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QS Weight

New Drupal Modules - 9 August 2014 - 5:12pm
Categories: Drupal

Panels One Column Stacked Layout

New Drupal Modules - 9 August 2014 - 11:10am

This is a derivative of the "2 column stacked 70/30" layout provided by the Panels Extra Layouts module. It is identical, except instead of a 70/30 split for the content regions, it is a single 100% region.

The justification for this module is if you have a site that is mostly 70/30 pages, but need a few to have a single full width region, this will style the same as the other pages (Panel's default one column layout has additional padding, and isn't divided up into the stacked sections).

Categories: Drupal

Joachim's blog: Using Human Queue Worker to process comments

Planet Drupal - 9 August 2014 - 1:44am

Some time ago, I released Human Queue Worker, a module that takes the concept of the Drupal Queue system, but where the processing of the items is done by human users rather than an automated process. I say 'takes the concept'; it in fact uses the Drupal Queue to create and claim queue items, but instead of declaring your queue with hook_cron_queue_info(), you declare it to Human Queue Worker as a queue that humans will be working on.

This was written for my current project and for a fairly specific need, and I didn't imagine many sites would be using it. However, it has an obvious and popular application: approving comments. I always figured it would be nice if someone wrote a little module to define a comment processing human queue.

Well, that someone is me, and the time is now. You see, I'm an idiot: when I set up this new blog site of mine, I totally forgot to set up a CAPTCHA, and then when I added Mollon, I didn't set it up properly. So this site has a few hundred spammy comments that I need to delete.

The problem is that comment management takes time. Unless there are some magical area of the core UI I've completely missed, I can either visit each node and delete them one by one, or use the comment admin form. There, I can mass-delete the ones with obvious spammy titles, but all the others will still need individual inspection.

The Human Queue UI simplifies this hugely. There's just one page for the queue. When you go to that page, you're presented with an item to process. In the case of comment approval, that's the comment itself, plus the parent node and parent comment to give you some context. To process the comment, click one of two buttons: 'Publish' or 'Delete'. The comment is dealt with, and the form reloads, with a brand new comment for you to process. Which means that the only clicking you do is the action buttons: Publish; Delete; Publish; Delete. (Though with the amount of spam on my site, it's probably Delete; Delete; Delete, like the Cybermen.)

I've not timed it, but I reckon I can probably go at quite a rate. And that's with just one of me: the core Queue system guarantees that only one worker can claim an item at any one time, and that applies to human workers too. So if another user were to work the queue too, by going to the same page, they would be getting shown different comments to work on, and we'd work through the comments at twice the rate.

Now I just need to find a compliant friend and make them into my worker drone. If you're interested, please don't post a comment!

Categories: Drupal

Single User Role

New Drupal Modules - 9 August 2014 - 1:39am

Module modifies user role assigning functionality and only allows to assign single role to a particular user. This helps in the situations where you want users to have only one role at a time.

Features

  • Changes multiple user role assignment to single role.
  • Gives flexibility to change user role checkboxes field to select list or radios field.
  • User role field helptext can be set from configuration page.
Categories: Drupal

GOLIVE Checklist

New Drupal Modules - 8 August 2014 - 5:55pm
Drupal GOLIVE Checklist - What is it?

The Drupal GOLIVE Checklist eliminates guesswork by creating a functional to-do list of modules and tasks that remain before your site can go live. If you are in charge of launching a Drupal website, then this module is for you.

Dependencies

Checklist API

Categories: Drupal

X-Team: ContributeX: Drupal 8 needs you

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2014 - 4:38pm
“Contributing to Drupal is life-changing.” Dries, you couldn’t be more right. At DrupalCamp Singapore 2014, developers from all over Asia had the opportunity to spend a day focused on learning, collaborating and preparing for Drupal 8. One takeaway was being reminded of the fact that Drupal 8 still needs significant help from its community to be...
Categories: Drupal

tsvenson: How Open Source worx

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2014 - 12:00pm

It's funny how quick things happen - Really it is!

Just a week ago I posted I am a Follower & Thinker describing some of my experiences from Open Source. Then, just days later, someone had left me a message in an open Drupal chatroom. What happened after is the result of a chain of interesting - but more or less isolated - events and situations.

