Drupal

CKEditor Bootstrap Grid

New Drupal Modules - 23 November 2017 - 8:10am

Allows creating rows and columns within CKEditor using Bootstrap syntax.

Categories: Drupal

Drop the Ripper

New Drupal Modules - 23 November 2017 - 8:08am

Drush command to try cracking user passwords against wordlists (like John the Ripper).

Categories: Drupal

Amazee Labs: Sustainable Drupal & React Maintenance - Video

Planet Drupal - 23 November 2017 - 5:55am
Sustainable Drupal & React Maintenance - Video

As mentioned in my previous post, I’ll be sharing the videos of the various talks by Amazees at Drupal Camp Cape Town 2017, over the upcoming weeks. 

Jason Lewis Thu, 11/23/2017 - 14:55

First up we have Head of Global Maintenance at Amazee Labs, Bryan Gruneberg, who spoke about "Maintainability and Longevity - Keeping customers and developers happy". Maintaining strong, robust sites that evolve with the client’s needs is of utmost importance to us and was a topic that received a lot of interest from Camp attendees. 

Enjoy the Video!

Categories: Drupal

Droptica: Droptica: Drupal node grants

Planet Drupal - 23 November 2017 - 5:00am
Everyone who codes in Drupal will sooner or later encounter the need to define tighter control of access to content. The standard mechanisms of roles and permissions are very flexible, but they may be insufficient in complex projects. When access to nodes starts to depend on, for example, fields assigned to a given user, then you have to take advantage of more advanced solutions. In Drupal 7 and 8 we can use a hook – hook_node_access() or a so-called grants mechanism.
Categories: Drupal

Valuebound: Configuring Memcache with Drupal 8 to reduce database load

Planet Drupal - 23 November 2017 - 4:59am

Developers often come across a situation where they are required to reduce database load by caching DB objects in RAM. Here Memcache improves Drupal application performance by moving standard caches out of the database and by caching the results of other expensive database operations. 

Note that Drupal doesn’t support Memcache by default, and for this, we need to install it on the server. Let’s see how to install Memcache on the server and configure it with Drupal 8 to reduce the load on the database with every page load.

Let’s see how to install Memcache on server

Open the terminal on your local machine and run the following codes:

Step 1: sudo apt-get…
Categories: Drupal

Node revisions autoclean

New Drupal Modules - 23 November 2017 - 4:47am

This module allows to manage node's revisions store : according to admin's settings, older revisions are automatically deleted.

You may choose how many revisions you want to keep for each node type. Latest drafts coming after a published revision are never deleted.

For larger websites with many node, you may choose to delete revision by cron or a drush command (drush 9 only).

This module will be release later, when i'll start using it in production environment. Do not hesitate to issue any problem.

Categories: Drupal

Agaric Collective: Global Training Day - fun and accesible to all!

Planet Drupal - 23 November 2017 - 4:23am

When you think of training, perhaps you remember an event that you were sent to where you had to learn something boring for your job. The word training does not usually make people smile and jump for joy, that is unless you are talking about Drupal training. These gatherings spread the Drupal knowledge and increase diversity in the community of Drupal developers.

Join us for Global Training Day on November 29th. It will be help online from 9 AM to 4 PM EST. - https://groups.drupal.org/node/517886

Sign up now.

A link to the live workshop on Zoom will be provided when you sign up!

The Drupal Association coordinates four dates each year as Global Training Days, designed to offer free and low-cost training events to new-to-Drupal developers and to create more Drupal talent around the world. The community is growing exponentially as more people learn how fun and easy it is to get involved and be productive. Volunteer trainers host these global events in person and online. In 2016, a Global Training Days Working Group was established to run this program. There is a Global Training Days group on Drupal.org that lists trainings around the world - https://groups.drupal.org/global-training-days

Coming up, we have Global Training Day on November 29th. Mauricio Dinarte will be leading the training online. As an introduction to Drupal a person needs to learn certain things that are specific to Drupal and some are not that intuitive. It is important to cover the very basics in terminology and process. An introductory class can include many things, but this list is what Mauricio covers during the day long event:

  • Drupal installation requirements and process
  • Nodes
  • Content types
  • Fields
  • Blocks
  • Theme regions
  • Views
  • User and permissions
  • Menus
  • Taxonomy

