia was a small startup, we were simultaneously focused on finding product-market fit and eliminating barriers to future growth.

In that light, I loved reading Eugene Wie's blog post called, Invisible asymptotes. Wie was a product leader at Amazon. In his blog post he explains how Amazon looks far into the future, identifies blockers for long-term growth, and turns eliminating these growth barriers into multi-decade efforts. As Amazon shows, eliminating barriers to growth remains very important long after you have outgrown the startup phase.

For example, Amazon considered shipping costs to be a growth blocker, or as Wie describes it, an invisible asymptote for growth. People hate paying for shipping costs, so Amazon decided to get rid of them. At first, solving this looked prohibitively expensive. How can you offer free shipping to millions of customers? Solving for this limitation became a multi-year effort. First, Amazon tried to appease customers' distaste for shipping fees with "Super Saver Shipping". Amazon introduced Super Saver Shipping in January 2002 for orders over $99. If you placed an order of $99 or more, you received free shipping. In the span of a few months, that number dropped to $49 and then to $25. Eventually this led to the launch of Amazon Prime in 2005, making all shipping "free". Members pay $79 per year for free, unlimited two-day shipping on eligible purchases. While a program like Amazon Prime doesn't actually make shipping free, it feels free to the customer, which effectively eliminates the barrier for growth. The impact on Amazon's growth was tremendous. Today, Amazon Prime provides Amazon an economic moat, or a sustainable competitive advantage – it isn't easy for other retailers to compete from a sheer economic and logistical standpoint.

Another obstacle for Amazon's growth was shipping times. People don't like having to wait for days to receive their Amazon purchase. Several years ago, I was talking to Werner Vogels, Amazon's global CTO, and asked him where most commerce investments were going. He responded that reducing shipping times was more strategic than making improvements to the commerce backend or website. As Wie points out in his blog, Amazon has been working on reducing shipping times for over a decade. First by building a higher density network of distribution centers, and more recently through delivery from local Whole Foods stores, self-service lockers at Whole Foods, predictive or anticipatory shipping, drone delivery, and more. Slowly, but certainly, Amazon is building out its own end-to-end delivery network with one primary objective: reducing shipping times.

Every organization has limitations that stunt long-term growth so there are important lessons that can be learned from how Amazon approached its blockers or invisible asymptotes:

  1. Take the time to correctly identify your long-term blockers for growth.
  2. Removing these long-term blockers for growth may look impossible at first.
  3. Removing these long-term blockers requires creativity, innovation, patience, persistence and aggressive capital allocation. It can take many initiatives and many years to eliminate them.
  4. Overcoming these obstacles can be a powerful strategy that can unlock unbelievable growth.

I spend a lot of time and effort working on eliminating Drupal's and Acquia's growth barriers so I love these kind of lessons. In a future blog post, I'll share my thoughts about Drupal's growth blockers. In the meantime, I'd love to hear what you think is holding Drupal or Acquia back — be it via social media, email or preferably your own blog.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: Relentlessly eliminating barriers to growth

Planet Drupal - 17 December 2018 - 7:11pm

In my last blog post, I shared that when Acquia was a small startup, we were simultaneously focused on finding product-market fit and eliminating barriers to future growth.

Today, Acquia is no longer a startup, but eliminating barriers to growth remains very important after you have outgrown the startup phase. In that light, I loved reading Eugene Wie's blog post called, Invisible asymptotes. Wie was a product leader at Amazon. In his blog post he explains how Amazon looks far into the future, identifies blockers for long-term growth, and turns eliminating these stagnation points into multi-decade efforts.

For example, Amazon considered shipping costs to be a growth blocker, or as Wie describes it, an invisible asymptote for growth. People hate paying for shipping costs, so Amazon decided to get rid of them. At first, solving this looked prohibitively expensive. How can you offer free shipping to millions of customers? Solving for this limitation became a multi-year effort. First, Amazon tried to appease customers' distaste for shipping fees with "Super Saver Shipping". Amazon introduced Super Saver Shipping in January 2002 for orders over $99. If you placed an order of $99 or more, you received free shipping. In the span of a few months, that number dropped to $49 and then to $25. Eventually this strategy led to Amazon Prime, making all shipping "free". While a program like Amazon Prime doesn't actually make shipping free, it feels free to the customer, which effectively eliminates the barrier for growth. The impact on Amazon's growth was tremendous. Today, Amazon Prime provides Amazon an economic moat, or a sustainable competitive advantage – it isn't easy for other retailers to compete from a sheer economic and logistical standpoint.