Quick background

I'm currently spending some of my time working on an open initiative called Baksteg. I have quite a bit of experience with Drupal and for me it is more than good enough to build the site I have in mind with. Just recently I begun doing some real prototyping of ideas too. Most of the testing have gone very well, but some not so and for those I have started to seek the online community more - poking for help to find solutions or alternative ways.

Online communities are everywhere

www.drupal.org is a fantastic resource to start with. Many problems can quickly be solved doing a quick search there, or it's related sites such as groups.drupal.org and api.drupal.org. Then, when you struggle to find useful help by just searching, you have already started to find other channels to communicate on. In fact you find people using, working with, Drupal everywhere these days. That even includes the same social networks everyone else uses, such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. Personally I prefer Twitter as it fills my needs and interests good enough, both with Drupal and other ones.

Over the last few months I have worked on tuning my own use of Twitter. I wanted it less as a *megaphone* and more a communication tool to have meaningful, while at the same time a bit entertaining, conversations on. It has worked out really well, while also - as an welcomed bonus - helped me much better appreciate what others actually share out there. My two main feeds are now @tsvenson (personal, mainly in English) and @Baksteg (mainly in Swedish). They both play important roles for my daily needs, which - totally coincidently - works really well with how I now see open source collaboration works out to ;)

Kinda one of the original Social Networks, not that long time ago

However this story happened in the Swedish Drupal-channel on IRC - a social network for geeks and nerds since long ago. It was from kristofferw_ (Kristoffer Wiklund) asking me about this entity ID *problem* I was having troubles with. Some days earlier I had posted a description of it in the Swedish Drupal Group. While that post resulted in some nice advices and ideas, they all turned out to be dead ends. Still, it gave me opportunity to play around with some other modules that later will be used.

- Practice is always good I'm told ;)

Kristoffer was one of them who had helped there. We also go further back, including several Drupal events around. Thus we already know each other, at least when it comes to Drupal stuff. I explained that testing been good, but the work had to, for good reasons, be *pushed* forward. That's when Kristoffer offered to help and write a simple module, if nothing else just to get some coding experience poking around.

As things often end up then, when passionate nerds and geeks find an interesting problem or challenge, brainstorming starts and ideas flows back and forth.

IRC is an important channel in the Drupal community, but it is not because of it's fancy features. It's its simplicity that makes it into such a useful tool to use as a communication hub. A hub that connects us to worldwide chatrooms that can run in the background only to be brought forward when needed or when we have a moment to spare. Or just as inspiration...

Just following the discussions is itself educational and often spurns new ideas. There are many different specialized chatrooms too, one simply called #Drupal-support, most often filled with several hundreds of users, helping each other. It is in these chatrooms many of the toughest challenges with improving the project is ironed out.

A new project is born

It is also here many new projects are born, small as larger ones. As Kristoffer and I began to talk, we quickly found a much more interesting approach. This one had much better potential and many more use cases as well as better flexibility and UX benefits too - So we created a sandbox project on drupal.org. It is now used so that we can experiment further in a better collaborative, open and efficient way.

If this module turns out the way we think it will, then we can take the next step and apply for it to become a Full project. This is a form of quality assurance process that includes us behind the project too, but to get there we need to pass gateways. These are not put in place to stop us though, quite the opposite. Many members in the community voluntary spend their own time to help others to pass. The whole guided process is filled with tools, tips and personal advices about how to make the project work as good as possible, not just for one self but for others too.

Once a full project, access to new features to organize and administrate is granted. Includes proper name space and better ways to manage versions and releases. These are features rarely needed when just poking around and testing ideas in the sandbox.

What I have also learned is what an amazing way to improve my own skills this is. Not just coding related, but also the way to collaborate and how great knowledge transfer can work too. All while at the same time get to know new interesting people and getting exposed to new cultures and ideas.

For me the Drupal community encapsulates all this, and more. Then, taking its size and success into count, it is a pretty remarkable achievement that shows how things can be done quite differently.

Add this to the mix:

  • Drupal is used on millions of sites
  • Drupal probably already generates a multi billion dollar ecosystem around it

 

Still there is room for practically anyone, like myself, to feel welcomed and included.

Even if it just starts out as a learning experience!

What this module does

At first glance it looks to do little more than adding an extra step, when creating new content, while hiding parts of the form from displaying. That's right, that is basically what it does and one of its main purposes.

