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Social Link Formatter

New Drupal Modules - 14 May 2015 - 1:44pm

Social Link Formatter is a module that adds a new formatter for link fields that renders a link as an appropriate icon linking to the destination if the link is related to a social network. The icon is guessed automatically from the hostname of the link. If the hostname is not related to a supported social network, then no icon is rendered.

Categories: Drupal

Acquia: Web Accessibility for Developers -- Part 2

Planet Drupal - 14 May 2015 - 1:15pm

We’re at the halfway point of what hopefully has been a helpful guide for developers to make a website accessible for all visitors. (If you missed the first part of this two-part series, please click here.)

In this blog, we’ll review how instructional text, navigation, and other parts of development can allow those with blindness and low vision, deafness, and other disabilities to make full use of a website.

There’s a Proper Place for Instructional Text

When providing an example that will help the user fill out a field, place it after the label of the field and before the field itself. This will let the screen reader pinpoint the instructional text and leave no doubt to the user that they’re hearing an example of what’s required. For instance, an example of how to enter the country code and remaining digits of a telephone number should come just before the field.

A Search that Searches When Instructed

Many people love filters that are dynamic — offering results after each selection is made — but it’s not the best thing for a text reader. Dynamic searches cause the page to constantly refresh, leaving a visitor who’s using a text reader to wonder what’s going on. A page shouldn’t reload until the user hits a button. That means all filters and search functionality should have “submit,” “go,” and “apply” buttons.

Jump Directly to Main Content

Readers without disabilities probably take it for granted that they can jump directly to the main content on a webpage. But for those using a screen reader, they first have to listen to a long list of navigation links, icons and other elements before reaching the main content. That’s where a “skip to main content” link comes in handy. It allows a user to skip everything at the top of the page.

The good news for developers using Drupal is that the “skip to main content” link is beginning to come right out of the box and is already included in some themes. If it’s not included, don’t worry. The code in your template should look similar to:

<a id="skip-link" href="#main-content" class="element-invisible element-focusable">Skip to main content</a>.

The CSS code should make the link invisible to a sighted user but will allow a screen reader to focus on the link.

An Easier Way to Zoom and Shrink

Visually impaired people who don’t need a screen reader still may need to manipulate the size of text. They don’t always know how to use keyboard shortcuts and need a user-friendly aid. In a matter of minutes, a site administrator can plop a text-resizing module onto a Drupal webpage. Here’s a handy helper on how to do it. Just keep in mind that it doesn’t always work for menu items, but it usually does resize static text.

Know What to Show; What to Hide

CSS allows developers to change the style of a webpage and make content sparkle. But some text-based screen readers or older screen readers need to read the page with all of the styles disabled. It’s important to make sure that if the stylesheets are turned off, the screen reader will still be able to read the order of the content correctly and be able to access all functionality.

Most of the responsive Drupal themes are already providing this functionality out of the box, but this standard is important to think about, and test when choosing how you will lay out your pages.

In order to test, disable your stylesheets — as seen in this screenshot of a White House page, for instance — and scroll down the page to ensure that the content order is the same as you originally intended.

These are only a few steps that can help developers make a website accessible to all visitors. If you’d like to see more ideas — or perhaps even gain a greater understanding of Web accessibility itself — here are two resources worth checking out:

The first is a checklist of standards from Section 508 of the federal Rehabilitation Act that government agencies must follow to provide full and fair Internet access to people with disabilities. Even though only federal agencies are required to follow them, the standards serve as a thorough and detailed source of steps for businesses and organizations to use.

Another useful resource are the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines offered by the World Wide Web Consortium (WC3). The guidelines are comprehensive and should also help you on the way to creating an accessible website.

Thanks for reading. Please leave a comment below if you have other suggestions you’d like to share.

Down the road, we’ll post a companion, two-part series on accessibility for clients – stay tuned.

Tags:  acquia drupal planet
Categories: Drupal

Dave Hall Consulting: Leaking Information in Drupal URLs

Planet Drupal - 14 May 2015 - 12:26pm

When a user doesn't have access to content in Drupal a 403 forbidden response is returned. This is the case out of the box for unpublished content. The problem with this is that sensitive information may be contained in the URL. A great example of this the DrupalCon site.