The outcome of a day of training is that everyone walks away understanding the main moving parts of Drupal and a bit about what they do. Of course you will not become a developer overnight, but you will have enough information to build a simple site and then explore more of Drupal on your own. You can follow up with many online tutorials and by joining the Drupal group in your area and attending the meetings. At meetings you will connect with other people at different levels of skill and you will be helped and helpful at the same time! If there is no Drupal group in your area, I suggest you start one. It can start as easily as posting online that you will be at a specific location doing Drupal at a certain time of day - you will be surprised at who may show up. If no one shows up the first time, try again or try a different location. One of the best things about Drupal is the community and how large and connected we are. If you start a group, people will usually help it grow. Bringing new people to Drupal is not only good for increasing the size of the member base, it also brings diversity and reaches people that may never have had an opportunity or access to a free training. The trainings are usually held at a University in or near a city which attracts people from different backgrounds and cultures. We can also reach people that are not in a city or near a school by sharing online.

Have you ever thought about volunteering at a Global Training Days event? We have a blog about organizing your own Global Training Days workshop that can get you started. This is a great way to get to know the people in the community better, up your skills and perhaps share something you have learned. I learned much about programming by assisting developers at sprints and trainings. This is where the real fun begins. Learning does not have to be stressful, and in the Drupal community people are friendly and welcoming. No question is stupid and even those with no experience have valuable skills. Developers love people without prior experience because they make the perfect testing candidates for UI and UX. The down side is that Drupal is so captivating that you will probably not remain a newbie for very long, so enjoy it while it lasts.

One of the true highlights of Global Training Days is seeing all the people around the world gain valuable skills and share knowledge. We hope you can join us.

Categories: Drupal

Entity Overlay

New Drupal Modules - 23 November 2017 - 2:53am

Loads an entity overlay view mode from another view mode.

Example: on a list of node teasers, a click event on an element of the list ajax loads an overlay of the node full view mode.

Categories: Drupal

Tim Millwood: Dreditor for Firefox

Planet Drupal - 23 November 2017 - 1:33am
Dreditor for Firefox

Last week I switch from years of using Chrome to Firefox 57 because of all the hype about it being fast, and that I'd been suffering from Chrome using up to 10GB of ram. The big issue I hit though was I didn't have Dreditor and there seemed to be no way to install it. I decided to go on using Firefox without Dreditor, and loading Chrome every time I needed to do an in depth patch review.

Then yesterday I saw the latest Commit Strip cartoon, where in a reply @williambl suggested Chrome Store Foxified for converting Chrome plugins to Firefox. First thing I thought was to try the Dreditor Chrome plugin, and it worked.

This morning Berdir suggested "maybe someone will release that thing as a public extension". So I went digging on addons.mozilla.org and found I could download the XPI file Chrome Store Foxified created during the conversion.

So here it is:
Download Dreditor for Firefox now!
MD5SUM: 2b7455e057ac6a84bd01423b0984c21d

timmillwood Thu, 23/11/2017 - 09:33 Tags drupal planet drupal-planet drupal dreditor Add new comment
Categories: Drupal

Amazee Labs: GraphQL for Drupalers - the queries

Planet Drupal - 23 November 2017 - 12:59am
GraphQL for Drupalers - the queries

GraphQL is becoming more popular every day. Now that we have a beta release of the GraphQL module (mainly sponsored and developed by Amazee Labs) it's easy to turn Drupal into a first-class GraphQL server. In this second post of the series, we'll describe they way Drupal fields are represented in GraphQL and look at a few examples.

  Blazej Owczarczyk Thu, 11/23/2017 - 09:59

Last week we talked about the new structure of the GraphQL package. We have also looked at the tools bundled with the module - the explorer and the voyager - and we've explored how to fetch a username. Now let's use GraphiQL to assemble queries that are a bit more complex.

The Naming

GraphQL naming conventions are slightly different than Drupal's.

  • Fields and properties are in camelCase. This means that field_image in Drupal becomes fieldImage in GraphQL and the revision_log property becomes revisionLog.
  • Entity types and bundles use camelCase with the first letter capitalized so taxonomy_term becomes TaxonomyTerm and the tags vocabulary becomes TaxonomyTermTags. As we can see bundles are prefixed with the entity type name.
The structures

While fields and properties both translate to the same GraphQL structure called Field, entity types and bundles, despite sharing the naming convention, don't. The former is implemented as GraphQL Interfaces and the latter are GraphQL Types (implementing these Interfaces). As an example: 

This query contains fields from 3 different GraphQL structures that build upon one another.