Some might now say - Hey, you just going to end up with tons of garbage content! - and they would be right too. Sure, this is going to make it quicker to create a lot of content - Yes, it can certainly be used for that!

But it also makes some other quite interesting new things possible - This is why:

  • Entities in Drupal have unique ID-numbers, which can be used for all sorts of interesting things.
  • A new entity doesn't get its own ID until after it has been saved the first time.

 

Therein we find my initial problem! There where no smooth way to get around the fact: Users filling in those forms must remember and manually save once before adding content to certain fields. Worse, it would be tricky to notice, when forgotten, as in most cases the data would evaluate, just with something much different than the entity ID needed.

As I played around, with several other modules to see if it was possible to circumvent this somehow, I always hit the same brick-wall. Problem was: Every new idea that showed promise resulted in a solution with tons of complexity, not just in one place but several. Gladly, that complexity was what Kristoffer and I could avoid with just a little bit collaborative brainstorming!

What this module now does is simple:

  1. Hijacks entity create (just for content types yet)
  2. Allows to limit to content create form down to only display the Title field
  3. Creates the new entity
  4. Immediately reopens it in normal edit

 

Content type settings:

 

Adding a new node:

 

Thanks to this, I can now avoid displaying any fields that needs the entity ID, minimizing the risk of mistakes. At the same time it also means this new - pre create content - step can be used to only show the bare essential fields while opening up to new interesting possibilities. Any rarely used, and other optional, fields can be dealt with better as they come into play.

This new, less complex, solution will also be much easier to improve upon. It has actually already allowed me to visualize and identify a whole bunch of interesting uses and UX-benefits. It will improve for many roles, not the least site builders and content editors.

So, for me, this is no garbage creator. Instead I see how a small improvement can open up many new creative ways to work and collaborate on content. However that depends, after all it is still just a sandbox project on drupal.org a kind of - Open Source playground - for nerds and geeks like myself.

Not everything is as limited as what is usually read on the tin. For me, this is a few good examples of how things in Open Source can work out just nicely.

Note: What *specifics* Kristoffer gets out of this I know little of. Those specifics are his to share and actually not that important for me - As long as I sense we both get something of value out of the collaboration.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal 8 Rules: #d8rules update July-August 2014

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2014 - 7:24am

Since our last update, May 2014, the #d8rules initiative was able to complete funding for Milestone 1 and has made major development progress with two unstable releases and loads of commits on our GitHub repository.

Thanks to 142 great supports, we were able to raise $ 15k on Drupalfund. In addition to that, Technocrat stepped in with buying our second largest sponsor package "Reusable component providers" which helps us cover 100 hours of Rules 8.x development. All in all, we are excited to say that Milestone 1 is now fully funded thanks to the crowd funding and 10 companies sponsoring #d8rules.

If you are interested in more background on the #d8rules Drupalfund campaign, make sure to Virginia's blog post with all the details

#d8rules Rulers & invoices info

As promised, everybody who has donated $65+ on the Drupalfund will get one of the fancy Rulers provided by Nico from Ausgetrock.net! We just finished production & packaging and will send them out by the next week!

Development update

Development has mainly focused on working with Drupal's context system. Rules actions and conditions need parameters (for example a node object), which is represented as plugin context as used in Drupal core. They also need to provide variables (for example an entity load action will provide the loaded node object), which is implemented as provided plugin context in Rules itself. Provided context might be interesting for other Drupal 8 modules as well, so this might be moved out of Rules either into Drupal core or a Ctools-like project in D8 contributed space.

Currently we try to figure out all parts of the Rules core engine, how context is passed around and how data selectors are applied (example: node:uid:entity:mail:value to access the email adress of a node author). We implemented prototypes of those system parts, but the API is still experimental and we expect to change and improve things here a lot.

A number of action and condition plugins have been ported from Drupal 7 with the help of new Rules contributors, thank you to fubhy, paranojik, jibran and ndewhurst!

We are currently working towards milestone 1 of our roadmap and we are doing monthly unstable releases to keep you up to date with development progress.