Another obstacle for Amazon's growth was shipping times. People don't like having to wait for days to receive their Amazon purchase. Several years ago, I was talking to Werner Vogels, Amazon's global CTO, and asked him where most commerce investments were going. He responded that reducing shipping times was more strategic than making improvements to the commerce backend or website. As Wie points out in his blog, Amazon has been working on reducing shipping times for over a decade. First by building a higher density network of distribution centers, and more recently through delivery from local Whole Foods stores, self-service lockers at Whole Foods, predictive or anticipatory shipping, drone delivery, and more. Slowly, but certainly, Amazon is building out its own end-to-end delivery network with one primary objective: reducing shipping speeds.

Every organization has limitations that stunt long-term growth so there are a few important lessons that can be learned from how Amazon approached its invisible asymptotes:

  1. Identify your invisible asymptotes or long-term blockers for growth.
  2. Removing these long-term blockers for growth may look impossible at first.
  3. Removing these long-term blockers requires creativity, patience, persistence and aggressive capital allocation. It can take many initiatives and many years to eliminate them.
  4. Overcoming these obstacles can be a powerful strategy that can unlock unbelievable growth.

I spend a lot of time and effort working on eliminating Drupal's and Acquia's growth barriers so I love these kind of lessons. In a future blog post, I'll share my thoughts about Drupal's growth blockers. In the meantime, I'd love to hear what you think is holding Drupal or Acquia back — be it via social media, email or preferably your own blog.

Categories: Drupal

Promet Source: How to Stop SPAM with Drupal 8's Recaptcha module

Planet Drupal - 17 December 2018 - 5:43pm
Have you ever tried logging in or registering to a website and you were asked to identify some distorted numbers and letters and type it into the provided box? That is the CAPTCHA system. The CAPTCHA helps to verify whether your site's visitor is an actual human being or a robot. Not a robot like you see in the Terminator movie but an automated software to generate undesired electronic messages (or content). In short, CAPTCHA protects you from SPAM.  
Categories: Drupal

Flocon de toile | Freelance Drupal: Small sites, large sites, micro sites with Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 17 December 2018 - 5:04pm

Drupal 8 is a tool designed to meet the needs of the most ambitious web projects. We hear a lot about the notions of headless, API first, decoupling, etc. that resolutely allow solid architectures for ambitious projects. But this does not mean that Drupal 8 no longer propels more traditional, and sometimes even much less ambitious sites: simple, small, and even large, websites, but for which we want to benefit from the modularity, flexibility and robustness of Drupal.

Categories: Drupal

Region In Content Template

New Drupal Modules - 17 December 2018 - 3:01pm

If you want to show a block within the content region of your Drupal 8 site, this may be the module for you. Specifically, if you would like to print the secondary menu region mixed in among the fields of your content in your custom full node template, we've got you covered.

Categories: Drupal

Shortcut Menu

New Drupal Modules - 17 December 2018 - 12:58pm

Drupal core shortcuts doesn't provide the ability to nest shortcuts like a traditional menu. This module provide the nesting capability that users are familiar with.

Categories: Drupal

Trisbee Commerce Payments

New Drupal Modules - 17 December 2018 - 12:07pm
Categories: Drupal

PHP PDFTK

New Drupal Modules - 17 December 2018 - 10:48am

This module wraps php-pdftk which is a PDF conversion and form utility based on pdftk.

Brings the power of pdftk to Drupal. Fill forms, split PDFs, add backgrounds or overlays, and more.

Requirements

The pdftk command must be installed on your system.

The php-pdftk library and it's dependencies must be installed in the `sites/all/library` directory.

Categories: Drupal

Gábor Hojtsy: How to automate testing whether your Drupal 8 module is incompatible with Drupal 9?

Planet Drupal - 17 December 2018 - 10:23am

Drupal 9 is planned to be only 18 months away now, wow! It is already being built in Drupal 8 by marking APIs to be removed in Drupal 9 as deprecated and eventually upgrading some dependency version requirements where needed. Once the Drupal 9 git branch will be open, you will be able to test directly against Drupal 9. That should not stop you from assessing the compatibility of your module with Drupal 9 now. To prepare for compatibility with Drupal 9, you need to keep up with deprecated functionality and watch out for upgraded dependencies (when we know which are those exactly). Of these two, automation can go a long way to help you keep up with deprecated APIs.

Categories: Drupal

DrupalCon News: DrupalCon Seattle: Sessions and Strides

Planet Drupal - 17 December 2018 - 10:10am

DrupalCon Seattle is looking different than the DrupalCons of years past.

The overarching goal when planning DrupalCon Seattle 2019 was to expand both outreach and accessibility so that attendees would be representative of the community as a whole. The value of the conference is in the perspectives, energy and diversity of experiences participants share.

DrupalCon began setting goals to overtly increase diversity starting with DrupalCon Baltimore 2017. This continued in the planning of DrupalCon Nashville 2018, and is prioritized for DrupalCon Seattle 2019.