The way to avoid this is to use the m4032404 module which changes a 403 response to a 404. This simple module prevents your site leaking information via URLs.

AttachmentSize DrupalCon-Philadephia.png139.21 KB
Categories: Drupal

Chapter Three: Drupal 8 Automated Testing with Travis CI

Planet Drupal - 14 May 2015 - 10:05am

Travis CI burst onto the hosted continous integration scene by offering free testing for public projects. If your code is on Github and available to the public then Travis will run your tests for you.



I will show you how to get Drupal 8 running all of it's PHPunit tests in Travis. If you want to use Travis for your own private repo, you will have to pay a little bit. In my opinion that is a small price to pay for never setting up Jenkins again.



First we specify our programming language and the version.




language: php

php:
- 5.4


Next up we specify our database information. Note that we do not have to specify install steps for either PHP or MySQL.

Categories: Drupal

Another Drop in the Drupal Sea: DrupalCon LA Wednesday Recap

Planet Drupal - 14 May 2015 - 9:30am

After the keynote I took advantage of the opportunity to meet face to face with a new contact. Then, after lunch I headed into a couple of BOFs that were way out of my league and made my brain hurt. I finished up the day with a session that was more in my comfort zone.

I think it's good to stretch my mind and get out of my comfort zone even though it, quite honestly, left me feeling really stupid. I also felt really tired by the end of the day. So, I decided to take a pass on any social events for the evening and just relax in my hotel room.

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Categories: Drupal

InternetDevels: DrupalTour Zhytomyr

Planet Drupal - 14 May 2015 - 6:52am

Spring time is just perfect for Drupal rides! The weather is great, drupallers are in the good mood and Drupal-van shines in the bright sun… So we decided to make a ride to Zhytomyr. And it turned out to be awesome!

We had to leave Lutsk at 7:30 AM to arrive to Zhytomyr in time. Getting up at 6 on Saturday morning is not so easy, by the way! But we actually had no other options and the trip to Zhytomyr was worth it :)

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Categories: Drupal

Friendly Machine: Notes from DrupalCon Los Angeles

Planet Drupal - 14 May 2015 - 6:41am

On Tuesday, Dries gave the best keynote I’ve heard him deliver. It included some very interesting Drupal history and it brought home to me how extraordinary Drupal really is. There were so many points in the project’s history when things could have happened differently - or not happened at all. To see a photo of the first DrupalCon attendees 10 years ago (27 people) while sitting among ~3000 Drupalists from around the world was pretty amazing.

There are so many people doing big, interesting things with Drupal. Despite concerns about corporate influence within the Drupal community, the project empowers a huge number of non-profits and institutions of higher education and it was great to see them so well represented here. It might be weird to talk about software as a force for good, but that’s really how I see Drupal. It makes a huge difference to a lot of organizations and the valuable work they contribute to society.

As you may have heard, there will be a DrupalCon in India next year. The city hasn’t been announced yet, but my money is on Mumbai. I’ve known two people who have traveled to India. Both said it was amazing and intense. I’m not sure if I’ll go, but I’m very tempted. I love travel, but that is one hell of a long flight (20 hours).

The sessions this year were all recorded and put on YouTube, so if you want to catch up on anything you might have missed, here’s the link. There are a few sessions I recommend you check out:

However, the biggest benefit of DrupalCon for me isn’t the sessions. It’s getting to meet people and talking with them about their projects and how they are solving the problems they encounter. To everyone that came by the Lullabot booth to chat, thank you! It was great to see you in person and I hope to chat again next year - if not sooner!

Drupal
Categories: Drupal

Acquia: Build Your Drupal 8 Team: Technical Roles and Required Skills

Planet Drupal - 14 May 2015 - 6:38am

Last time, we discussed some big themes your Drupal 8 team should be synched up with, like object-oriented programming. Now we're going to drill down into more specifics on the technical side.

Is your tech team full of generalists, or do all your developers have special skill sets and focus on specific kinds of functionality, like databases or communications? Either way, someone on your team will have to fill each of these technical roles for a successful Drupal 8 project.