Drupalaton training & sprints: Porting Actions

After a great training/sprint session at DrupalCamp Alpe-Adria Portoroz we finished porting most of the conditions. This weekend, at Drupalaton we just delivered our second training session to get contributors up to speed with Rules in Drupal 8. Topics delivered include our git pull request workflow and the new and shiny things about Drupal 8 including the plug-in system, CMI and many more.

Follow [META] Port all actions to 8.x to find out about the current status of actions being ported. Our getting started google doc provides steps in addition to the documentation available on fago's Rules GitHub repository. Upcoming sprint: DrupalCon Amsterdam

Thank you all for contributing.

Josef / dasjo on behalf of the #d8rules team

Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: Front-end Rapport #7

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2014 - 6:35am
What are You Going to Learn This Month?

Topics: Tools, Technique, Education

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association News: Introducing Drupal.org Terms of Service and Privacy Policy

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2014 - 6:32am

Almost half a year ago, with the help of the Drupal.org Content Working Group and lawyers, the Drupal Association started working on a Drupal.org Terms of Service (ToS) and Privacy Policy. After a number of drafts and rewrites, we are now ready to introduce both documents to Drupal.org users. Read the announcement on Drupal.org for more information.

Categories: Drupal

Aten Design Group: Declarative Programming and Drupal

Planet Drupal - 8 August 2014 - 6:17am

Lately I've been very interested in declarative programming. Last week Smashing Magazine published my article on Declarative Programming and the Web, and last weekend I gave a talk at DrupalCamp Colorado on "Footless Drupal" in which I talked about how Drupal 8 is using declarative programming for configuration; how the Config in Code (CINC) module is aiming to, among other things, backport that to Drupal 7; and how it's already possible to use custom configuration workflows outside the default Drupal interfaces.

If you're not already familiar with declarative programming and/or the Drupal 8 configuration API, I recommend reading my declarative programming article in Smashing (of course I do), as well as Drupal's configuration API documentation before continuing. All caught up? Great, let's talk about some next steps for expanding declarative programming in Drupal.

Custom Configuration Tools

First, we need more tools for managing configuration, with interfaces designed around more specific workflows. We're using a wide variety of approaches to building Drupal sites, and with a standard configuration format, there's no reason we shouldn't have the same variety of configuration interfaces. Do you define your content types in spreadsheets? Me too. I made an interface for that. Do you test your menus as static HTML? Great, let's make an interface that converts HTML menus to Drupal menu config. Do 90% of your views show all content of a given type? Let's auto-generate those Views configs.

While there's still a lot changing in Drupal 8, and some of that will likely impact configuration structures, those structures are stable enough and simple enough that we should be building our own tools around them today. And as CINC gets closer to D8 config API parity, we can use more and more of the same configuration in D7 as well. These tools can be written entirely outside Drupal, in a completely different language if you prefer, which then exports to YAML. Or you can take advantage of the information available within Drupal, i.e. current site configuration and content, and build modules with new interfaces. The world is our new Drupal configuration playground. Let's get playing.

Declarative Forms

But there's also no reason declarative programming in Drupal needs to stop at configuration. Drupal has a wide variety of non-configuration concepts that could benefit from declarative approaches. One area I've been thinking a lot about lately is forms. Drupal's form API is already mostly declarative, but it's built around PHP arrays, and we interact with form arrays with imperative code. We could probably learn a lot by comparing Drupal forms to existing standards for declarative forms, like XForms. But simply taking a form array and formatting it as YAML would be a good start. (Or we could do it as JSON, as Amitai Burstein has suggested).

I'm sure declarative forms in Drupal would end up being a large and complex project, but it would come with large benefits as well. Many form alters apply universally to a given form, so they might as well be editing the original form definition directly. That wouldn't make sense in community module code, but moving the form definition outside code would allow such form alters to happen directly in the configuration. The same way we can now do \Drupal::config('node.type.page')->set('name', 'Basic page')->save(), we could do form alters with something like \Drupal::form('formid')->set('mytextfield.#title', 'My Text Field')->save(). Or with a YAML workflow, simply editing a YAML file would edit the form. That's already a huge benefit, as it would open up many form alters to a much wider group of implementers. Remember when we edited forms directly in HTML? A YAML form interface could give us that same ease of editing while still maintaining the power of Drupal's form API.

And just like with declarative configuration, declarative forms would open up a wider world of use cases. Forms created in Webform or the field API could be easily reused in custom modules. And the same forms could be built or used entirely outside Drupal, opening the door for more form-building tools focused on specific workflows.