Categories: Drupal

MidCamp - Midwest Drupal Camp: Summits: What to Expect?

Planet Drupal - 17 December 2018 - 9:37am
Summits: What to Expect?

This year MidCamp will be including summits in addition to the regular programming that we have provided in the future. Here are some things we think you should know in order to prepare yourself:

A summit is a one-day topic-intensive meeting where people who share an industry or interest can come together to collaborate, share pain points and solutions, and meet like-minded individuals in a structured, safe environment.

Summits focus a full day unconference around a singular topic, in which different groups of interested parties collaborate, gather information and learn together. This programming is for focused discussion, planning, hacking and learning about the topic. 

We believe in facilitating like an unconference. On the day of, each summit group led by a facilitator will compile an agenda and create breakout groups on various subtopics of the overall summit topic.

Unlike training, attendees are generally still planning and information gathering. There won’t be any required deliverable, like code or documentation. Instead, summits focus on conversation and dialog. During a training, the focus is learning a thing, but summits encourage open idea sharing on a broad range of topics related to the overall theme. 
 

Takeaways from the Midcamp Team

Below are some stories from our team as they reflect back on their first summit.

“I felt like I was in a room full of rock stars. Angie Byron, Sam Boyer, Chris Vanderwater... I forget who else, but there were a fair number of big names. We were there to discuss the panels/blocks initiative. There was considerable brainstorming on various problems that were currently being solved in the initiative.”

- Andrea Soper

“I just attended my first summit at BADCamp this year. It was the front end summit and attendees were polled ahead of time to get an overall sense of what front end topics people were interested in discussing. At the summit, we used that list and then added to it via post-its to organize the topics into larger categories. Then throughout the day, we broke into smaller groups to discuss almost every topic that came up. The facilitators were good about keeping the discussion moving along and ensuring we covered everything. The day was also broken up with some fun group icebreakers and a talk from one of the creators of GatsbyJS.”

- Kevin Thull

Categories: Drupal

CKEditor Advanced Tab

New Drupal Modules - 17 December 2018 - 7:48am

This module integrates the [dialogadvtab](
https://ckeditor.com/cke4/addon/dialogadvtab) CKEditor plugin for Drupal 8.

This plugin provides the Advanced dialog window tab to extend some editor dialog windows.
Thanks to this other plugins do not need to implement the same features for their dialog windows.

Categories: Drupal

DrupalEasy: DrupalEasy Podcast 213 - Ted Bowman - Layout Builder in Core

Planet Drupal - 17 December 2018 - 6:33am

Direct .mp3 file download.

Ted Bowman, senior software engineer with the Drupal Acceleration Team at Acquia, joins Mike to discuss the game-changing work of the Layout Initiative. Sorry about the poor quality of part of Mike's side of the conversation (as well as the comical overdubbing of other portions of the conversation).

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Categories: Drupal

OpenSense Labs: Breaking Down the Concept of Distributed Content Management System

Planet Drupal - 17 December 2018 - 6:10am
Breaking Down the Concept of Distributed Content Management System Akshita Mon, 12/17/2018 - 19:40

Heading a multinational or location agnostic organization with complex content creation and publication needs while also keeping a track of the content can be a difficult task without the right content management system.

The number of bloggers is expected to reach 31.7 million in 2020 in the US alone. 

Imagine the number of blogs on the internet. The huge amount of information flowing online has brought us to the situation where the ever-flowing media content needs to be routinely stored and encoded. Networked storage and exchange of data allow content to be distributed making the task of content management all but impossible to deal, without a content management system.

Content and teams that interact in a distributed system need to be dealt intrinsically different from the ones that interact in a centralized system.

Considering the popularity of Drupal as the enterprise’s CMS, in this blog, we will explore how it can help in providing and managing the modern digital experience as a Distributed Content Management System.

 

Understanding the Concept

A distributed content management system can be difficult to comprehend to different people as it implies a different meaning to a different situation. 

To develop a better understanding of the distributed content management system, let’s understand with an example of a national daily which also publishes in different regional languages. 

The Distributed Management of Content or The Management of Distributed Content

The Distributed Management of Content deals with the workflow involved in the content creation with a decentralized approach. 

The Management of Distributed Content works around dealing with existing content from a variety of sources, involving input (from other websites/sources), output (to other websites) or both. 

By implementing Distributed Management of Content, organizations can eliminate the time and opportunity for error introduced when users enter content in multiple places. Unlike the first concept, the goals for Management of Distributed Content are generally around efficiency and control. 

Setting up An Example of a National Media House

Let’s call this media house - OneIndia News

One India news has 6 regional websites. Similar to many media institutions, the website channels are split into multiple categories (let’s say 5) and each of those categories further houses a number of sub-sections.  