  • entityId and entityCreated come from the Entity Interface. These fields are available for all entity objects. nodeById query returns a Node Interface which extends Entity Interface.
  • title and status are defined in the Node Interface and are available for all nodes, regardless of their content type.
  • fieldSubtitle is a field (field_subtitle in Drupal) that has been added to the Article content type. It's not a part of neither Node nor Entity Interfaces, it is only available in the NodeArticle Type. nodebyId can return any node, not just Article, so we need to wrap the fieldSubtitle in a GraphQL Fragment.

If we paste the query into GraphiQL (/graphql/explorer) we'll get a result similar to this one:

The Fragments

GraphQL Fragments, as the name implies, are just pieces of a query. They mostly serve two purposes:

  1. Executing part of a query conditionally - only when the result is of a specified type. In the example above fieldSubtitle will be evaluated only when the node with id 1 is an Article. If it turns out to be a Basic Page, the fragment will be omitted and the response will just be one field shorter without raising any exceptions.
  2. Reusability. A fragment can be given a name and be used more than once.

There are two fragments in this query. The first one starting on line 3 is an inline fragment. We need it because fieldCategory and fieldTags are only attached to Articles and nodeById can return any node.

The other one, defined on line 18, is a named fragment thanks to which we don't need to repeat the sub-queries for fieldCategory and fieldTags.

This is how the result could look like. Node 1 is an Article, it has 2 tags in one category term.

The Aliases

There might be situations when we want to use the same field more than once in a single query, to fetch node 1 and 2 simultaneously for instance. We can do that thanks to GraphQL Aliases

Here we're calling nodeById twice, each time with different arguments and aliases. The former will appear under nodeOne key in the result and the latter will be available under nodeTwo. We've also transformed the inline fragment holding the article fields into a named fragment and used it in both queries to reduce unnecessary repetition.

That's it for this post. In the next one, we'll see how to retrieve the values of Drupal fields and properties.

 
Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: Top 5 reasons to use Drupal

Planet Drupal - 23 November 2017 - 12:41am
Drupal has become one of the most popular CMS around the world. Since it is written in PHP, very popular web programming language, it is also attractive to developers. It has nearly forty thousand modules and more than two thousand different themes, so it's no wonder that developers and designers like to work with it. It is suitable for all types of websites, from those advanced and heavier portals for communities to lighter, simpler personal web pages. Most importantly, it's great for ambitious websites (link to blog post about this). What are other benefits we recognize? It is open… READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

Promet Source: Last Chance for Drupal 7 & Drupal 8 Training in 2017!

Planet Drupal - 22 November 2017 - 1:39pm
Ready to level up your skills before the New Year?
Categories: Drupal

OSTraining: Smart Cropping of Media with Image Widget Crop Drupal Module

Planet Drupal - 22 November 2017 - 11:23am

Sometimes, in your Drupal site, you may need to crop images with a predefined aspect ratio but with different size values within a certain range. This is where the Image Widget Crop module is your tool for the job.

It can be used in a great variety of Drupal sites. From image galleries to educational sites with illustrations.

In this tutorial, you’ll be using the contrib Image Widget Crop module in conjunction with the new media features for images available in Drupal core.  

Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: An update on the Workflow Initiative for Drupal 8.4/8.5

Planet Drupal - 22 November 2017 - 9:57am

This blog has been re-posted with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

Over the past weeks I have shared an update on the Media Initiative and an update on the Layout Initiative. Today I wanted to give an update on the Workflow Initiative.

Creating great software doesn't happen overnight; it requires a desire for excellence and a disciplined approach. Like the Media and Layout Initiatives, the Workflow Initiative has taken such an approach. The disciplined and steady progress these initiative are making is something to be excited about.

8.4: The march towards stability

As you might recall from my last Workflow Initiative update, we added the Content Moderation module to Drupal 8.2 as an experimental module, and we added the Workflows module in Drupal 8.3 as well. The Workflows module allows for the creation of different publishing workflows with various states (e.g. draft, needs legal review, needs copy-editing, etc) and the Content Moderation module exposes these workflows to content authors.

