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agoradesign: Beware of evil pathauto patterns!

Planet Drupal - 6 August 2014 - 9:38am

Recently, a very mysterious problem has cost us quite a lot of time and some headache too. Before I explain, what happened, I want to mention, that it happened on a Drupal 7 Site on a MS SQL Server database. According to an issue on drupal.org, that I will mention later, it may also occur with PostegreSQL, but most likely not with MySQL. But I also have a general advice regarding pathauto patterns and best practices.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal.org frontpage posts for the Drupal planet: Drupal 7.31 and 6.33 released

Planet Drupal - 6 August 2014 - 9:35am

Drupal 7.31 and Drupal 6.33, maintenance releases which contain fixes for security vulnerabilities, are now available for download. See the Drupal 7.31 and Drupal 6.33 release notes for further information.

Download Drupal 7.31
Download Drupal 6.33

Upgrading your existing Drupal 7 and 6 sites is strongly recommended. There are no new features or non-security-related bug fixes in these releases. For more information about the Drupal 7.x release series, consult the Drupal 7.0 release announcement. More information on the Drupal 6.x release series can be found in the Drupal 6.0 release announcement.

Security information

We have a security announcement mailing list and a history of all security advisories, as well as an RSS feed with the most recent security advisories. We strongly advise Drupal administrators to sign up for the list.

Drupal 7 and 6 include the built-in Update Status module (renamed to Update Manager in Drupal 7), which informs you about important updates to your modules and themes.

Bug reports

Both Drupal 7.x and 6.x are being maintained, so given enough bug fixes (not just bug reports) more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.

Changelog

Drupal 7.31 is a security release only. For more details, see the 7.31 release notes. A complete list of all bug fixes in the stable 7.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Drupal 6.33 is a security release only. For more details, see the 6.33 release notes. A complete list of all bug fixes in the stable 6.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Security vulnerabilities

Drupal 7.31 and 6.33 were released in response to the discovery of security vulnerabilities. Details can be found in the official security advisory:

To fix the security problem, please upgrade to either Drupal 7.31 or Drupal 6.33.

Update notes

See the 7.31 and 6.33 release notes for details on important changes in this release.

Known issues

None.

Front page news: Planet DrupalDrupal version: Drupal 6.xDrupal 7.x
Categories: Drupal

Forum One: NVDA Screen Readers and Invisible Elements

Planet Drupal - 6 August 2014 - 7:02am

Here’s an interesting bug…

It is a pretty common practice to hide from view text that is meant for visually impaired users to read via a screen reader. In Drupal, required fields will get a value that is hidden in this way via CSS in the field’s label elements. By default, this text reads “This field is required” however the text is translated, so it may vary depending on the language of the page. Visually, this text is hidden; sighted users will still see a red star character next to these fields, but it is only meant as a cue for users utilizing screen readers.

A common method of hiding these ‘Cur’ elements is to set the element’s width and height to 1px and use the the clip property. This method can be seen in this blog post and is briefly hit upon in this WebAIM article.

.element-invisible {

position: absolute !important;

height: 1px;

width: 1px;

overflow: hidden;

clip: rect(1px 1px 1px 1px); /* IE6, IE7 */

clip: rect(1px, 1px, 1px, 1px);

}

The Problem

I’ve come across an issue that can hamper accessibility. Users employing the NVDA Screen Reader with Firefox and using the screen reader viewer will see elements styled like this with the spaces removed, e.g., “Thisfieldisrequired.” This does not appear to be an issue in Chrome, and I have not tested in other browsers. The screen reader view renders as:


The Solution

It seems that this spacing is caused by how Firefox is interpreting the width property. Using a larger width here seems to resolve the issue, and a good threshold for this seems to be 9px. I tried it with 8, but oddly, that width leaves some words still missing spaces while correcting others. This may cause some layout issues, however. (I spend more of my time in back-end development, so I am not a CSS expert by any means.) Here is the result of changing the element’s width to 9px:

 

 

Thus, it seems changing the pixel size of these invisible elements could be one small step towards improving accessibility of this screen reader in Firefox.

Categories: Drupal

Acquia: Drupal 8's new theming layer – Joël Pittet and Scott Reeves

Planet Drupal - 6 August 2014 - 6:09am

Drupal 8 theming layer co-maintainers Joël Pittet and Scott Reeves sat down with me at NYC Camp 2014 at United Nations Headquarters in New York City to talk about how Twig and the new theming layer in Drupal 8 empowers front- and back-end developers, convergence and contribution in PHP, and more.