Some of the regional websites may only have 2 to 4 categories depending on the demand, but others may have upwards of 10. 

Each category has an editorial team of its own.

Now the regional websites are handled by a number of different editors for each category and channel. Toss in the requisite assortment of content types and workflow hierarchy - you can see how quickly the web presence gets complex!  

Management of distributed content revolves around efficiency and control.

At this scale, we’re likely dealing with multiple websites of one media organization, all of which have requirements around content. This has now become the perfect use-case for Distributed Content Management!

  Use Case 1: Publishing Workflows For Individual Websites

For the main website of One India News, a central editorial team with defined roles and distributed content production would suffice.

Consideration of a content approval workflow is a critical part of the content strategy for any organization that employs distributed management.

Each news needs to be added and edited by different people. Editing the news on the live site can result in accidental publishing.

Be it living a number of articles at the same time, sending the final copy for the approval of different persons (without living them) or publishing articles on different subdomains. A robust virtual workflow and content staging and publishing without the requiring the editor to log into the target site is needed from the CMS. 

Publishing workflows will be tailored not only to the regional media house but to each channel and team that’s in charge of their regional website. The idea here is to manage the responsibilities across the organization while empowering the editors. 

Content to be published on the homepage of the website will likely require significantly more oversight than in the humor or offbeat channel. 
 

Use Case 2: Sharing Content Out - Centralized Content On A Distributed Web Platform

Copy-and-paste becomes a less efficient option when the content is further distributed to the workflow.

A distributed system must have a Pub-Sub (Publisher-Subscriber) feature to ensure the information is processed quickly across the different systems. The centralized system must allow editing and processing of the data while pushing the request to the subsystems. This needs to be done asynchronously so the results populate really fast, for the editor. 

Use Case 3: Sharing Content In - Decentralized Websites As Points Of Origin

Another interesting use case presents itself when we consider distributed websites as the starting point for content creation. One India, as any media houses maintain a central calendar of events, such as festivals and political events. 

In a well-formed distributed content model, with an appropriate CMS like Drupal, the same metadata that allows visitors to filter events - audience, department, program - can be easily used to syndicate those events to various other websites.  

Unfortunately, the same level of consideration is not always given to everyone outside the subset team with appropriate permissions. 

Content managers who are generally empowered to manage their own content may not have the same access to do so, or, in cases where they do have permission, find themselves needing to enter content into an entirely different website system to get it published to their site. But why should this be the case?  

By extending the same technologies that allow websites to receive events from a central calendar, in Drupal we can enable content managers to publish events to the calendar from within the same website they usually manage. (The same content approval and publishing workflow considerations apply, of course.)
 

Difference between Centralized and Distributed Content Management
 

Centralized Content Management

Distributed Content Management 

  • All content funneled through one group

  • Small individual workgroups responsible for respective areas

  • Central rules and procedures to ensure rules are followed 

  • The responsibility of individual groups to oversee content quality

  • One person authority - who is responsible for the rules and implementation

  • Each group may have one or more lead approvers. Workgroups leads handle process and rules

  • Advantage - Resulting process control without confusion

  • Advantage - Responsibility and the workload are distributed

  • Disadvantage - May result in a bottleneck

  • Disadvantage - Individual groups can interpret rules differently


Use Case 4: Multichannel Brand Content

Single-source content syndication also provides an opportunity for media companies to promote their brand across multiple mediums. Many companies choose to employ standalone, all-in-one news providers such as Reuters, rather than integrating a category for each of the news providers. 

This makes a tremendous amount of sense - these organization systems when merged with the own CMS can provide a number of compelling results such as quicker results and faster news publishing. 

By programmatically receiving the content from a content repository the organization can eliminate the risk of delayed news and perpetual loss of audience. 


Use Case 5: Content Delivery To Validated Audiences

In an attempt to decentralize content over the years, media organizations now allow users to add stories to the website. 

How they access, validate, identify the users is another key consideration for the company’s distributed content management strategy. 

A common approach is to segregate guest editor content into different regional “portals” - websites that require the editor to create accounts and login to see the information for their country or part of the world.  

To overcome the challenge of validating these accounts, companies often integrate with an Identity Provider (IdP) such as SAML 2.0 Single Sign On easy configuration & active support, in your Drupal website. 

At the far end of the Distributed Content Management spectrum are systems that need to publish consistent, controlled content to websites with no possibility for discrepancies across multiple sites.  

Drupal allows Distributed Content Management strategy to be applied to large volumes of content to facilitate efficient workflow. Specifically, the system allows different content and editors to be part of the same system without much replication. 

Finally, the modular design of the Drupal architecture allows both stand-alone and distributed realizations so that the system can be deployed in a variety of applications. Connect with us, drop a mail at hello@opensenselabs.com or tweet us @OpenSenseLabs

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