As of Drupal 8.4, the Workflows module has been marked stable. Additionally, the Content Moderation module is marked beta in Drupal 8.4, and is down to two final blockers before marking stable. If you want to help with that, check out the Content Moderation module roadmap.

8.4: Making more entity types revisionable

To advance Drupal's workflow capabilities, more of Drupal's entity types needed to be made "revisionable". When content is revisionable, it becomes easier to move it through different workflow states or to stage content. Making more entity types revisionable is a necessary foundation for better content moderation, workflow and staging capabilities. But it was also hard work and took various people over a year of iterations — we worked on this throughout the Drupal 8.3 and Drupal 8.4 development cycle.

When working through this, we discovered various adjacent bugs (e.g. bugs related to content revisions and translations) that had to be worked through as well. As a plus, this has led to a more stable and reliable Drupal, even for those who don't use any of the workflow modules. This is a testament to our desire for excellence and disciplined approach.

8.5+: Looking forward to workspaces

While these foundational improvements in Drupal 8.3 and Drupal 8.4 are absolutely necessary to enable better content moderation and content staging functionality, they don't have much to show for in terms of user experience changes. Now a lot of this work is behind us, the Workflow Initiative changed its focus to stabilizing the Content Moderation module, but is also aiming to bring the Workspace module into Drupal core as an experimental module.

The Workspace module allows the creation of multiple environments, such as "Staging" or "Production", and allows moving collections of content between them. For example, the "Production" workspace is what visitors see when they visit your site. Then you might have a protected "Staging" workspace where content editors prepare new content before it's pushed to the Production workspace.

While workflows for individual content items are powerful, many sites want to publish multiple content items at once as a group. This includes new pages, updated pages, but also changes to blocks and menu items — hence our focus on making things like block content and menu items revisionable. 'Workspaces' group all these individual elements (pages, blocks and menus) into a logical package, so they can be prepared, previewed and published as a group. This is one of the most requested features and will be a valuable differentiator for Drupal. It looks pretty slick too:

An outside-in design that shows how content creators could work in different workspaces. When you're building out a new section on your site, you want to preview your entire site, and publish all the changes at once. Designed by Jozef Toth at Pfizer.

I'm impressed with the work the Workflow team has accomplished during the Drupal 8.4 cycle: the Workflow module became stable, the Content Moderation module improved by leaps and bounds, and the under-the-hood work has prepared us for content staging via Workspaces. In the process, we've also fixed some long-standing technical debt in the revisions and translations systems, laying the foundation for future improvements.

Special thanks to Angie Byron for contributions to this blog post and to Dick Olsson, Tim Millwood and Jozef Toth for their feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

Indiana University Paragraphs

New Drupal Modules - 22 November 2017 - 9:40am
Paragraphs for Indiana University

This module provides custom Paragraph types for building complex pages comprised of elements from the IU Pattern Library like section, grids, and chunks that conform to the design standards in the IU Web Style Guide.

Categories: Drupal

NTools

New Drupal Modules - 22 November 2017 - 9:12am

Access important markup information in 1 click or less to expand faster.
https://github.com/NerOcrO/ntools

Categories: Drupal

Agaric Collective: Display forms in a modal dialog with Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 22 November 2017 - 8:54am

Drupal 8 has a great AJAX form API which includes some tools to create modal dialogs using the jQuery modal library. The Examples module even demonstrates how to create a custom form and display it in a modal window. But what if what you want to do is display an already created form in a modal? How do we do that? Let's see how to do it with an example. Let's display the node add form in a modal window.

The first thing that we need to do is create a link which will trigger the modal when the user clicks it. The only special things that this link needs to have are a few attributes that will let Drupal know to display the contents of the link in a dialog:

<a href="http://agaric.com/node/add/article" class="use-ajax" data-dialog-type="modal" data-dialog-options="{'width':800,';height':500}"> Create Node </a>

Drupal also needs to include the JavaScript libraries which will read these attributes and make them work, so let's add the following libraries to your module's dependencies (in your equivalent to this example's modal_form_example.libraries.yml file).

dependencies: 'core/drupal.dialog.ajax', 'core/jquery.form',

If you are unsure about how to add libraries on Drupal 8 you can consult the documentation to either add it in a theme or add it in a custom module. At the end of the post I will provide a repository with the code where I added the libraries in a block.