Drupal 8 Architect

More than anyone else on the project, the Drupal 8 architect needs to understand Drupal 8 in depth. The architect needs to make the decisions about the project's overall architecture, which requires envisioning how the system works as a whole. This is bigger than just the Drupal 8 application, because the project needs to fit into your company's entire software environment. It may need to be integrated with other corporate back-end systems, so this role needs to understand the full technical environment, not just the tech stack that comes with Drupal 8. As much as possible, this individual needs to have a strong understanding of front-end and back-end development tools in addition to a thorough understanding of how Drupal 8 works.

UI Designer

The UI designer needs to understand what the technology is capable of and how to use it to create the best experience for end users. To work with Drupal 8, the UI designer should keep building HTML, CSS and Javascript knowledge, but also develop a Drupal 8-specific understanding of how to create themes and build sites. Learning the capabilities of Twig is needed because Twig replaces PHPTemplate in the new version of Drupal. Instead of .tpl.php files, .html.twig files are needed.

Front-End Developer

All that stuff the UI designer promised the business? It's the front-end developer's job to turn that hypothetical design into a functioning interface. Like the UI designer, front end developers should enhance their knowledge of HTML, CSS and Javascript, and pick up knowledge of Twig. PHP knowledge will help also; so will knowing MySQL. The front-end developer will also want a Drupal 8-specific understanding of how to create themes and build sites, as well as how to develop custom modules and address Drupal 8 performance and Drupal 8 security concerns.

Back-End Developer

Clicking on website front-end elements does nothing until you implement the functionality in the back-end. You need to be able to write new functionality from scratch, building on existing components when possible. When the application needs to integrate with other systems, the back-end developer writes the code that hooks it all together into a system that functions seamlessly. This role needs some knowledge of front-end tools like HTML, CSS and JavaScript, but it also requires understanding back-end tools like PHP and MySQL in depth. For Drupal 8 knowledge, the back-end developer should focus on architecture and planning topics as well as how to develop custom modules and address Drupal 8 performance and Drupal 8 security concerns.

Marketing Technical Lead

The marketing technical lead owns the content publishing process. She defines the procedure for publishing content and makes sure it adheres to site standards. Because content doesn't accomplish anything unless someone sees it, the marketing technical lead needs to make sure it follows good SEO and SEM practices. It's important that the marketing tech lead keeps current with ever-changing SEO practices, and focuses on learning Drupal 8 as a content management system. Learning about the administration functions, and the kinds of changes you can make that won't require a developer to write code, will be especially useful for this role.

Next time: Non-Technical Team Roles and Required Skills for a Drupal 8 Project.

Tags:  acquia drupal planet
Categories: Drupal

Drupalize.Me: Learning To Debug: Stop Thinking and Look

Planet Drupal - 14 May 2015 - 6:02am

Debugging is a discipline that requires patience, and a fervent attention to detail. In the often times fast paced world of software development, when we're faced with deadlines, and an ever growing list of new features to add, and bugs to resolve, it can be a difficult to slow down and proceed in a meticulous, measured fashion. When it comes to solving difficult problems though, this fastidious approach is exactly what's required to locate, and resolve, a problem's root cause.

Categories: Drupal

Forgot Password Block

New Drupal Modules - 14 May 2015 - 5:04am

This module will provide a Forgot Password Block.

Install module and go to admin/structure/block. A Forgot Password Block will be coming in blocks.

You can place Forgot Password Block in any region.

You will type email address in the text field and forgot password link will be sent to your email address.

Categories: Drupal

Commerce SEUR

New Drupal Modules - 14 May 2015 - 5:03am

Drupal module for Commerce transport SEUR company

Credits

First code release by morgothz

Categories: Drupal

Annertech: Thoughts on DrupalCon LA's Front End Forum

Planet Drupal - 14 May 2015 - 4:34am
Thoughts on DrupalCon LA's Front End Forum

At DrupalconLA, I had the opportunity to go to an Open Front End Forum, wherein people chatted about the state of the front end. It was good fun, and the moderator did a good job of keeping the conversation flowing.

First question: "Where is the line that separates front end from back end?"

There was some disagreement on that. There is a line, there is no line, it's a permeable line... Going on to explore what defined front end or backend, people cited tasks and tools like PHP, HTML/CSS/JS, the browser, Photoshop, in favour of one argument or another.

Categories: Drupal

Dynamic widget for commerce line item field

New Drupal Modules - 14 May 2015 - 4:24am

@TODO: add description

Categories: Drupal
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