Hopefully this is enough to get more people excited about taking advantage of the parts of Drupal that already have declarative interfaces, and also pushing declarative programming even further in Drupal. I'm continuing to work on these ideas and will likely have more examples to share soon, but I'd really like to see more people playing here. If you're already working or interested in working on declarative programming in Drupal, let's talk.

Categories: Drupal

Sticky Local Tabs

New Drupal Modules - 8 August 2014 - 5:42am

Has styles & code to format the local tabs so they are fixed to the bottom of the browser.

Project Development supported by Highlights for Children

Categories: Drupal

2gis maps

New Drupal Modules - 8 August 2014 - 2:11am

Provides configurable drupal block with 2gis map

Categories: Drupal

Lullabot: Keeping Up with Drupal News

Planet Drupal - 7 August 2014 - 11:38pm

This week the podcast gets a little bit meta by discussing how to find Drupal news. Addison Berry is joined by three different community news sources: Mike Anello of DrupalEasy podcast, Bob Kepford of The Weekly Drop newsletter, and Chris Weber from Drupal and Coffee in the Morning hangout and the Google+ Drupal community. We discuss why following the news is important, and how we manage to keep up with it.

Categories: Drupal

DrupalCon Amsterdam: Register before midnight and save 50€ on tickets to DrupalCon Amsterdam

Planet Drupal - 7 August 2014 - 10:16pm

Will you be coming to DrupalCon Amsterdam?

DrupalCon is where all the big magic happens. From sprints that improve the project to training that brings in new talent, attending DrupalCon is the best way to get involved, get connected, and give back.

Take a break from your summer holiday and secure your place at DrupalCon before ticket prices rise on 8 August (that's tonight!) at 23:59 Amsterdam local time. Save the €50 you'd pay on a late ticket and make sure you buy your tickets now to take advantage of the regular rate. You can even buy for your company, with our easy prepaid tickets.

On the fence about attending?

If you're having trouble deciding whether to attend, we suggest you check out the schedule of sessions, BoFs, parties, and more, see who's going to be in Amsterdam, what you can learn, and how you can help the project while you're there. We've even got Cory Doctorow keynoting the event on Wednesday! What's not to love about that?

If you're having trouble convincing your boss to send you, check out these resources we've put together to help you get your manager's buy-in on the conference.

There will be great sessions, fantastic training opportunities, a quickly-filling business summit, a community summit, tons of sprints, and lots of fun at DrupalCon Amsterdam.

Have more questions? Check out the @DrupalConEur Twitter handle for breaking news and new information, or let us know if you need help.

We hope to see you in Amsterdam!

Categories: Drupal

Circliful

New Drupal Modules - 7 August 2014 - 5:01pm

-- SUMMARY --

Incorporates the Circliful JQuery plugin so you can make
pretty round pie charts. See
http://ladensia.com/circliful/index.html

*** This is an early development version of this module ***
It will not generate these graphics for you without adding HTML to your content.

-- REQUIREMENTS --

Libraries 2.0 or later
Jquery Update : You must run JQuery version 1.10 or later.

-- INSTALLATION --

Categories: Drupal

Drush Taxonomyinfo

New Drupal Modules - 7 August 2014 - 8:43am

Get information about taxonomies and their terms.

Installation

With drush:

drush dl drush_taxonomyinfo

With git:

Categories: Drupal

Mail New User

New Drupal Modules - 7 August 2014 - 4:53am

This module enables admin users to modify the welcome email subject and body at
the moment at which the email is about to be sent.

Categories: Drupal

Yild

New Drupal Modules - 7 August 2014 - 12:22am
What is it?

Yild stands for "Yild - Integrator for Linked Data". It's a Drupal module that provides a taxonomy term reference widget for connecting to an arbitrary number of external ontologies using provider modules. Provider modules are easy to write once you read through an example and allow you to connect any service to Yild. Furthermore, Yild comes prepackaged with a handful of working provider modules, such as Freebase, Dbpedia, Wikipedia and Finto (Finnish Ontology).

Categories: Drupal

Chinese CAPTCHA

New Drupal Modules - 6 August 2014 - 10:47pm

Coming soon...

Categories: Drupal
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