Categories: Drupal

Amazee Labs: How to write Sass within Chromes DevTools using Workspaces and Auto-reload

Planet Drupal - 6 August 2014 - 3:48am
How to write Sass within Chromes DevTools using Workspaces and Auto-reload

There is this feature in Chromes’ DevTools that allows you to directly edit your local Sass files without ever leaving your beloved browser. Even better, it will refresh your CSS files as soon as Compass has compiled them for you (kinda like Guard!). And to go even further, it will show you where the CSS definitions really come from (the original Sass files), instead of that generated gibberish.

Intro

So to start, you'll obviously have to be working with Sass/Compass for this to work (pardon the pun!). I won’t go into detail on how to install these lovely things as this could take up an entire post itself. So if you know how to install Sass/Compass on your machine or have a handy co-worker you can annoy (preferably a sys-monkey admin) you’re good to go.

With Sass and Compass there are as always issues if you're not working with certain specific versions. The most reliable combination that worked for me was this one:

  • Susy 1.0.9
  • Ruby 1.9.3
  • Sass 3.3.0.alpha.134 (i suppose Sass 3.3.x will work fine too)
  • Compass 0.12.4.sourcemaps
The thing about source maps

For Compass you need an entirely different version from the one that you probably have, its called “compass-sourcemap”.

In order to get that juicy source map action you'll have to open up your shell and type in the following:

sudo gem install compass-sourcemaps --pre

This will install a compass version with source map, in the future source map will (hopefully) be included in the regular compass versions.

So what is compass-sourcemap exactly you ask? Well first of it’s super fantastic, even if you don't want to have all the workspace/auto-reload mayhem you should take a look at it.

For example, on a casual day while you’re working with that sassy generated CSS, the inspector can’t really tell you where the real definitions are coming from. It only shows you the line within the generated CSS file. This is where source maps comes in, it generates an additional .map file for every .css file and tells your browser where the CSS definition is coming from. There are 4 things you'll have to do after you've installed all the necessary tools:

  1. Enable “CSS source maps” in the General Chrome DevTools Settings under “Sources”
  2. Enable it in your config.rb file, just add the following line (make sure its not already there)
    • sass_options = {:sourcemap => true}
  3. In the shell, run your compass just like you always have
    • compass watch
  4. Enjoy it!
Prepare your Drupal

Disable the “Aggregate and Compress CSS files.” option in your Drupal 7 Installation in “YOURSITE/admin/config/development/performance”.

Next up: download and enable this small module: https://github.com/AmazeeLabs/cache_buster

This will remove that pesky query behind your .css files, normally this would be a bad thing and you should never use this on a production site. However, for Chrome to properly track your local files it needs to have a permanent link to them, in other words a path that doesn't change. I got the code from an issue queue (i think…) on drupal.org but i can’t remember which one, I simply put it inside a module for easy handling. So credits go to the unknown contributor, thank you very much (and sorry)!

Before:

After:

Prepare your Chrome

Go back to your general DevTools settings and enable “Auto-reload generated CSS”, its right below the source maps option:

After that open up your local project with Chrome and navigate to “Sources” in DevTools. You should see something that looks a little like this:

What you’re gonna do next is adding your local site as a workspace inside Chrome, this will remain in there until you manually remove it. I like to take the entire theme folder; you could also add the entire site, that’s all up to you. If you've picked the folder you want, right click and pick “Add folder to workspace”. Navigate to the exact same folder on your local machine and select it.

At this point Chrome will ask you for writing permissions, just oblige and never think of it again. I mean it’s Google; what could possibly go wrong, amiright?

You should now see a new folder at the bottom of the sources tab inside your DevTools, it’s named after the folder you've just picked. Navigate to where the main .css file is (or any other .scss file), right click and select “Map to Network Resource”

Chrome will now bring up a selection of files from your site, match it to your local file.

And finally Chrome will ask you if it’s okay to reload DevTools; you are totally fine with that so pick “ok” - and you're done!

You can open any .scss files from your workspace or use the inspector to directly open a file and make all the changes you want. You can save using your standard cmd+s and even open files using cmd+o. Everything will be saved just as if it was done within a proper IDE, except its Chrome!

But there’s one more thing

If you right-click on any of your .scss files you can select “Local Modifications”; this will bring up a general “History” of all your changes and you can even revert them!

 

Categories: Drupal

KYbest: Exporting image field defaults in D7

Planet Drupal - 6 August 2014 - 1:32am

We all love image fields' defaults: it's so easy to have a hero image for a product or a colleague's profile even when the editor does not provide one, with all the niceties such as displaying it with various image styles in a list, in the teaser or on the actual page. We all love Features module as it allows us to export Drupal 7 content types with all its settings.

Categories: Drupal
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