And that's it! If you click the link, the form will be displayed in a modal dialog! Drupal will automatically detect that you are sending an AJAX request and will display just the form so you won't need to worry about removing the rest of the blocks or hiding undesired markup.

The last thing missing, is what will happen if the user creates a node? By default, the node will redirect the user to another page but if we want to just close the modal dialog and leave the user on the same page we need to tell the form to do that. For this we are going to alter the form and add an AJAX command letting Drupal know that we want to close the dialog as soon as the node is created. In the .module file of a custom module we will add this code:

use Drupal\Core\Form\FormStateInterface; use Drupal\Core\Ajax\AjaxResponse; use Drupal\Core\Ajax\CloseModalDialogCommand; use Drupal\Core\Ajax\RedirectCommand; /** * Implements hook_form_alter(). */ function modal_form_example_form_node_article_form_alter(&$form, FormStateInterface $form_state, $form_id) { $form['actions']['submit']['#submit'][] = '_modal_form_example_ajax_submit'; $form['actions']['submit']['#attributes']['class'][] = 'use-ajax-submit'; } /** * Close the Modal and redirect the user to the homepage. * * @param array $form * The form that will be altered. * @param \Drupal\Core\Form\FormStateInterface $form_state * FormState Object. */ function _modal_form_example_ajax_submit(array $form, FormStateInterface &$form_state) { $response = new AjaxResponse(); $response->addCommand(new CloseModalDialogCommand()); $form_state->setResponse($response); }

The first function adds an extra submit function (which will be executed after Drupal finishes processing the node) and the second function adds the command to close the Dialog when the node has been created.

We can do this with practically any form in Drupal and you can add extra commands to do more complex things. Here are two resources:

Categories: Drupal

Bookable Entities Everywhere

New Drupal Modules - 22 November 2017 - 7:52am
Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: An update on the Workflow Initiative for Drupal 8.4/8.5

Planet Drupal - 22 November 2017 - 6:57am

Over the past weeks I have shared an update on the Media Initiative and an update on the Layout Initiative. Today I wanted to give an update on the Workflow Initiative.

Creating great software doesn't happen overnight; it requires a desire for excellence and a disciplined approach. Like the Media and Layout Initiatives, the Workflow Initiative has taken such an approach. The disciplined and steady progress these initiative are making is something to be excited about.

8.4: The march towards stability

As you might recall from my last Workflow Initiative update, we added the Content Moderation module to Drupal 8.2 as an experimental module, and we added the Workflows module in Drupal 8.3 as well. The Workflows module allows for the creation of different publishing workflows with various states (e.g. draft, needs legal review, needs copy-editing, etc) and the Content Moderation module exposes these workflows to content authors.

As of Drupal 8.4, the Workflows module has been marked stable. Additionally, the Content Moderation module is marked beta in Drupal 8.4, and is down to two final blockers before marking stable. If you want to help with that, check out the Content Moderation module roadmap.

8.4: Making more entity types revisionable

To advance Drupal's workflow capabilities, more of Drupal's entity types needed to be made "revisionable". When content is revisionable, it becomes easier to move it through different workflow states or to stage content. Making more entity types revisionable is a necessary foundation for better content moderation, workflow and staging capabilities. But it was also hard work and took various people over a year of iterations — we worked on this throughout the Drupal 8.3 and Drupal 8.4 development cycle.

When working through this, we discovered various adjacent bugs (e.g. bugs related to content revisions and translations) that had to be worked through as well. As a plus, this has led to a more stable and reliable Drupal, even for those who don't use any of the workflow modules. This is a testament to our desire for excellence and disciplined approach.

8.5+: Looking forward to workspaces

While these foundational improvements in Drupal 8.3 and Drupal 8.4 are absolutely necessary to enable better content moderation and content staging functionality, they don't have much to show for in terms of user experience changes. Now a lot of this work is behind us, the Workflow Initiative changed its focus to stabilizing the Content Moderation module, but is also aiming to bring the Workspace module into Drupal core as an experimental module.

The Workspace module allows the creation of multiple environments, such as "Staging" or "Production", and allows moving collections of content between them. For example, the "Production" workspace is what visitors see when they visit your site. Then you might have a protected "Staging" workspace where content editors prepare new content before it's pushed to the Production workspace.

While workflows for individual content items are powerful, many sites want to publish multiple content items at once as a group. This includes new pages, updated pages, but also changes to blocks and menu items — hence our focus on making things like block content and menu items revisionable. 'Workspaces' group all these individual elements (pages, blocks and menus) into a logical package, so they can be prepared, previewed and published as a group. This is one of the most requested features and will be a valuable differentiator for Drupal. It looks pretty slick too:

I'm impressed with the work the Workflow team has accomplished during the Drupal 8.4 cycle: the Workflow module became stable, the Content Moderation module improved by leaps and bounds, and the under-the-hood work has prepared us for content staging via Workspaces. In the process, we've also fixed some long-standing technical debt in the revisions and translations systems, laying the foundation for future improvements.

Special thanks to Angie Byron for contributions to this blog post and to Dick Olsson, Tim Millwood and Jozef Toth for their feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

An update on the Workflow Initiative for Drupal 8.4/8.5

Dries Buytaert - 22 November 2017 - 6:57am

Over the past weeks I have shared an update on the Media Initiative and an update on the Layout Initiative. Today I wanted to give an update on the Workflow Initiative.

Creating great software doesn't happen overnight; it requires a desire for excellence and a disciplined approach. Like the Media and Layout Initiatives, the Workflow Initiative has taken such an approach. The disciplined and steady progress these initiative are making is something to be excited about.

8.4: The march towards stability

As you might recall from my last Workflow Initiative update, we added the Content Moderation module to Drupal 8.2 as an experimental module, and we added the Workflows module in Drupal 8.3 as well. The Workflows module allows for the creation of different publishing workflows with various states (e.g. draft, needs legal review, needs copy-editing, etc) and the Content Moderation module exposes these workflows to content authors.

As of Drupal 8.4, the Workflows module has been marked stable. Additionally, the Content Moderation module is marked beta in Drupal 8.4, and is down to two final blockers before marking stable. If you want to help with that, check out the Content Moderation module roadmap.

8.4: Making more entity types revisionable

To advance Drupal's workflow capabilities, more of Drupal's entity types needed to be made "revisionable". When content is revisionable, it becomes easier to move it through different workflow states or to stage content. Making more entity types revisionable is a necessary foundation for better content moderation, workflow and staging capabilities. But it was also hard work and took various people over a year of iterations — we worked on this throughout the Drupal 8.3 and Drupal 8.4 development cycle.

When working through this, we discovered various adjacent bugs (e.g. bugs related to content revisions and translations) that had to be worked through as well. As a plus, this has led to a more stable and reliable Drupal, even for those who don't use any of the workflow modules. This is a testament to our desire for excellence and disciplined approach.

8.5+: Looking forward to workspaces

While these foundational improvements in Drupal 8.3 and Drupal 8.4 are absolutely necessary to enable better content moderation and content staging functionality, they don't have much to show for in terms of user experience changes. Now a lot of this work is behind us, the Workflow Initiative changed its focus to stabilizing the Content Moderation module, but is also aiming to bring the Workspace module into Drupal core as an experimental module.

The Workspace module allows the creation of multiple environments, such as "Staging" or "Production", and allows moving collections of content between them. For example, the "Production" workspace is what visitors see when they visit your site. Then you might have a protected "Staging" workspace where content editors prepare new content before it's pushed to the Production workspace.

While workflows for individual content items are powerful, many sites want to publish multiple content items at once as a group. This includes new pages, updated pages, but also changes to blocks and menu items — hence our focus on making things like block content and menu items revisionable. 'Workspaces' group all these individual elements (pages, blocks and menus) into a logical package, so they can be prepared, previewed and published as a group. This is one of the most requested features and will be a valuable differentiator for Drupal. It looks pretty slick too:

I'm impressed with the work the Workflow team has accomplished during the Drupal 8.4 cycle: the Workflow module became stable, the Content Moderation module improved by leaps and bounds, and the under-the-hood work has prepared us for content staging via Workspaces. In the process, we've also fixed some long-standing technical debt in the revisions and translations systems, laying the foundation for future improvements.

Special thanks to Angie Byron for contributions to this blog post and to Dick Olsson, Tim Millwood and Jozef Toth for their feedback during the writing process.

Categories: Drupal

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